Filmfare

Filmfare is an Indian English-language fortnightly magazine published by Worldwide Media. Acknowledged as one of Indian most popular entertainment magazines, it publishes pieces involving news, interviews, photos, videos, reviews, events, and style. The magazine also gives annually the Filmfare Awards, the Filmfare Awards South, the Filmfare Awards East, the Filmfare Marathi Awards, the Filmfare Awards Punjabi, the Filmfare OTT Awards, the Filmfare Short Film Awards and the Filmfare Style & Glamour Awards.

Filmfare
Filmfare.png
Filmfare April 2021.jpg
Cover of the April 2021 issue
EditorJitesh Pillai
Former editors
CategoriesEntertainment
FrequencyFortnightly
Circulation342,000[1]
PublisherJoji Varghese
FounderJ. C. Jain
Year founded1952
CompanyWorldwide Media
CountryIndia
Based inMumbai
LanguageEnglish
Websitefilmfare.com
ISSN0971-7277
OCLC1774328

After the businessman Ramkrishna Dalmia (1893–1978) of Dalmia Group purchased Bennett, Coleman and Company Limited (BCCL) in 1946, J. C. Jain from Bharat Insurance Company was employed to help him to run the company in 1950. In this period, Jain conceived the idea of Filmfare at the actress Kamini Kaushal's house. The magazine was launched by the industrialist Sahu Shanti Prasad Jain alongside his wife Rama in Bombay on 7 March 1952. Its publication's circulation started to decline in the early 1990s and, to handle these problems, Filmfare started special monthly editions for Tamil, Telugu, and Malayalam cinema. In 2004, BCCL (who was previously published the magazine) established a subsidiary, Worldwide Media, for publishing its future issues.

HistoryEdit

Establishment (1946–1952)Edit

 
The cover of the first issue of Filmfare, featuring Kamini Kaushal, whose house was occupied by Jain to conceive the magazine's idea.[2]

Ramkrishna Dalmia (1893–1978)[3] was born in Chirawa into a Marwari family. He had a brother, Jaidayal Dalmia, with whom he established Dalmia Group in the 1930s. In 1946, on the threshold of the independence of India from the United Kingdom, Ramkrishna Dalmia purchased Bennett, Coleman and Company Limited (BCCL) for 20 million (US$270,000). According to Sangita P. Menon Malhan's The TOI Story (2013), the attempt was did by him solely because he wanted to establish newspapers that could help him to "serve India effectively".[4] While Dalmia searching for a person to help him to run it, J. C. Jain, a former employee of Bharat Insurance Company, saw the opportunity and took it in March 1950; he became the company's general manager until 1963.[5]

During his term-of-office, Jain started the publication of Filmfare as a fortnightly magazine on 7 March 1952 to "build awareness about filmmaking and films".[6][7] It was launched by Sahu Shanti Prasad Jain and his wife Rama in Bombay,[8] distributed by The Times of India newspaper,[9] and promoted with the taglines, "Another name for 'Credibility'" and "The first serious effort in film journalism in India".[10] It contains short biography of rising actors at the time, film reviews, and a number of columns, including "The Fortnight in Films" and "Filmfacts".[11] Published two months after the 1st International Film Festival of India, Neepa Majumdar (in her 2012 book Global Neorealism: The Transnational History of a Film Style) wrote that the magazine "saw the festival as an opportunity for Indian film [actors] to be expose to quality films" and established themselves as leading actors.[12] In the first issue, a manifesto was declared:

It is from this dual standpoint of its industry and its patrons, whom comprise the vast audience of movie fans, that Filmfare is primarily designed. This magazine represents the first serious effort in film journalism in India. It is a movie magazine—with a difference. The difference lies in our realisation that the film as a composite art medium calls for serious study and constructive criticism and appreciation from the industry as also from the public.[11]

The Filmfare Awards (1953–2001)Edit

 
The cover of the 2 April 1954 issue of Filmfare, published a month after the 1st Filmfare Awards was held

