Portal:Drink

The Drink Portal

A portal dedicated to all beverages

Introduction

Tea is the second‑most‑consumed drink in the world, after water.

A drink or beverage is a liquid intended for human consumption. In addition to their basic function of satisfying thirst, drinks play important roles in human culture. Common types of drinks include plain drinking water, milk, juice, smoothies and soft drinks. Traditionally warm beverages include coffee, tea, and hot chocolate. Caffeinated drinks that contain the stimulant caffeine have a long history.

In addition, alcoholic drinks such as wine, beer, and liquor, which contain the drug ethanol, have been part of human culture for more than 8,000 years. Non-alcoholic drinks often signify drinks that would normally contain alcohol, such as beer, wine and cocktails, but are made with a sufficiently low concentration of alcohol by volume. The category includes drinks that have undergone an alcohol removal process such as non-alcoholic beers and de-alcoholized wines. (Full article...)

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A tea bag being removed from a mug of hot tea to stop the brewing process
A tea bag being removed from a mug of hot tea to stop the brewing process
A tea bag, or the compound teabag, is a small, porous, sealed bag or packet, typically containing tea leaves or the leaves of other herbs, which is immersed in water to steep and make an infusion. Originally used only for tea (Camellia sinensis), they are now made with other tisanes ("herbal teas") as well.

Tea bags are commonly made of filter paper or food-grade plastic, or occasionally of silk cotton or silk. The tea bag performs the same function as a tea infuser. Tea bags can be used multiple times until there is no extraction left. Some tea bags have an attached piece of string with a paper label at the top that assists in removing the bag, while also displaying the brand or variety of tea. (Full article...)

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  • ... that German minister Wolfgang Clement said that the secret to drinking a glass of beer in 1.5 seconds was to fold back the uvula?
  • ... that a saying in Britain states that one should "never drink in a flat-roofed pub"?
  • ... that an image of MacCarthy's Bar on the front cover of a book featured a staff member posing as a nun drinking a pint of Guinness and the surprise appearance of a dog?
  • ... that the River Poddle, the main water source of the city of Dublin for over 500 years, was later so polluted by industry that it allegedly killed cattle and horses drinking from it?
  • ... that the Duke of Sussex has been providing drinks in Acton Green for over a century?
  • ... that late arrivals at American colonial-era inns might find that the only drink on offer was Whistle Belly Vengeance, a mixture of sour beer, molasses and bread crusts?

... ... that demand for beer from Pittsburgh's East End Brewing Company spiked after the Pittsburgh Steelers won Super Bowl XLIII?
Other "Did you know" facts... Read more...

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The following are images from various drink-related articles on Wikipedia.

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An illustration of racial segregation in the United States (Jim Crow laws) in a mid 20th century photograph showing a "Colored" drinking fountain in Oklahoma City with an African-American drinking.

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Anthony Talamo Rossi (September 13, 1900 – January 24, 1993) was an Italian-born American who founded Tropicana Products, a producer of orange juice, in 1947 in Bradenton, Florida. It grew from 50 employees to over 8,000 in 2004, expanding into multiple product lines and becoming one of the world's largest producers and marketers of citrus juice.

Rossi was an early pioneer in including Florida's citrus juices in school meal programs. He also became a noted religiously-oriented businessman, making annual pilgrimages back to Sicily where he helped build a church and mission. In the U.S., he married Sana Barlow and endowed the Aurora Foundation, which has funded various Christian programs. (Full article...)

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And malt does more than Milton can
     To justify God's ways to man.
— A. E. Housman
A Shropshire Lad LXII. Terence, this is stupid stuff

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hybrid skeletal structure of the caffeine molecule
hybrid skeletal structure of the caffeine molecule
Caffeine is a central nervous system (CNS) stimulant of the methylxanthine class. It is used as a cognitive enhancer, increasing alertness and attentional performance. Caffeine acts by blocking binding of adenosine to the adenosine A1 receptor, which enhances release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. Caffeine also increases cyclic AMP levels through nonselective inhibition of phosphodiesterase.


Caffeine is a bitter, white crystalline purine, a methylxanthine alkaloid, and is chemically related to the adenine and guanine bases of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA). It is found in the seeds, fruits, nuts, or leaves of a number of plants native to Africa, East Asia and South America, and helps to protect them against herbivores and from competition by preventing the germination of nearby seeds, as well as encouraging consumption by select animals such as honey bees. The best-known source of caffeine is the coffee bean, the seed of the Coffea plant. People may drink beverages containing caffeine to relieve or prevent drowsiness and to improve cognitive performance. To make these drinks, caffeine is extracted by steeping the plant product in water, a process called infusion. Caffeine-containing drinks, such as coffee, tea, and cola, are consumed globally in high volumes. In 2020, almost 10 million tonnes of coffee beans were consumed globally. Caffeine is the world's most widely consumed psychoactive drug. Unlike most other psychoactive substances, caffeine remains largely unregulated and legal in nearly all parts of the world. Caffeine is also an outlier as its use is seen as socially acceptable in most cultures and even encouraged in others, particularly in the Western world. (Full article...)

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WikiProjects

WikiProject Food & Drink is an association of Wikipedians with an interest in culinary-related subjects. They have come together to co-ordinate the development of food and drink articles here on Wikipedia as well as the many subjects related to food such as foodservice, catering and restaurants. If you wish to learn more about these subjects as well as get involved, please visit the project.

Stein Glass (Beer).svg WikiProject Beer – covers Wikipedia's coverage of beer and breweries and microbreweries

Goblet Glass (Teardrop).svg WikiProject Wine – aims to compile thorough and accurate information on different vineyards, wineries and varieties of wines, including but not limited to their qualities, origins, and uses.


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