Al Hirschfeld Theatre

The Al Hirschfeld Theatre, originally the Martin Beck Theatre, is a Broadway theater at 302 West 45th Street in the Theater District of Midtown Manhattan in New York City. Opened in 1924, it was designed by G. Albert Lansburgh in a Moorish and Byzantine style and was constructed for vaudevillian Martin Beck. It has 1,404 seats across two levels and is operated by Jujamcyn Theaters. Both the facade and the interior are New York City landmarks.

Al Hirschfeld Theatre
Martin Beck Theatre
Al Hirschfeld Theatre - Moulin Rouge (48296061427).jpg
Showing the musical Moulin Rouge! in 2019
Address302 West 45th Street
Manhattan, New York City
United States
Coordinates40°45′33″N 73°59′21″W / 40.7593°N 73.9892°W / 40.7593; -73.9892Coordinates: 40°45′33″N 73°59′21″W / 40.7593°N 73.9892°W / 40.7593; -73.9892
Public transitSubway: Times Square–42nd Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal
OwnerJujamcyn Theaters
TypeBroadway theater
Capacity1,424
ProductionMoulin Rouge!
Construction
OpenedNovember 11, 1924
Years active1924–present
ArchitectG. Albert Lansburgh
Albert Herter (interior)
Website
www.jujamcyn.com/theatres/al-hirschfeld/
DesignatedNovember 4, 1987[1]
Reference no.1315[1]
Designated entityFacade
DesignatedNovember 4, 1987[2]
Reference no.1316[2]
Designated entityLobby and auditorium interior

The Al Hirschfeld's auditorium and stage house share a design for their facade. There is a double-height arcade with cast-stone columns at the base of the theater. The eastern section of the arcade contains the auditorium entrance, the center section includes a staircase with emergency exits, and the western section leads to the stage house. Red brick is used for the upper stories of the facade. Albert Herter, a muralist who frequently collaborated with Lansburgh, oversaw much of the interior design. A square ticket lobby is directly inside the main entrance, leading to a vaulted inner lobby and an "L"-shaped mezzanine lounge. The auditorium is decorated with ornamental plasterwork and contains a sloped orchestra level, a mezzanine level, and a curved sounding board. In addition, there are box seats at the balcony level, near the front of the auditorium. The auditorium has an octagonal ceiling with a multicolored dome.

Beck had proposed the theater in 1923, and it opened with a production of Madame Pompadour on November 11, 1924. It was the only theater in New York City to be owned outright without a mortgage. The Beck was used by several theatrical groups in its early years, including the Theatre Guild. After Martin Beck's death in 1940, the theater was managed by his wife Louise Heims Beck. The theater was purchased in 1966 by William L. McKnight of Jujamcyn Theaters, and it hosted several short runs during the 1970s and 1980s. The theater was renamed for Broadway illustrator Al Hirschfeld in 2003. Throughout the years, the theater has staged long-running productions including The Teahouse of the August Moon, Dracula, Into the Woods, Guys and Dolls, and Kinky Boots.

SiteEdit

The Al Hirschfeld Theatre is on 302 West 45th Street, on the south sidewalk between Ninth and Eighth Avenues, in the Theater District and Hell's Kitchen neighborhoods of Midtown Manhattan in New York City.[3][4] The land lot is rectangular. The lot covers 13,389 square feet (1,243.9 m2), with a frontage of 133.33 ft (40.64 m) on 45th Street and a depth of 100.42 ft (31 m).[4] The Al Hirschfeld Theatre shares the city block with the Film Center Building and the off-Broadway Davenport Theatre to the west. Across Eighth Avenue to the east are the Row NYC Hotel and the Majestic, John Golden, and Bernard B. Jacobs theaters. In addition, St. Luke's Lutheran Church, the off-Broadway St. Luke's Theatre, and The Whitby are to the north.[4]

The Al Hirschfeld is the westernmost Broadway theater in the Theater District[5][6] and the only one west of Eighth Avenue.[1][a] When the venue was constructed in 1925, the block to the east already contained eight theaters.[7][b] The site of the theater itself, at 302 to 314 West 45th Street, was filled by seven brownstone townhouses of three stories each. Six of the houses, numbers 302 to 312, had been purchased by Nathan Wilson and then sold by Berkley Builders.[8][9] The seventh house at number 314 was owned by Nellie Clauss.[10]

DesignEdit

The Al Hirschfeld Theatre, originally the Martin Beck Theatre, was designed by Gustave Albert Lansburgh in the Byzantine and Romanesque styles.[11][12] The theater opened in 1924 and was built for Martin Beck (1868–1940),[13] who originally named the venue for himself.[3][7][12] The Beck was the only Broadway theater designed in a Byzantine style; most other Broadway theater buildings of the time were designed in a neoclassical style.[11][14] Furthermore, Lansburgh specialized in designing movie palaces on the West Coast of the United States, including Los Angeles's Hill Street Theatre and San Francisco's Golden Gate Theater.[7] H. H. Oddie Inc. built the theater, and numerous material suppliers and contractors were involved in the project.[15] The Al Hirschfeld is operated by Jujamcyn Theaters.[16][17][18]

FacadeEdit

The Al Hirschfeld's auditorium and stage house share a design for their facades, unlike with most other Broadway theaters, where the auditorium and stage house have distinct designs.[11] The facade of the Al Hirschfeld is much wider than its length. The base of the theater contains a granite water table[19] and a double-height arcade with cast-stone columns. The rest of the facade uses red brick.[c][11][20][21]

BaseEdit

 
Doorways on the easternmost end of the facade

The arcade on the lowest two stories contains eleven arches. The second-outermost arch on either end is both taller and wider than the remaining arches. The octagonal columns rest on granite bases and contain capitals with both Moorish and Byzantine motifs. The tops of each arch contain stone borders.[19] The presence of the arcade gives the theater's exterior a three-dimensional quality compared to other Broadway theaters' relatively flat facades.[14]

The three easternmost arches contain the theater's main entrance. The doorway to the lobby is recessed within the second-easternmost arch (at the center of the three arches). It contains two bronze-and-glass double doors, which have bronze grilles with arch motifs. There are sheet-metal ceiling panels with light fixtures directly in front of the doors, as well as engaged columns flanking the doors. To the left (east) of the lobby entrance is a metal service door, a sign board, and a gate to a service alley. To the right (west) is a box office window with a marble sill and iron shutters; a panel above the window is inscribed with the words "Martin Beck Theatre". The box office window is also flanked by two pairs of engaged columns rounded and the other octagonal. Above the three arches is a modern marquee cantilevered from the arches. On the second floor are recessed brick walls. There are windows flanked by brick jambs and topped by round-arched stone panels. The center window opening is a double window separated by a stone colonette, while the other window openings are single.[19]

The five center arches screen a stone fire-escape staircase.[19][20][22] The underside of the staircase includes arches of varying sizes.[22] The top of the staircase, to the east, contains two double metal doors from the balcony. Directly beneath the top of the staircase are two double metal doors from the orchestra level, which are topped by stone lintels and metal-and-glass lanterns. The bottom of the staircase, to the west, contains another doorway that is marked as a stage entrance; the words "Erected by Martin Beck 1924" are carved on an adjacent column.[19]

The three westernmost arches contain recessed brick walls similar to those at the lobby entrance. The second-westernmost arch contains a double metal door at the ground story, while the westernmost (right) arch has a window at the ground story. The second story of the three western arches is similar to the second story above the main entrance, with arched brick windows.[19]

Upper storiesEdit

 
Upper-story windows on the facade of the auditorium

Above the arcade are additional stories with round-arched openings, each containing a one-over-one sash window.[23] The facade of the auditorium, to the east, has two stories above the arcade.[11] The stage house to the west has three stories.[23] There is a corbel table with Romanesque-style round arches near the top of the facade; additional stories rise above the main roof. The upper stories of the stage house are set back from the main roof. In front of this is a large metal sign board facing east toward Eighth Avenue, which is used to display the name of the present production.[24]

InteriorEdit

Beck had intended for the theater's interior to be more lavish than any other in the area.[12] Albert Herter, a muralist who frequently collaborated with Lansburgh, oversaw much of the interior design.[25] Herter's decorative scheme was largely in the Moorish and Byzantine styles.[12][25] According to a contemporary source from the theater's opening, the decorative motifs were intended to depict various mythological scenes.[21]

LobbiesEdit

The square ticket lobby is directly inside the main entrance. It has stone walls and a groin-vaulted ceiling with Guastavino tiles.[26] The walls on both sides contain segmental arches, and the western arches contain ticket windows. There are wrought-iron lamps on the west and east walls. The two double doors on the north wall lead from the street, while two glass-and-bronze double doors on the south wall connect to the inner lobby.[27]

 
The inner lobby in 1925, facing south. The staircase to the mezzanine is at the southeast end, on the left. The doors to the orchestra, as well as the mezzanine lounge above it, are to the right.