In the next year, Filmfare instituted the Filmfare Awards (previously Clare Awards, named after Clare Mendonça).[9][13] Modelled after the Academy Awards, the winners were voted by a total of 20,000 of the magazine's readers.[9][14] The first iteration's ceremony took place at Metro Cinema in Bombay on 21 March 1954, and only five categories without nominations were presented: Best Film, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress, and Best Music Director.[15] The award has been considered one of the oldest and most prominent film awards in India;[16] Business Line called it "one such coveted award".[17]

In 1957, Filmfare published the "Self-portraits" series, where several well-known actors at the time, including Ashok Kumar, Dev Anand, Dilip Kumar, Meena Kumari, Nargis, Nutan and Raj Kapoor, were invited and accepted to explain themselves and their life experiences.[18] The magazine faced controversy after the actress Sharmila Tagore did a shot with her photographer Dhiren Chawda with only wearing a two-piece floral bikini for its 19 August 1966 issue. The first time for an Indian celebrity to pose with only a bikini for a magazine cover, she revealed that it was her personal choice but later admitted she had "no idea" why she wanted to.[19] In association with United Producers (a group formed by G. P. Sippy, Shakti Samanta and B. R. Chopra), Filmfare organised the United Producers-Filmfare Talent Contest (also known as the All India Talent Contest)[a] in 1965.[20]

In the 1970s, Rauf Ahmed worked as the editor of the magazine, replacing B. K. Karanjia who had filled the position for 18 years.[b] Talking to Daily News and Analysis in 2015, Ahmed spoke of how the magazine was nearly collapsed at the time due to no gossip columns were written by its journalist.[23] Following his quit, Bikram Singh (the actor K. N. Singh's brother)[24] was hired for the position until the early of the next decade.[25][26] Pritish Nandy replaced him in 1984; the first issue he edited was published in July that year, titled "Unquestionably No. 1", which features the actress Sridevi on the cover.[27][28] The circulation of Filmfare dropped in the early 1990s, prompting the publisher to attach free consumer products (such as soaps or shampoo sachets) to the magazine. Additionally, special monthly editions with a few pages dedicated to Malayalam, Tamil and Telugu cinema were begun and, as reported by The Quint in 2019, becoming commercial successes. Khalid Mohamed was appointed as the new editor in 1993.[29]

Ownership change (2002–present)Edit

In 2002, following Mohamed's nine-year tenure, Shashi Baliga replaced him as Filmfare's editor; in an article published in Business Line, she described the occupation as "an opportunity that came unsought".[30] BCCL announced their joint venture with the BBC Worldwide, a company named Worldwide Media, on 1 December 2004; the new company later published the future issues of the magazine.[31][32] In 2006, Jitesh Pillai was appointed as the new editor.[33] Filmfare launched the Filmfare Awards East in 2014,[34] the Filmfare Style & Glamour Awards and Filmfare Marathi Awards in 2015,[35][36] the Filmfare Short Film Awards in 2016,[37] the Filmfare Awards Punjabi in 2017,[38] and the Filmfare OTT Awards in 2020.[39] As of March 2021, the magazine was published by Joji Varghese under The Times Group's subsidiary Worldwide Media and Pillai served as the editor.[40]

ReceptionEdit

Filmfare covers news, interviews, photos, videos, reviews, events, and style.[41] It is considered one of the most popular and reputable magazine in India;[42] The Illustrated Weekly of India referred to the magazine as "decorous",[43] and British magazine The Spectator praised it for "[providing] a good example of how the mainstream media marginalizes certain films as 'sleaze'".[44] According to a 2004 article by The Economic Times, the magazine's monthly print circulation was 147,000. In 2008, the cinema and cultural analysis professor Rachel Dwyer estimated that it was 200,000.[45] In a survey conducted by the Indian Readership Survey, the circulation of the magazine was 276,000 in 2013 and 342,000 in 2014.[1]

