May 1924

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The following events occurred in May 1924:

May 1, 1924 (Thursday)Edit

May 2, 1924 (Friday)Edit

May 3, 1924 (Saturday)Edit

  • In Argentina, 150,000 workers participated in a general strike protesting the paying of 5 percent of their wages into a fund for old-age pensions.[3]
  • The "Bozenhardt incident" occurred in Berlin when German police raided the Soviet Trade Delegation.[4][5][6]

May 4, 1924 (Sunday)Edit

May 5, 1924 (Monday)Edit

May 6, 1924 (Tuesday)Edit

May 7, 1924 (Wednesday)Edit

  • 300,000 miners went on strike in the Ruhr region of Germany over working hours.[13]
  • The first issue of Liberty magazine, with a cover date of May 10, appeared on newsstands.[14]
  • Died: Dimitar Blagoev, 67, Bulgarian political leader

May 8, 1924 (Thursday)Edit

May 9, 1924 (Friday)Edit

May 10, 1924 (Saturday)Edit

May 11, 1924 (Sunday)Edit

May 12, 1924 (Monday)Edit

May 13, 1924 (Tuesday)Edit

May 14, 1924 (Wednesday)Edit

  • In Springfield, Massachusetts, the Methodist general conference committee voted 76 to 37 to recommend to the conference that the Methodist church never again as an organization participate in any kind of warfare under any circumstances, not even self-defense. An amendment to make an exception for wars to save the country and help humanity was tabled.[26]

May 15, 1924 (Thursday)Edit

May 16, 1924 (Friday)Edit

  • A Labour government bill to nationalize Britain's coal mining industry was defeated 264 to 168 when the Liberals refused to support it. It was first attempt by the Ramsay MacDonald government to introduce truly socialist legislation.[28]
  • Born: Dawda Jawara, 1st President of the Gambia, in Barajally, Gambia (d. 2019)

May 17, 1924 (Saturday)Edit

May 18, 1924 (Sunday)Edit

May 19, 1924 (Monday)Edit

May 20, 1924 (Tuesday)Edit

  • Over a million radio listeners in the United Kingdom listened in on an experimental broadcast from a garden in Surrey in which a nightingale's song was picked up by a microphone concealed in a bush. Cellist Beatrice Harrison played a few soft notes in the garden until the nightingale joined in.[33] It has since been suggested, however, that the "nightingale" was actually the work of a bird impressionist.[34]

May 21, 1924 (Wednesday)Edit

  • Many were wounded in Gelsenkirchen during rioting over the Ruhr miners' strike. Belgian troops and German police fought a mob trying to prevent emergency employees from working in the mines.[35]
  • Fourteen-year-old Bobby Franks, son of the millionaire head of a watch manufacturer, disappeared while walking home from school in the Kenwood area of Chicago.[36][37]
  • Babe Ruth joined the New York Guard.

May 22, 1924 (Thursday)Edit

May 23, 1924 (Friday)Edit

  • French authorities notified owners of mines in the Ruhr that occupying forces would seize their coal if the strike continued.[40]

May 24, 1924 (Saturday)Edit

May 25, 1924 (Sunday)Edit

  • Beulah Annan was acquitted of murder in her sensationalized trial in Chicago.[42]

May 26, 1924 (Monday)Edit

  • The United States enacted the Immigration Act of 1924.
  • The Cabinet of German Chancellor Wilhelm Marx resigned as he failed to form a new government.[43]
  • Canada explained why it was defying the British government's wishes by refusing to ratify the Treaty of Lausanne until it was submitted to Parliament for a vote on it, saying Canada had not been invited to the conference that drafted it.[44]
  • Died: Victor Herbert, 65, Irish-born, German-raised American composer and conductor

May 27, 1924 (Tuesday)Edit

May 28, 1924 (Wednesday)Edit

May 29, 1924 (Thursday)Edit

May 30, 1924 (Friday)Edit

  • Italian socialist politician Giacomo Matteotti made an impassioned speech criticizing the way the election of the previous month had been conducted and saying it had no validity due to the Fascist tactics of intimidating voters and candidates.[53] His speech was shouted down by Fascists with cries such as "villain" and "traitor".[54]
  • Born: Turk Lown, baseball player, in Brooklyn, New York

