January 1924

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The following events occurred in January 1924:

January 1, 1924 (Tuesday)Edit

January 2, 1924 (Wednesday)Edit

January 3, 1924 (Thursday)Edit

January 4, 1924 (Friday)Edit

  • Germany issued an emergency decree known as the Emminger Reform, best known for abolishing the jury system in court proceedings and replacing it with a mixed system of judges.
  • The Kingdom of Yugoslavia sent another sharp note to Bulgaria saying it would not accept the return of Ferdinand from exile or any further provocations. Newspapers in Belgrade clamored for war.[8]
  • Born: Wally Ris, competitive swimmer, in Chicago (d. 1989)
  • Died: John Peters, 73, American baseball player

January 5, 1924 (Saturday)Edit

  • The National Assembly of Greece elected national hero Eleftherios Venizelos as its Speaker, but he had to leave due to illness. It was later announced that he'd had a minor heart attack.[9] He would only serve six days in the position.
  • Factories and mines in the Ruhr region shut down as laborers refused to work ten hours a day.[10]

January 6, 1924 (Sunday)Edit

January 7, 1924 (Monday)Edit

January 8, 1924 (Tuesday)Edit

  • Soviet newspaper Pravda reported that Leon Trotsky was ill, a statement which the rank and file took to mean as a sign of his imminent removal.[14]
  • United Kingdom Labour Party leader Ramsay MacDonald gave a speech at a packed Royal Albert Hall where he announced that Labour would accept office as soon as it was invited to do so, though it would be taking over a "bankrupt estate". MacDonald pledged to run the country along sound economic lines, make efforts through the League of Nations to retain peace in Europe, and end the "pompous folly" of refusing to recognize the Soviet Union.[15]
  • Born: Ron Moody, actor, in Tottenham, England

January 9, 1924 (Wednesday)Edit

January 10, 1924 (Thursday)Edit

  • The British submarine HMS L24 sank in a collision with the battleship HMS Resolution in a training exercise in the English Channel. All 43 crewmen were lost.[17][18]
  • In the occupied Rhineland, the border to the rest of Germany was closed to traffic except for railroad business and food supplies and a curfew was imposed, due to fears of a new separatist coup attempt after the murder of Franz Josef Heinz the previous day.[19]
  • Relations between Britain and France became strained when French Prime Minister Raymond Poincaré refused to allow British officials into the occupied Rhineland to conduct their own investigation of the separatist movement there.[19]
  • Born: Max Roach, jazz drummer, in Newland, North Carolina (d. 2007)

January 11, 1924 (Friday)Edit

January 12, 1924 (Saturday)Edit

  • Mexican mountaineer irregulars loyal to President Obregón recaptured Oaxaca City from the rebels.[21]
  • France rejected a British-backed proposal to arrange a League of Nations committee to investigate separatism in the Rhineland Palatinate. Prime Minister Poincaré insisted it was strictly the business of the countries directly involved in administrating the region.[22]
  • Bengali activist Gopinath Saha shot a man he thought was Calcutta police commissioner Charles Tegart, but he'd killed a different Englishman instead. Saha would be sentenced to death for the crime.[23]
  • Born: Chris Chase, model, actress, and journalist, in New York City (d. 2013); Olivier Gendebien, racing driver, in Brussels, Belgium (d. 1998)
  • Died: Alexis Lapointe, 63, French Canadian athlete

January 13, 1924 (Sunday)Edit

January 14, 1924 (Monday)Edit

January 15, 1924 (Tuesday)Edit

January 16, 1924 (Wednesday)Edit

January 17, 1924 (Thursday)Edit

January 18, 1924 (Friday)Edit

  • Conflicting accounts arose as to the whereabouts of Leon Trotsky amid rumors he had been arrested.[36] He was in fact traveling to the Black Sea to convalesce from illness.[14]
  • A Soviet party conference ended with the passing of a resolution blaming Trotsky for divisions within the Communist Party. Joseph Stalin attacked Trotsky in a withering speech accusing him of sowing dissent.[14][37]
  • A preliminary hearing into the New Year's Day shooting of Courtland Dines began in Los Angeles.[2] Edna Purviance testified that she was not present in the room when the shooting occurred.[38]
  • In Madison Square Garden, world middleweight boxing champion Harry Greb defeated Johnny Wilson in a fifteen-round decision to retain the title.