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ While the biographer Yasser Usman called it the United Producers-Filmfare Talent Contest,[20] Joy Bhattacharjya of Business Line reported that it was named the All India Talent Contest.[21]
  2. ^ The Hindu did not mention the year when B. K. Karanjia joined Filmfare.[22]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Top English Magazines" (PDF). Indian Readership Survey. 2014. p. 15. Archived (PDF) from the original on 27 February 2021. Retrieved 8 April 2021.
  2. ^ Anmol, R. J. (26 June 2016). RJ Anmol reads the 1st Ever issue of Filmfare Magazine (dated 7th March 1952). YouTube. Event occurs at 7:49–7:58. Retrieved 8 April 2021.
  3. ^ Malhan 2013, p. 10.
  4. ^ Malhan 2013, pp. 9–10.
  5. ^ Trivedy, Shikha (2 March 1986). ""No sane man would talk like Ram Nath Goenka did"". The Illustrated Weekly of India. Vol. 106 no. 9–18. p. 34. Retrieved 8 April 2021.
  6. ^ Dwyer 2008, p. 243; Panda 2004, p. 137.
  7. ^ Chatterjee, Mrinal (May 2012). "Film Journalism in India". Kerala Media Academy. Archived from the original on 14 August 2020. Retrieved 9 April 2021.
  8. ^ Malhan 2013, pp. 11, 17.
  9. ^ a b c Dwyer 2008, p. 243.
  10. ^ Panda 2004, p. 138; Majumdar 2012, p. 180.
  11. ^ a b "Editorial: Introducing ourselves". Filmfare. Vol. 1 no. 1. 7 March 1952. pp. 2–3.
  12. ^ Majumdar 2012, p. 180.
  13. ^ Sengupta, Ratnottama (9 March 2014). "Tollywood's tryst with Black Lady". The Times of India. Times News Network. Archived from the original on 14 July 2019. Retrieved 9 April 2021.
  14. ^ "One Starry Night In Mumbai..." The Times of India. Archived from the original on 11 October 1999. Retrieved 9 April 2021.
  15. ^ "The Nominations – 1953". Filmfare. Archived from the original on 20 May 2007. Retrieved 9 April 2021.
  16. ^ Mehta, Monika (1 July 2005). "Globalizing Bombay Cinema: Reproducing the Indian State and Family". Cultural Dynamics. 17 (2): 135–154. doi:10.1177/0921374005058583. S2CID 143950404.
  17. ^ Nigam, Aditi (29 July 2011). "Raj Kumar of dialogue delivery". Business Line. Archived from the original on 10 April 2021. Retrieved 10 April 2021.
  18. ^ Akbar 2011, p. 114.
  19. ^ Bhatia, Vivek (12 March 2013). "Actresses today can smoke, drink, live-in... — Sharmila Tagore". Filmfare. Archived from the original on 2 September 2017. Retrieved 9 April 2021.
  20. ^ a b Usman 2014, pp. 46–47.
  21. ^ Bhattacharya, Joy (12 December 2020). "Quiz on superstars". Business Line. Archived from the original on 10 April 2021. Retrieved 10 April 2021.
  22. ^ Gangadhar, V. (29 January 2006). "Writing for pleasure". The Hindu. Archived from the original on 2 May 2007. Retrieved 9 April 2021.
  23. ^ Nair, Roshni (5 April 2015). "Death of the gossip columnist". Daily News and Analysis. Archived from the original on 1 October 2018. Retrieved 9 April 2021.
  24. ^ Gangadhar, V. (4 April 1997). "'I saw to it that my entry brought an air of unpleasantness and bitterness'". Rediff.com. Archived from the original on 23 February 2021. Retrieved 9 April 2021.
  25. ^ Rahman, M. (28 February 1986). "Censor Borad: Cutting charges". India Today. Archived from the original on 1 November 2020. Retrieved 9 April 2021.
  26. ^ "Critics choice". India Today. 31 December 1976. Archived from the original on 30 November 2020. Retrieved 9 April 2021.