May 31, 1924 (Saturday)Edit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Seldes, George (May 2, 1924). "8 Killed, Many Hurt in German May Day Riots". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  2. ^ "Coolidge Aims Arms Embargo at Cuba Revolt". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 3, 1924. p. 3.
  3. ^ White, John (May 4, 1924). "Strike Against Pension Law is On in Argentina". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 4.
  4. ^ Jacobson, Jon. When the Soviet Union Entered World Politics. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press. p. 311. ISBN 0-520-08332-6.
  5. ^ Seldes, George (May 4, 1924). "Russ Embassy Raided in Berlin so Envoy Quits". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  6. ^ Rosenbaum, Kurt (1965). Community of fate: German-Soviet diplomatic relations, 1922–1928. Syracuse University Press. pp. 87–88.
  7. ^ Jablonsky, David (1989). The Nazi Party in Dissolution: Hitler and the Verbotzeit 1923-25. Frank Cass and Company Limited. pp. 85–86. ISBN 0-7146-3322-4.
  8. ^ "Russian Envoy Delays Plan to Leave Germany". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 5, 1924. p. 16.
  9. ^ "Cuban Revolution Spreads to Eastern Provinces". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 6, 1924. p. 3.
  10. ^ "Russia Stops German Trade; Shuts Offices". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 7, 1924. p. 16.
  11. ^ "Wigan RL History – 1923-24 Season". Cherry & White. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  12. ^ "British General Strike Affects Twenty Million Workers in Many Trades". Nashua Telegraph. Nashua, New Hampshire: 4. May 3, 1926.
  13. ^ Seldes, George (May 8, 1924). "300,000 Idle in Ruhr as Miners Strike". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  14. ^ "First Issue of Liberty, New Magazine, Out". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 8, 1924. p. 1.
  15. ^ Rue, Larry (May 9, 1924). "Lack of Leader Dooms Revolt of Cuban Army". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 4.
  16. ^ Henning, Arthur Sears (May 10, 1924). "Override Coolidge Jap Plea". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  17. ^ Sheean, Vincent (May 10, 1924). "Parliament in Uproar as Scots Ask Home Rule". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 14.
  18. ^ Matheson, Roderick (May 11, 1924). "Riots Rage as Japs Vote; U S Act Stirs Ire". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  19. ^ a b "Five Men, Buried 80 Hours, Rescued from Iron Mine Tomb". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 14, 1924. p. 1.
  20. ^ Schumann, Dirk (2012). Political Violence in the Weimar Republic, 1918–1933. Berghahn Books. pp. 145–149. ISBN 978-1-84545-460-9.
  21. ^ a b c "The 1924 explosions of Kilauea". United States Geological Survey. July 23, 2001. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  22. ^ Wales, Henry (May 13, 1924). "Poincaré Beaten, to Get Out". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  23. ^ "Racing History Highlights – Mau 8-21". EquiSearch. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  24. ^ a b "Moscow Hangs Stresemann and Poincaré in Effigy". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 14, 1924. p. 1.
  25. ^ "A Short History of Liquor Regulations in Alberta". Alberta Gaming and Liquor Commission. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  26. ^ Norton, W.B. (May 15, 1924). "No More War! Is Methodist Committee Cry". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  27. ^ Henning, Arthur Sears (May 16, 1924). "Press Bonus, Despite Veto". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  28. ^ Sheean, Vincent (May 17, 1924). "British Scheme to Nationalize Mines Defeated". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 3.
  29. ^ "Fate of Bonus up to Senate". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 18, 1924. p. 1.
  30. ^ "Yanks Fly Across Pacific". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 17, 1924. p. 1.
  31. ^ Henning, Arthur Sears (May 20, 1924). "First Bonus Pay Day Jan. 1". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  32. ^ "1924 Chronology of Aviation History". Skytamer. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  33. ^ "Broadcast Song of Nightingale on London Radio". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 21, 1924. p. 10.
  34. ^ Giddings, Darren. "Birdsong and Music". Colander.org. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  35. ^ "Many Wounded as Ruhr Police Battle Rioters". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 22, 1924. p. 14.
  36. ^ Kreis, James (2014). Ten Stories from the Roaring Twenties. Bloomington, Indiana: AuthorHouse. p. 311. ISBN 978-1-4918-3841-9.
  37. ^ a b "Kidnap Rich Boy; Kill Him". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 23, 1924. p. 1.
  38. ^ Schmidt, John R. (2014). On This Day in Chicago History. Charleston, South Carolina: History Press. p. 155. ISBN 9781626192539.
  39. ^ Matheson, Roderick (May 23, 1924). "Japan Booms Grand Greeting to U.S. Birdmen". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 5.
  40. ^ Wales, Henry (May 24, 1924). "France to Seize Coal in Ruhr if Strike Keeps Up". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 5.
  41. ^ Holland, Harrison M. (1984). Managing Diplomacy: The United States and Japan. Stanford, California: Stanford University. p. 13. ISBN 0-8179-8001-6.
  42. ^ Watkins, Maurine (May 25, 1924). "Jury Finds Beulah Annan Is "Not Guilty"". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  43. ^ Seldes, George (May 27, 1924). "Marx Cabinet Out on Eve of New Reichstag". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  44. ^ "Canada Defies England on O.K. of Turk Treaty". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 27, 1924. p. 3.
  45. ^ a b "Rip Roaring Reds Raz Ludendorff; Shut Reichstag". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 28, 1924. p. 5.
  46. ^ Skene, Don (May 28, 1924). "U.S. Navy Enters Race of Nations for Death Ray". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 3.
  47. ^ Matheson, Roderick (May 28, 1924). "Japan Protests Alien Bar". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  48. ^ Wales, Henry (May 29, 1924). "British Court Calls Death Ray Man to London". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 5.
  49. ^ Fendrick, Raymond (May 30, 1924). "Blast Imperils Roumanian King; Smashes Palace". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 5.
  50. ^ "Franks Case Near Solution". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 30, 1924. p. 1.
  51. ^ a b Proper, Diana. "The Incomprehensible Crime of Leopold and Loeb: "Just an Experiment."" Crimes and Trials of the Century Ed. Steven Chermark and Frankie Y. Bailey. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Publishing Group, 2007. 80. ISBN 978-0-313-34109-0.
  52. ^ "Girl He Beat to Jail Tinney to "Save" Others". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 29, 1924. p. 1.
  53. ^ Townley, Edward (2002). Mussolini and Italy. Oxford: Heinemann Educational Publishers. p. 53. ISBN 0-435327-25-9.
  54. ^ Neville, Peter. Mussolini. Routledge. ISBN 9781317613039.
  55. ^ Herrick, John (June 1, 1924). "Search for New Thrills Motive, Slayers Assert". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 3.