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Finland men's national ice hockey team

The Finnish men's national ice hockey team, or Leijonat / Lejonen (The Lions in Finnish and Swedish), as it is called in Finland, is governed by the Finnish Ice Hockey Association. Finland is considered a member of the so-called "Big Six", the unofficial group of the six strongest men's ice hockey nations, along with Canada, United States, the Czech Republic, Russia and Sweden.

Finland
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)Leijonat / Lejonen
(The Lions)
AssociationFinnish Ice Hockey Association
Head coachJukka Jalonen
AssistantsKari Lehtonen
Mikko Manner
Antti Pennanen
CaptainMarko Anttila
Most gamesRaimo Helminen (331)
Most pointsRaimo Helminen (207)
IIHF codeFIN
Finland national ice hockey team jerseys 2018 IHWC.png
Ranking
Current IIHF3 Increase 2 (26 May 2019)[1]
Highest IIHF2 (first in 2011)
Lowest IIHF7 (2005)
First international
Sweden  8–1  Finland
(Helsinki, Finland; 29 January 1928)
Biggest win
Finland  20–1  Norway
(Hämeenlinna, Finland; 12 March 1947)
Biggest defeat
Canada  24–0  Finland
(Oslo, Norway; 3 March 1958)
IIHF World Championships
Appearances65 (first in 1939)
Best resultGold medal world centered-2.svg Gold: (1995, 2011, 2019)
World Cup / Canada Cup
Appearances7 (first in 1976)
Best result2nd: (2004)
Olympics
Appearances14 (first in 1952)
MedalsSilver medal.svg Silver (1988, 2006)
Bronze medal.svg Bronze (1994, 1998, 2010, 2014)
Medal record
Olympic Games
Silver medal – second place 1988 Calgary Team
Silver medal – second place 2006 Turin Team
Bronze medal – third place 1994 Lillehammer Team
Bronze medal – third place 1998 Nagano Team
Bronze medal – third place 2010 Vancouver Team
Bronze medal – third place 2014 Sochi Team
World Cup / Canada Cup
Silver medal – second place 2004 Toronto
Bronze medal – third place 1991 Hamilton
World Championship
Gold medal – first place 1995 Sweden
Gold medal – first place 2011 Slovakia
Gold medal – first place 2019 Slovakia
Silver medal – second place 1992 Czechoslovakia
Silver medal – second place 1994 Italy
Silver medal – second place 1998 Switzerland
Silver medal – second place 1999 Norway
Silver medal – second place 2001 Germany
Silver medal – second place 2007 Russia
Silver medal – second place 2014 Belarus
Silver medal – second place 2016 Russia
Bronze medal – third place 2000 Russia
Bronze medal – third place 2006 Latvia
Bronze medal – third place 2008 Canada
European Championship
Silver medal – second place 1962 United States
Bronze medal – third place 1985 Czechoslovakia
Bronze medal – third place 1986 Soviet Union
Bronze medal – third place 1987 Austria
Bronze medal – third place 1991 Finland
Winter Universiade
Silver medal – second place 1981 Jaca
Silver medal – second place 1997 Muju-Jeonju
Bronze medal – third place 1970 Rovaniemi
Bronze medal – third place 1985 Belluno
Bronze medal – third place 1989 Sofia
Bronze medal – third place 1991 Sapporo
Bronze medal – third place 2005 Innsbruck

Contents

Recent historyEdit

In the 1995 Men's World Ice Hockey Championships, Finland achieved its first ever gold in international ice hockey. Finland reached the final with a 5–0 victory over France in the quarterfinals, and a 3–0 victory over the Czech Republic in the semi-finals. In the finals, the Finns faced off against their hockey rivals and host of the 1995 tournament, Sweden. In the first period of the final, left wing Ville Peltonen scored a natural hat trick, and then assisted on Timo Jutila's first period goal to give Finland a 4–0 lead, on the way to an eventual 4–1 victory.

At the 1998 Olympic men's ice hockey tournament, Team Finland came away with Bronze, after defeating Canadian national team 3–2. Teemu Selänne led the tournament in goals scored (4) and total points achieved (10). The tournament was the first in which professional players from the National Hockey League (NHL) were allowed to participate, allowing national teams to be constructed using the best possible talent from each country. The 1998 Olympic tournament therefore came to be known as the "Tournament of the Century". Unlike previous Olympics where athletes could choose five-star hotel accommodations (such as the USA Men's Basketball team), NHL players were required to stay in the Olympic Village like other athletes.

