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The following events occurred in February 1924:

Contents

February 1, 1924 (Friday)Edit

February 2, 1924 (Saturday)Edit

February 3, 1924 (Sunday)Edit

  • Woodrow Wilson died in his Washington, D.C. home at 11:15 in the morning.
  • The Soviet Union welcomed Britain's diplomatic recognition of the USSR as an "historic step" and pledged to "make every effort to settle all misunderstandings and develop and consolidate economic relations."[4]
  • Germany and Turkey signed a Treaty of Friendship.[2]
  • Died: Woodrow Wilson, 67, 28th President of the United States

February 4, 1924 (Monday)Edit

  • Austria formally recognized the Soviet Union.[5]
  • Born: Dorothy Harrell, baseball player, in Los Angeles (d. 2011)

February 5, 1924 (Tuesday)Edit

  • The Winter Olympics closed in Chamonix, France. Norway and Finland tied for the most gold medals with four each, but Norway won 17 total medals to Finland's 11.
  • Mexican rebels retreated from their former stronghold of Veracruz when federal troops won a crucial victory at Córdoba.[6]
  • The government of British India released Mahatma Gandhi from prison two years into his six-year sentence, citing "reasons of health".[7][8]
  • A controversy broke out over the German embassy in Washington, D.C. not offering any condolences over the death of Wilson nor flying its flag at half mast. The embassy issued a statement saying it would fly its flag at half-mast the next day in observance of the national mourning on the day of Wilson's funeral.[9]

February 6, 1924 (Wednesday)Edit

  • Woodrow Wilson was buried in the Washington National Cathedral.[10]
  • Demonstrators raised disturbances outside the German embassy in Washington. About 200 taxi drivers walked onto its lawn, planted an American flag and saluted it amid cheers and pistol shots.[11]

February 7, 1924 (Thursday)Edit

February 8, 1924 (Friday)Edit

February 9, 1924 (Saturday)Edit

February 10, 1924 (Sunday)Edit

February 11, 1924 (Monday)Edit

  • The United States Senate passed a resolution by a vote of 47 to 34 calling on President Coolidge to remove Edwin Denby as Secretary of the Navy over his role in the Teapot Dome scandal. Coolidge issued a formal statement that evening saying he would ignore the resolution. "As soon as special counsel can advise me as to the legality of these leases and assemble for me the pertinent facts in the various transactions, I shall take such action as seems essential for the full protection of the public interests", the statement read.[17]
  • Died: Jean-François Raffaëlli, 74, French painter, sculptor and printmaker

February 12, 1924 (Tuesday)Edit

February 13, 1924 (Wednesday)Edit

  • German nationalists launched an attack on the headquarters of Rhineland separatists in Pirmasens, smashing their way into the building and setting it ablaze while snipers set up outside to shoot at the separatists. At least 36 died in the fighting and the blaze, with most of the casualties on the separatist side. An elderly woman bystander was also killed by a stray bullet.[21]
  • An assembly for British fascists was staged at the Hotel Cecil in London to meet and discuss common goals. It was the first fascist event ever held in public in the United Kingdom. About 500 black-shirted Britons and Italian expatriates attended.[22]
  • Happy Felsch was arrested for perjury over his testimony of the previous day. Felsch posted his own $2,000 bail and was released.[23]
  • Howard Carter abruptly suspended work on Tutankhamun's tomb and had it resealed, "owing to the impossible restrictions and discourtesies on the part of the public works department and its antiquity section." The dispute was reportedly about media access rights.[24]

February 14, 1924 (Thursday)Edit

February 15, 1924 (Friday)Edit

  • Vermont Senator Frank L. Greene was walking along Pennsylvania Avenue with his wife at night when he was shot in the head by a stray bullet during a shootout between Prohibition enforcement agents and bootleggers.[28]
  • The jury in the Joe Jackson-White Sox case awarded Jackson over $16,000 in unpaid salary. However, Judge Gregory declared that the plaintiff's case was based on perjury and threw the jury's ruling out.[29] Jackson was triumphant at the verdict despite it being overruled.[30]

February 16, 1924 (Saturday)Edit

  • Nearly 200,000 British dock workers went on strike.[31]
  • German artist George Grosz was fined 500 gold marks (6,000 marks) when a collection of his drawings depicting the decadence of Berlin society was ruled obscene by the court.[32][33]
  • Born: Ray Gunkel, professional wrestler, in Chicago (d. 1972)
  • Died: John William Kendrick, 70, American railroad executive; Wilhelm Schmidt, 65, German engineer and inventor