  27. ^ Nandy, Pritish [@PritishNandy] (25 February 2018). "In 1984 when Filmfare was ailing, I was asked to take over as Editor. My first issue had #Sridevi on the cover, headlined No 1. She was not. Not yet. The issue sold out. Filmfare was back. And in six months everyone acknowledged her as No 1" (Tweet). Retrieved 9 April 2021 – via Twitter.
  28. ^ Pathak, Vedanshi (21 April 2020). "A reel of late Sridevi's top 10 Filmfare covers". Filmfare. Archived from the original on 18 April 2021. Retrieved 9 April 2021.
  29. ^ Mohamed, Khalid (5 March 2019). "Filmindia to Blitz: The Inside Story & Spice of B'wood Magazines". The Quint. Archived from the original on 21 September 2019. Retrieved 19 June 2019.
  30. ^ Baliga, Shashi (16 May 2013). "The stuff dreams are made of". Business Line. Archived from the original on 10 April 2021. Retrieved 10 April 2021.
  31. ^ "BBC Worldwide, Times Group ink magazine JV". The Economic Times. Mumbai, India. Times News Network. 2 December 2004. Archived from the original on 10 April 2021. Retrieved 10 April 2021.
  32. ^ "About WWM". Worldwide Media. Archived from the original on 27 October 2010. Retrieved 10 April 2021.
  33. ^ "Nakuul Mehta writes open letter to Jitesh Pillai after he mocked Hina Khan". India Today. New Delhi, India. 19 May 2019. Archived from the original on 10 April 2021. Retrieved 10 April 2021.
  34. ^ "Black Lady on Odia cinema doorstep". The Times of India. Times News Network. 12 March 2014. Archived from the original on 10 April 2021. Retrieved 10 April 2021.
  35. ^ "Riteish Deshmukh launches Marathi Filmfare awards". Rediff.com. 29 October 2015. Archived from the original on 10 April 2021. Retrieved 10 April 2021.
  36. ^ "Filmfare Style & Glamour Awards unveiled by Sonam Kapoor". India Today. 6 February 2015. Archived from the original on 10 April 2021. Retrieved 10 April 2021.
  37. ^ "Filmfare Awards to introduce Short Film category this year; Vidya Balan, Gauri Shinde on jury". Firstpost. 16 December 2016. Archived from the original on 10 April 2021. Retrieved 10 April 2021.
  38. ^ "1st edition of Jio Filmfare Awards Punjabi 2017". The Times of India. 3 April 2017. Archived from the original on 10 April 2021. Retrieved 10 April 2021.
  39. ^ "Flyx Filmfare OTT Awards: Nawazuddin Siddiqui, 'Raat Akeli Hai' win big; 'Paatal Lok' takes home 5 awards". The Economic Times. 20 December 2020. Archived from the original on 10 April 2021. Retrieved 10 April 2021.
  40. ^ "Filmfare contributor". Filmfare. Vol. 70 no. 3. March 2021. p. 4. Retrieved 8 April 2021.
  41. ^ "About Us". Filmfare. Archived from the original on 23 March 2021. Retrieved 10 April 2021.
  42. ^ Boltin, Kylie (January 2003), "Saathiya: South Asian Cinema Otherwise Known as 'Bollywood'", Metro Magazine: Media & Education Magazine (136), ISSN 0312-2654
  43. ^ M., C. R. (13 April 1952). "Books: This week's gossip". The Illustrated Weekly of India. Vol. 73 no. 14–25. p. 42. Retrieved 10 April 2021.
  44. ^ "The "Charmed" Audience: Gender and the Politics of Contemporary Culture". The Spectator. Vol. 24–25. 2005. p. 39. Archived from the original on 18 April 2021. Retrieved 10 April 2021.
  45. ^ Dwyer 2008, p. 244.

BibliographyEdit

External linksEdit