At the 2006 IIHF World Championship, Finland achieved 3rd place winning the Bronze medal game against Canada. Petteri Nummelin was named to the Media All-Star team.

In the 2006 Winter Olympics, Finland won a Silver medal, coming close to winning in the final but losing 3–2 to Sweden. Finland's goaltender Antero Niittymäki was named the MVP of the tournament (only 8 goals against in the whole tournament) and Teemu Selänne was voted best forward. The format was changed from the 1998 and 2002 tournaments, to a format similar to the 1992 and 1994 tournaments. The number of teams was reduced from 14 to 12. The 12 teams were split into two groups in the preliminary stage, which followed a round robin format. Each team played the other teams in their group once. The top four teams from each group advanced to the quarter-finals.

At the 2007 IIHF World Championship, Finland lost the finals to Canada's national team. The final marked the second time that Finland and Canada met in the final of a World Championship, the first time being in 1994. However, only a year before in 2006 Finland had defeated Canada 5–0 in the Bronze medal game. In 2007, Canada were looking on form, being undefeated coming into the playoff round, while Finland had registered two losses in the run-up to the finals. Rick Nash scored on the powerplay at 6:10 into the first period on a one-timer from the point from a pass by Cory Murphy off of Matthew Lombardi, to put Canada up 1–0. Near the middle of the period, Eric Staal scored in similar fashion also on the powerplay, assisted by Justin Williams, and Mike Cammalleri. 9:11 into the second period, Colby Armstrong scored to give the Canadians a 3–0 lead. This goal ended up as the game winner. Finland had some discipline difficulty in the first two periods, taking 6 minutes apiece in penalties in both periods. Finland started to bring up the pressure in the last ten minutes, and Petri Kontiola scored a nice glove-side goal on Ward at 51:08 assisted by Ville Peltonen, to put the Finns on the board. Only with 3 minutes left Antti Miettinen scored to bring Finland within one, 3–2. However, only one minute later Rick Nash scored on a skillful breakaway to put the game away, 4–2 final for team Canada. The Canadians were outshot 22–18, but the Canadian goaltender, Cam Ward, kept them in the game as he was solid between the pipes. They also were able to capitalize on the powerplay, which ended up being decisive in the Canadian win. Kari Lehtonen was voted Tournament's best goaltender. At the 2008 IIHF World Championship, Finland achieved 3rd place winning the Bronze medal 4–0 against Sweden's national team.

At the 2010 Winter Olympics, Finland came away with 3rd place winning 5–3 against team Slovakia. During the tournament, Teemu Selänne of Finland became the all-time leader for points scored in the Olympics.[2][3] He notched an assist in his second game of the tournament for 37 career points, surpassing Valeri Kharlamov of the Soviet Union, Vlastimil Bubník of Czechoslovakia, and Harry Watson of Canada.[2][3]

At the 2011 IIHF World Championship, Finland won its second World Championship, beating the Swedish national team by a score of 6–1. As two highly ranked neighboring countries, Sweden and Finland have a long-running competitive tradition in ice hockey. Before the game, mainstream media in both countries titled the match "a dream final".[4][5] After a goalless first period, Sweden opened the game with a 1–0 goal by Magnus Pääjärvi in the second period at 27:40. Seven seconds before the period's end, Finland's Jarkko Immonen scored to tie the game 1–1. Finland took the lead early in the third period, scoring two goals at 42:35 and 43:21 by Nokelainen and Kapanen. Sweden took a time-out before the last period's half but did not manage to regroup, and the tournament was decided by a clear 6–1 victory to Finland by Janne Pesonen's, Mika Pyörälä's and Pihlström goals.[6] Team Finland's Jarkko Immonen led the Tournament in both goals and points scored with 9 and 12 respectively.

In recent years, Finland has been consistently ranked among the best teams in international hockey. Currently the team is ranked 3rd (26 May 2019) in the IIHF World Ranking. Finland won their third World Championship title at the 2019 IIHF World Championship in Slovakia.