The inner lobby is double-height and rectangular in plan, with a staircase to the mezzanine at the southeast end.[27] It was originally decorated in cream-colored plaster.[21] The northern wall (leading from the ticket lobby) is decorated with a molded panel. Above that is a large arch, which encompasses three smaller arched openings with geometric glass panes.[28] The inner lobby contains piers on the west and east walls, with attached wrought-iron lighting sconces.[21][29] These piers support three round arches on each side; a mezzanine-level lounge is behind the western arches.[26] At ground level, the western wall contains modillions and pilasters, topped by capitals containing stylized-leaf and volute motifs.[29] There are also leaded-glass double doors in the two outermost arches, which lead to the auditorium.[30] At mezzanine level, both walls contain paneled railings with molded bands of dentils and bosses.[29] Three circular ceiling domes rise from the wall arches.[22][26] One contemporary source described the domes as depicting "figures in mediaeval costumes against a gold ground".[21]

The mezzanine lounge is "L"-shaped. The short arm of the "L" is the staircase landing on the south, while the long arm runs above the western wall of the inner lobby.[28] The piers on the lounge's eastern wall correspond to the piers on the inner lobby's western wall.[30] The capitals of the piers contain stylized-leaf motifs, supporting the ceiling, which in turn is divided into half and full groin vaults. Wrought-iron sconces are installed on the piers. The southern end of the lounge contains a seating area, with a niche enclosing a marble water fountain. On the northern end, a staircase with a wrought-iron railing and ceiling lantern descends directly into the orchestra seating. The western wall includes doors that lead to the auditorium.[28] The lounge is directly below the top row of mezzanine seating and is at the same level as the bottom mezzanine row. This removes the need for ticket-holders to climb to the top of the mezzanine seating before descending to their seat.[22]

AuditoriumEdit

The auditorium has an orchestra level, a mezzanine-level balcony, boxes, and a stage behind the proscenium arch. The space is designed with plaster decorations in low relief.[31] Playbill cites the theater as having 1,302 seats,[16] while The Broadway League cites 1,404 seats.[17] Originally, the theater seated 1,200 patrons, or 600 on either level.[21] The original color scheme was red, blue, and orange, with some golden highlights. Byzantine motifs were used extensively in the design, and three murals decorated the side and rear walls. The seats were upholstered in a rose-red color, with blue highlights, while the auditorium was surrounded by blue draperies.[22]

Seating areasEdit
 
View from the mezzanine seating toward the proscenium arch

The orchestra level is wheelchair-accessible via the main doors.[18] The rear or western end of the orchestra contains a promenade.[32] Originally, the promenade had stained glass, bronze, marble, tapestries, and other objects from Martin Beck's collection.[33] The orchestra level is raked, sloping down toward an orchestra pit in front of the stage.[32] Near the front of the auditorium, stairs with wrought-iron railings lead up to the boxes.[34] The side walls have exit doors, and the rear wall contains doorways from the inner lobby. In addition, wrought-iron lighting sconces are placed on the orchestra walls.[35]

The mezzanine level can only be accessed by steps.[18] The mezzanine and boxes share a front railing, which is decorated with geometric patterns in plasterwork.[32] The side walls have wrought-iron lighting sconces. There are metal railings around the staircases to the orchestra and the passageways to the mezzanine lounge.[35] Originally, the side walls also had tapestries.[11][35] A technical booth is at the rear of the balcony, while light boxes are mounted onto the front rail. Moldings and bands divide the mezzanine's underside into paneled sections. Five of these panels contain circular wrought-iron grills with light fixtures.[34]

On either side of the proscenium is a box at the mezzanine level,[28] which contains a shallow S-curve that appears to spiral downward.[11][22] At the orchestra level, decorated groups of columns support the bottoms of the boxes, which are paneled. The fronts of the boxes are ornamented with geometric patterns in plasterwork. There are also large clustered columns at the centers of each box, which support a fan vault. Within either box, between the proscenium and the clustered columns is an opening with four marble pilasters, topped by Byzantine and Moorish capitals, which support three arches. Above these triple arches are half-domes, which support the sounding board. Between either box and the mezzanine seats is another opening, formed by the clustered columns on one side and the auditorium wall on the opposite side.[32]

Other design featuresEdit
 
Auditorium ceiling, showing the painted chandelier hanging from the circular wooden dome

Next to the boxes is the proscenium with an elliptically arched opening.[28] On either side of the proscenium are half-columns containing geometric designs, which support four concentric arches.[22][32] Each column on either sides is made of stone upon a marble base and is carved in a different Byzantine motif from the other columns.[22] Albert Herter also designed the theater's original curtain, which was hung across the proscenium opening.[21][33] The curtain was originally decorated in the same red, orange, blue, and gold color scheme as the rest of the auditorium.[22] The stage, covering 2,914 square feet (270.7 m2), was Broadway's largest stage before the construction of the Vivian Beaumont Theater in the 1960s.[36]

A perforated-plaster sounding board curves onto the ceiling above the boxes, in front of the proscenium arch.[31] The ceiling itself is decorated with moldings, which divide the surface into recessed panels. The main section of the ceiling is an octagonal canopy.[22][32] The center of the ceiling contains a large, circular wooden dome, which hangs from the octagonal ceiling panel via canvas strips.[11][32] The dome and the canvas strips are both decorated in a red, yellow, and green color scheme with geometric designs.[32] A painted glass chandelier is suspended from the dome's center.[21][35]

HistoryEdit

Times Square became the epicenter for large-scale theater productions between 1900 and the Great Depression.[37] Manhattan's theater district had begun to shift from Union Square and Madison Square during the first decade of the 20th century.[38][39] Most of the theaters built in the 1900s and 1910s were built on side streets near Broadway, but the Broadway-theater district expanded westward to Eighth Avenue and eastward to Sixth Avenue after World War II.[40] Martin Beck was a vaudevillian who operated the Orpheum Circuit, which in the early 20th century was the dominant vaudeville circuit on the West Coast of the United States. In the early 1910s, he expanded to the East Coast and developed the Palace Theatre in New York City, which he soon lost to his rival Edward Albee.[41][42] Although Beck was supplanted as the leader of the Orpheum Circuit in 1923, he wished to continue doing business in the city, and he planned a theater for legitimate shows.[13][43]

Beck operationEdit

Development and early yearsEdit

 
Daytime view of the Beck (later Hirschfeld), looking east

In July 1923, Martin Beck acquired six dwellings at 302 to 312 West 45th Street, with the intent of building a legitimate theater there.[9][44] That September, Beck enlarged his site by buying a townhouse at 314 West 45th Street.[10][45] The same month, Oddie and Falk were awarded the construction contract for the theater, which was to cost $1 million. The venue was to have a 1,160-seat capacity and a stage measuring 40 by 90 ft (12 by 27 m).[46] The existing buildings on the site were being razed by November 1923.[47][48] Beck's 45th Street theater, along with another one planned on 52nd Street, were part of an effort to shift the Theater District westward.[49] Beck initially planned to open his namesake theater with a production of Imre Madách's The Tragedy of Man, but he instead decided to book the operetta Madame Pompadour after seeing it in London and several other European cities. Since Charles Dillingham had the rights to present Madame Pompadour in the United States, Beck convinced Dillingham to jointly produce the operetta at the new theater.[50]

According to Martin Beck's wife Louise, the Beck was the only theater in New York City that, at its completion, was owned outright without a mortgage.[51] The theater opened on November 11, 1924, with Madame Pompadour,[52][53][54] which ultimately ran for 80 performances.[55][56] This was followed in 1925 by a more popular show, a musical adaptation of the play Captain Jinks by Clyde Fitch,[55][57] starring J. Harold Murray and Joe E. Brown for 167 performances.[58][59] A. H. Woods subsequently leased the theater for his production of the John Colton play The Shanghai Gesture,[60][61] starring Florence Reed, which opened at the Beck in 1926[55][62] and ran for 210 performances.[58][63] The next year, the Beck hosted James Gleason's comedy The Shannons of Broadway, featuring Gleason and his wife Lucile,[55][64] which had 288 performances.[65][66]

Late 1920s to 1930sEdit

In 1928, the Theatre Guild took over the Beck.[67][68] The Guild's first production at the theater was Wings Over Europe,[69] which opened at the end of the same year.[70][71] Next, the Guild staged Dynamo by Eugene O'Neill, starring Glenn Anders and Claudette Colbert,[69][72] which ran for 66 performances in early 1929.[73][74] Later that year, the theater hosted the Czech comedy The Camel Through the Needle's Eye,[75][76] as well as the Russian play Red Rust.[77][78] The latter was the Theatre Guild Acting Company (later the Group Theatre)'s first production.[79] In 1930, the Theatre Guild presented George Bernard Shaw's The Apple Cart,[80][81] Philip Barry's Hotel Universe,[82][83] and Sergei Tretyakov's Roar China! at the Beck.[84][85] The Theatre Guild hosted Maxwell Anderson's play Elizabeth the Queen to the Beck in early 1931, starring Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne.[86][87] The Group Theatre had its first production that September[88] with the opening of Paul Green's The House of Connelly.[89][90][91] Lunt and Fontanne returned to the theater in the Guild's Reunion in Vienna later that year.[92][93][94]

The Abbey Irish Theatre Players performed at the Martin Beck Theatre for the 1932–1933 season,[95] their first New York City appearance since 1911.[96] Their productions included The Far-off Hills, The New Gossoon, Juno and the Paycock, and Playboy of the Western World.[97] The Abbey Theatre departed in January 1933,[98] and the Beck hosted the play The Lake, featuring film star Katharine Hepburn, the same year.[89][99] Sidney Howard's docudrama Yellow Jack was presented next in 1934.[100][101][102] The D'Oyly Carte Opera Company commenced a season of Gilbert and Sullivan works at the Beck in September 1934,[103][104] performing 11 operettas[105] and running for 15 weeks.[106] Next was a revival of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet in late 1934, featuring Basil Rathbone and Katharine Cornell.[100][107][108] Cornell and Burgess Meredith starred in two plays in 1935: The Barretts of Wimpole Street, also featuring Brian Aherne and Brenda Forbes,[109][110][111] and Flowers of the Forest, also featuring Margalo Gillmore.[109][112][113] Later in 1935, Anderson's Winterset opened at the Beck, featuring Meredith, Margo, and Eduardo Ciannelli.[109][114][115]