January 19, 1924 (Saturday)Edit

January 20, 1924 (Sunday)Edit

January 21, 1924 (Monday)Edit

  • 60,000 rail workers went on strike in the United Kingdom beginning at midnight, protesting a recent reduction in wages ordered by the National Wage Board. British newspapers with nationwide distribution arranged fleets of trucks to maintain their circulations during the work stoppage.[41]
  • The British House of Commons passed a motion of no confidence against the Stanley Baldwin government, 328 to 256.[42]
  • Semi-retired Soviet leader Vladimir Lenin died at his estate in Gorki at 18:50 hrs Moscow time following a stroke.[14][43]
  • Top Soviet leaders were convening at the Eleventh All-Russia Congress of Soviets at the Bolshoi Theatre when news of Lenin's death was communicated by telephone; an eyewitness reported never seeing so many men in tears.[14]
  • Mabel Normand and Courtland S. Dines testified in the New Year's Day shooting case when the court convened in the hospital where they were staying (Normand was there with an inflamed appendix). Both of them claimed to be unable to remember much about the incident.[44][45][46]
  • The musical comedy Lollipop with book by Zelda Sears, lyrics by Sears and Walter De Leon and music by Vincent Youmans opened on Broadway.[47]
  • Born: Benny Hill, comedian and actor, in Southampton, England (d. 1992)
  • Died: Vladimir Lenin, 53, communist revolutionary and leader of the Soviet Union

January 22, 1924 (Tuesday)Edit

January 23, 1924 (Wednesday)Edit

January 24, 1924 (Thursday)Edit

January 25, 1924 (Friday)Edit

January 26, 1924 (Saturday)Edit

January 27, 1924 (Sunday)Edit

January 28, 1924 (Monday)Edit

January 29, 1924 (Tuesday)Edit

January 30, 1924 (Wednesday)Edit

January 31, 1924 (Thursday)Edit

  • The United States Senate passed a resolution concerning the Teapot Dome scandal, stating that the leases to the Mammoth Oil Company and the Pan American Petroleum Company "were executed under circumstances indicating fraud and corruption".[52]
  • Japanese Prime Minister Kiyoura Keigo dissolved the National Diet and called for new elections. A brawl broke out during the morning session over accusations that the government had failed to protect a train that prominent opposition leaders were riding on when it was pelted with rocks and timbers.[65]
  • White Sox owner Charles Comiskey took the stand as a hostile witness in the Joe Jackson lawsuit trial.
  • Former U.S. President Woodrow Wilson was reported to be seriously ill with a digestive disorder.[66]
  • Twenty-four days after the death of his wife, Prussian state executioner Paul Spaethe dressed in formal evening wear, lit 45 candles – one for each person he'd beheaded – and committed suicide with a revolver.[4][67][68]

