Music Box Theatre

The Music Box Theatre is a Broadway theater at 239 West 45th Street (George Abbott Way) in the Theater District of Midtown Manhattan in New York City. Opened in 1921, the Music Box Theatre was designed by C. Howard Crane in a Palladian-inspired style and was constructed for Irving Berlin and Sam H. Harris. It has about 1,000 seats across two levels and is operated by The Shubert Organization. Both the facade and the auditorium interior are New York City landmarks.

Music Box Theatre
Music Box Theater - Front (48193460267).jpg
Showing Dear Evan Hansen, July 2019
Address239 West 45th Street
Manhattan, New York City
United States
Coordinates40°45′31″N 73°59′14″W / 40.75861°N 73.98722°W / 40.75861; -73.98722Coordinates: 40°45′31″N 73°59′14″W / 40.75861°N 73.98722°W / 40.75861; -73.98722
OwnerShubert Organization
TypeBroadway
Capacity1,025 (including 35 in the orchestra pit)[1]
ProductionDear Evan Hansen
Construction
OpenedSeptember 1921
ArchitectC. Howard Crane
Website
Official website
DesignatedDecember 8, 1987[2]
Reference no.1359[2]
Designated entityFacade
DesignatedDecember 8, 1987[3]
Reference no.1360[3]
Designated entityAuditorium interior

The facade is made of limestone and is symmetrically arranged, with both Palladian and neo-Georgian motifs. At ground level, the eastern portion of the facade contains the theater's entrance, with a marquee over it, while the stage door is to the west. A double-height central colonnade, at the second and third floors, conceals a fire-escape staircase and are flanked by windows in the outer bays. The auditorium contains Adam style detailing, a large balcony, and two outwardly curved box seats within ornate archways. The theater was also designed with a comparatively small lobby, a lounge in the basement, and mezzanine-level offices.

Harris proposed the Music Box Theatre in 1919 specifically to host his productions with Berlin. The Shubert family gained an ownership stake shortly after the Music Box opened. In its first three years, the theater hosted the partners' Music Box Revue nearly exclusively; plays were not shown until 1925. Many of the Music Box's early productions were hits with several hundred performances, including multiple productions by Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman in the 1930s. After Harris died in 1940, Berlin and the Shuberts shared ownership of the theater, and the Music Box largely showed dramas rather than musicals. Though the length of production runs declined in later years, the Music Box has remained in theatrical use since its opening. The Shuberts acquired the Berlin estate's ownership stake in 2007.

SiteEdit

The Music Box Theatre is on 239 West 45th Street, on the north sidewalk between Eighth Avenue and Broadway, near Times Square in the Theater District of Midtown Manhattan in New York City.[4][5] The square land lot covers 10,050 square feet (934 m2).[5] The theater has a frontage of 100 feet (30 m) on 45th Street and a depth of about 100 feet.[5][6]

The surrounding block of 45th Street is also known as George Abbott Way,[7] and foot traffic on the street impacts box-office totals on the theaters there.[8] The Music Box shares the block with the Richard Rodgers Theatre and Imperial Theatre to the north, as well as the New York Marriott Marquis to the east. Other nearby buildings include the Paramount Hotel to the north; the Hotel Edison and Lunt-Fontanne Theatre to the northeast; One Astor Plaza to the southeast; the Gerald Schoenfeld, Booth, Shubert, and Broadhurst Theatres to the south; and the Majestic, Bernard B. Jacobs, and John Golden Theatres to the southwest.[5]

DesignEdit

The Music Box Theatre was designed by C. Howard Crane in a Palladian-inspired style and was constructed from 1920 to 1921 for Irving Berlin and Sam H. Harris.[4][9] The interior was decorated by Crane and William Baumgarten, with many Adam style details.[10][11][12] The Longacre Engineering and Construction Company built the theater, with M. X. C. Weinberger as consulting engineer. Numerous other contractors were involved in the theater's development.[11] The Music Box is operated by the Shubert Organization.[13][14]

FacadeEdit

Ground floor (west to east)
Fire escape (bronze gate)
Auditorium exits (three double doors)
Main entrance (four double doors)

The facade is made of limestone.[9][15] It is symmetrically arranged, though the theater is shorter than its width.[16] For the design of the facade, Crane drew from both Palladian and neo-Georgian motifs.[9][11] The facade's largest feature is a double-height central colonnade at the second and third floors.[11][15][16] According to theatrical historian Ken Bloom, the facade design was inspired by that of the Chestnut Street Theatre in Philadelphia.[12]

The easternmost side on 45th Street includes four pairs of glass and bronze doors leading to the ticket lobby. There are bronze sign boards on either side, and the entrance is topped by a marquee. Just west of the ticket-lobby entrance is a single doorway. The center of the ground story includes three pairs of glass and bronze doors from the auditorium. There are wood-and-glass sign boards on either side of the central doors, with colonettes on either side and sheet metal-wood pediments above them. A bronze fire-escape gate, accessed by two granite steps, and two wide sign boards are to the west of the center doors. The westernmost part of the facade contains a double door, a narrow sign board, and a single door.[17] These doors, adjacent to the Imperial Theatre's entrance, constitute the stage doors.[17][13] Above the ground floor is a horizontal band course with motifs of swags, urns, and vertical bars.[17]

At the second and third floors is a colonnade between a pair of outer bays. The colonnade has four fluted columns, which are topped by Corinthian-style decorative capitals. The auditorium facade is slightly recessed behind the colonnade, creating a gallery, which is shielded decorative iron railings between the columns.[17] The recessed gallery contains the auditorium's fire escape, with stairs leading down to ground level.[17][18] There are also three double doorways with stone surrounds, which exit onto the gallery. Above each doorway is a frieze with urns and swags; there is a triangular pediment in the outer doorways and scrolled pediment in the center doorway.[17] A pair of pilasters flanks each of the outer bays,[9][10] with Corinthian capitals atop each pilaster.[17] The second-floor window of each outer bay is a Palladian window,[16] which contains sash window panes. The tympanum is divided into three sections, with an arched tympanum above the center section. The third story has a rectangular sash window with a molded frame. A vertical sign hangs from the easternmost bay on the upper stories.[17]

The top of the facade has a frieze with rosette motifs, as well as a cornice with dentils and modillions.[17] Above the facade is a sloping slate roof with several projecting dormers for windows.[16] There is also a roof balustrade with cast-iron and wrought-iron railings.[17]

InteriorEdit

AuditoriumEdit

 
Auditorium as seen from balcony level, looking toward the left-hand box

The auditorium has an orchestra level, one balcony, boxes, and a stage behind the proscenium arch.[19] The auditorium is wider than its depth, and the space is designed with plaster decorations in high relief.[20] According to the Shubert Organization, the auditorium has 1,025 seats;[14] meanwhile, The Broadway League cites a capacity of 1,009 seats[21] and Playbill cites 984 seats.[13] The discrepancy arises from the fact that there are 1,009 physical seats and 16 standing-only spots. The physical seats are divided into 538 seats in the orchestra, 455 at the balcony, and 16 in the boxes. The orchestra seating includes 35 seats in the orchestra pit at the front of the stage.[14] The original color scheme was ivory and dark green.[10][22] The carpets and curtain were designed in a coral color.[11][18]