Cornell's husband Guthrie McClintic had directed several of the mid-1930s plays at the Martin Beck Theatre, including Romeo and Juliet and Winterset.[105] Also among these were Shaw's play Saint Joan, which opened in 1936 and featured Cornell, Maurice Evans, and Tyrone Power Jr.[109][116][117] The D'Oyly Carte Opera Company returned in August 1936 to perform another set of Gilbert and Sullivan operettas,[118][119] running through to the end of the year.[120] Another Anderson play, High Tor, opened in 1937[121][122] and starred Meredith, Peggy Ashcroft, and Hume Cronyn for 171 performances.[123][124][125] Also in 1937, the Beck hosted the play Barchester Towers with Ina Claire,[109][126][127] for which some of the orchestra seating was temporarily removed and walled off.[128] In 1938, the theater hosted Victoria Regina, featuring Helen Hayes,[121][129] for 87 performances.[123][130] The D'Oyly Carte Opera Company hosted yet another season of Gilbert and Sullivan shows early the next year.[131][132] Hayes returned later in 1939, performing in the drama Ladies and Gentlemen[121][133] for 105 performances.[134][135]

1940s to early 1960sEdit

 
Ticket booth showing the still visible Martin Beck Theatre name above the window

The play Lady in Waiting, adapted from Margery Sharp's novel of the same name, ran at the Beck for 87 performances in 1940.[134][136] Martin Beck died later the same year, and Louise Beck and Louis A. Lotito took over.[137] Lillian Hellman's A Watch on the Rhine opened in 1941[138][139] and ran for 378 performances.[140][141] Lunt and Fontanne returned to the theater the next year with the opening of S. N. Behrman's play The Pirate,[138][142] which had 176 performances.[140][143] Members of the United States Army then presented five plays in August 1943,[144][145] and Richard Rodgers and Herbert Fields's musical A Connecticut Yankee opened that November.[146][147] The next year, Berhman's Jacobowsky and the Colonel opened at the Beck,[148][149] running for 417 performances.[140][150] The Beck hosted the play Foolish Notion with Tallulah Bankhead and Donald Cook in 1945,[140][151] followed the same year by Leonard Bernstein, Betty Comden, and Adolph Green's popular musical On the Town,[148] the latter of which ran for six months.[152][153]

Harold Arlen and Johnny Mercer's musical St. Louis Woman was presented at the Beck in 1946,[154][155] and O'Neill's The Iceman Cometh was staged that year.[154][156] This was followed the next year by the musical Barefoot Boy with Cheek, featuring Nancy Walker,[157][158] and a revival of Antony and Cleopatra, featuring Katharine Cornell.[154][159][160] Revivals of Shaw's play You Never Can Tell[157][161][162] and Jerome Kern's Sally were presented at the Beck in 1948,[157][163][164] followed by That Lady in 1949 with Cornell.[154][165] Next, the Beck hosted The Wisteria Trees with Helen Hayes,[154][166] as well as a translation of Jean Anouilh's Ring Round the Moon, in 1950.[157][167][168] The following year, Tennessee Williams's The Rose Tattoo starred Eli Wallach and Maureen Stapleton,[154][169][170] Maxwell Anderson's Barefoot in Athens had a short run in 1951,[171][172] as did Truman Capote's The Grass Harp in 1952.[171][173] This was followed in 1953 by Arthur Miller's The Crucible.[174][175]

The John Patrick comedy The Teahouse of the August Moon, starring David Wayne, opened in October 1953[176][177] and ultimately ran for 1,027 performances over two and a half years.[178][179] The Beck then hosted a revival of Shaw's Major Barbara in 1956,[180][181][182] as well as a musical version of Candide.[180][183][184] Tennessee Williams's Orpheus Descending opened in 1957, featuring Maureen Stapleton and Cliff Robertson,[180][185] but it only ran for 68 performances.[178][186] By contrast, the Norman Krasna comedy Who Was That Lady I Saw You With? had 208 performances in 1958,[187][188] while Williams's Sweet Bird of Youth lasted for 375 performances in 1959.[187][189] Other appearances at the Beck in the late 1950s included performances from Israel's Inbal Dance Theater in 1958[190] and Les Ballets Africains in 1959.[191][192] Louis Lotito's group City Playhouses Inc. took a ten-year lease on the theater in August 1958.[193]

Charles Strouse and Lee Adams's first collaboration,[194] the musical Bye Bye Birdie featuring Dick Van Dyke and Chita Rivera, opened at the Beck in April 1960[195] and stayed for 607 performances.[187][196] Afterward, the theater hosted Jerry Herman's musical Milk and Honey, which opened in 1961[197][198] and stayed for a year and a half.[199] In 1963, the theater staged Mother Courage and Her Children with Anne Bancroft, Barbara Harris, and Gene Wilder;[200][201] a transfer of Strange Interlude;[202] and Edward Albee's version of The Ballad of the Sad Café with Colleen Dewhurst and Michael Dunn.[203][204][205] The play The Physicists with Jessica Tandy and Hume Cronyn,[203][206][207] as well as the musical I Had a Ball with Richard Kiley and Buddy Hackett, both opened at the Beck in 1964.[203][208][209] This was followed the next year by the Royal Shakespeare Company's production of Marat/Sade.[210][211][212]

Jujamcyn operationEdit

Late 1960s to 1980sEdit

 
Side view of the theater's facade

Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing president William L. McKnight, who headed Jujamcyn Theaters and already operated the St. James Theatre, offered Louise Beck $1.5 million for the Martin Beck Theatre in December 1965. McKnight also offered to buy out Lotito's lease on the theater, which was to expire in three years.[213] The sale was finalized in February 1966, with McKnight paying $1.35 million to Louise Beck and $150,000 to Lotito. McKnight would not receive the property title until the next month, after Marat/Sade was set to close.[214] Under Jujamcyn's operation, the Beck hosted the Albee play A Delicate Balance, featuring Tandy, Cronyn, Rosemary Murphy, and Marian Seldes, in 1966.[215][216][217] The next year, the theater staged a production of Comden, Green, and Jule Styne's musical Hallelujah, Baby!.[215][218][219] In 1968, the off-Broadway musical Man of La Mancha relocated to the Beck,[220][221] staying for three years.[222][223]

Many of the Beck's productions in the 1970s were short-lived.[224] In 1971, the Beck hosted Albee's All Over with Tandy, Dewhurst, Betty Field, and George Voskovec,[225][226] as well as the musical The Grass Harp, based on Capote's play two decades earlier.[227][228] Two productions during the decade had just one performance: Ring Around the Bathtub on April 29, 1972, and No Hard Feelings on April 8, 1973.[17][229] The British play Habeas Corpus was presented at the Beck in late 1975,[225][230] running for 95 performances.[231][232] In 1976, McKnight transferred the Beck and Jujamcyn's other venues to his daughter Virginia and her husband James H. Binger.[233] Finally, the theater had a hit in 1977 with the opening of the play Dracula, featuring Frank Langella,[224][234] which ran for 925 performances.[235][236]

In 1981, the Beck hosted the Lillian Hellman play The Little Foxes, featuring Elizabeth Taylor,[237][238][239] and the Robert Brush and Martin Charnin musical The First.[237][240][241] This was followed in 1982 by the Michael Stewart play Come Back to the Five and Dime, Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean with Cher,[237][242][243] as well as A Little Family Business with Angela Lansbury.[237][244] The Royal Shakespeare Company returned in 1983 with All's Well That Ends Well,[237][245][246] and the musical The Rink with Liza Minnelli and Chita Rivera was staged at the Beck in 1984,[237][247] running for 204 performances.[248][249] On the other hand, Requiem for a Heavyweight managed just three performances in March 1985,[250][251] and the following month's revival of the musical Take Me Along closed on its opening night.[252][253] The next hit at the Beck was Into the Woods, with music by Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine, which opened in 1987[254][255] and had 765 performances.[256][257] Another popular production at the theater was Grand Hotel, which premiered in late 1989[258][259] and stayed two years before transferring to another theater.[260][261]

The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) had started considering protecting the Beck as an official city landmark in 1982,[262] with discussions continuing over the next several years.[263] The LPC designated both the facade and the interior as landmarks on November 4, 1987.[264][265] This was part of the LPC's wide-ranging effort in 1987 to grant landmark status to Broadway theaters.[266] The New York City Board of Estimate ratified the designations in March 1988.[267] Jujamcyn, the Nederlanders, and the Shuberts collectively sued the LPC in June 1988 to overturn the landmark designations of 22 theaters, including the Beck, on the merit that the designations severely limited the extent to which the theaters could be modified.[268] The lawsuit was escalated to the New York Supreme Court and the Supreme Court of the United States, but these designations were ultimately upheld in 1992.[269]

1990s to presentEdit

After the closure of Grand Hotel in early 1992, the musical Guys and Dolls was revived that year,[258][270] running until 1995.[271] Following this, Laurie Metcalf starred in My Thing of Love, which ran at the Beck for 13 performances in May 1995.[272][273] That October, Ken Ludwig's Moon Over Buffalo opened at the Beck with Carol Burnett and Philip Bosco;[274][275] it lasted for 308 performances.[276] The Beck was renovated in 1996,[277][278] a project that involved extending the mezzanine level forward by three rows.[278] Magician David Copperfield performed in the show Dreams & Nightmares that year.[279][280] Afterward, a revival of the musical Annie opened in March 1997,[281][282] running for 238 performances.[283] The Rodgers and Hammerstein musical The Sound of Music, featuring Rebecca Luker and Richard Chamberlain, was revived at the Beck in 1998[284] for 533 performances.[285] The musical Kiss Me, Kate was revived at the Beck in late 1999,[286][287] running through the end of 2001[288] after nearly closing due to the September 11 attacks.[289][290] This was followed in 2002 by the musical Sweet Smell of Success, which had 108 performances,[291][292] as well as a revival of Man of La Mancha.[291][293]

