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A bowler delivers the ball to a batsman during a game of cricket.
Cricket is a bat-and-ball game played between two teams of eleven players on a field at the centre of which is a 20-metre (22-yard) pitch with a wicket at each end, each comprising two bails balanced on three stumps. The batting side scores runs by striking the ball bowled at the wicket with the bat, while the bowling and fielding side tries to prevent this and dismiss each player (so they are "out"). Means of dismissal include being bowled, when the ball hits the stumps and dislodges the bails, and by the fielding side catching the ball after it is hit by the bat, but before it hits the ground. When ten players have been dismissed, the innings ends and the teams swap roles. The game is adjudicated by two umpires, aided by a third umpire and match referee in international matches. They communicate with two off-field scorers who record the match's statistical information.

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Bill Woodfull

The Adelaide leak was the revelation to the press of a dressing-room incident during the third Test, a cricket match played during the 1932–33 Ashes series between Australia and England, more commonly known as the Bodyline series. During the course of play on 14 January 1933, the Australian Test captain Bill Woodfull was struck over the heart by a ball delivered by Harold Larwood. Although not badly hurt, Woodfull was shaken and dismissed shortly afterwards. On his return to the Australian dressing room, Woodfull was visited by the managers of the Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC) team, Pelham Warner and Richard Palairet. Warner enquired after Woodfull's health, but the latter dismissed his concerns in brusque fashion. He said he did not want to speak to the Englishman owing to the Bodyline tactics England were using, leaving Warner embarrassed and shaken. The matter became public knowledge when someone present leaked the exchange to the press and it was widely reported on 16 January. Such leaks to the press were practically unknown at the time, and the players were horrified that the confrontation became public knowledge.

In the immediate aftermath, many people assumed Jack Fingleton, the only full-time journalist on either team, was responsible. This belief may have affected the course of his subsequent career. Fingleton later wrote that Donald Bradman, Australia's star batsman and the primary target of Bodyline, was the person who disclosed the story. Bradman always denied this, and continued to blame Fingleton; animosity between the pair continued for the rest of their lives. Woodfull's earlier public silence on the tactics had been interpreted as approval; the leak was significant in persuading the Australian public that Bodyline was unacceptable.

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A terracotta urn with two brass plaques on it sits on a wooden base. The urn is on display, with the glass surround and other exhibits visible in the background.

The Ashes is a Test cricket series played between England and Australia. The series have varied in length, consisting of between one and seven Test matches, but since 1998 have been consistently five matches. It is one of sport's most celebrated rivalries and dates back to 1882. It is generally played biennially, alternating between the United Kingdom and Australia. Australia are the current holders of the Ashes, having clinched the 2017-18 series in the third test in Perth.

Although the first Test series played between England and Australia was in the 1876–77 season, the Ashes originated from the solitary Test which the two nations contested in 1882. England lost the match, played at The Oval, and a mock obituary was posted in The Sporting Times, declaring the death of English cricket. It stated that: "The body will be cremated and the ashes taken to Australia." The Honourable Ivo Bligh adopted the term and, as captain of the English party that travelled to Australia the following winter, promised to bring the "Ashes" home. Read more...


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On this day in cricket

Aubrey Smith
England
  • 1863 - Aubrey Smith (pictured) ,the only player to captain England in his only Test, is born.
  • 1934 - Bill Voce is taken out of the attack for bowling four overs of Bodyline for Nottinghamshire against Lancashire.
  • 1981 - England, having followed on 227 runs behind Australia in the third Ashes Test at Leeds and then being 135 for seven wickets in their second innings in the early afternoon of the previous day, still 92 behind, recover through Ian Botham's unbeaten 149 to 356 all out, setting Australia 130 to win. Then Bob Willis, changing ends to bowl with the wind as Australia get to 56 for one, takes eight of the last nine wickets at a personal cost of 43 runs as England win by 18 runs. This is only the second time in a Test match that a side following on has recovered to win.
South Africa
  • 1945 - Batsman Barry Richards - who could play only four tests because of Apartheid - is born.
  • 1994 - South Africa play in England for the first time after re admittance to Test cricket[1]. They had not been able to so for 29 years because of expulsion from Test Cricket because of Apartheid .
India
  • 1934 - All-rounder Chandu Borde - later manager of the Indian cricket team - is born.
  • 1947 - Opening batsman Chetan Chauhan is born.
West Indies

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ICC Rankings

The International Cricket Council (ICC) is the international governing body of cricket, and produces team rankings for the various forms of cricket played internationally.

Test cricket is the longest form of cricket, played up to a maximum of five days with two innings per side.

One Day International cricket is played over 50 overs, with one innings per side.

Twenty20 International cricket is played over 20 overs, with one innings per side.....