The rear (east) end of the orchestra contains a shallow promenade, and the orchestra level is raked. The rear wall of the promenade (corresponding with the orchestra's aisles) has doorways with Corinthian-style piers, above which is an entablature in the Adam style.[23] The north end of the promenade has a stair that rises to the balcony's foyer, as well as a double stair that leads down to a basement lounge.[24] Both stairs have Adam-style railings.[24] The orchestra and its promenade contain plasterwork panels on the walls. A standing rail is placed at the rear of the orchestra.[25] No boxes were installed at orchestra level per Harris and Berlin's request.[15][22]

The balcony level is raked and contains plasterwork panels on the walls. An Adam-style entablature runs above the top of the balcony wall, wrapping around to the tops of the boxes and proscenium. The balcony front curves outward and has vine and flower motifs, as well as medallions depicting female characters. Modern light boxes are in front of the balcony, and a technical booth is at the rear. The balcony's soffit, or underside, is divided into panels that contain plaster medallions with light fixtures, as well as air-conditioning vents.[25] The auditorium was originally lit by five-armed sconces on the walls, which were replaced in the 1960s with imitation brass sconces.[10] The original sconces were described in American Architect and Architecture as "Dutch brass with amber crystals".[15]

 
Box detail

On either side of the stage is an archway with a single box at the balcony level.[22] The boxes were described in American Architect as having "a very decided decorative charm to the motive of the proscenium treatment".[15][22] Each box is semicircular and is cantilevered from the wall; they are accessed from stair halls leading from the orchestra.[20] The boxes' archways are supported by six Corinthian columns, three on each side, and are additionally flanked by paired Corinthian pilasters.[23] Within each archway, the two center columns flank mirrored panels, which in turn are topped by broken pediments with urns.[24] The fronts of the boxes contain Adam-style metal railings,[26] originally ornamented in silver-gray.[15][22] An entablature rises above the box seats, topped by a half-dome with a pastoral mural.[27] These murals depict classical ruins.[24] The half-domes are flanked by spandrels with decorations of eagles spreading their wings.[23]

Next to the boxes is a flat proscenium arch.[19] The archway is flanked by fluted columns and pilasters in the Corinthian style. The top of the archways contains an entablature with Adam-style decorations of urns, vines, fans, and reeds.[23] The proscenium measures about 26 feet (7.9 m) high and 40 feet (12 m) wide.[14] Due to a lack of space backstage, a counterweight system was installed to lift sets and other objects onto the stage.[15] The ceiling contains Adam-style moldings and friezes, which divide it into sections. There are also air-conditioning vents in the ceiling,[24] and four chandeliers originally hung from it.[28] Above the front of the balcony is a wide circular medallion. The rear of the ceiling contains a cove that curves downward onto the wall, supported by modillions at the entablature of the wall.[24]

Other interior spacesEdit

The Music Box's rear promenade is accessed directly from the lobby,[15] a small room measuring 8 feet (2.4 m) wide and 25 feet (7.6 m) long.[29] The lobby was decorated as a simple space, with pink marble baseboards, marble walls, and a plaster cornice. The cornice was decorated with neo-Georgian ornaments. A bronze box-office booth was placed in the lobby.[18] The lobby has a box office because the theater had no dedicated box office when it opened.[30] The floor was made of alternating gray and pink marble tiles.[18] The lobby was separated from the auditorium itself by draped partitions, which removed the drafts that typically occurred behind the last row of seats.[15][18]

At the balcony level is a mezzanine. This level contained Berlin's studio, as well as ladies' retiring rooms, telephone rooms, and managers' offices. Berlin's studio was designed like an attic, with exposed ceiling rafters, as well as wainscoted walls and a stone fireplace mantel.[18]

 
Stair from the basement lounge to the foyer

Below the auditorium is a basement lounge. Its lavish design contrasted with the lounges of other Broadway theaters, which generally received little attention.[28] Architecture and Building magazine described the lounge as being in the Queen Anne style, "developed more as if in a dwelling than in a club or public place".[11] The staircase to the basement lounge is made of marble and contains an intermediate landing.[11][15][24] A tapestry is mounted on the stair landing.[11][18][24] The tapestry depicts a reclining figure of a nude woman next to a waterfall.[24] A mirrored panel was hung on the lounge's wall, opposite the tapestry. Siena marble fireplace mantels, with mirrors above them, were placed at each end of the lounge.[18] The basement also has the theater's restrooms.[13]

HistoryEdit

Times Square became the epicenter for large-scale theater productions between 1900 and the Great Depression.[31] During the 1900s and 1910s, many theaters in Midtown Manhattan were developed by the Shubert brothers, one of the major theatrical syndicates of the time.[32] Meanwhile, Sam H. Harris was a producer and Irving Berlin was a songwriter. Prior to the development of the Music Box Theatre, Harris had partnered with George Cohan in the development of several theaters and productions in the 1900s and 1910s.[33]

Development and early yearsEdit

Venue for revuesEdit

According to one account, the name for the Music Box Theatre arose from a conversation between Sam H. Harris and Irving Berlin in 1919. Harris had suggested building a theater, to which Berlin suggested the name "Music Box".[34][30] Harris liked the name and suggested that Berlin could write a song for the new theater.[30] In March 1920, Harris and Berlin bought the properties at 239 to 245 West 45th Street from L. and A. Pincus and M. L. Goldstone.[35][36][37] They then announced plans to build the Music Box Theatre on the site.[35][38] By that May, Crane had prepared plans for the theater.[6] Harris planned to stage twice-yearly revues,[39] and he subsequently ended his long-running partnership with George M. Cohan.[40] Hassard Short was named as the first general stage director,[41][42] spending over $240,000 on the first show.[9] The Music Box ultimately cost more than $1 million, $400,000 for the building itself and $600,000 for the land;[9][43] the theater overran its original budget by about $300,000.[44] The Music Box was one of the only Broadway theaters to be built for specific producers' work.[9][45]

The Music Box Theatre opened on September 22, 1921, with performances of Music Box Revue.[46][47][48] The new theater was praised by both architectural and theatrical critics, and several architectural publications printed pictures of the theater.[49] These included the American Architect and the Architectural Review, which called the theater's design "remarkable" both in design and layout.[15][49] The New-York Tribune called the facade "singularly successful in its expression of the interior",[18] while Architecture and Building said the "delicacy of domestic architecture" was fitting for the Music Box's design.[11][49] Among theatrical critics, Jack Lait referred to the Music Box as the "daintiest theatre in America" in Variety magazine.[48][49] Other reviewers said the theater was "unparalleled" in design and had "dignified architectural decorations" in contrast to other theaters.[49] The comedian Sam Bernard said simply, "It stinks from class."[50] In his autobiography, producer Moss Hart said that the Music Box was "everybody's dream of a theatre", enhancing the quality of the productions staged there.[51][52]