In late 2002, Jujamcyn announced that the Martin Beck Theatre would be renamed after illustrator Al Hirschfeld the following June, celebrating what would be his 100th birthday. This would make Hirschfeld the first visual artist with a Broadway theater named for him.[277][294] Jujamcyn President Rocco Landesman described the renaming as "an important event for the history and heritage of Broadway".[277][295] Hirschfeld died in January 2003, months before he would have turned 100,[296] though he knew the theater would be renamed for him.[297] A celebration and tribute to Hirschfeld were held on June 23, 2003,[297][298] featuring performers drawn by Hirschfeld during his career.[299][300] The Al Hirschfeld Theatre was renovated after Man of La Mancha closed.[295] The theater constructed a new marquee with an illuminated version of Hirschfeld's Self-Portrait as an Inkwell.[299] Red neon initially represented the "ink" on the marquee, but blue neon was later substituted; Playbill said the red neon gave the "macabre" impression that the figure on the marquee was using ink from its own head.[290] The mezzanine lounge received 22 reproductions of Hirschfeld drawings, which depict plays and actors that appeared at the theater.[277]

 
Kinky Boots at the Al Hirschfeld

The Al Hirschfeld reopened on November 23, 2003, with a revival of the musical Wonderful Town;[290][301] it ran for 497 performances.[302] After Binger died in 2004,[303] Landesman bought the Al Hirschfeld and Jujamcyn's four other theaters in 2005, along with the air rights above them.[304] Jordan Roth joined Jujamcyn as a resident producer the same year.[305] The musical Sweet Charity opened at the Al Hirschfeld in May 2005 after nearly being canceled,[290][306] staying for 297 performances.[307] In 2006, some of the air rights above the Al Hirschfeld were sold to two developers as part of a special zoning provision.[308][d] The musical The Wedding Singer opened in 2006[290][309] and ran for 285 performances,[310] followed in 2007 by Curtains for 511 performances.[311][312] A musical version of A Tale of Two Cities had a short run in 2008,[313][314] while the musical Hair opened the next year with 519 performances.[315][316] In 2009, Roth acquired a 50 percent stake in Jujamcyn and assumed full operation of the firm when Landesman joined the National Endowments of the Arts.[317][318]

Elf the Musical opened at the Al Hirschfeld in late 2010 for a limited run,[319][320] followed in 2011 by a revival of How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying.[321][322] Next, the play Fela! had a limited revival at the Al Hirschfeld in July 2012,[323][324] and Elf the Musical was revived again that November.[325][326] The musical Kinky Boots opened at the theater in April 2013,[327][328] ultimately running for 2,507 performances over six years.[329][330] The next show to occupy the Al Hirschfeld was the musical Moulin Rouge!, which opened in 2019.[331][332] Moulin Rouge! achieved the box office record for the Al Hirschfeld Theatre, grossing $2,716,892 over nine performances for the week ending December 29, 2019.[333] The theater closed on March 12, 2020, due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[334] It reopened on September 24, 2021, with Moulin Rouge! returning.[335]

Notable productionsEdit

Martin Beck TheatreEdit

Al Hirschfeld TheatreEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ The Vivian Beaumont Theater at Lincoln Center is west of Central Park West, a continuation of Eighth Avenue. However, it is outside the Theater District, on the Upper West Side.[4]
  2. ^ The Booth, Plymouth, Music Box, and Imperial theaters, as well as the former Astor, Bijou, Morosco, and Klaw theaters
  3. ^ The brickwork is generally laid in rows of stretchers, with the long sides of the brick exposed. One out of every six rows are headers, with the wide sides of the brick exposed.[19]
  4. ^ New York City zoning sets a maximum floor area for each land lot, after which developers must buy air rights to increase their floor area. Typically, building owners could only sell air rights to developers who owned adjacent sites. Broadway theater owners are allowed to sell their air rights to developers of any lot between Sixth and Eighth Avenues north of 40th Street, regardless of whether the land lots were contiguous.[308]
  5. ^ The following plays appeared: The Gondoliers, Cox and Box/The Pirates of Penzance, Iolanthe, H.M.S. Pinafore/Trial by Jury, The Mikado, The Yeomen of the Guard, Ruddigore, Princess Ida, Patience[108]
  6. ^ The following plays appeared: The Mikado, The Pirates of Penzance/Trial by Jury, The Gondoliers, The Yeomen of the Guard, Iolanthe, Cox and Box/H.M.S. Pinafore, Patience, Princess Ida, Ruddigore[339]
  7. ^ The following plays appeared: The Pirates of Penzance, Trial by Jury, The Mikado, Iolanthe, Cox and Box, H.M.S. Pinafore, The Gondoliers, The Yeomen of the Guard

