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List of U.S. state beverages

This is a list of state beverages as designated by the various states of the United States.[1] The first known usage of declaring a specific beverage a "state beverage" within the US began in 1965 with Ohio designating tomato juice as their official beverage. The most popular choice for state beverage designation is Milk (or a flavored milk) with 21 out of the 28 states (26 states and 2 territories with official beverages) making milk their official beverage, while Rhode Island chose coffee-flavored milk. Alabama and Virginia are the only two U.S. states to have alcoholic beverages as their state beverages.

Contents

TableEdit

State Drink Year
Alabama Conecuh Ridge Whiskey
(State Spirit)
2004[2]
Arkansas Milk 1985[3]
Delaware Milk 1983[4]
Florida Orange juice 1967[5]
Kentucky Milk (State Drink) 2005[6]
Ale-8-One
(An original Kentucky soft drink)
2013[7]
Louisiana Milk 1983[8]
Maine Moxie 2005[9]
Maryland Milk 1998[10]
Massachusetts Cranberry juice 1970[11]
Minnesota Milk 2004[12]
Mississippi Milk 1984[13]
Nebraska Milk (State Beverage) 1998[14]
Kool-Aid (State Soft Drink)
New York Milk 1981[15][16][17][18]
North Carolina Milk 1987[19]
North Dakota Milk 1983[20]
Ohio Tomato juice 1965[21]
Oklahoma Milk 2002[22]
Oregon Milk 1997[23]
Pennsylvania Milk 1982[24]
Rhode Island Coffee milk 1993[25]
South Carolina Milk (State Beverage) 1984[26]
South Carolina-grown tea
(State Hospitality Beverage)
1995[26]
South Dakota Milk 1986[27]
Tennessee Milk 2009[28]
Vermont Milk 1983[29]
Virginia Milk 1982[30]
Rye Whiskey 2017[31]
Wisconsin Milk 1987[32]
D.C. & U.S. Territories Drink Year
District of Columbia Rickey 2011[33]
Puerto Rico Piña Colada 1978[34]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Official State Beverages, NetState.com, accessed April 21, 2006.
  2. ^ "State Spirit of Alabama", Alabama Emblems, Symbols and Honors, Alabama Department of Archives & History, 2005-08-25 .
  3. ^ "Arkansas State Symbols" (PDF), sos.arkansas.gov, Arkansas Secretary of State, retrieved 2017-04-01 .
  4. ^ "Delaware Miscellaneous Symbols", delaware.gov, Delaware, retrieved 2017-04-02 .
  5. ^ McGovern, Bernie (2007). Florida Almanac 2007-2008. Pelican Publishing. p. 451. ISBN 978-1-58980-428-9. 
  6. ^ "Kentucky State Symbols". Kentucky Legislature. 2007-03-30. Retrieved 2014-03-26. 
  7. ^ "Kentucky State Original Kentucky Soft Drink". NetState. Retrieved 2017-10-01. 
  8. ^ "RS 49:170", legis.la.gov, Louisiana State Legislature, retrieved 2017-04-02 .
  9. ^ "Title 1, Section 224", mainelegislature.org, Maine Legislature, retrieved 2017-05-02 .
  10. ^ "Maryland at a Glance", msa.maryland.gov, Maryland State Archives, 2016-03-06, retrieved 2017-04-02 .
  11. ^ "Massachusetts Fun Facts", mass.gov, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, retrieved 2017-04-02 .
  12. ^ "State Drink", mn.gov, Minnesota, retrieved 2017-04-02 .
  13. ^ "State Symbols", ms.gov, Mississippi, retrieved 2017-04-02 .
  14. ^ "Nebraska Symbols", snr.unl.edu, University of Nebraska, retrieved 2017-04-02 .
  15. ^ New York State Law § 82, New York State Assembly .
  16. ^ New York State Symbols, New York State Secretary of State .
  17. ^ New York State Symbols, I Love New York government tourism marketing office .
  18. ^ Marc Butler (June 8, 2008), June Is the Time to Recognize New York's Dairy Industry, New York State Assembly .
  19. ^ "Official State Symbols of North Carolina". North Carolina State Library. State of North Carolina. 
  20. ^ "State Symbols (capital, bird, tree, flag...)", nd.gov, The State of North Dakota, 2011, retrieved 2017-04-02 .
  21. ^ Fry, Stephen (2010). Stephen Fry in America: Fifty States and the Man Who Set Out to See Them All. HarperCollins. p. 160. ISBN 978-0-06-145638-1. 
  22. ^ Talley, Tim (November 2, 2002). "Milk becomes official state beverage". Amarillo Globe News. Archived from the original on 2011-06-28. Retrieved 2016-12-12. 
  23. ^ "State Symbols: Animal to Fish", bluebook.state.or.us, Oregon Blue Book, 2017, retrieved 2017-04-02 .
  24. ^ Facts About the States, 1993, p.433, Joseph Nathan Kane, 973 F119A.
  25. ^ Rhode Island statutes - section 42-4-15
  26. ^ a b "1995-96 Bill 3487: State Hospitality Beverage, Tea - South Carolina Legislature Online". 1995-04-10. Retrieved 2016-12-12. 
  27. ^ "1-6-16", sdlegislature.gov, South Dakota Legislature, 2017, retrieved 2017-04-02 .
  28. ^ "June Dairy Month Kicks Off in Tennessee". TN.gov. State of Tennessee. June 3, 2009. Retrieved 2016-12-12. 
  29. ^ [ Office of the Secretary of State, Vermont Legislative Directory and State Manual, Biennial Session, 1993-1994, p. 19.]
  30. ^ "Code of Virginia", law.lis.virginia.gov, Virginia Law, 2017, retrieved 2017-04-02 .
  31. ^ "Virginia to honor George Washington's Whiskey". WTOP. Associated Press. March 23, 2017. Retrieved April 25, 2017. 
  32. ^ "Wisconsin's State Symbols", legis.wisconsin.gov, State Wisconsin Reference Bureau, 2017, retrieved 2017-04-02 .
  33. ^ "Rickey Named Official D.C. Cocktail". dcist. Gothamist LLC. July 2011. Archived from the original on 2011-10-14. Retrieved 2013-01-05. 
  34. ^ "Celebrate Two of Mankind's Greatest Inventions". Retrieved 2007-06-19. 

External linksEdit