 
View of the auditorium

Film executive Joseph M. Schenck originally was a partner in the Music Box Theatre with Berlin and Harris,[9][53] though he transferred his stake to the Shubert brothers not long afterward.[9] For the first three years of its operation, the Music Box exclusively hosted the Music Box Revue.[54] The inaugural edition in 1921 starred Bernard and Berlin.[47][48][12] Three subsequent editions of the Music Box Revue were hosted in as many years, and each subsequent edition gradually declined in quality. Among the performers who appeared multiple times were the Brox Sisters, Clark and McCullough, Florence Moore, Grace Moore, Joseph Santley, and Ivy Sawyer.[12] One notable performance was the 1924 edition, which featured Fanny Brice of the Ziegfeld Follies.[12][55] Earl Carroll's Vanities was also staged in 1924, becoming the second production to be presented at the Music Box.[56][57] Its producer, Earl Carroll, was briefly jailed in November 1924 after showing "obscene" photos outside the Music Box.[58]

1920s and 1930s hit playsEdit

The comedy The Cradle Snatchers, with Humphrey Bogart, was the first play to be staged at the Music Box, opening in 1925.[43][54] With close to 500 performances, it was a hit.[59][60] More generally, of the productions staged in the Music Box in its first decade, only two flops with less than 100 performances were staged, both of which ran immediately after The Cradle Snatchers closed.[43] The first was Gentle Grafters in October 1926,[61][62] while the second was Mozart that November.[61][63] This was followed by the comedy Chicago, which premiered in late 1926 with Francine Larrimore and Charles Bickford,[54][64] and a run of the melodrama The Spider in 1927, which transferred from a neighboring theater.[43][65] By the end of 1927, Hassard Short had given up his stake in managing the Music Box.[66] The play Paris Bound also premiered in 1927,[54][67] followed the next year by the similarly named Paris with Irène Bordoni.[54][68] The last show in the 1920s was The Little Show,[54] which premiered in 1929.[69][70]

The Music Box staged the French play Topaze with Frank Morgan in 1930,[71][72] followed by the comedy The Third Little Show with Ernest Truex and Beatrice Lillie in 1931.[73][74] The theater largely hosted works by Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman, produced either individually or in partnership, during the 1930s. Immediately following Topaze was Hart and Kaufman's first-ever collaboration, Once in a Lifetime,[30][75] which premiered in late 1930.[76][77] Kaufman and Morrie Ryskind collaborated in 1931 for Of Thee I Sing,[78][79] the first Pulitzer Prize-winning musical,[73] and Kaufman joined Edna Ferber the next year to produce Dinner at Eight,[80][81] which ran 232 performances.[82][83] The next year, Berlin and Hart staged the revue As Thousands Cheer,[80][84] which with 400 performances was lengthy for a Great Depression-era musical.[82][85] Hart and Kaufman again partnered in 1934 for the play Merrily We Roll Along.[80][86]

Five plays were performed at the Music Box in 1935.[87] These were Rain,[88][89] Ceiling Zero,[90][91] If This Be Treason,[92][93] a theatrical version of Pride and Prejudice,[94][95] and finally Kaufman and Katharine Dayton's collaboration First Lady.[96][97] Kaufman and Ferber collaborated again in the 1936 production Stage Door.[80][98] This was followed the next year by a short run of Young Madam Conti with Constance Cummings,[99][100] as well as a Kaufman-directed adaptation of the John Steinbeck novel Of Mice and Men.[101][102] Two Hart and Kaufman productions were staged in 1938: a transfer of I'd Rather Be Right[103][104] and the original Sing Out the News.[104][105] The productions in 1939 began with the Noël Coward revue Set to Music,[106][107] following which was From Vienna, produced by the Refugee Artists Group.[108][109] The last hit of the 1930s was Hart and Kaufman's The Man Who Came to Dinner,[110][111] which had 739 performances through 1941.[108][112] Irving Berlin subsequently recalled that he and Harris had almost lost control of the otherwise financially-successful Music Box Theatre during the Depression.[30] In spite of this, all but three shows had at least 100 performances in the Music Box's first 25 years.[113]

1940s to 1970sEdit

 
Scaffolding over the entrance

The Music Box Theater underwent several changes in operation during the 1940s.[114] Sam Harris died in July 1941,[115][116][117] and his ownership stake in the theater went to his widow Kathleen Marin, pursuant to his will.[118] Additionally, independent producers began to lease the Music Box.[119] The theater also pivoted away from hosting revues and musicals because of its relatively low seating capacity; instead, it mainly hosted small dramas.[120] The burlesque revue Star and Garter opened in 1942,[114][121] eventually running 609 performances.[120][122] This was followed in 1944 by a 713-performance run of the comedy I Remember Mama,[123][124] which featured Marlon Brando in his Broadway debut.[114] Another major production in the 1940s was Summer and Smoke, which premiered in 1948.[114][125] The next year, the Music Box showed Lost in the Stars,[114][126] which was the last musical staged at the Music Box until the 1970s.[120]

The long-running comedy Affairs of State transferred to the Music Box from the Royale Theatre in 1950.[127][128] The same year, Marin sold her one-third ownership stake in the Music Box Theatre to Harris and the Shuberts.[129][130][a] In 1952, the Music Box staged a transfer of the hit The Male Animal.[132][133] The playwright William Inge had three highly successful plays during the 1950s,[134] all of which had over 400 performances.[135] First among these was Picnic, which opened in 1953.[134][136] This was followed by Bus Stop in 1955[137][138] and The Dark at the Top of the Stairs in 1957.[137][139] Besides Inge's productions, the Music Box hosted a transfer of The Solid Gold Cadillac in 1954,[140][141] as well as Separate Tables in 1956.[132][142] The decade ended with the 1959 plays Rashomon, featuring Claire Bloom and Rod Steiger,[143][144] and Five Finger Exercise, featuring Brian Bedford and Jessica Tandy.[143][145]

In 1961, the Music Box staged A Far Country, featuring Kim Stanley and Steven Hill.[146][147] The next year saw the opening of the comedy The Beauty Part with Bert Lahr,[143][148] which flopped during the city's newspaper strike despite critical acclaim.[149] The Music Box staged a more successful production, Dear Me, the Sky Is Falling with Gertrude Berg, the next year.[150][151] The theater's most successful play of the 1960s was the comedy Any Wednesday, which opened in 1964[147][152] and ran for 983 performances.[153][154] The decade's other hits included Harold Pinter's The Homecoming, which opened in 1967,[147][155] and There's a Girl in My Soup, which opened later that year.[147][156]