CitationsEdit

  1. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 1.
  2. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 1.
  3. ^ a b White, Norval; Willensky, Elliot; Leadon, Fran (2010). AIA Guide to New York City (5th ed.). New York: Oxford University Press. p. 299. ISBN 978-0-19538-386-7.
  4. ^ a b c d "302 West 45 Street, 10036". New York City Department of City Planning. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved November 17, 2021.
  5. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 167.
  6. ^ "TheaterMania's Off-Broadway Walking Tours: Hell's Kitchen Edition". TheaterMania. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  7. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 11.
  8. ^ "Another Theatre: Martin Beck Reported to Have Purchased Site in Times Sq. Section". The New York Times. August 19, 1923. p. REA14. ISSN 0362-4331. ProQuest 100187232.
  9. ^ a b "Theater May Be Erected On West 45th St. Site Sold". New-York Tribune. July 17, 1923. p. 8. ProQuest 1237333218.
  10. ^ a b "Enlarge 45th Street Site For $1,000,000 Theater". New-York Tribune. September 13, 1923. p. 22. ProQuest 1237332791.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h Morrison, William (1999). Broadway Theatres: History and Architecture. Mineola, NY: Dover Publications. p. 131. ISBN 0-486-40244-4.
  12. ^ a b c d New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission; Dolkart, Andrew S.; Postal, Matthew A. (2009). Postal, Matthew A. (ed.). Guide to New York City Landmarks (4th ed.). New York: John Wiley & Sons. p. 92. ISBN 978-0-470-28963-1.
  13. ^ a b "Martin Beck Dies; Theatre Veteran; Manager, Producer and Actor, Builder of the Palace, Stricken Here at 71". The New York Times. November 17, 1940. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  14. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, pp. 11–12.
  15. ^ architecture and Building 1925, p. 83.
  16. ^ a b "Al Hirschfeld Theatre (1924) New York, NY". Playbill. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  17. ^ a b c The Broadway League (July 25, 2019). "Al Hirschfeld Theatre – New York, NY". IBDB. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  18. ^ a b c "Al Hirschfeld Theatre". Jujamcyn Theaters. June 19, 2019. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  19. ^ a b c d e f g Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 14.
  20. ^ a b Stern, Robert A. M.; Gilmartin, Patrick; Mellins, Thomas (1987). New York 1930: Architecture and Urbanism Between the Two World Wars. New York: Rizzoli. p. 231. ISBN 978-0-8478-3096-1. OCLC 13860977.
  21. ^ a b c d e f g h architecture and Building 1925, p. 82.
  22. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "G. Albert Lansburgh's Work on Martin Beck Theater, New York". The Christian Science Monitor. November 20, 1924. p. 6. ProQuest 511426971.
  23. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, pp. 14–15.
  24. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  25. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 12.
  26. ^ a b c architecture and Building 1925, p. 82; Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 15.
  27. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 15.
  28. ^ a b c d e Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 16.
  29. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, pp. 15–16.
  30. ^ a b architecture and Building 1925, p. 82; Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 16.
  31. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, pp. 16–17.
  32. ^ a b c d e f g h Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 17.
  33. ^ a b "Martin Beck' Theater Opens Tuesday Night: 'Mine. Pompadour,' London and Continental Success, To Be First Attraction". New York Herald Tribune. November 9, 1924. p. F12. ProQuest 1114019450.
  34. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, pp. 17–18.
  35. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 18.
  36. ^ Gelb, Arthur (November 14, 1961). "Vast Stage Can Be Transformed For Variety of Dramatic Action". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 6, 2022.
  37. ^ Swift, Christopher (2018). "The City Performs: An Architectural History of NYC Theater". New York City College of Technology, City University of New York. Archived from the original on March 25, 2020. Retrieved March 25, 2020.
  38. ^ "Theater District –". New York Preservation Archive Project. Archived from the original on October 19, 2021. Retrieved October 12, 2021.
  39. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 2.
  40. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 4.
  41. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, pp. 7–8.
  42. ^ Rogers, Will; Gragert, Steven K.; Johansson, M. Jane (2001). The Papers of Will Rogers: From vaudeville to Broadway : September 1908 – August 1915. The Papers of Will Rogers. University of Oklahoma Press. pp. 53–54. ISBN 978-0-8061-3315-7. Archived from the original on October 19, 2021. Retrieved October 17, 2021.
  43. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 8.
  44. ^ "Russian Countess Killed; Claudia Kapnist, an Aviator, Found Dead After a Fall in Rome". The New York Times. July 14, 1923. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  45. ^ "Beck Adds to Theater Site". The Billboard. Vol. 35, no. 38. September 22, 1923. p. 21. ProQuest 1031738214.
  46. ^ "Legitimate: Beck's Little Theatre With Very Big Stage". Variety. Vol. 72, no. 5. September 20, 1923. p. 12. ProQuest 1505692614.
  47. ^ "New Projects for Eighth Av. Section: Large Theatre Will Replace Row of Brick Houses in Forty-fifth Street". The New York Times. November 18, 1923. p. RE1. ISSN 0362-4331. ProQuest 103141914.
  48. ^ "Clearing Site for New Martin Beck Theater". The Billboard. Vol. 35, no. 47. November 24, 1923. p. 8. ProQuest 1505520126.
  49. ^ "Martin Beck Buying Much New York Real Estate". The Billboard. Vol. 35, no. 44. November 3, 1923. pp. 5, 121. ProQuest 1505523602.
  50. ^ "Why 'Madame Pompadour' Is To Open Martin Beck Theater". The New York Herald, New York Tribune. October 19, 1924. p. F13. ProQuest 1113286562.
  51. ^ Ormsbee, Helen (September 12, 1948). "Play Must Pass Louise Beck To Get Into Beck Theater". New York Herald Tribune. p. C1. ProQuest 1324164844.
  52. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 5; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 167; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 12.
  53. ^ "Madame Pompadour' Opens in New House; Veterans Find Production at Martin Beck Theatre More Beautiful Than Those Abroad". The New York Times. November 12, 1924. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  54. ^ "Wilda Bennett Is Court Favorite in 'Mme. Pompadour': Operetta, With Dreamy Viennese Melodies, Finds Suitable Trappings in New Martin Beck Theater". The New York Herald, New York Tribune. November 12, 1924. p. 15. ProQuest 1113178855.
  55. ^ a b c d Bloom 2007, p. 5; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 167; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 22.
  56. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 11, 1924). "Madame Pompadour – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Madame Pompadour (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1924)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  57. ^ "The Play; Who Was Strauss's Daughter?". The New York Times. September 9, 1925. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  58. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 167; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 22.
  59. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 8, 1925). "Captain Jinks – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
    "Captain Jinks (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1925)". Playbill. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  60. ^ "Shuberts Withdraw From Eltinge Theater". The Billboard. Vol. 38, no. 6. February 6, 1926. p. 6. ProQuest 1031778513.
  61. ^ Henderson, Mary C. & Greene, Alexis (2008). The Story of 42nd Street: The Theaters, Shows, Characters, and Scandals of the World's Most Notorious Street. Back Stage Books. p. 151. ISBN 978-0-8230-3072-9.
  62. ^ Atkinson, J. Brooks (February 2, 1926). "The Play; Melodrama of the Orient". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  63. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 1, 1926). "The Shanghai Gesture – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The Shanghai Gesture (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1926)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  64. ^ "James Gleason's New Comedy Is Effective; Author and Lucile Webster Breezily Act 'The Shannons of Broadway at the Martin Beck". The New York Times. September 27, 1927. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  65. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 26, 1927). "The Shannons of Broadway – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The Shannons of Broadway (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1927)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  66. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 167; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 23.
  67. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 5; Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 167–169.
  68. ^ "Guild Gets Beck Theatre; To Take It Over on Dec. 1--Will Have Three Playhouses". The New York Times. September 19, 1928. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  69. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 5; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 169.
  70. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 10, 1928). "Wings Over Europe – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Wings Over Europe (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1928)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  71. ^ Atkinson, J. Brooks (December 11, 1928). "The Play; Intimations of Immortality". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  72. ^ Atkinson, J. Brooks (February 12, 1929). "The Play; God in the Machine". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  73. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 169; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 23.
  74. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 11, 1929). "Dynamo – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Dynamo (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1929)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  75. ^ The Broadway League (April 15, 1929). "The Camel Through the Needle's Eye – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
    "The Camel Through the Needle's Eye (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1929)". Playbill. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  76. ^ "Theatre Guild Gives a Czech Comedy; 'The Camel Through the Needle's Eye' Is Found to Be a Fairly Amusing Adaptation". The New York Times. April 16, 1929. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  77. ^ The Broadway League (December 17, 1929). "Red Rust – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
    "Red Rust (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1929)". Playbill. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  78. ^ "'Red Rust' Is Given by Theatre Guild; Studio Group of Younger Players Presents Soviet Drama at Martin Beck Theatre". The New York Times. December 18, 1929. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  79. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 6.
  80. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 24, 1930). "The Apple Cart – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The Apple Cart (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1930)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  81. ^ Atkinson, J. Brooks (February 25, 1930). "Shaw's 'Applecart' Pokes Fun at Us; Benignant Deviltry in His New "Political Extravaganza" Produced by Theatre Guild". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  82. ^ The Broadway League (April 14, 1930). "Hotel Universe – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
    "Hotel Universe (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1930)". Playbill. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  83. ^ Atkinson, J. Brooks (April 15, 1930). "The Play; Panacea for Modern Complaints". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  84. ^ The Broadway League (October 27, 1930). "Roar China – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
    "Roar China (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1930)". Playbill. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  85. ^ Atkinson, J. Brooks (October 28, 1930). "The Play". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  86. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 6; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 169.
  87. ^ "Guild Play to Move; "Elizabeth the Queen" to Beck to Make Way for "In the Meantime."". The New York Times. December 12, 1930. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  88. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 6; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 169; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 12.
  89. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 6; Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 169–170; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 24.
  90. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 28, 1931). "The House of Connelly – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The House of Connelly (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1931)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  91. ^ Hammond, Percy (September 29, 1931). "The Theaters: A Good Show, Though Presented Margaret Barker". New York Herald Tribune. p. 18. ProQuest 1114202369.
  92. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 6; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 169; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 24.
  93. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 16, 1931). "Reunion in Vienna – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Reunion in Vienna (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1931)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  94. ^ Ruhl, Arthur (November 17, 1931). "The Theaters: Lynn Fontanne". New York Herald Tribune. p. 16. ProQuest 1114238838.
  95. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 6; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 170; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 13.
  96. ^ "The Abbey Players to Open Here Oct. 18; Dublin Company to Offer at the Martin Beck Theatre Several Plays New to New York". The New York Times. September 15, 1932. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  97. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 6; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 170.
  98. ^ "News of the Theaters: Abbey Theater Players Begin Final Week Here; Newark to See 'Melody'". New York Herald Tribune. January 23, 1933. p. 10. ProQuest 1221656321.
  99. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 26, 1933). "The Lake – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The Lake (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1933)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  100. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 6; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 171; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 24.
  101. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 6, 1934). "Yellow Jack – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Yellow Jack (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1934)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  102. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (March 7, 1934). "The Play; " Yellow Jack," in Which Sidney Howard Shows How Scientific Heroism Can Be Displayed on the Stage". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  103. ^ Allen, Kelcey (September 4, 1934). "D'oyly Carte Opera Co. Scores Brilliant Success At Martin Beck Theatre". Women's Wear Daily. Vol. 49, no. 45. p. 44. ProQuest 1654293944.
  104. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (September 4, 1934). "' The Gondoliers' Sung by the D'Oyly Carte Opera Company -- Reopening of 'No More Ladies.'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  105. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 13.
  106. ^ "News of the Stage; D'Oyly Carte Company to Continue at Another Theatre? -- Abbey Players in a Premiere". The New York Times. November 16, 1934. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  107. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 20, 1934). "Romeo and Juliet – Broadway Play – 1934 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Romeo and Juliet (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1934)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  108. ^ a b c d e f g Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 24.
  109. ^ a b c d e Bloom 2007, p. 6; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 171; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 25.
