June 1924

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29 30  

The following events occurred in June 1924:

June 1, 1924 (Sunday)Edit

  • Austrian Chancellor Ignaz Seipel was shot by a disgruntled worker. A bullet was extracted from his lung and he survived.[1][2]
  • The June Revolution began in Albania as an army of 6,000 nationalists marched on Tirana.[3]
  • Raymond Poincaré resigned as Prime Minister of France.[4]
  • The Bengal Provincial Congress Committee passed a resolution acknowledging the sacrifice of Gopinath Saha. It stated that 'this conference, while denouncing and dissociating itself from violence and adhering to the principle of non-violence, appreciates Gopinath Saha's idea of self-sacrifice, misguided though it is, in respect of the country's best interest and expresses respect for such self-sacrifice.' Mahatma Gandhi opposed the resolution.[5]
  • Born: William Sloane Coffin, Christian clergyman, in New York City (d. 2006)

June 2, 1924 (Monday)Edit

  • U.S. President Calvin Coolidge signed the Revenue Act into law, despite his many criticisms of the bill. "A correction of its defects may be left to the next session of Congress", Coolidge stated. "I trust a bill less political and more economic may be passed at that time."[6][7]
  • The Frank Lloyd-directed film The Sea Hawk premiered at the Astor Theatre in New York City.[8]
  • Miners in the Ruhr ended their strike after accepting a 6 percent wage increase.[9]
  • Born: June Callwood, journalist, writer and activist, in Chatham, Ontario, Canada (d. 2007)

June 3, 1924 (Tuesday)Edit

June 4, 1924 (Wednesday)Edit

June 5, 1924 (Thursday)Edit

June 6, 1924 (Friday)Edit

June 7, 1924 (Saturday)Edit

June 8, 1924 (Sunday)Edit

June 9, 1924 (Monday)Edit

June 10, 1924 (Tuesday)Edit

June 11, 1924 (Wednesday)Edit

  • Comedian and actor Frank Tinney was held to the grand jury on $25,000 bail over the assault charge brought by Imogene Wilson. Tinney denied ever striking her and made jokes on the witness stand despite admonitions from the bench.[19]
  • Died: Théodore Dubois, 86, French composer and music teacher

June 12, 1924 (Thursday)Edit

June 13, 1924 (Friday)Edit

June 14, 1924 (Saturday)Edit

  • Aldo Finzi resigned as Italy's Under Secretary of State over the Matteotti disappearance, explaining he was doing so in order to defend himself from "libelous accusations" spread against him by the opposition.[23]
  • Born: James W. Black, pharmacologist, in Uddingston, Scotland (d. 2010)

June 15, 1924 (Sunday)Edit

June 16, 1924 (Monday)Edit

  • King Victor Emmanuel III of Italy held an extraordinary council with former Prime Ministers and members of the royal family to discuss the Matteotti crisis as Mussolini's hold on power appeared increasingly tenuous.[25]
  • Italian Fascist politician Cesare Rossi surrendered to police after going into hiding for several days for being wanted in connection with the Matteotti disappearance.[26]
  • The airmen trying to make the first round-the-world flight arrived in Saigon.[27]
  • The much-delayed trial of Mabel Normand's chauffeur over the New Year's Day shooting opened in Los Angeles. Edna Purviance once again testified that she was out of the room when the shooting happened.[28]

June 17, 1924 (Tuesday)Edit

June 18, 1924 (Wednesday)Edit

  • The United Kingdom broke off its relations with Mexico over the treatment of diplomatic agent H.C. Cummins.[32]
  • It was reported that Amerigo Dumini had confessed to the Matteotti kidnapping.[33]
  • Denmark formally recognized the Soviet Union.[34]
  • Born: George Mikan, basketball player, in Joliet, Illinois (d. 2005)

June 19, 1924 (Thursday)Edit

  • A postal strike began in Canada.[35]
  • Fascist leader Giovanni Marinelli was arrested in connection with the Matteotti kidnapping.[36]
  • Mabel Normand's chauffeur was acquitted on the assault charge from the New Year's Day shooting, though he was immediately re-arrested on a separate liquor charge.[37] Despite the acquittal, the scandal was too much for Normand's film career after the William Desmond Taylor murder and she was effectively finished as a Hollywood star.[38]