The British play Sleuth opened in 1970, featuring Keith Baxter and Anthony Quayle;[147][157] it became the theater's longest-running production with 1,222 performances.[153][158] When the Music Box celebrated its 50th anniversary the next year, the theater was still largely successful.[30][141] Berlin said at the time that he still held part-ownership in the Music Box for sentimental reasons.[30][113] In 1974, the theater staged its first musical in 25 years: Rainbow Jones,[120] which closed after its only performance.[159][160] It was followed the same year by the comparatively more successful Absurd Person Singular.[147][161] The Music Box staged a revival of Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? in 1976,[162][163] and it hosted a range of Stephen Sondheim songs in the musical Side by Side by Sondheim the next year.[164][165] The theater's last production of the 1970s was Deathtrap, which opened in 1978.[166] Deathtrap was ultimately transferred four years later and ran 1,793 total performances.[167][168]

1980s and 1990sEdit

 
Seen from the east

The Music Box had a major hit in the early 1980s with the religious drama Agnes of God, which premiered in 1982[169][170] and had 599 performances with Geraldine Page and Amanda Plummer.[171][172] By contrast, the theater mostly hosted flops during the mid-1980s.[173] The Music Box hosted a revival of Hay Fever in 1985,[174][175] followed the next year by a revival of Loot,[171][176] which was Alec Baldwin's first Broadway appearance.[177] In 1987, the Music Box staged Sweet Sue with Mary Tyler Moore,[171][178] as well as the Royal Shakespeare Company's hit production Les Liaisons Dangereuses.[164][179] This was followed by several short-lived productions,[173] including Mail[180][181] and Spoils of War in 1988,[182][183] as well as Welcome to the Club in 1989.[184][185] The decade ended with the hit A Few Good Men.[186][187] Irving Berlin continued to co-own the theater until he died in 1989 at the age of 101; in his final years, Berlin would contact the Shuberts to ask them about the theater's receipts.[188]

The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) had started to consider protecting the Music Box as a landmark in 1982,[189] with discussions continuing over the next several years.[190] The LPC designated the Music Box's facade and interior as a landmark in December 1987.[191][192] This was part of the commission's wide-ranging effort in 1987 to grant landmark status to Broadway theaters.[193] The New York City Board of Estimate ratified the designations in March 1988.[194] The Shuberts, the Nederlanders, and Jujamcyn collectively sued the LPC in June 1988 to overturn the landmark designations of 22 theaters, including the Music Box, on the merit that the designations severely limited the extent to which the theaters could be modified.[195] The lawsuit was escalated to the New York Supreme Court and the Supreme Court of the United States, but these designations were ultimately upheld in 1992.[196]

In the 1990s, the Music Box continued to have many relatively short runs.[173] The solo play Lucifer's Child with Julie Harris played a limited engagement in April 1991,[197][198] and Park Your Car in Harvard Yard opened the same year with Judith Ivey and Jason Robards.[199][200] The next year, the Music Box staged A Small Family Business, which ran for a little over one month.[201][202] A more successful production was Blood Brothers, opening in 1993[203] and running 893 performances over the next two years.[177][204][205] In addition, a plaque commemorating Irving Berlin was installed at the Music Box in 1994.[206] The musical Swinging on a Star opened in 1995.[207][208] The next year, the Music Box staged the musical State Fair,[209][210] the latter of which was the final Broadway show produced by David Merrick.[211] Subsequently, Barrymore ran 238 performances in 1997,[212][213] and The Diary of Anne Frank opened later that year, running through the next year with 221 performances.[214][215] Finally, the Music Box staged Closer in 1999, with 173 performances.[216][217]

2000s to presentEdit

 
The marquee as seen in 2012

The Music Box's tendency for short production runs continued into the 2000s.[173] A revival of the Shakespeare play Macbeth closed in June 2000 after 13 performances,[218][219] and a more successful production came later that year with The Dinner Party,[220][221] which ran 364 performances.[222] The 19th-century drama Fortune's Fool was staged in 2002,[173][223] as was short-lived comedy Amour.[224][225] The Music Box hosted Cat on a Hot Tin Roof in 2003[226][227] and Dame Edna: Back with a Vengeance in 2004,[228][229] as well as Antony Sher's solo Primo[230] and the musical In My Life in 2005.[231][232] These were followed in 2006 by Festen[233][234] and The Vertical Hour.[235][236] Meanwhile, the Shubert Organization continued to co-operate the theater with Berlin's estate.[131][237] The unusual arrangement, which led to jokes that the Shuberts owned sixteen and a half theaters, continued until 2007, when the Berlin estate sold its interest to the Shuberts.[131]

The Music Box's productions at the end of the 2000s included Deuce and The Farnsworth Invention in 2007; a transfer of the long-running August: Osage County from the Imperial Theatre in 2008; and Superior Donuts in 2009. This was followed by Lend Me a Tenor and La Bête in 2010; Jerusalem and Private Lives in 2011; and One Man, Two Guvnors and Dead Accounts in 2012.[13][21] The play Pippin opened in 2013 and ran for two years.[238][239] Further productions in the mid-2010s included The Heidi Chronicles and King Charles III in 2015, as well as Shuffle Along, or, the Making of the Musical Sensation of 1921 and All That Followed in 2016.[13] The Music Box has housed the musical Dear Evan Hansen ever since the production opened in December 2016.[240][241] The theater closed on March 12, 2020, due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[242] It will reopen on December 11, 2021, with performances of Dear Evan Hansen.[243]

Notable productionsEdit

Box office recordEdit

Dear Evan Hansen achieved the box office record for the Music Box Theatre. The production grossed $2,119,371 over the eight performances during the week ending December 31, 2017.[291] The same production had also achieved a record earlier in the year, making that record the highest gross for a Broadway house that seats under 1,000.[292]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Some sources have cited Harris's widow as having immediately sold the theater to the Berlins and Shuberts.[120][131]