  110. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 25, 1935). "The Barretts of Wimpole Street – Broadway Play – 1935 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The Barretts of Wimpole Street (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1935)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  111. ^ "'The Barretts' Again; An Account of Katharine Cornell's Residence on Wimpole Street". The New York Times. February 24, 1935. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  112. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 8, 1935). "Flowers of the Forest – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Flowers of the Forest (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1935)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  113. ^ "News of the Stage; Mr. van Druten's 'Flowers of the Forest' Will Bloom Tonight -- Various Matters". The New York Times. April 8, 1935. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  114. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 25, 1935). "Winterset – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Winterset (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1935)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  115. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (September 26, 1935). "Justice and Fate the Theme of 'Winterset' -- 'Remember the Day,' a Crisis in Boyhood". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  116. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 9, 1936). "Saint Joan – Broadway Play – 1936 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Saint Joan (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1936)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  117. ^ "News of the Stage; 'St. Joan' Tonight -- Mr. Coward, Miss Lawrence Here In Fall -- Billy Rose's 'Frontier Centennial.'". The New York Times. March 9, 1936. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  118. ^ Watts, Richard Jr. (August 16, 1936). "Gilbert and Sullivan Opera Initiates Broadway Season". New York Herald Tribune. p. E1. ProQuest 1222135064.
  119. ^ "News of the Stage; D'Oyly Carte Opera Company Opens Season Here Tonight at the Martin Beck". The New York Times. August 20, 1936. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  120. ^ "News of the Stage; The D'Oyly Carte Company Extends Its Engagement Again -- Five Broadway Closings". The New York Times. November 28, 1936. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  121. ^ a b c Bloom 2007, p. 6; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 171; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 13.
  122. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (January 11, 1937). "The Play; Maxwell Anderson's 'High Tor,' With Burgess Meredith, Peggy Ashcroft and Charles D. Brown". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  123. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 171; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 25.
  124. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 9, 1937). "High Tor – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "High Tor (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1937)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  125. ^ "NEWS OF THE STAGE; ' High Tor' Is the Evening's Only Closing--Other Concerns of Broadway and Environs". The New York Times. June 5, 1937. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  126. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 30, 1937). "Barchester Towers – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Barchester Towers (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1937)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  127. ^ "Ina Clair Opens New Play Tonight; Star Will Feature the Cast in 'Barchester Towers' at the Martin Back Theatre". The New York Times. November 30, 1937. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  128. ^ "Theater's Size Simple Matter Of Arithmetic: Too Many Seats? Just Take Some Out; Not Enough? Then Put a Few Back The Government (Kaufman-Hart Version) at Play". New York Herald Tribune. December 26, 1937. p. E5. ProQuest 1223336123.
  129. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (October 4, 1938). "The Play; Helen Hayes Returns in 'Victoria Regina' With a New Prince Albert". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  130. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 3, 1938). "Victoria Regina – Broadway Play – 1938 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Victoria Regina (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1938)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  131. ^ a b c d Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 171.
  132. ^ "The Play; Notes on 'The Mikado,' a 'Merchant'--Of Venice, Not Yonkers--and the French Theatre". The New York Times. January 10, 1939. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  133. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (October 18, 1939). "The Play; Helen Hayes and Philip Merivale in 'Ladies and Gentlemen,' by MacArthur and Hecht". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  134. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 171; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 26.
  135. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 17, 1939). "Ladies and Gentlemen – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Ladies and Gentlemen (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1939)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  136. ^ The Broadway League (March 27, 1940). "Lady in Waiting – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
    "Lady in Waiting (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1940)". Playbill. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  137. ^ Clark, Alfred E. (March 17, 1978). "Louise Helms Beck, Widow of the Producer And a Founder of American Theater Wing". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  138. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 6; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 173; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 13.
  139. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (April 2, 1941). "The Play; Lillian Hellman's 'Watch on the Rhine' Acted With Paul Lukas in the Leading Part". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  140. ^ a b c d Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 173; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 26.
  141. ^ The Broadway League (April 1, 1941). "Watch on the Rhine – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
    "Watch on the Rhine (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1941)". Playbill. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  142. ^ "Lunts Will Open in 'Pirate' Tonight; S.N. Behrman Extravaganza at Beck". The New York Times. November 25, 1942. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  143. ^ The Broadway League (November 25, 1942). "The Pirate – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
    "The Pirate (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1942)". Playbill. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  144. ^ "Army Plays Open Run Here Tonight; 'Try and Get It,' Sheldon Davis Farce, Also Arrives -- Helen Hayes Back in 'Harriet'". The New York Times. August 2, 1943. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  145. ^ "News of the Theatre". New York Herald Tribune. August 24, 1943. p. 12. ProQuest 1282798922.
  146. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 17, 1943). "A Connecticut Yankee – Broadway Musical – 1943 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "A Connecticut Yankee (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1943)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  147. ^ Zolotow, Sam (November 17, 1943). "NEWS OF THE STAGE; 'Connecticut Yankee,' Revised to Date, Opening at Martin Beck Tonight -- 'Naked Genius' Will Close at Plymouth Saturday". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  148. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 7; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 173.
  149. ^ Zolotow, Sam (March 14, 1944). "Premiere Tonight for 'Jacobowsky'; Play Adapted From Original by Franz Werfel to Make Bow at Martin Beck". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  150. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 14, 1944). "Jacobowsky and the Colonel – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Jacobowsky and the Colonel (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1944)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  151. ^ Nichols, Lewis (March 14, 1945). "The Play". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  152. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 28, 1944). "On the Town – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "On the Town (Broadway, George Abbott Theatre, 1944)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  153. ^ Zolotow, Sam (January 11, 1946). "'On the Town' Run Will End on Feb. 2; Hit Musical Will Leave After 462 Performances--Tour to Open in Baltimore Readers Theatre Cancels Play Gift for Bride" Suspending". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  154. ^ a b c d e f Bloom 2007, p. 7; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 173; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 27.
  155. ^ "News of the Stage; 'St. Louis Woman,' All-Negro Musical, Arriving at the Martin Beck Tonight--Ruby Hill in Lead "Walk Hard" to Quit Potpourri of the Town". The New York Times. March 30, 1946. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  156. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (October 10, 1946). "The Play in Review; Iceman Cometh,' Mr. O'Neill's New Work, With Four-Hour Running Time, Has Its World Premiere at the Martin Beck". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  157. ^ a b c d Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 173; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 27.
  158. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (April 4, 1947). "The New Play: 'Barefoot Boy With Cheek'; Abbott's Musical Comedy at the Martin Beck Seen as Another Class Reunion on a Dear Old College Campus". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  159. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 26, 1947). "Antony and Cleopatra – Broadway Play – 1947 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Antony and Cleopatra (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1947)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  160. ^ Zolotow, Sam (November 26, 1947). "Cornell Appears in Drama Tonight; Actress Opening at Martin Beck in 'Antony and Cleopatra' Opposite Godfrey Tearle". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  161. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 16, 1948). "You Never Can Tell – Broadway Play – 1948 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "You Never Can Tell (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1948)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  162. ^ Calta, Louis (March 16, 1948). "Comedy by Shaw Returns Tonight; Theatre Guild-Alfred Fischer Revival of 'You Never Can Tell' Opens at Martin Beck". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  163. ^ a b The Broadway League (May 6, 1948). "Sally – Broadway Musical – 1948 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Sally (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1948)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  164. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (May 7, 1948). "Willie Howard and Bambi Linn in a Revival of 'Sally,' With Music by Jerome Kern". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  165. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (November 23, 1949). "At the Theatre". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  166. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (March 30, 1950). "First Night at the Theatre; Helen Hayes Returns in Logan's 'The Wisteria Trees,' Set on a Louisiana Plantation". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  167. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 23, 1950). "Ring Round the Moon – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Ring Round the Moon (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1950)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  168. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (November 24, 1950). "First Night at the Theatre; Fry's Version of 'Ring Round Moon' From the French of Jean Anouilh". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  169. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 3, 1951). "The Rose Tattoo – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The Rose Tattoo (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1951)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  170. ^ Shanley, J. p (February 3, 1951). "'The Rose Tattoo' Due Here Tonight; Tennessee Williams' Play, Set in Gulf Coast Village, Will Open at the Martin Beck". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  171. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 173; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 28.
  172. ^ The Broadway League (October 31, 1951). "Barefoot in Athens – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
    "Barefoot in Athens (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1951)". Playbill. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  173. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 27, 1952). "The Grass Harp – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The Grass Harp (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1952)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  174. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 7; Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 173–174; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 28.
  175. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 22, 1953). "The Crucible – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The Crucible (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1953)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  176. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 7; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 174; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 13.
  177. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (October 16, 1953). "'The Teahouse of the August Moon'; John Patrick's Comedy About the American Occupation of Okinawa Island". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  178. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 174; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 28.
  179. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 15, 1953). "The Teahouse of the August Moon – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The Teahouse of the August Moon (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1953)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  180. ^ a b c Bloom 2007, p. 7; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 174; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 28.
  181. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 30, 1956). "Major Barbara – Broadway Play – 1956 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Major Barbara (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1956)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  182. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (October 31, 1956). "Theatre: 'Major Barbara'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  183. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 1, 1956). "Candide – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Candide (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1956)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  184. ^ Calta, Louis (December 1, 1956). "Candide to Open at Beck Tonight; Operetta of Voltaire's Work Bows at 8--Spewacks to Adapt 'Human Bondage' Carmen Mathews in Play". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  185. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (March 22, 1957). "Theatre: Rural Orpheus". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  186. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 21, 1957). "Orpheus Descending – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Orpheus Descending (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1957)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  187. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 174; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 29.
  188. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 3, 1958). "Who Was That Lady I Saw You With? – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
    "Who Was That Lady I Saw You With? (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1958)". Playbill. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  189. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 10, 1959). "Sweet Bird of Youth – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Sweet Bird of Youth (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1959)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  190. ^ Martin, John (January 7, 1958). "Dance: Israeli Troupe; Inbal Group Makes American Debut". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  191. ^ Martin, John (February 17, 1959). "Dance: 'Ballets Africains'; Keita Fodeba Company Demonstrates Liveliness in Opening at Martin Beck". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  192. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 16, 1959). "Les Ballets Africains – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Les Ballets Africains (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1959)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  193. ^ Zolotow, Sam (August 1, 1958). "Lotito Gets Lease on Beck Theatre; His City Playhouses, Inc., to Be in Control 10 Years -- Skulnik in Demand". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  194. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 7.