Tournament recordEdit

Olympic GamesEdit

Games GP W L T GF GA Coach Captain Finish
  1920 Antwerp was not involved -
  1924 Chamonix
  1928 St. Moritz
  1932 Lake Placid
  1936 Garmisch-Partenkirchen
  1948 St. Moritz
  1952 Oslo 8 2 6 0 21 60 Risto Lindroos Aarne Honkavaara 7th
  1956 Cortina d'Ampezzo Did not compete
  1960 Squaw Valley 6 3 2 1 55 23   Joe Wirkkunen Yrjö Hakala 7th
  1964 Innsbruck 8 3 5 0 18 33   Joe Wirkkunen Raimo Kilpiö 6th
  1968 Grenoble 8 4 3 1 28 25   Gustav Bubník Matti Reunamäki 5th
  1972 Sapporo 6 3 3 0 27 25 Seppo Liitsola Lasse Oksanen 5th
  1976 Innsbruck 6 3 3 0 30 20 Seppo Liitsola Seppo Lindström 4th
  1980 Lake Placid 7 3 3 1 31 25 Kalevi Numminen Tapio Levo 4th
  1984 Sarajevo 6 2 3 1 31 26 Alpo Suhonen Anssi Melametsä 6th
  1988 Calgary 8 5 2 1 34 14 Pentti Matikainen Timo Blomqvist   Silver
  1992 Albertville 8 4 3 1 29 11 Pentti Matikainen Pekka Tuomisto 7th
  1994 Lillehammer 8 7 1 0 38 10   Curt Lindström Timo Jutila   Bronze
  1998 Nagano 6 3 3 0 20 19 Hannu Aravirta Saku Koivu   Bronze
  2002 Salt Lake City 4 2 2 0 12 10 Hannu Aravirta Teemu Selänne 6th
  2006 Turin 8 7 1 0 29 8 Erkka Westerlund Saku Koivu   Silver
  2010 Vancouver 6 4 2 0 19 13 Jukka Jalonen Saku Koivu   Bronze
  2014 Sochi 6 4 1 1 24 10 Erkka Westerlund Teemu Selänne   Bronze
  2018 Pyeongchang 5 3 0 2 16 9 Lauri Marjamäki Lasse Kukkonen 6th
  2022 Beijing To be determined
Totals
Games Gold Silver Bronze Total
16 0 2 4 6

World ChampionshipEdit

Year Location Result
1939 Zürich / Basel,    Switzerland 13th place
1949 Stockholm,   Sweden 7th place
1951 Paris,   France 7th place
1954 Stockholm,   Sweden 6th place
1955 Krefeld / Dortmund / Cologne, West Germany   9th place
1957 Moscow,   Soviet Union 4th place
1958 Oslo,   Norway 6th place
1959 Prague / Bratislava,   Czechoslovakia 6th place
1961 Geneva / Lausanne,    Switzerland 7th place
1962 Colorado Springs / Denver,   United States 4th place
1963 Stockholm,   Sweden 5th place
1965 Tampere,   Finland 7th place
1966 Ljubljana,   Yugoslavia 7th place
1967 Vienna,   Austria 6th place
1969 Stockholm,   Sweden 5th place
1970 Stockholm,   Sweden 4th place
1971 Bern / Geneva,    Switzerland 4th place
1972 Prague,   Czechoslovakia 4th place
1973 Moscow,   Soviet Union 4th place
1974 Helsinki,   Finland 4th place
1975 Munich / Düsseldorf,   West Germany 4th place
1976 Katowice,   Poland 5th place
1977 Vienna,   Austria 5th place
1978 Prague,   Czechoslovakia 7th place
1979 Moscow,   Soviet Union 5th place
1981 Gothenburg / Stockholm,   Sweden 6th place
1982 Helsinki / Tampere,   Finland 5th place
1983 Düsseldorf / Dortmund / Munich, West Germany   7th place
1985 Prague,   Czechoslovakia 5th place
1986 Moscow,   Soviet Union 4th place
1987 Vienna,   Austria 5th place
1989 Stockholm / Södertälje,   Sweden 5th place
1990 Bern / Fribourg,    Switzerland 6th place
1991 Turku / Helsinki / Tampere,   Finland 5th place
1992 Prague / Bratislava,   Czechoslovakia Silver
1993 Dortmund / Munich,   Germany 7th place
1994 Bolzano / Canazei / Milano,   Italy Silver
1995 Stockholm / Gävle,   Sweden Gold
1996 Vienna,   Austria 5th place
1997 Helsinki / Turku / Tampere,   Finland 5th place
1998 Zürich / Basel,    Switzerland Silver
1999 Oslo / Lillehammer / Hamar,   Norway Silver
2000 Saint Petersburg,   Russia Bronze
2001 Cologne / Hanover / Nuremberg,   Germany Silver
2002 Gothenburg / Karlstad / Jönköping,   Sweden 4th place
2003 Helsinki / Tampere / Turku,   Finland 5th place
2004 Prague / Ostrava,   Czech Republic 6th place
2005 Innsbruck / Vienna,   Austria 7th place
2006 Riga,   Latvia Bronze
2007 Moscow / Mytishchi,   Russia Silver
2008 Quebec City / Halifax,   Canada Bronze
2009 Bern / Kloten,    Switzerland 5th place
2010 Cologne / Mannheim / Gelsenkirchen,   Germany 6th place
2011 Bratislava / Košice,   Slovakia Gold
2012 Helsinki,   Finland / Stockholm,   Sweden 4th place
2013 Stockholm,   Sweden / Helsinki,   Finland 4th place
2014 Minsk,   Belarus Silver
2015 Prague / Ostrava,   Czech Republic 6th place
2016 Moscow / Saint Petersburg,   Russia Silver
2017 Cologne,   Germany / Paris,   France 4th place
2018 Copenhagen / Herning,   Denmark 5th place
2019 Bratislava / Košice,   Slovakia Gold
2020 Zürich / Lausanne,    Switzerland