CitationsEdit

  1. ^ "Music Box Theatre | Shubert Organization".
  2. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 1.
  3. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 1.
  4. ^ a b White, Norval; Willensky, Elliot & Leadon, Fran (2010). AIA Guide to New York City (5th ed.). New York: Oxford University Press. p. 298. ISBN 978-0-19538-386-7.
  5. ^ a b c d "239 West 45 Street, 10036". New York City Department of City Planning. Retrieved March 25, 2021.
  6. ^ a b "Contemplated Construction". The Real Estate Record: Real estate record and builders' guide. 105 (19): 622. May 9, 1920 – via columbia.edu.
  7. ^ Feirstein, Sanna (2001). Naming New York: Manhattan Places and How They Got Their Names. NYU Press. p. 119. ISBN 978-0-8147-2711-9.
  8. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 30.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 12.
  10. ^ a b c d Morrison 1999, p. 123.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i "The Music Box Theatre, New York". Architecture and Building. 53: 95. 1921.
  12. ^ a b c d e Bloom 2007, p. 178.
  13. ^ a b c d e f "Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 2, 2021.
  14. ^ a b c d "Music Box Theatre". Shubert Organization. December 4, 2016. Retrieved December 2, 2021.
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "The Music Box Theatre, West 45th Street". The American Architect-The Architectural Review. 121 (2386): 99. February 1, 1922 – via Internet Archive.
  16. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 17; Morrison 1999, p. 123.
  17. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 17.
  18. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Music Box Theater Paragon of Taste; A Model House". New-York Tribune. September 18, 1921. p. 48. Retrieved December 2, 2021.
  19. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 17.
  20. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, pp. 17–18.
  21. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 4, 2016). "Music Box Theatre – New York, NY". IBDB. Retrieved December 2, 2021.
  22. ^ a b c d e Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 13.
  23. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 18.
  24. ^ a b c d e f g h i Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 19.
  25. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, pp. 18–19.
  26. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 19; Morrison 1999, p. 124.
  27. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 18; Morrison 1999, p. 124.
  28. ^ a b Morrison 1999, p. 124.
  29. ^ "Fire Envelops Woman in Lobby of Theatre: Dropped Cigarette Ignites Gown of Playgoer at Music Box and She Is Badly Burned". The New York Times. February 29, 1936. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  30. ^ a b c d e f g Gussow, Mel (September 23, 1971). "The Music Box Theater Takes a Bow at 50". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 2, 2021.
  31. ^ Swift, Christopher (2018). "The City Performs: An Architectural History of NYC Theater". New York City College of Technology, City University of New York. Archived from the original on March 25, 2020. Retrieved March 25, 2020.
  32. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 4.
  33. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, pp. 7–8.
  34. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, pp. 11–12.
  35. ^ a b "Still Another Theatre; Times Square Section to Have a Beautiful "Music Box."". The New York Times. March 15, 1920. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 2, 2021.
  36. ^ "Harris-Berlin Theater". The Billboard. 32 (12): 29. March 20, 1920. ProQuest 1031594279.
  37. ^ "News of the Dailies". Variety. 58 (4): 21. March 19, 1920. ProQuest 1505587082.
  38. ^ "Drama Notes". New York Daily News. March 16, 1920. p. 12. Retrieved December 2, 2021.
  39. ^ "Sam H. Harris Will Try To Make the Music Box Second Weber & Fields". New-York Tribune. May 9, 1920. p. 39. Retrieved December 2, 2021.
  40. ^ "Cohan & Harris Firm Leaves Trail Of Stage Successes". New-York Tribune. July 1, 1920. p. 12. Retrieved December 2, 2021.
  41. ^ "The Stage Door". New-York Tribune. June 6, 1921. p. 6. ProQuest 576405904.
  42. ^ "To Manage Music Box Theater". The Billboard. 33 (24): 6. June 11, 2021. ProQuest 1031662911.
  43. ^ a b c d Toohey, John Peter (September 27, 1931). "The Music Box Stops to Count Up; With a Record of Only Two Failures in Ten Years, Broadway's Luckiest House Can Eat Its Birthday Cake and Have It, Too". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 2, 2021.
  44. ^ "Music Box Theatre, Expensively Built". Variety. 63 (9): 1. July 22, 1921. ProQuest 1475659165.
  45. ^ Collins, Glenn (December 23, 2005). "Dreaming of Irving Berlin in the Season That He Owned". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 4, 2021.
  46. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 178; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 147; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 12.
  47. ^ a b Hammond, Percy (September 23, 1921). "The New Play". New-York Tribune. p. 8. Retrieved December 2, 2021.
  48. ^ a b c Lait, Jack (September 30, 1921). "America's Greatest Show". Variety. 64 (6): 15. ProQuest 1475670513.
  49. ^ a b c d e Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 13.
  50. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 178; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 147.
  51. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 16.
  52. ^ Hart, Moss (1959). Act One: An Autobiography. New York: Random House. pp. 261–262. OCLC 898790423.
  53. ^ "Music Box Theatre, Expensively Built". Variety. 63 (9): 1. July 22, 1921. ProQuest 1475659165.
  54. ^ a b c d e f Bloom 2007, p. 178; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 147; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  55. ^ "Music Box Revue Filled With Beauty; Novelties in a Gorgeous Spectacle, With Irving Berlin's Beguiling Melodies". The New York Times. December 2, 1924. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 2, 2021.
  56. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 10, 1924). "Earl Carroll's Vanities [1924] – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Earl Carroll's Vanities of 1924 Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  57. ^ "News of Theaters". The New York Herald, New York Tribune. September 10, 1924. p. 12. ProQuest 1113158261.
  58. ^ "Carroll Accepts Freedom on Bail; After Four Days in the Tombs Producer Decides He Has Had Enough of Jail. (Published 1924)". November 4, 1924. Retrieved December 2, 2021.
  59. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 23.
  60. ^ The Broadway League (September 7, 1925). "Cradle Snatchers – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 2, 2021.
    "Cradle Snatchers Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 2, 2021.
  61. ^ a b c d e f Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 26.
  62. ^ The Broadway League (October 27, 1926). "Gentle Grafters – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
    "Gentle Grafters Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  63. ^ The Broadway League (November 22, 1926). "Mozart – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  64. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 30, 1926). "Chicago – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Chicago Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  65. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 147.
  66. ^ "Musical Comedy: Hassard Short In Shubert Fold". The Billboard. 39 (53): 27. December 31, 1927. ProQuest 1031853916.
  67. ^ The Broadway League (December 27, 1927). "Paris Bound – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
    "Paris Bound Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  68. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 8, 1928). "Paris – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Paris Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  69. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 30, 1929). "The Little Show – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "The Little Show Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  70. ^ "The Beginnings of 'The Little Show'". The New York Times. May 12, 1929. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  71. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 12, 1930). "Topaze – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Topaze Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  72. ^ a b Bloom 2007, pp. 178–179; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 147; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 24.
  73. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 179; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 147; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  74. ^ Barnes, Howard (June 2, 1931). "'The Third' Little Show: New Musical Revue Opens at the Music Box". New York Herald Tribune. p. 20. ProQuest 1114111856.
  75. ^ a b Bloom 2007, pp. 178–179; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 147; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  76. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 24, 1930). "Once in a Lifetime – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Once in a Lifetime Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  77. ^ "Theater News: 'Once in a Lifetime' Opens Tonight at the Music Box". New York Herald Tribune. September 24, 1930. p. 14. ProQuest 1113663535.
  78. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 26, 1931). "Of Thee I Sing – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Of Thee I Sing Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  79. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 8; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 24.
  80. ^ a b c d Bloom 2007, p. 179; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 148; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  81. ^ "Dinner at Eight-thirty; Tracing the Course of a New Hit, From Idea to the Music Box's Stage". The New York Times. October 30, 1932. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  82. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 148.
  83. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 22, 1932). "Dinner at Eight – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Dinner at Eight Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  84. ^ "Theatrical Notes". The New York Times. September 30, 1933. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  85. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 30, 1933). "As Thousands Cheer – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "As Thousands Cheer Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  86. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 29, 1934). "Merrily We Roll Along – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Merrily We Roll Along Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  87. ^ a b c d e f Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 148; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 25.
  88. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 12, 1935). "Rain – Broadway Play – 1935 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Rain Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  89. ^ "News of the Theaters: Miss Bankhead to Revive 'rain' Tonight; Holiday Matinees the Rule Today Bert Lahr". New York Herald Tribune. February 12, 1935. p. 17. ProQuest 1221678503.