June 20, 1924 (Friday)Edit

June 21, 1924 (Saturday)Edit

June 22, 1924 (Sunday)Edit

  • Britain and France agreed to hold a conference in London starting in mid-July to discuss implementation of the Dawes Plan.[42]
  • Murder suspect Fritz Haarmann was arrested in Hanover, Germany after he was seen stalking boys at the Central Station. A search of his apartment turned up bloodstains and possessions of victims as one of the most notorious serial killers in German history was revealed.[43]

June 23, 1924 (Monday)Edit

June 24, 1924 (Tuesday)Edit

June 25, 1924 (Wednesday)Edit

June 26, 1924 (Thursday)Edit

June 27, 1924 (Friday)Edit

  • The Italian opposition gave Benito Mussolini an ultimatum demanding a recognition of ministerial responsibility for fascist crimes, a complete and thorough investigation of the Matteotti affair and the abolition of the Blackshirts. If the government did not accede, the ultimatum read, the opposition would stage a boycott of parliament.[51]
  • Ten minutes of silence were observed all over Italy in respect for Giacomo Matteotti.[52]
  • American golfer Walter Hagen won the British Open.
  • Born: Bob Appleyard, English cricketer

June 28, 1924 (Saturday)Edit

June 29, 1924 (Sunday)Edit

June 30, 1924 (Monday)Edit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Lahm, Karl (June 2, 1924). "Father Seipel, Chancellor of Austria, Shot". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 12.
  2. ^ Rabinach, Anson (May 19, 2002). "The World: Past as Prologue; The Politics of Assassination". The New York Times. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  3. ^ "Albania Revolt". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 2, 1924. p. 11.
  4. ^ "French "Left" Demands Scalp of Millerand". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 2, 1924. p. 18.
  5. ^ Sengupta, Nitish K. (2011). Land of Two Rivers: A History of Bengal from the Mahabharata to Mujib. London: Penguin Books. p. 342. ISBN 978-0-14-341678-4.
  6. ^ "Criticizing Tax Measure, Coolidge Signs It". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 3, 1924. p. 1.
  7. ^ Sobel, Robert (1998). Coolidge: An American Enigma. Washington, D.C.: Regnery Publishing, Inc. ISBN 978-1-59698-737-1.
  8. ^ Holston, Kim R. (2013). Movie Roadshows: A History and Filmography of Reserved-Seat Limited Showings, 1911–1973. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc. p. 37. ISBN 978-0-7864-6062-5.
  9. ^ "Ruhr Miners Expected to Resume Work Monday". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 1, 1924. p. 11.
  10. ^ Clayton, John (June 4, 1924). "Albania Rebels Rout Nationals, Seize Capital". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 12.
  11. ^ "Albanian Rebel Forces Win One Town; Lose One". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 5, 1924. p. 13.
  12. ^ "The 100 best novels: No 47 – A Passage to India by EM Forster (1924)". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. August 18, 2014. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  13. ^ Steinberg, Ellen Fitzsimmons (2004). Irma: A Chicago Woman's Story, 1871–1966. University of Iowa Press. p. 120. ISBN 0-87745-894-4.
  14. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (June 7, 1924). Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  15. ^ Watkins, Maurine (June 6, 1924). "Jury Finds Mrs. Gaertner Not Guilty". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  16. ^ "U.S. Flyers Tune Up at Hongkong; Indo-China Next". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 9, 1924. p. 7.
  17. ^ Townley, Edward (2002). Mussolini and Italy. Oxford: Heinemann Educational Publishers. p. 53. ISBN 0-435-32725-9.
  18. ^ Elsie, Robert (2010). Historical Dictionary of Albania (2nd Ed.). Plymouth: Scarecrow Press. p. 105. ISBN 0-8108-6188-7.
  19. ^ "Tinney Loses Court Bout to "Kis" Imogene". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 12, 1924. p. 13.
  20. ^ "Coolidge and Dawes Named". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 13, 1924. p. 1.
  21. ^ Shaffer, George (June 13, 1924). "Forty-Eight Die in 2 Blasts on U.S. Battleship". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  22. ^ Storer, John (June 14, 1924). "Kidnap Chief of Socialists in Italy; Dead?". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  23. ^ "Minister Quits in Kidnapping of Italian Deputy". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 15, 1924. p. 1.