ReferencesEdit

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  2. ^ a b Milton, Joyce (1998). Tramp: The Life of Charlie Chaplin. Da Capo Press. pp. 221–223. ISBN 0-306-80831-5.
  3. ^ Cornyn, John (January 2, 1924). "Mexico Rebels Trap 2,000 Men, Battle 2 Days". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  4. ^ a b c d e Mercer, Derrik (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 314. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3.
  5. ^ a b Fendrick, Raymond (January 2, 1924). "Ultimatum to Bulgars Sent by Jugo-Slavs". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  6. ^ "Jan 3, 1924: King Tut's sarcophagus uncovered". This Day in History. History. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
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  8. ^ "Balkan Clash Near on Former King Ferdinand". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 5, 1924. p. 1.
  9. ^ "Venizelos Ill in Triumph's Mist". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 6, 1924. p. 1.
  10. ^ Wales, Henry (January 6, 1924). "Fight on 10 Hour Workday Again Paralyzes Ruhr". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 10.
  11. ^ "New Report Says Bomb Hit Kemal". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 8, 1924. p. 1.
  12. ^ a b c "Chronology 1924". indiana.edu. 2002. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  13. ^ "Tampico, Oil Port, Captured by Rebels, Report". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 8, 1924. p. 3.
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  16. ^ Steele, John (January 10, 1924). "MacDonald is Re-Elected Head of British Labor". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 5.
  17. ^ Steele, John (January 11, 1924). "Locate Wreck of Submarine". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  18. ^ "British Give Up Hope of Saving Any on Submarine". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 13, 1924. p. 16.
  19. ^ a b Clayton, John (January 11, 1924). "Allies Resume Check on German Military Moves". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 4.
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  21. ^ Cornyn, John (January 13, 1924). "Loyal Mountaineers Drive Mexican Rebels from Town". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 16.
  22. ^ Clayton, John (January 13, 1924). "Allied Officers Hunting German Arms Face Mob". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 16.
  23. ^ Sengupta, Nitish K. (2011). Land of Two Rivers: A History of Bengal from the Mahabharata to Mujib. London: Penguin Books. p. 342. ISBN 978-0-14-341678-4.
  24. ^ a b Clayton, John (January 14, 1924). "Britain Defies France; Begins Rhine Inquiry". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 11.
  25. ^ Goldwater, Walter Radical periodicals in America 1890–1950 New Haven, Yale University Library 1964 pp.10, 30, 42, 46
  26. ^ "$25,000 Cash for a Name for Magazine!". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 13, 1924. p. 1.
  27. ^ Wales, Henry (January 15, 1924). "Dawes Speeds German Quiz to Save Europe". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  28. ^ Steele, John (January 16, 1924). "King's Ermine Rubs Tweeds of Socialism". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
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  31. ^ "AERONAUTICS: Pateras Pescara", Time, January 28, 1924
  32. ^ "French Helicopter Rises 15 Feet; Flies 8 Minutes". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 17, 1924. p. 1.
  33. ^ New York Times, January 24, 1924.
  34. ^ a b "U.S. Blimp Outrides Storm". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 17, 1924. p. 1.
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  36. ^ Steele, John (January 19, 1924). "Use Dynamite in Battle to Nab Trotzky". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
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  38. ^ Doherty, Edward (January 18, 1924). "Edna Purviance Testifies in Dines Shooting". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 11.
  39. ^ "Committee Told Value of Polar Trip to Nation". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 20, 1924. p. 21.
  40. ^ Wright, Frederick (January 21, 1924). "Rebels Take Town". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 2.
  41. ^ "British Rail Lines Tied Up; 60,000 Strike". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 21, 1924. p. 1.
  42. ^ Steele, John (January 22, 1924). "Britain Calls Socialists to Rule Monarchy". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
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  45. ^ Doherty, Edward (January 24, 1924). "Dines Ordered to Appear Again at Greer Trial". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 3.
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  48. ^ Steele, John (January 23, 1924). "Socialist Son of Poor Scot Rules Britain". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 3.
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  53. ^ "37 Killed in Illinois Coal Mine Explosion". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 26, 1924. p. 1.
  54. ^ Cornyn, John (January 29, 1924). "400 Yaquis Battle 4,000 Rebels 4 Days". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  55. ^ Wilcox, Grafton (January 27, 1924). "Special Counsel Ordered to Let No Guilty Escape". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  56. ^ "Rename Petrograd Leningrad, Honor Late Red Premier". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 25, 1924. p. 3.
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  61. ^ "$100,000 Voted for Coolidge to Strain Oil Dregs". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 29, 1924. p. 4.
  62. ^ "British Railway Strike Settled; Men Back Today". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 29, 1924. p. 1.
  63. ^ "Dawes in Berlin; "Stay Until We Solve the Problem"". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 30, 1924. p. 1.
  64. ^ Wright, Frederick (January 31, 1924). "Obregon Victory Breaks Back of Rebels in East". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 6.
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  66. ^ "Illness Prostrates Wilson". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 1, 1924. p. 1.
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