  90. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 10, 1935). "Ceiling Zero – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Ceiling Zero Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  91. ^ "News of the Theaters: 'Ceiling Zero,' Melodrama With Aviation Background, Is Opening for Tonight Philip Merivale". New York Herald Tribune. April 10, 1935. p. 12. ProQuest 1221580800.
  92. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 23, 1935). "If This Be Treason – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "If This Be Treason Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  93. ^ "Japanese Actors Almost Hold Up New Guild Play: Finally Assured Roles Will Not Offend Emperor". New York Herald Tribune. September 25, 1935. p. 15. ProQuest 1329625496.
  94. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 5, 1935). "Pride and Prejudice – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  95. ^ "'Pride and 'Prejudice' Is Opening for Tonight; 'Libel' in Rehearsal Margaret Rawlings". New York Herald Tribune. November 5, 1935. p. 16. ProQuest 1222060180.
  96. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 26, 1935). "First Lady – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "First Lady Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  97. ^ "The Openings". The New York Times. November 24, 1935. p. X1. ISSN 0362-4331. ProQuest 101266974.
  98. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 22, 1936). "Stage Door – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Stage Door Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  99. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 149; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 25.
  100. ^ The Broadway League (March 31, 1937). "Young Madame Conti – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
    "Young Madame Conti Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  101. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 179; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 149; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 25.
  102. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 23, 1937). "Of Mice and Men – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Of Mice and Men Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  103. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 2, 1937). "I'd Rather Be Right – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "I'd Rather Be Right Broadway @ Alvin Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  104. ^ a b c Bloom 2007, p. 179; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 149; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 26.
  105. ^ The Broadway League (September 24, 1938). "Sing Out the News – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
    "Sing Out the News Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  106. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 18, 1939). "Set to Music – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Set to Music Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  107. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 179; Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 149–150; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 26.
  108. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 150; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 26.
  109. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (June 21, 1939). "The Play in Review; Refugee Artists' Group Gives Initial Performance of a Revue Under the Title of 'From Vienna' at the Music Box Theatre". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  110. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 179; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 150; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  111. ^ "' Man Who Came to Dinner' Says Farewell Tonight -- Ingrid Bergman Slated for Maplewood Sept. 1". The New York Times. July 12, 1941. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  112. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 16, 1939). "The Man Who Came to Dinner – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "The Man Who Came to Dinner Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  113. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 14.
  114. ^ a b c d e Bloom 2007, p. 180; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 150; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  115. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 150; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  116. ^ "Sam Harris Dies; Noted Producer". The New York Times. July 4, 1941. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  117. ^ "Sam H. Harris, 69, Theatrical Producer, Dies: Contracted Pneumonia After Operation; Won Success Willi George M. Cohan". New York Herald Tribune. July 4, 1941. p. 8. ProQuest 1257838526.
  118. ^ "Sam H. Harris Left Estate to His Widow; 3 Actor Groups and 2 Orphans' Homes Get $2,500 Each". The New York Times. July 9, 1941. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  119. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  120. ^ a b c d e Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 150.
  121. ^ L.n (June 25, 1942). "' Star and' Garter,' Burlesque With Bobby Clark and Gypsy Rose Lee Heading Cast, Has Premiere at the Music Box". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  122. ^ a b The Broadway League (June 24, 1942). "Star and Garter – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Star and Garter Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  123. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 19, 1944). "I Remember Mama – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "I Remember Mama Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  124. ^ Zolotow, Sam (June 18, 1946). "'Remember Mama' Closing on June 29; Van Druten Play on Forbes' Novel to Leave Music Box After 713 Performances". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  125. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 6, 1948). "Summer and Smoke – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Summer and Smoke Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  126. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 30, 1949). "Lost in the Stars – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Lost in the Stars Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  127. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 25, 1950). "Affairs of State – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Affairs of State Broadway @ Royale Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  128. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 150; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 28.
  129. ^ Calta, Louis (March 7, 1950). "Settlement Seen in Shuberts Suit; Possibility of 'Consent Decree' in U.S. Anti-Trust Action Indicated by Both Sides Form Used on Films Aims to Buy Theatre Sells Share in Theatre". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  130. ^ Walker, Danton (March 6, 1950). "Broadway". New York Daily News. p. 36. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  131. ^ a b c "New York Notes". Poughkeepsie Journal. August 10, 2007. p. 17. Retrieved December 4, 2021.
  132. ^ a b c d Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 151; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 28.
  133. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 30, 1952). "The Male Animal – Broadway Play – 1952 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "The Male Animal Broadway @ City Center". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  134. ^ a b c Bloom 2007, p. 180; Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 150–151; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  135. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 28.
  136. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 19, 1953). "Picnic – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Picnic Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  137. ^ a b c d Bloom 2007, p. 180; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 151; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  138. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 2, 1955). "Bus Stop – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Bus Stop Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  139. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 5, 1957). "The Dark at the Top of the Stairs – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "The Dark at the Top of the Stairs Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  140. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 5, 1953). "The Solid Gold Cadillac – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "The Solid Gold Cadillac Broadway @ Belasco Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  141. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 151.
  142. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 25, 1956). "Separate Tables – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Separate Tables Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  143. ^ a b c d e f Bloom 2007, p. 180; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 151; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 29.
  144. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 27, 1959). "Rashomon – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Rashomon Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  145. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 2, 1959). "Five Finger Exercise – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Five Finger Exercise Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  146. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 4, 1961). "A Far Country – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "A Far Country Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  147. ^ a b c d e f Bloom 2007, p. 180; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 151; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 16.
  148. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 26, 1962). "The Beauty Part – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "The Beauty Part Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  149. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 180.
  150. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 151; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 29.
  151. ^ The Broadway League (March 2, 1963). "Dear Me, The Sky is Falling – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
    "Dear Me, the Sky Is Falling Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  152. ^ "The Theater: 'Any Wednesday' Opens; Muriel Resnik Comedy at the Music Box". The New York Times. February 19, 1964. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  153. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 151; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 30.
  154. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 18, 1964). "Any Wednesday – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Any Wednesday Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  155. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 5, 1967). "The Homecoming – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "The Homecoming Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  156. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 18, 1967). "There's a Girl in My Soup – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "There's a Girl in My Soup Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  157. ^ "The Openings". The New York Times. November 8, 1970. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  158. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 12, 1970). "Sleuth – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Sleuth Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  159. ^ a b c d e Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 31.