ICC Test Championship
Rank Team Matches Points Rating
1  India 32 3,631 113
2  New Zealand 23 2,547 111
3  South Africa 27 2,917 108
4  England 35 3,663 105
5  Australia 27 2,640 98
6  Sri Lanka 37 3,462 94
7  Pakistan 27 2,263 84
8  West Indies 29 2,381 82
9  Bangladesh 25 1,898 65
10  Zimbabwe 9 140 16
 Afghanistan* 2 50 25
 Ireland* 2
*Countries that have not played enough matches to gain an official ranking
Reference: Cricinfo rankings page, ICC Rankings, 3 May 2019
"Matches" is no. matches + no. series played in the 12–24 months since the May before last, plus half the number in the 24 months before that.
ICC ODI Rankings
Rank Team Matches Points Rating
1  England 54 6,745 125
2  India 56 6,807 122
3  New Zealand 42 4,709 112
4  Australia 50 5,543 111
5  South Africa 47 5,193 110
6  Pakistan 49 4,756 97
7  Bangladesh 43 3,873 90
8  Sri Lanka 51 4,009 79
9  West Indies 46 3,541 77
10  Afghanistan 40 2,359 59
11  Ireland 29 1,466 51
12  Zimbabwe 35 1,538 44
13  Netherlands 6 222 37
14  Scotland 11 399 36
15    Nepal 8 152 19
16  United Arab Emirates 15 144 10
17  Papua New Guinea 9 50 6
Matches is the number of matches played in the 12-24 months since the May before last, plus half the number in the 24 months before that. See points calculations for more details.
Reference: Cricinfo Rankings page,ICC ODI rankings 14 July 2019
ICC T20I Championship
Rank Team Matches Points Rating
1  Pakistan 26 7365 283
2  England 16 4253 266
3  South Africa 16 4196 262
4  Australia 21 5471 261
5  India 28 7273 260
6  New Zealand 16 4056 254
7  Afghanistan 16 3849 241
8  Sri Lanka 18 4093 227
9  West Indies 21 4747 226
10  Bangladesh 16 3525 220
11    Nepal 10 2143 214
12  Scotland 11 2185 199
13  Zimbabwe 13 2477 191
14  Netherlands 11 2065 188
15  Ireland 21 3834 183
16  United Arab Emirates 14 2527 181
17  Papua New Guinea 17 2920 172
18  Oman 5 774 155
19  Hong Kong 8 1213 152
20  Namibia 12 1729 144
21  Qatar 11 1421 129
22  Saudi Arabia 11 1331 121
23  Singapore 10 1181 118
24  Jersey 16 1834 115
25  Canada 8 887 111
26  Italy 12 1326 111
27  Kuwait 7 727 104
28  Denmark 14 1438 103
29  Kenya 12 1229 102
30  Germany 18 1527 85
31  United States 9 758 84
32  Botswana 14 1142 82
33  Ghana 10 773 71
34  Uganda 14 1069 76
35  Malaysia 17 1259 74
36  Austria 6 439 73
37  Norway 10 709 87
38  Nigeria 10 708 71
39  Guernsey 16 1127 70
40  Sweden 8 465 58
41  Tanzania 6 334 56
42  Luxembourg 6 328 55
43  Spain 9 479 53
44  Philippines 9 433 48
45  France 6 267 45
46  Belize 9 377 42
47  Peru 9 356 40
48  Bahrain 7 261 37
49  Mexico 12 426 36
50  Fiji 6 210 35
51  Samoa 6 205 34
52  Vanuatu 10 330 33
53  Panama 9 291 32
54  Belgium 9 290 32
55  Japan 10 317 32
56  Costa Rica 8 252 32
57  Argentina 12 370 31
58  Hungary 6 180 30
59  Mozambique 12 352 29
60  Thailand 14 369 26
61  Chile 10 249 25
62  Malawi 12 297 25
63  Israel 7 173 25
64  Bhutan 8 180 23
65  South Korea 10 217 22
66  Isle of Man 7 149 21
67  Finland 10 200 20
68  Malta 11 158 14
69  Bulgaria 5 68 14
70  Sierra Leone 5 61 12
71  Brazil 9 108 12
72  Maldives 11 114 10
73  Czech Republic 10 91 9
74  Saint Helena 12 109 9
75  Gibraltar 8 35 4
76  Myanmar 9 23 3
77  Indonesia 7 3 0
78  China 11 0 0
79  Gambia 6 0 0
80  Swaziland 6 0 0
81  Rwanda 6 0 0
82  Lesotho 6 0 0
Reference: ICC rankings for Tests, ODIs, Twenty20 & Women ICC page, 14 July 2019
"Matches" is the number of matches played in the 12-24 months since the May before last, plus half the number in the 24 months before that.

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