  24. ^ Mensah, Emmanuel (April 17, 2014). "Countdown To Brazil: Law 17 – The Corner Kick". Infoboxx Daily. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  25. ^ Wales, Henry (June 17, 1924). "Dictator of Italy Totters". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  26. ^ a b Sachar, Howard M. (2015). The Assassination of Europe, 1918–1942: A Political History. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. ISBN 978-1-4426-0920-4.
  27. ^ Dailey, Charles (June 17, 1924). "World Girdling Yankees Fly to Cochin China". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 4.
  28. ^ Shaffer, George (June 17, 1924). "Dines a Stingy Host When it Came to Attire". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 6.
  29. ^ Mercer, Derrik (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. pp. 319–320. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3.
  30. ^ "Smuts Beaten by Labor Man in South African Election". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 18, 1924. p. 7.
  31. ^ Storer, John (June 18, 1924). "Cabinet Quits as Scandal in Italy Grows". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  32. ^ Steele, John (June 19, 1924). "U.S. Takes Over British Embassy in Mexico City". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 9.
  33. ^ Storer, John (June 19, 1924). "Get Confession in Italian Plot; Crisis Averted". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 9.
  34. ^ "Denmark Recognizes Red Government in Russia". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 20, 1924. p. 7.
  35. ^ "Postal Strike Stops Service Over Canada". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 20, 1924. p. 1.
  36. ^ "Sensational Arrest". The Straits Times. Singapore: 9. June 20, 1924.
  37. ^ "Greer, Freed in Shooting, Taken on Booze Charge". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 20, 1924. p. 1.
  38. ^ Milton, Joyce (1998). Tramp: The Life of Charlie Chaplin. Da Capo Press. pp. 221–223. ISBN 0-306-80831-5.
  39. ^ "2 Die Trying to Reach Peak of Mt. Everest". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 21, 1924. p. 1.
  40. ^ "Here's the Complete Log of the Flyers Round the World". Chicago Daily Tribune. September 16, 1924. p. 2.
  41. ^ "History of the Turkish Republic". Enjoy Turkey. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  42. ^ Steele, John (June 23, 1924). "British, French Premiers Call Allied Parley". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 5.
  43. ^ Parker, R.J. Serial Killers Abridged: : 100 Serial Killers. Createspace. p. 100. ISBN 978-1-4947-7216-1.
  44. ^ "Flies Across U.S.; 18 Hours". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 24, 1924. p. 1.
  45. ^ Henning, Arthur Sears (June 20, 1924). "It is McAdoo vs. the Field". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  46. ^ Sheean, Vincent (June 25, 1924). "Mussolini Will Oust All but 3 of His Advisers". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 6.
  47. ^ "U.S. Envoy will Attend Parley on Dawes Plan". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 26, 1924. p. 9.
  48. ^ "Jesse Barnes". Baseball Library. Archived from the original on January 17, 2015. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  49. ^ "U.S. and Bulgaria Ratify Treaty of Extradition". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 27, 1924. p. 6.
  50. ^ Ellings, A. (June 27, 1924). "Yankee Flyers Float on Ganges – Speed Up Trip". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 5.
  51. ^ Sheean, Vincent (June 27, 1924). "Deputies Serve Ultimatum on Italy Premier". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  52. ^ Sheean, Vincent (June 28, 1924). "Italy Prays for Matteotti as Cabinet Alters". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 12.
  53. ^ Richardson, Darcy G. (2008). Others: "Fighting Bob" La Follette and the Progressive Movement: Third-Party Politics in the 1920s. Lincoln, Nebraska: iUniverse. p. 179. ISBN 978-0-595-60224-7.
  54. ^ Evans, Arthur (June 29, 1924). "Wilson League Plank Beaten 353 to 742". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  55. ^ Henning, Arthur Sears (June 29, 1924). "Democrats Spare Klan by Close Vote". Chicago Daily Tribune: 1.
  56. ^ "Canada's Postal Strike Ends; Men Go Back to Jobs". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 30, 1924. p. 1.
  57. ^ "Leather Collar Latest Fancy of Women in Paris?". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 30, 1924. p. 1.
  58. ^ Henning, Arthur Sears (July 1, 1924). "Deadlock After 15 Ballots". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  59. ^ Mikkelson, Barbara and David (June 12, 2014). "Too Young to Dye". Snopes. Retrieved January 16, 2015.