  160. ^ The Broadway League (February 13, 1974). "Rainbow Jones – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
    "Rainbow Jones Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  161. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 8, 1974). "Absurd Person Singular – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Absurd Person Singular Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  162. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 1, 1976). "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? – Broadway Play – 1976 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  163. ^ a b Bloom 2007, pp. 180–181; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 151; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 16.
  164. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 181; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 151; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 16.
  165. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 18, 1977). "Side by Side by Sondheim – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Side by Side by Sondheim Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  166. ^ Hoge, Warren (February 26, 1978). "The Last of the 'Gentleman' Producers?; 'Deathtrap' is the first thriller for de Liagre since 'Mr. and Mrs. North' in 1941". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  167. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 181; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 151; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 31.
  168. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 26, 1978). "Deathtrap – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Deathtrap Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  169. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 181; Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 151–153; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 16.
  170. ^ Rich, Frank (March 31, 1982). "Stage: 'Agnes of God,' in a Convent". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  171. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 153; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 31.
  172. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 30, 1982). "Agnes of God – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Agnes of God Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  173. ^ a b c d e f Bloom 2007, p. 181.
  174. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 153; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 16.
  175. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 12, 1985). "Hay Fever – Broadway Play – 1985 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Hay Fever Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  176. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 7, 1986). "Loot – Broadway Play – 1986 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Loot Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  177. ^ a b c d e Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 153.
  178. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 8, 1987). "Sweet Sue – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Sweet Sue Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  179. ^ a b c d e f Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 32.
  180. ^ "'Mail' to Close Saturday". The New York Times. May 11, 1988. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  181. ^ The Broadway League (April 14, 1988). "Mail – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  182. ^ "'Spoils of War' to Close". The New York Times. December 5, 1988. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  183. ^ The Broadway League (November 10, 1988). "Spoils of War – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  184. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 13, 1989). "Welcome to the Club – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Welcome to the Club Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  185. ^ "'Welcome' Closes Tonight". The New York Times. April 15, 1989. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  186. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 15, 1989). "A Few Good Men – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "A Few Good Men Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  187. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 181; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 153.
  188. ^ Berger, Marilyn (September 23, 1989). "Irving Berlin, Nation's Songwriter, Dies". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 4, 2021.
  189. ^ Dunlap, David W. (October 20, 1982). "Landmark Status Sought for Theaters". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 29, 2021. Retrieved October 29, 2021.
  190. ^ Shepard, Joan (August 28, 1985). "Is the final curtain near?". New York Daily News. pp. 462, 464. Archived from the original on September 21, 2021. Retrieved September 16, 2021.
  191. ^ Dunlap, David W. (December 14, 1987). "7 Theaters Become Landmarks; Owners Plan Appeal". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on September 17, 2021. Retrieved November 2, 2021.
  192. ^ "Legitimate: N.Y.C. Landmarks 7; Owners Don't Like It". Variety. 329 (8): 85. December 16, 1987. ProQuest 1438478876.
  193. ^ Dunlap, David W. (November 22, 1987). "The Region; The City Casts Its Theaters In Stone". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 16, 2021. Retrieved October 16, 2021.
  194. ^ Purdum, Todd S. (March 12, 1988). "28 Theaters Are Approved as Landmarks". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 20, 2021.
  195. ^ Dunlap, David W. (June 21, 1988). "Owners File Suit to Revoke Theaters' Landmark Status". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 29, 2021. Retrieved October 29, 2021.
  196. ^ Dunlap, David W. (May 27, 1992). "High Court Upholds Naming Of 22 Theaters as Landmarks". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 30, 2021. Retrieved October 29, 2021.
  197. ^ "'Lucifer's Child' to Close". The New York Times. April 24, 1991. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  198. ^ The Broadway League (April 4, 1991). "Lucifer's Child – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
    "Lucifer's Child Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  199. ^ Rich, Frank (November 8, 1991). "Review/Theater; Robards and Ivey As Head and Heart". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  200. ^ The Broadway League (November 7, 1991). "Park Your Car in Harvard Yard – Broadway Show – Play". IBDB. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  201. ^ "'Family Business' to Close". The New York Times. June 2, 1992. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 4, 2021.
  202. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 27, 1992). "A Small Family Business – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "A Small Family Business Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  203. ^ Nightingale, Benedict (April 18, 1993). "Theater; They May Be 'Blood Brothers' But Class Will Tell". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 4, 2021.
  204. ^ "'Blood Brothers' Closing". The New York Times. April 13, 1995. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 4, 2021.
  205. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 25, 1993). "Blood Brothers – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Blood Brothers Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  206. ^ "In Focus: Music Box Theatre Gets Berlin Plaque". Back Stage. 35 (48): 2. December 9, 1994. ProQuest 963001402.
  207. ^ "On a Star' Is Closing". The New York Times. January 11, 1996. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 4, 2021.
  208. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 22, 1995). "Swinging on a Star – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Swinging on a Star Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  209. ^ "State Fair' Closing". The New York Times. June 27, 1996. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 4, 2021.
  210. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 27, 1996). "State Fair – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "State Fair Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  211. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 153–154.
  212. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 25, 1997). "Barrymore – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Barrymore Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  213. ^ a b c d e Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 154.
  214. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 4, 1997). "The Diary of Anne Frank – Broadway Play – 1997 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "The Diary of Anne Frank Broadway @ Music Box Theatre | Playbill". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  215. ^ "'Anne Frank' Is to Close". The New York Times. June 11, 1998. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 4, 2021.
  216. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 25, 1999). "Closer – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Closer Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  217. ^ "'Closer' to Close". The New York Times. August 19, 1999. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 4, 2021.
  218. ^ a b The Broadway League (June 15, 2000). "Macbeth – Broadway Play – 2000 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Macbeth Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  219. ^ a b McKinley, Jesse (June 20, 2000). "'Macbeth' Will Close After Just 10 Days on Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 4, 2021.
  220. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 181; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 154.
  221. ^ Brantley, Ben (October 20, 2000). "Theater Review; A Fine Meal: Please Pass The Vitriol". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 4, 2021.
  222. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 19, 2000). "The Dinner Party – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "The Dinner Party Broadway @ Music Box Theatre | Playbill". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  223. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 2, 2002). "Fortune's Fool – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Fortune's Fool Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  224. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 20, 2002). "Amour – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Amour Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  225. ^ a b "'Amour' to Close Sunday". The New York Times. October 30, 2002. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 4, 2021.
  226. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 2, 2003). "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof – Broadway Play – 2003 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  227. ^ a b Brantley, Ben (November 3, 2003). "Theater Review; Big Daddy's Ego Defies Death and His Family". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 4, 2021.