Canada Cup / World CupEdit

Year Coach Captain Finish Rank
1976 Lasse Heikkilä Veli-Pekka Ketola Round-robin 6th
1981 Kalevi Numminen Jari Kurri Round-robin 6th
1987 Rauno Korpi Jari Kurri Round-robin 6th
1991 Pentti Matikainen Jari Kurri Semi-final  
Year GP W OW T OL L GF GA Coach Captain Finish Rank
1996 4 2 0 2 17 16   Curt Lindström Jari Kurri Quarter-final 5th
2004 6 4 0 1 0 1 17 9 Raimo Summanen Saku Koivu Final  
2016 3 0 0 0 3 1 9 Lauri Marjamäki Mikko Koivu Group stage 8th

Euro Hockey TourEdit

EHT Medal tableEdit

Gold Silver Bronze Medals
9 7 6 22

Tournament summaryEdit

Finland's Euro Hockey Tour (EHT) Cup medal tableEdit

As of the 2018 Channel One Cup

Tournament Gold Silver Bronze Medals
Karjala Tournament 12 7 1 20
Channel One Cup 2 10 16 28
Sweden Hockey Games 7 3 5 15
Czech Hockey Games 6 7 4 17
Total 27 20 24 71

Euro Hockey ChallengeEdit

  • 2011 – Finished in  
  • 2012 – Finished in  
  • 2013 – Finished in  
  • 2014 – Finished in  
  • 2015 – Finished in  
  • 2016 – Finished in  
  • 2017 – Finished in  
  • 2018 – Finished in  

Other tournamentsEdit

TeamEdit

Current rosterEdit

Roster for the 2019 IIHF World Championship.[7][8]