February 17, 1924 (Sunday)Edit

February 18, 1924 (Monday)Edit

  • British Prime Minister Ramsay MacDonald warned against profiteers extracting "unjust prices" during the dock worker's strike. "The cabinet hopes this notice will have the effect of stopping these increases, but in the meantime it has asked that law officers consider the powers of the government in this matter and draft such emergency measures as may be necessary to prevent exploitation of the consumers owing to the present strike", he said.[35]

February 19, 1924 (Tuesday)Edit

  • An initial outline of the Dawes committee's financial plan was presented to French Prime Minister Raymond Poincaré in Paris.[36]
  • Born: Lee Marvin, actor, in New York City (d. 1987)

February 20, 1924 (Wednesday)Edit

  • French military leaders objected to a clause in the Dawes proposal that would return the railroads in the occupied Ruhr region to German control.[37]
  • Born: Gerson Goldhaber, particle physicist, in Chemnitz, Germany (d. 2010); Gloria Vanderbilt, artist, actress, fashion designer and socialite, in New York City

February 21, 1924 (Thursday)Edit

February 22, 1924 (Friday)Edit

February 23, 1924 (Saturday)Edit

February 24, 1924 (Sunday)Edit

  • Mexican federal troops defeated rebels in a battle fought in an oil region in the state of Tamaulipas.[45]
  • The Beverly Hills Speedway hosted its final race, attended by 85,000. The track was torn down afterward because the rapidly increasing real estate values had rendered the track an uneconomical use of property. Harlan Fengler broke the world record for a 250-mile race, averaging 116.6 miles per hour.[46]
  • British dock workers voted to accept the offer of their employers to receive a rise of 1 shilling-per-day plus an additional shilling on June 1.[47]

February 25, 1924 (Monday)Edit

February 26, 1924 (Tuesday)Edit

February 27, 1924 (Wednesday)Edit

February 28, 1924 (Thursday)Edit

February 29, 1924 (Friday)Edit

  • Erich Ludendorff took the stand in his defense in the trial at Munich. He gave a long justification of the reasons for attempting the putsch, explaining, "We want a Germany free of Marxism, semitism, and papal influences."[53]
  • Born: Al Rosen, baseball player, in Spartanburg, South Carolina