  195. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (April 15, 1960). "Theatre:'Bye Bye Birdie'; Michael Stewart Play at Martin Beck". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  196. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 14, 1960). "Bye Bye Birdie – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Bye Bye Birdie (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1960)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  197. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 7; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 175; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 29.
  198. ^ Taubman, Howard (October 11, 1961). "Theatre: All 'Milk and Honey' at the Martin Beck; Musical of Americans in Israel Opens Weede, Mimi Benzell, Molly Picon Star". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  199. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 10, 1961). "Milk and Honey – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Milk and Honey (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1961)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  200. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 28, 1963). "Mother Courage and Her Children – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Mother Courage and Her Children (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1963)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  201. ^ Taubman, Howard (March 30, 1963). "Theater: Fine Brecht; 'Mother Courage' a Play to Welcome". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  202. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 11, 1963). "Strange Interlude – Broadway Play – 1963 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Strange Interlude (Broadway, Hudson Theatre, 1963)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  203. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 175; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 30.
  204. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 30, 1963). "The Ballad of the Sad Cafe – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
    "The Ballad of the Sad Cafe (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1963)". Playbill. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  205. ^ Taubman, Howard (October 31, 1963). "Theater: 'The Ballad of the Sad Cafe'; Albee's Adaptation of Novella Presented". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  206. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 13, 1964). "The Physicists – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The Physicists (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1964)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  207. ^ "The Theater: Durrenmatt's 'Physicists'; Play About Atomic Era Opens at Martin Beck ". The New York Times. October 14, 1964. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  208. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 15, 1964). "I Had a Ball – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "I Had a Ball (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1964)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  209. ^ "Theater: 'I Had a Ball,' a Musical With Buddy Hackett, Opens; A Coney Island Tale at the Martin Beck". The New York Times. December 16, 1964. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  210. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 7; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 175; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 13.
  211. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 27, 1965). "The Persecution and Assassination of Marat as Performed by the Inmates of the Asylum of Charenton Under the Direction of the Marquis de Sade – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The Persecution and Assassination of Jean-Paul Marat as Performed by the Inmates of the Asylum of Charenton Under the Direction of the Marquis de Sade (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1965)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  212. ^ Taubman, Howard (December 28, 1965). "Theater: The Assassination of Marat; Play Within a Play Has Martin Beck Premiere". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  213. ^ Zolotow, Sam (December 23, 1965). "3-M Chief Buying the Martin Beck; McKnight to Pay 1.5 Million for 41-Year-Old Theater". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 15, 2022.
  214. ^ Zolotow, Sam (February 17, 1966). "The Martin Beck Is Sold by Widow; McKnight, Chairman of 3-M, Signs to Pay $1.5-Million". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  215. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 7; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 175; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 30.
  216. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 22, 1966). "A Delicate Balance – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "A Delicate Balance (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1966)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  217. ^ Kerr, Walter (September 23, 1966). "The Theater: Albee's 'A Delicate Balance' at the Martin Beck; Cronyn and Jessica Tandy in Cast Drama Directed by Alan Schneider". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  218. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 26, 1967). "Hallelujah, Baby! – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Hallelujah, Baby! (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1967)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  219. ^ Kerr, Walter (April 27, 1967). "Theater: Musical With Leslie Uggams; 'Hallelujah, Baby!' Is Unveiled at the Beck". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  220. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 8; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 175; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 30.
  221. ^ "' La Mancha' to Move Soon". The New York Times. January 11, 1968. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  222. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 22, 1965). "Man of La Mancha – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Man of La Mancha (Broadway, ANTA Washington Square Theatre, 1965)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  223. ^ "La Mancha' to Close At 2,328 Performances". The New York Times. June 16, 1971. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  224. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 8; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 175.
  225. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 8; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 175; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 31.
  226. ^ The Broadway League (March 28, 1971). "All Over – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
    "All Over (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1971)". Playbill. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  227. ^ The Broadway League (November 2, 1971). "The Grass Harp – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
    "The Grass Harp (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1971)". Playbill. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  228. ^ Barnes, Clive (November 3, 1971). "Theater: Capote's 'The Grass Harp' Makes Its Debut as Musical". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  229. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 31.
  230. ^ Barnes, Clive (November 26, 1975). "A Well Donebut Slight 'Habeas Corpus'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  231. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 25, 1975). "Habeas Corpus – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Habeas Corpus (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1975)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  232. ^ "'Habeas Corpus' to Close". The New York Times. February 11, 1976. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  233. ^ "Legitimate: New Management Takes Control Of McKnight Houses". Variety. Vol. 284, no. 9. October 6, 1976. p. 77. ProQuest 1401295438.
  234. ^ Eder, Richard (October 21, 1977). "Theater: An Elegant, Bloodless 'Dracula'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  235. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 175; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 31.
  236. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 20, 1977). "Dracula – Broadway Play – 1977 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Dracula (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1977)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  237. ^ a b c d e f Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 175; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 32.
  238. ^ a b The Broadway League (May 7, 1981). "The Little Foxes – Broadway Play – 1981 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The Little Foxes (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1981)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  239. ^ Rich, Frank (May 8, 1981). "Stage: the Misses Taylor and Stapleton in 'Foxes'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  240. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 17, 1981). "The First – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The First (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1981)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  241. ^ Rich, Frank (November 18, 1981). "Stage: 'First,' Baseball Musical". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  242. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 18, 1982). "Come Back to the 5 & Dime Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
    "Come Back to the 5 & Dime Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1982)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  243. ^ "'Jimmy Dean' Will End After Sunday's Matinee". The New York Times. March 30, 1982. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  244. ^ Rich, Frank (December 16, 1982). "Stage: 'Family Business,' With Angela Lansbury". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  245. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 13, 1957). "The Tunnel of Love – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The Tunnel of Love (Broadway, Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre, 1957)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  246. ^ Rich, Frank (April 14, 1983). "Stage: Royal Shakespeare Company's 'All's Well'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  247. ^ Nightingale, Benedict (February 19, 1984). "Stage View; 'The Rink' Succumbs to Charmless Predictability". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  248. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 9, 1984). "The Rink – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The Rink (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1984)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  249. ^ "'The Rink' Closes Saturday". The New York Times. August 1, 1984. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  250. ^ "Serling's 'Requiem' to Close". The New York Times. March 9, 1985. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  251. ^ The Broadway League (March 7, 1985). "Requiem for a Heavyweight – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
    "Requiem for a Heavyweight (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1985)". Playbill. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  252. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 14, 1985). "Take Me Along – Broadway Musical – 1985 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Take Me Along (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1985)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  253. ^ "Take Me Along' Closes". The New York Times. April 16, 1985. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  254. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 8; Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 175–176.
  255. ^ Rich, Frank (November 6, 1987). "Stage: 'Into the Woods,' From Sondheim". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  256. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 5, 1987). "Into the Woods – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Into the Woods (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1987)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  257. ^ "'Into the Woods' to Close". The New York Times. August 30, 1989. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  258. ^ a b c Bloom 2007, p. 8; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 176.
  259. ^ Rich, Frank (November 13, 1989). "Review/Theater; Tune's Swirling Vision of a 'Grand Hotel'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  260. ^ Collins, Glenn (January 25, 1992). "Two Shows Will Lower Some Prices". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  261. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 12, 1989). "Grand Hotel – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Grand Hotel (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1989)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  262. ^ Dunlap, David W. (October 20, 1982). "Landmark Status Sought for Theaters". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 29, 2021. Retrieved October 29, 2021.
  263. ^ Shepard, Joan (August 28, 1985). "Is the final curtain near?". New York Daily News. pp. 462, 464. Archived from the original on September 21, 2021. Retrieved September 16, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  264. ^ "Legitimate: Landmarks Panel Names 5 Theaters". Variety. Vol. 329, no. 3. November 11, 1987. p. 93. ProQuest 1286133538.
  265. ^ Dunlap, David W. (November 5, 1987). "5 More Broadway Theaters Classified as Landmarks". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on December 14, 2019. Retrieved October 29, 2021.
  266. ^ Dunlap, David W. (November 22, 1987). "The Region; The City Casts Its Theaters In Stone". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 16, 2021. Retrieved October 16, 2021.
  267. ^ Purdum, Todd S. (March 12, 1988). "28 Theaters Are Approved as Landmarks". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 20, 2021.
  268. ^ Dunlap, David W. (June 21, 1988). "Owners File Suit to Revoke Theaters' Landmark Status". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 29, 2021. Retrieved October 29, 2021.
  269. ^ Dunlap, David W. (May 27, 1992). "High Court Upholds Naming Of 22 Theaters as Landmarks". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 30, 2021. Retrieved October 29, 2021.
  270. ^ Rich, Frank (April 15, 1992). "Review/Theater: Guys and Dolls; Damon Runyon's New York Lives Anew". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  271. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 14, 1992). "Guys and Dolls – Broadway Musical – 1992 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Guys and Dolls (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1992)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  272. ^ "'Thing of Love' to Close". The New York Times. May 10, 1995. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  273. ^ The Broadway League (May 3, 1995). "My Thing Of Love – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
    "My Thing of Love (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1995)". Playbill. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  274. ^ a b c d e Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 177.
  275. ^ Canby, Vincent (October 2, 1995). "Theater Review; Carol Burnett, Game and Goofy, Opens the Season". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  276. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 1, 1995). "Moon Over Buffalo – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Moon Over Buffalo (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1995)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  277. ^ a b c d Jacobs, Leonard (October 10, 2002). "Martin Beck renamed Al Hirschfeld Theater". Back Stage. Vol. 43, no. 40. p. 2. ProQuest 221070346.
  278. ^ a b "Al Hirschfeld Theatre". EverGreene. July 8, 2021. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  279. ^ Brantley, Ben (December 6, 1996). "Disappearing, Reappearing, Still Smiling". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  280. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 5, 1996). "David Copperfield: Dreams and Nightmares – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "David Copperfield: Dreams and Nightmares (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1996)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  281. ^ Schaye, Kimberly; O'Haire, Patricia; McFarland, Stephen (March 27, 1997). "'Annie' has big night out". New York Daily News. p. 964. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  282. ^ Marks, Peter (March 27, 1997). "Orphan, Mongrel and Mogul Return". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  283. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 26, 1997). "Annie – Broadway Musical – 1997 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Annie (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1997)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  284. ^ Brantley, Ben (March 13, 1998). "Theater Review; Sweetness, Light and Lederhosen". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  285. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 12, 1998). "The Sound of Music – Broadway Musical – 1998 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The Sound of Music (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1998)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  286. ^ Winer, Linda (November 19, 1999). "Brushed-up Shakespeare and 'Kate' Still Darn Hot". Newsday. pp. 114, 115. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  287. ^ Mordden, Ethan (November 14, 1999). "Theater; Shakespeare And Cole Porter, Together Again". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  288. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 18, 1999). "Kiss Me, Kate – Broadway Musical – 1999 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Kiss Me, Kate (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1999)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  289. ^ "Pay Cut Saves 'Kiss Me, Kate'". The New York Times. September 24, 2001. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  290. ^ a b c d e "At This Theatre: Al Hirschfeld Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  291. ^ a b c The Broadway League (December 5, 2002). "Man of La Mancha – Broadway Musical – 2002 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Man of La Mancha (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 2002)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  292. ^ a b McKinley, Jesse (June 5, 2002). "The Musical 'Sweet Smell of Success' Is to Close". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  293. ^ a b Weber, Bruce (September 8, 2002). "The New Season/Theater; That Man From La Mancha". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  294. ^ McKinley, Jesse (September 26, 2002). "A Theater Gets A New Name: Al Hirschfeld". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 15, 2021.