Head coach: Jukka Jalonen

No. Pos. Name Height Weight Birthdate Team
4 D Mikko LehtonenA 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in) 89 kg (196 lb) (1994-01-16) 16 January 1994 (age 25)   HV71
7 D Oliwer Kaski 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in) 85 kg (187 lb) (1995-09-04) 4 September 1995 (age 24)   Detroit Red Wings
12 F Marko AnttilaC 2.03 m (6 ft 8 in) 104 kg (229 lb) (1985-05-27) 27 May 1985 (age 34)   Jokerit
15 F Arttu Ilomäki 1.82 m (6 ft 0 in) 89 kg (196 lb) (1991-06-12) 12 June 1991 (age 28)   Lukko
19 F Veli-Matti SavinainenA 1.82 m (6 ft 0 in) 82 kg (181 lb) (1986-01-05) 5 January 1986 (age 33)   Kunlun Red Star
20 F Niko Ojamäki 1.81 m (5 ft 11 in) 84 kg (185 lb) (1995-06-17) 17 June 1995 (age 24)   Tappara
21 F Juhani Tyrväinen 1.81 m (5 ft 11 in) 86 kg (190 lb) (1990-09-11) 11 September 1990 (age 29)   HIFK
24 F Kaapo Kakko 1.87 m (6 ft 2 in) 82 kg (181 lb) (2001-02-13) 13 February 2001 (age 18)   New York Rangers
25 F Toni Rajala 1.79 m (5 ft 10 in) 76 kg (168 lb) (1991-03-29) 29 March 1991 (age 28)   EHC Biel
27 F Eetu Luostarinen 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in) 86 kg (190 lb) (1998-09-02) 2 September 1998 (age 21)   KalPa
28 D Henri Jokiharju 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in) 87 kg (192 lb) (1999-06-17) 17 June 1999 (age 20)   Buffalo Sabres
30 G Kevin Lankinen 1.87 m (6 ft 2 in) 84 kg (185 lb) (1995-04-28) 28 April 1995 (age 24)   Rockford IceHogs
35 G Veini Vehviläinen 1.84 m (6 ft 0 in) 79 kg (174 lb) (1997-02-13) 13 February 1997 (age 22)   Oulun Kärpät
40 D Petteri Lindbohm 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in) 95 kg (209 lb) (1993-09-23) 23 September 1993 (age 25)   Lausanne HC
41 F Joel Kiviranta 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) 80 kg (180 lb) (1996-03-23) 23 March 1996 (age 23)   Vaasan Sport
45 G Jussi Olkinuora 1.89 m (6 ft 2 in) 91 kg (201 lb) (1990-11-04) 4 November 1990 (age 28)   Lahti Pelicans
50 D Miika Koivisto 1.84 m (6 ft 0 in) 88 kg (194 lb) (1990-07-20) 20 July 1990 (age 29)   HC Dynamo Moscow
55 D Atte Ohtamaa 1.88 m (6 ft 2 in) 96 kg (212 lb) (1987-11-06) 6 November 1987 (age 31)   Oulun Kärpät
58 D Jani Hakanpää 1.95 m (6 ft 5 in) 99 kg (218 lb) (1992-03-31) 31 March 1992 (age 27)   Oulun Kärpät
65 F Sakari Manninen 1.70 m (5 ft 7 in) 71 kg (157 lb) (1992-02-10) 10 February 1992 (age 27)   Jokerit
70 D Niko Mikkola 1.94 m (6 ft 4 in) 84 kg (185 lb) (1996-04-27) 27 April 1996 (age 23)   San Antonio Rampage
71 F Kristian Kuusela 1.75 m (5 ft 9 in) 82 kg (181 lb) (1983-02-19) 19 February 1983 (age 36)   Tappara
76 F Jere Sallinen 1.87 m (6 ft 2 in) 91 kg (201 lb) (1990-10-26) 26 October 1990 (age 28)   Örebro HK
82 F Harri Pesonen 1.82 m (6 ft 0 in) 88 kg (194 lb) (1988-08-06) 6 August 1988 (age 31)   SCL Tigers
91 F Juho Lammikko 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in) 91 kg (201 lb) (1996-01-29) 29 January 1996 (age 23)   Springfield Thunderbirds

Former national jerseysEdit

           

Retired jerseysEdit

Finland men's national retired numbers
No. Player Position Career Year of retirement
5 Timo Jutila D 1979–1999 2018
8 Teemu Selänne RW 1987–2014 2015
11 Saku Koivu C 1992–2014 2015
14 Raimo Helminen C 1982–2008 2010
16 Ville Peltonen LW 1991–2014 2015
17 Jari Kurri RW 1977–1998 2007
26 Jere Lehtinen RW 1992–2010 2015
44 Kimmo Timonen D 1991–2015 2018

Notable playersEdit

List of head coachesEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "IIHF Men's World Ranking". IIHF. 26 May 2019. Retrieved 26 May 2019.
  2. ^ a b "Ice hockey: Selanne sets Olympic scoring record". Vancouver. 19 February 2010. Retrieved 10 March 2010.
  3. ^ a b "Selanne's 37th point tops Games mark". ESPN. Associated Press. 20 February 2010. Retrieved 27 September 2010.
  4. ^ Anrell, Lasse (14 May 2011). "Drömfinal". Aftonbladet (in Swedish). Retrieved 16 May 2011.
  5. ^ "Jääkiekossa unelmafinaali Leijonat–Tre Kronor". Helsingin Sanomat (in Finnish). Sanoma. 13 May 2011. Retrieved 16 May 2011.
  6. ^ Aykroyd, Lucas (15 May 2011). "It's gold for Finland!". IIHF. Archived from the original on 18 May 2011. Retrieved 16 May 2011. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  7. ^ "Miesten MM-kisat käyntiin perjantaina - Suomen MM-joukkue valittu". leijonat.fi. 5 May 2019.
  8. ^ 2019 IIHF World Championship roster
  9. ^ "Jalonen Leijonien seuraava päävalmentaja". mtv3.fi (in Finnish). 7 June 2013. Retrieved 7 June 2013.
  10. ^ "IS: Marjamäki on Leijonien uusi päävalmentaja". mtv3.fi (in Finnish). 28 August 2015. Retrieved 28 August 2015.
  11. ^ "Jukka Jalonen Palaa Leijonien päävalmentajaksi". iltalehti.fi (in Finnish). 4 October 2017. Retrieved 18 March 2018.

External linksEdit