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e Mercer, Derrik (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 315. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3.
  2. ^ a b c d "Chronology 1924". indiana.edu. 2002. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  3. ^ Vaughan, Irving (February 2, 1924). "Jackson's Side of Case Against Sox Completed". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 10.
  4. ^ Williams, Paul (February 4, 1924). "Russia Accepts Britain's Offer of Recognition". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 16.
  5. ^ "Russia Orders Revision of New Rome Treaty". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 5, 1924. p. 5.
  6. ^ "Mexican Rebel Forces Beaten; Quit Vera Cruz". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 6, 1924. p. 1.
  7. ^ "Years of Arrests & Imprisonment of Mahatma Gandhi". MKGandhi.org. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  8. ^ "British Release Gandhi, Indian Non Co-Op Chief". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 5, 1924. p. 5.
  9. ^ "Flag at German Embassy Joins Mourning Group". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 6, 1924. p. 1.
  10. ^ Bennett, James O'Donnell (February 7, 1924). "Wilson Sleeps in Cathedral Tomb". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  11. ^ "Cab Drivers and Students 'Flag' Embassy". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 7, 1924. p. 1.
  12. ^ "Mexican Rebel Chief and Staff Reach Yucatán". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 8, 1924. p. 2.
  13. ^ Henning, Arthur Sears (February 9, 1924). "Coolidge Signs Revocation of Big Oil Leases". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  14. ^ "Feb 8, 1924: First execution by lethal gas". This Day in History. History. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  15. ^ Vaughan, Irving (February 9, 1924). "Read Statement by Cicotte in Sox Case". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 15.
  16. ^ "Obregon Wins in Big Battle Against Rebels". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 11, 1924. p. 1.
  17. ^ Henning, Arthur Sears (February 12, 1924). "Senate Defied by President". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  18. ^ "Mummy Case of Tut Built of Solid Gold". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 13, 1924. p. 1.
  19. ^ "Feb 12, 1924: Rhapsody In Blue, by George Gershwin, performed for first time". This Day in History. History. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  20. ^ "Felsch Spills Jackson Beans; Helps Comiskey". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 13, 1924. p. 27.
  21. ^ Skene, Don (February 14, 1924). "Cheer Massacare of Rhine Rebels". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  22. ^ "British Fascism Forms to Avert Labor Dictator". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 14, 1924. p. 5.
  23. ^ "Arrest Felsch for Perjury in Jackson Case". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 14, 1924. p. 11.
  24. ^ "Carter Leaves Tut to his Fate in Gilded Tomb". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 14, 1924. p. 3.
  25. ^ "Swift Escobar Crushed Mexico Rebels in West". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 15, 1924. p. 1.
  26. ^ "Chronological History of IBM: 1920s". IBM. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  27. ^ "UFA Film Nights: Die Nibelungen – Siegfried". Visit Berlin. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  28. ^ "Senator Shot by Dry Sleuth". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 16, 1924. p. 1.
  29. ^ "Jury Finds for Jackson; Judge "Kills" Verdict". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 16, 1924. p. 13.
  30. ^ Curran, Dan (April 23, 2010). "The Milwaukee trial of Shoeless Joe Jackson". On Milwaukee. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  31. ^ Williams, Paul (February 17, 1924). "Britain Facing Food Rationing as Dockers Strike". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 3.
  32. ^ Philip, Neil (November 25, 2010). "Port d'eaux-mortes – George Grosz in France". Adventures in the Print Trade. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  33. ^ "Kunstwerk des Monats Juni". Museum Kunstpalast. 2014. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  34. ^ Nohlen, D & Stöver, P (2010) Elections in Europe: A data handbook, p1909 ISBN 978-3-8329-5609-7
  35. ^ Williams, Paul (February 19, 1924). "Labor Cabinet Fights British Docker Strike". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  36. ^ Wales, Henry (February 20, 1924). "France Bows to Dawes Experts on Ruhr Control". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 5.
  37. ^ "Dawes Plan for Ruhr is Opposed by French Army". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 21, 1924. p. 6.
  38. ^ Williams, Paul (February 22, 1924). "Dockers' Strike Flames Anew on Radical Fuel". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 7.
  39. ^ Holston, Kim R. (2013). Movie Roadshows: A History and Filmography of Reserved-Seat Limited Showings, 1911–1973. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc. p. 35. ISBN 978-0-7864-6062-5.
  40. ^ "Other "Firsts"". The Broadcast Archive. February 17, 2013. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  41. ^ "Coolidge Again Will Be Heard All Over U.S.". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 3, 1924. p. 27.
  42. ^ Elsie, Robert (2010). Historical Dictionary of Albania (2nd Ed.). Plymouth: Scarecrow Press. p. 105. ISBN 0-8108-6188-7.
  43. ^ "Strike Ties Up Cuba; Army Ready to Act". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 24, 1924. p. 1.
  44. ^ Williams, Paul (February 24, 1924). "Britain Calls on Navy for Aid in Docker's Strike". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 3.
  45. ^ Cornyn, John (February 25, 1924). "Obregon Troops Rout Rebels at "Cave of Devil"". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 4.
  46. ^ Rasmussen, Cecilia (October 19, 1992). "L.A. Scene – The City – Then and Now". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  47. ^ "British Dockers Vote to Accept Offer of Bosses". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 25, 1924. p. 4.
  48. ^ "Reach Settlement of Cuban Railway and Dock Strike". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 26, 1924. p. 1.
  49. ^ Rees, Laurence (2012). Hitler's Charisma: Leading Millions into the Abyss. London: Pantheon Books. p. 42. ISBN 978-0-307-37729-6.
  50. ^ "Treason Trial of Ludendorff Real Friendly". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 27, 1924. p. 11.
  51. ^ Wales, Henry (February 28, 1924). "Fall of Belgian Cabinet Halts Dawes Exports". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 14.
  52. ^ Fendrick, Raymond (February 29, 1924). "Jugo-Slavs Move Big Force for Bulgaria Group". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 5.
  53. ^ Clayton, John (March 1, 1924). ""I Fought Rule by Red or Jew" – Ludendorff". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 3.