  228. ^ The Broadway League (November 21, 2004). "Dame Edna: Back with a Vengeance – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 4, 2021.
    "Dame Edna: Back with a Vengeance Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 4, 2021.
  229. ^ Brantley, Ben (November 22, 2004). "Insult Alert: Duck if You Can, Possums". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 4, 2021.
  230. ^ Brantley, Ben (July 12, 2005). "Crystallizing Legacy of Auschwitz Survivor". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 4, 2021.
  231. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 20, 2005). "In My Life – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "In My Life Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  232. ^ a b McKinley, Jesse (December 3, 2005). "Arts, Briefly; 'In My Life' to Close". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 4, 2021.
  233. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 9, 2006). "Festen – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Festen Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  234. ^ a b McKinley, Jesse (April 2, 2006). "Rufus Norris Brings 'Festen,' a Danish Drama, to Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 4, 2021.
  235. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 30, 2006). "The Vertical Hour – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "The Vertical Hour Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  236. ^ a b Robertson, Campbell (February 7, 2007). "Manhattan: 'Vertical Hour' to Close Early". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 4, 2021.
  237. ^ Marks, Peter (September 18, 1996). "2 Presidents At Shubert, But Just One Chairman". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 4, 2021.
  238. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 25, 2013). "Pippin – Broadway Musical – 2013 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Pippin Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  239. ^ a b Piepenburg, Erik (November 3, 2014). "'Pippin' to Close on Broadway". ArtsBeat. Retrieved December 4, 2021.
  240. ^ Clement, Olivia (December 4, 2016). "Dear Evan Hansen Opens on Broadway December 4". Playbill. Retrieved December 4, 2021.
  241. ^ a b Isherwood, Charles (December 5, 2016). "Review: In 'Dear Evan Hansen,' a Lonely Teenager, a Viral Lie and a Breakout Star". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 4, 2021.
  242. ^ Paulson, Michael (March 12, 2020). "Broadway, Symbol of New York Resilience, Shuts Down Amid Virus Threat". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on September 16, 2021. Retrieved October 22, 2021.
  243. ^ Gans, Andrew (May 13, 2021). "Dear Evan Hansen Sets Reopening Date at Broadway's Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved October 28, 2021.
  244. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 24.
  245. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 25.
  246. ^ The Broadway League (October 28, 1941). "The Land Is Bright – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "The Land Is Bright Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  247. ^ The Broadway League (March 10, 1942). "A Kiss for Cinderella – Broadway Play – 1942 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "A Kiss for Cinderella Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  248. ^ The Broadway League (January 3, 1944). "Over 21 – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Over 21 Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  249. ^ a b c d e f g h Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 27.
  250. ^ The Broadway League (September 5, 1946). "A Flag Is Born – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "A Flag Is Born Broadway @ Alvin Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  251. ^ The Broadway League (March 2, 1948). "The Linden Tree – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "The Linden Tree Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  252. ^ The Broadway League (February 16, 1949). "They Knew What They Wanted – Broadway Play – 1949 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "They Knew What They Wanted Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  253. ^ The Broadway League (May 4, 1949). "Mrs. Gibbons' Boys – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Mrs. Gibbons' Boys Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  254. ^ The Broadway League (September 18, 1950). "Daphne Laureola – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Daphne Laureola Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  255. ^ The Broadway League (May 1, 1952). "Much Ado About Nothing – Broadway Play – 1952 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Much Ado About Nothing Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  256. ^ The Broadway League (February 16, 1956). "The Ponder Heart – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "The Ponder Heart Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  257. ^ The Broadway League (October 3, 1957). "Miss Lonelyhearts – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Miss Lonelyhearts Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  258. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 29.
  259. ^ The Broadway League (November 30, 1961). "Daughter of Silence – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Daughter of Silence Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  260. ^ The Broadway League (October 7, 1963). "Semi-Detached – Broadway Play – 1963 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Semi-Detached Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  261. ^ a b c d e f Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 30.
  262. ^ The Broadway League (February 2, 1966). "Wait Until Dark – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Wait Until Dark Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  263. ^ The Broadway League (July 25, 1968). "Lovers – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Lovers Broadway @ Vivian Beaumont Theater". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  264. ^ The Broadway League (January 13, 1969). "Harkness Ballet – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Harkness Ballet Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  265. ^ The Broadway League (March 12, 1969). "The Watering Place – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "The Watering Place Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  266. ^ The Broadway League (October 25, 1973). "Veronica's Room – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Veronica's Room Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  267. ^ The Broadway League (November 28, 1976). "Comedians – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Comedians Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  268. ^ The Broadway League (January 29, 1984). "Open Admissions – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Open Admissions Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  269. ^ The Broadway League (March 5, 1985). "The Octette Bridge Club – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "The Octette Bridge Club Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  270. ^ The Broadway League (April 30, 1987). "Les Liaisons Dangereuses – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Les Liaisons Dangereuses Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  271. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 181; Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 153–154.
  272. ^ The Broadway League (December 15, 1999). "Amadeus – Broadway Play – 1999 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Amadeus Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  273. ^ The Broadway League (May 6, 2007). "Deuce – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Deuce Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  274. ^ Brantley, Ben (May 7, 2007). "Misty Watercolor Memories, Anyone?". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 4, 2021.
  275. ^ The Broadway League (December 3, 2007). "The Farnsworth Invention – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "The Farnsworth Invention Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  276. ^ Brantley, Ben (December 4, 2007). "A Farm Boy and a Mogul, and How They Changed the World". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 4, 2021.
  277. ^ The Broadway League (December 4, 2007). "August: Osage County – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "August: Osage County Broadway @ Imperial Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  278. ^ Itzkoff, Dave (June 17, 2009). "Final Curtain for 'August: Osage County'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 4, 2021.
  279. ^ The Broadway League (October 1, 2009). "Superior Donuts – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Superior Donuts Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  280. ^ Healy, Patrick (November 27, 2009). "'Superior Donuts' to Close". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 4, 2021.
  281. ^ The Broadway League (April 4, 2010). "Lend Me a Tenor – Broadway Play – 2010 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Lend Me a Tenor Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  282. ^ The Broadway League (October 14, 2010). "La Bête – Broadway Play – 2010 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "La Bête Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  283. ^ The Broadway League (April 21, 2011). "Jerusalem – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Jerusalem Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  284. ^ The Broadway League (November 17, 2011). "Private Lives – Broadway Play – 2011 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Private Lives Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  285. ^ The Broadway League (April 18, 2012). "One Man, Two Guvnors – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "One Man, Two Guvnors Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  286. ^ The Broadway League (November 29, 2012). "Dead Accounts – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Dead Accounts Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  287. ^ The Broadway League (March 19, 2015). "The Heidi Chronicles – Broadway Play – 2015 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "The Heidi Chronicles Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  288. ^ The Broadway League (November 1, 2015). "King Charles III – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "King Charles III Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  289. ^ The Broadway League (April 28, 2016). "Shuffle Along, Or The Making of the Musical Sensation of 1921 and All That Followed – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Shuffle Along, or the Making of the Musical Sensation of 1921 and All That Followed Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  290. ^ The Broadway League (December 4, 2016). "Dear Evan Hansen – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "Dear Evan Hansen Broadway @ Music Box Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  291. ^ "Production Gross". Playbill. March 11, 2018. Retrieved December 4, 2021.
  292. ^ "Grosses Analysis: New Tony Winner Dear Evan Hansen Breaks Box-Office Record". BroadwayWorld. July 10, 2017. Retrieved July 10, 2017.

SourcesEdit

External linksEdit