  295. ^ a b Jacobs, Leonard (March 25, 2013). "Martin Beck Renamed Al Hirschfeld Theater". Back Stage. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  296. ^ Gussow, Mel (January 25, 2003). "Remembering Al Hirschfeld, The 'Line King' of Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 15, 2021.
  297. ^ a b Pogrebin, Robin (June 24, 2003). "A Theater Is Renamed for Al Hirschfeld". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 15, 2021.
  298. ^ Jones, Kenneth (June 23, 2003). "Stars Honor the Late 'Line King' June 23 When Bway's Beck Becomes The Hirschfeld". Playbill. Retrieved November 15, 2021.
  299. ^ a b "Broadway Salutes Al Hirschfeld at Unveiling of Caricaturist's New Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 19, 2022.
  300. ^ "Broadway recalls Al Hirschfeld—and names theater after him". Press and Sun-Bulletin. June 29, 2003. p. 59. Retrieved November 15, 2021.
  301. ^ Wasserstein, Wendy (November 23, 2003). "Theater; Betty Comden's Wonderful Hometown". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 15, 2021.
  302. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 23, 2003). "Wonderful Town – Broadway Musical – 2003 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Wonderful Town (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 2003)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  303. ^ McKinley, Jesse (November 5, 2004). "Theater Chain on Broadway May Be Sold to Its President". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  304. ^ Smith, Dinitia (February 17, 2005). "A New Owner for 5 Theaters on Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 15, 2021. Retrieved November 15, 2021.
  305. ^ McKinley, Jesse (October 28, 2005). "Arts, Briefly; Producer at Jujamcyn". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on December 23, 2021. Retrieved December 23, 2021.
  306. ^ Brantley, Ben (May 5, 2005). "'Sweet Charity,' After a Rocky Road, Finally Reaches Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  307. ^ a b The Broadway League (May 4, 2005). "Sweet Charity – Broadway Musical – 2005 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Sweet Charity (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 2005)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  308. ^ a b McGeehan, Patrick (August 6, 2006). "Theater District Will Get Taller, if Not Richer". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 4, 2022.
  309. ^ Brantley, Ben (April 28, 2006). "Something Borrowed, Something Renewed: The Return of the 80's in 'The Wedding Singer'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  310. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 27, 2006). "The Wedding Singer – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
    "The Wedding Singer (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 2006)". Playbill. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  311. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 22, 2007). "Curtains – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
    "Curtains (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 2007)". Playbill. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  312. ^ a b Robertson, Campbell (March 20, 2008). "'Curtains' to Close". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  313. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 18, 2008). "A Tale of Two Cities – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
    "A Tale of Two Cities (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 2008)". Playbill. August 19, 2008. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  314. ^ a b Itzkoff, Dave (November 5, 2008). "A Tale of Woe: 'Two Cities' to Close". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  315. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 31, 2009). "Hair – Broadway Musical – 2009 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
    "Hair (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 2009)". Playbill. March 6, 2009. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  316. ^ a b Healy, Patrick (June 10, 2010). "Broadway Is Losing Its 'Hair'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  317. ^ Cohen, Patricia (September 8, 2009). "A New Force on Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on December 23, 2021. Retrieved November 15, 2021.
  318. ^ Jones, Kenneth (January 22, 2013). "Jordan Roth Is Now Principal Owner of Broadway's Jujamcyn Theaters". Playbill. Archived from the original on April 1, 2019. Retrieved April 1, 2019.
  319. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 14, 2010). "Elf – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
    "Elf (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 2010)". Playbill. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  320. ^ a b Isherwood, Charles (November 15, 2010). "North Pole Naïf Tries to Thaw Hearts". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  321. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 27, 2011). "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying – Broadway Musical – 2011 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
    "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 2011)". Playbill. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  322. ^ a b Piepenburg, Erik (May 8, 2012). "'How to Succeed' Revival to Close". ArtsBeat. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  323. ^ a b The Broadway League (July 12, 2012). "Fela! – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
    "Fela! (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 2012)". Playbill. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  324. ^ a b Brantley, Ben (July 13, 2012). "Well-Traveled Revolutionary Returns". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  325. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 9, 2012). "Elf – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
    "Elf (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 2012)". Playbill. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  326. ^ a b Genzlinger, Neil (November 19, 2012). "Santa's Helper Seeks His Dad in Manhattan". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  327. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 4, 2013). "Kinky Boots – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
    "Kinky Boots (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 2013)". Playbill. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  328. ^ a b Brantley, Ben (April 5, 2013). "High Spirits, Higher Heels". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  329. ^ "'Kinky Boots' Ending Broadway Run After 5 Years – The Hollywood Reporter". The Hollywood Reporter. April 7, 2019. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  330. ^ "Kinky Boots Sets Closing Date on Broadway". Playbill. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  331. ^ a b The Broadway League (July 25, 2019). "Moulin Rouge! The Musical – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
    "Moulin Rouge! The Musical! (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 2019)". Playbill. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  332. ^ a b Brantley, Ben (July 26, 2019). "Review: 'Moulin Rouge! The Musical' Offers a Party, and a Playlist, for the Ages". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  333. ^ "Grosses - Broadway in NYC". The Broadway League. January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  334. ^ Paulson, Michael (March 12, 2020). "Broadway, Symbol of New York Resilience, Shuts Down Amid Virus Threat". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on September 16, 2021. Retrieved October 22, 2021.
  335. ^ Meyer, Dan (September 24, 2021). "Moulin Rouge! Reopens on Broadway September 24". Playbill. Retrieved November 15, 2021.
  336. ^ a b c d e f g h Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 23.
  337. ^ The Broadway League (September 12, 1928). "Night Hostess – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Night Hostess (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1928)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  338. ^ The Broadway League (September 13, 1929). "Porgy – Broadway Play – 1929 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Porgy (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1929)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  339. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 25.
  340. ^ The Broadway League (December 23, 1935). "Romeo and Juliet – Broadway Play – 1935 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Romeo and Juliet (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1935)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  341. ^ The Broadway League (February 8, 1938). "How to Get Tough About It – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "How to Get Tough About It (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1938)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  342. ^ The Broadway League (May 18, 1939). "Filling Station – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The Devil and Daniel Webster (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1939)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  343. ^ a b c d e f g Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 26.
  344. ^ The Broadway League (October 25, 1940). "Cabin in the Sky – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Cabin in the Sky (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1940)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  345. ^ The Broadway League (April 1, 1941). "Watch on the Rhine – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Watch on the Rhine (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1941)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  346. ^ The Broadway League (April 7, 1942). "The Moon Is Down – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The Moon Is Down (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1942)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  347. ^ The Broadway League (December 26, 1940). "My Sister Eileen – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "My Sister Eileen (Broadway, Samuel J. Friedman Theatre, 1940)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  348. ^ The Broadway League (May 3, 1943). "The Corn Is Green – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The Corn Is Green (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1943)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  349. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 173.
  350. ^ The Broadway League (February 21, 1946). "Jeb – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Jeb (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1946)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  351. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 27.
  352. ^ The Broadway League (March 30, 1946). "St. Louis Woman – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "St. Louis Woman (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1946)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  353. ^ The Broadway League (October 9, 1946). "The Iceman Cometh – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The Iceman Cometh (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1946)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  354. ^ The Broadway League (December 8, 1943). "The Voice of the Turtle – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The Voice of the Turtle (Broadway, Morosco Theatre, 1943)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  355. ^ The Broadway League (September 30, 1948). "Edward, My Son – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Edward, My Son (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1948)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  356. ^ The Broadway League (November 17, 1948). "Goodbye, My Fancy – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Goodbye, My Fancy (Broadway, Morosco Theatre, 1948)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  357. ^ The Broadway League (October 24, 1950). "The Curious Savage – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The Curious Savage (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1950)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  358. ^ a b c d e f g Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 28.
  359. ^ The Broadway League (February 20, 1952). "Mrs. McThing – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Mrs. McThing (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1952)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  360. ^ The Broadway League (March 29, 1956). "Mister Johnson – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Mister Johnson (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1956)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  361. ^ a b c d e f g Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 29.
  362. ^ The Broadway League (November 5, 1958). "Maria Golovin – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Maria Golovin (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1958)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  363. ^ The Broadway League (April 3, 1958). "Say, Darling – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Say, Darling (Broadway, August Wilson Theatre, 1958)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  364. ^ The Broadway League (April 3, 1961). "The Happiest Girl in the World – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The Happiest Girl in the World (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1961)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  365. ^ a b c d e f g h i Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 30.
  366. ^ The Broadway League (April 17, 1964). "Cafe Crown – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Cafe Crown (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1964)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  367. ^ The Broadway League (August 2, 1965). "Oliver! – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Oliver! (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1965)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  368. ^ The Broadway League (October 10, 1965). "Drat! The Cat! – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Drat! The Cat! (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1965)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  369. ^ The Broadway League (February 16, 1965). "Baker Street – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Baker Street (Broadway, Broadway Theatre, 1965)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  370. ^ The Broadway League (May 7, 1977). "Happy End – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Happy End (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1977)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  371. ^ The Broadway League (December 14, 1980). "Onward Victoria – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Onward Victoria (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1980)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  372. ^ a b c d e f g Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 32.
  373. ^ The Broadway League (March 5, 1981). "Bring Back Birdie – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Bring Back Birdie (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1981)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  374. ^ The Broadway League (April 13, 1983). "All's Well that Ends Well – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "All's Well That Ends Well (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1983)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  375. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 175.
  376. ^ The Broadway League (October 30, 1997). "The Cherry Orchard – Broadway Play – 1997 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The Cherry Orchard (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1997)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  377. ^ The Broadway League (November 19, 1997). "Eugene Onegin – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Eugene Onegin (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 1997)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  378. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 178.
  379. ^ The Broadway League (March 14, 2002). "Sweet Smell of Success – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Sweet Smell of Success (Broadway, Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 2002)". Playbill. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  380. ^ a b c Bloom 2007, p. 8.

SourcesEdit

External linksEdit