November 1924

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The following events occurred in November 1924:

November 1, 1924 (Saturday)Edit

November 2, 1924 (Sunday)Edit

November 3, 1924 (Monday)Edit

November 4, 1924 (Tuesday)Edit

November 5, 1924 (Wednesday)Edit

  • Former Chinese emperor Puyi was expelled from the Forbidden City and all Manchu titles were abolished.[1]

November 6, 1924 (Thursday)Edit

November 7, 1924 (Friday)Edit

  • Germany announced its first balanced budget since the war.[9]
  • The Ignaz Seipel government resigned in Austria.[10]

November 8, 1924 (Saturday)Edit

November 9, 1924 (Sunday)Edit

November 10, 1924 (Monday)Edit

November 11, 1924 (Tuesday)Edit

November 12, 1924 (Wednesday)Edit

  • A new session of Italian parliament opened with 185 opposition members absent in protest. This boycott became known as the Aventine Secession.[14]

November 13, 1924 (Thursday)Edit

November 14, 1924 (Friday)Edit

November 15, 1924 (Saturday)Edit

  • France clashed with the United States over a letter from reparations agent Seymour Parker Gilbert stating that Britain and France were not entitled to collect a tax of 26 percent on German imports as part of reparations payments under the Dawes Plan. France contended that the import tax had nothing to do with the Plan.[16]
  • The United Kingdom angered Japan at the International Opium Conference in Geneva when British delegate Malcolm Delevingne said that Great Britain could not habitually recognize import certificates, because they were often diverted on the way to the country of purchase for illicit purposes by high officials in one far eastern country that he "preferred not to name."[17]

November 16, 1924 (Sunday)Edit

  • French troops evacuated the right bank of the Rhine between Cologne and Koblenz.[18]
  • Japan essentially quit the International Opium Conference, claiming the proposed agreement was discriminatory against them and that the British delegation had offended Japan's honour.[17]
  • Born: Mel Patton, track and field athlete, in Los Angeles (d. 2014)

November 17, 1924 (Monday)Edit

November 18, 1924 (Tuesday)Edit

November 19, 1924 (Wednesday)Edit

November 20, 1924 (Thursday)Edit

November 21, 1924 (Friday)Edit

November 22, 1924 (Saturday)Edit

November 23, 1924 (Sunday)Edit

November 24, 1924 (Monday)Edit

November 25, 1924 (Tuesday)Edit

  • Charlie Chaplin married his second wife, Lita Grey, in Empalme, Mexico.[25]
  • Radio stations in the United States broadcast an "hour of silence" between 10 and 11 p.m., setting it aside for international broadcasting tests. Listeners as far west as Duluth, Minnesota reported being able to hear broadcasting from England, France and Spain.[26]
  • Born: Takaaki Yoshimoto, poet, critic and philosopher, in Tokyo (d. 2012)

November 26, 1924 (Wednesday)Edit

November 27, 1924 (Thursday)Edit

November 28, 1924 (Friday)Edit

November 29, 1924 (Saturday)Edit

November 30, 1924 (Sunday)Edit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d Mercer, Derrik (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 324. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3.
  2. ^ Fox, Charles (November 4, 1924). "Feng's Troops in Tientsin as Ex-Chief Flees". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 12.
  3. ^ "Cal's Radio to Nation: Vote!". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 4, 1924. p. 1.
  4. ^ a b c "Chronology 1924". indiana.edu. 2002. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  5. ^ "1924 Presidential Election". 270 To Win. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  6. ^ Sarfatti, Margherita (2014). Sullivan, Brian R. (ed.). My Fault: Mussolini As I Knew Him. New York: Enigma Books. pp. 109–110. ISBN 978-1-936274-40-6.
  7. ^ a b Rue, Larry (November 24, 1924). "Mussolini, the Eagle, Coos Like Dove; Saves Job". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 15.
  8. ^ Cameron, Laura and Forrester, John. "'A nice type of the English scientist': Tansley and Freud." Dreams and History: The Interpretation of Dreams from Ancient Greece to Modern Psychoanalysis. Ed. Daniel Pick and Lyndal Roper. New York: Brunner-Routledge, 2004. 220. ISBN 1-58391-282-7.
  9. ^ Seldes, George (November 8, 1924). "German Budget Balanced; Will Finance Farmer". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 3.
  10. ^ Wales, Henry (November 9, 1924). "Austrian Strike May Bring New European Storm". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 3.
  11. ^ "Coreans to Seek Independence by Economic Club". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 9, 1924. p. 6.
  12. ^ Day, Donald (November 10, 1924). "Russia Tries to Curb Esthonian Trial of Reds". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 23.
  13. ^ Neumeier, Frederick (November 11, 1924). "Mexicans Seize Land of Calles, New President". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 18.
  14. ^ Rue, Larry (November 13, 1924). "Parliament of Italy Shunned by 185 Members". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 3.
  15. ^ Bart, Sheldon (2013). Race to the Top of the World: Richard Byrd and the First Flight to the North Pole. Washington, D.C.: Regnery Publishing. p. 63. ISBN 978-1-62157-082-0.
  16. ^ Seldes, George (November 16, 1924). "Allies Clash with U.S. Head of Dawes Plan". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 5.
  17. ^ a b "Japanese Bolt Opium Accord; Blame Britain". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 17, 1924. p. 1.
  18. ^ "Free Ruhr Road". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 16, 1924. p. 5.
  19. ^ "Ontario Joins U.S. in Fight on Rum Runners". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 18, 1924. p. 16.
  20. ^ "Britain Scraps League's World Peace Protocol". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 18, 1924. p. 1.
  21. ^ Evert, Roger (2004). Roger Ebert's Movie Yearbook 2005. Kansas City: Andrews McNell Publishing. p. 105. ISBN 0-7407-4742-8.
  22. ^ Belletti, Valeria (2006). Beauchamp, Cari (ed.). Adventures of a Hollywood Secretary: Her Private Letters from Inside the Studios of the 1920s. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press. pp. 86–89. ISBN 0-520-24780-9.
  23. ^ "Ultimatum Sent to Egypt". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 23, 1924. p. 1.
  24. ^ "New Cabinet in Egypt; League to Get Protest". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 25, 1924. p. 1.
  25. ^ "Chaplin Weds Lita Grey in Mexican Dawn". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 26, 1924. p. 1.
  26. ^ "City Gets Europe by Radio". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 26, 1924. p. 1.
  27. ^ Rue, Larry (November 29, 1924). "'Me or Deluge,' Mussolini Cry to Italy". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 7.
  28. ^ "Garbisch Thrills Call and 80,000 as Navy Falls, 12-0". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 30, 1924. p. Part 2 p. 1.
  29. ^ Cornyn, John (December 1, 1924). "Calles Takes Presidency of Mexico". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  30. ^ Steele, John (December 1, 1924). "Northcliffe "Speaks from Spirit Land"". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.