Open main menu

Wikipedia β

D r i n k

A portal dedicated to all beverages

The Drink Portal

A drink, in this case a glass of port wine.

Drinks, or beverages, are liquids specifically prepared for human consumption. In addition to basic needs, beverages form part of the culture of human society.

Despite the fact that most beverages, including juice, soft drinks, and carbonated drinks, have some form of water in them; water itself is often not classified as a beverage, and the word beverage has been recurrently defined as not referring to water.

Essential to the survival of all organisms, water has historically been an important and life-sustaining drink to humans. Excluding fat, water composes approximately 70% of the human body by mass. It is a crucial component of metabolic processes and serves as a solvent for many bodily solutes. Health authorities have historically suggested at least eight glasses, eight fluid ounces each, of water per day (64 fluid ounces, or 1.89 litres), and the British Dietetic Association recommends 1.8 litres. The United States Environmental Protection Agency has determined that the average adult actually ingests 2.0 litres per day.

Distilled (pure) water is rarely found in nature. Spring water, a natural resource from which much bottled water comes, is generally imbued with minerals. Tap water, delivered by domestic water systems in developed nations, refers to water piped to homes through a tap. All of these forms of water are commonly drunk, often purified through filtration.

An alcoholic beverage is a drink containing ethanol, commonly known as alcohol, although in chemistry the definition of an alcohol includes many other compounds. Alcoholic beverages, such as wine, beer, and liquor have been part of human culture and development for 8,000 years.

Non-alcoholic beverages often signify drinks that would normally contain alcohol, such as beer and wine but are made with less than .5 percent alcohol by volume. The category includes drinks that have undergone an alcohol removal process such as non-alcoholic beers and de-alcoholized wines.

Drink and Beverage WikiProjects

Goblet Glass (Banquet).svg

WikiProject Food & Drink is an association of Wikipedians with an interest in culinary-related subjects. They have come together to co-ordinate the development of food and drink articles here on Wikipedia as well as the many subjects related to food such as foodservice, catering and restaurants. If you wish to learn more about these subjects as well as get involved, please visit the Food & Drink Wikiproject page to see how you can help!

Beyond the general culinary interests, several groups of Wikipedians have banded together for beverage-specific projects covering their favorite types of drinks. If any of these subjects pique your interest, please feel free to visit their projects. These groups would love you to have you participate!

Cocktail-strainer.jpg Stein Glass (Beer).svg Pint Glass (Pub).svg Irish Coffee Glass (Mug).svg Shot Glass (Standard).svg Goblet Glass (Teardrop).svg
WikiProject
Bartending
WikiProject
Beer
Pubs
Taskforce
Beverages
Task Force
WikiProject
Spirits
WikiProject
Wine

Selected article

Glengoyne Distillery
Glengoyne Distillery is a whisky distillery founded in 1833 at the south of the Scottish Highlands and is known for working continuously since it was first opened.

The distillery has won various awards for its products including a double gold awarded to the 17 year old Single Malt at the San Francisco World Spirits Competition and a gold for the 15 year old Scottish oak wood finish for "best wood finish" by the Stockholm Beer and Whisky Festival. Glengoyne 17 year old was voted World's Best Single Highland Malt in the "Best of the Best" whisky tasting, organised by "Whisky Magazine". The name, Glengoyne comes from 'Glenguin' or 'Glen of the Wild Geese'. Unlike many malt whiskys Glengoyne does not user peat smoke to dry their barley but instead favours the use of warm air.

The novels of Sir Walter Scott novels where set in the area surrounding Glengoyne with the character Rob Roy, who was known for many illegal activity's such as cattle thieving, believed to have once hidden in an oak tree just 300 meters from Glengoyne to avoid detection by the local law enforcement.


Selected person

A can of Moxie
Augustin Thompson
B. November 25, 1835 – d. June 8, 1903

Augustin Thompson was a physician, business person and philanthropist who created the Moxie soft drink and the company that manufactures it.

Thompson was born in Union Maine on November 25, 1835. In the early part of the American Civil War, he joined the Union Army forces with Company G of the 28th regiment of the Maine Volunteer Infantry. Obtaining the rank of captain, he went on to see action in the Siege of Port Hudson in Donaldsonville, Louisiana as well as minor action at Fort Pickens in Pensacola, Florida.[1] Later in life he was granted the rank of lieutenant colonel through an act of Congress.[2][3]

After the war ended, he went on to attend Hahnemann Homeopathia College and graduated with honors at the head of his class. Upon graduation he settled in Lowell, Massachusetts where he set up his medical practice in 1867. By 1885, Dr. Thompson's practice had become highly successful and he was said to have one of the largest patient lists in the New England.[2][3] However it was at this time he gave up his $15,000 (over $350,000 by 2009) to begin the marketing and sale of his Moxie nerve tonic.[2][3]

The tonic, based upon his original patent medicine "Nerve Food" created in 1876, was first released as a syrup in 1884. In 1885, he received a trade mark for the term and released it as a carbonated beverage.



Selected ingredient

Blackstrap molasses
Molasses is a thick by-product from the processing of the sugar beet or sugar cane into sugar. (In some parts of the US, molasses also refers to syrup.) The word molasses comes from the Portuguese word melaço, which comes from "meli", the Greek word for "honey". The quality of molasses depends on the maturity of the sugar cane or beet, the amount of sugar extracted, and the method of extraction. Sweet Sorghum syrup is known as molasses in some parts of the U.S., though it is not true molasses.
More selected ingredients... Used in Rum Read more...


Drink news

Selected quote

Alonso of Aragon was wont to say in commendation of age, that age appears to be best in four things,—old wood best to burn, old wine to drink, old friends to trust, and old authors to read.
— Francis Bacon
 Apothegms No. 97,
reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919).


Did you know...

...there is a white variety of Tempranillo grapes?
Other "Did you know" facts... Read more...


Selected picture

Things you can do


Here are some tasks awaiting attention:

Categories

Category puzzle

The following entries are categories relating to drinks:


Drink lists

Topics related to Beverages

The following are topics relating to drinks:

General topics: Bartending  • Bottling • Refrigeration
Alcoholic beverages: Beer • Brandy • Brewing • Caffeinated alcoholic drinks • Cocktails • Distillation • Fermentation • Liqueur • Proof • Schnapps • Vodka • Whiskey • Wine
Soft Drinks: Carbonation • Coffee • Cola • Juice • Root beer • Soda water • Lithia water • Steeping • Tea


  1. ^ ""The Road To The Sea" Preserved: The 28th Maine Infantry at Donaldsonville, La". Department of the Maine Secretary of State. 2000-03-29. Retrieved 2009-02-02. 
  2. ^ a b c Frank N. Potter (1981). The Moxie Mystique. Donning Company. ISBN 089865145X. 
  3. ^ a b c Frank N. Potter (1987). The Book of Moxie. Collector Books. ISBN 0891453482.