Lillehammer (Norwegian pronunciation: [ˈlɪ̂lːəˌhɑmːər] (listen)) is a municipality in Innlandet county, Norway. It is located in the traditional district of Gudbrandsdal. The administrative centre of the municipality is the town of Lillehammer. Some of the more notable villages in the municipality include Fåberg, Hunderfossen, Jørstadmoen, Vingnes, and Vingrom.

Lillehammer kommune
View of the town of Lillehammer
View of the town of Lillehammer
Official logo of Lillehammer kommune
Lillehammer within Innlandet
Lillehammer within Innlandet
Coordinates: 61°7′N 10°28′E / 61.117°N 10.467°E / 61.117; 10.467Coordinates: 61°7′N 10°28′E / 61.117°N 10.467°E / 61.117; 10.467
CountryNorway
CountyInnlandet
DistrictGudbrandsdal
Established1 Jan 1838
 • Created asFormannskapsdistrikt
Administrative centreLillehammer
Government
 • Mayor (2019)Ingunn Trosholmen (Ap)
Area
 • Total477.95 km2 (184.54 sq mi)
 • Land450.72 km2 (174.02 sq mi)
 • Water27.23 km2 (10.51 sq mi)  5.7%
 • Rank#211 in Norway
Population
 (2021)
 • Total28,493
 • Rank#38 in Norway
 • Density63.2/km2 (164/sq mi)
 • Change (10 years)
Increase +7.2%
DemonymLillehamring[1]
Official language
 • Norwegian formBokmål
Time zoneUTC+01:00 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+02:00 (CEST)
ISO 3166 codeNO-3405
WebsiteOfficial website

The 478-square-kilometre (185 sq mi) municipality is the 211th largest by area out of the 356 municipalities in Norway. Lillehammer is the 38th most populous municipality in Norway with a population of 28,493. The municipality's population density is 63.2 inhabitants per square kilometre (164/sq mi) and its population has increased by 7.2% over the previous 10-year period.[3][4]

The town of Lillehammer is the largest urban centre in the municipality. It lies in the central part of the municipality and it is surrounded by more rural areas. The town centre is a late nineteenth-century concentration of wooden houses, which enjoys a picturesque location overlooking the northern part of lake Mjøsa and the river Lågen, surrounded by mountains. Lillehammer hosted the 1994 Winter Olympics and 2016 Winter Youth Olympics.[5]

General informationEdit

The municipality was established on 1 January 1838 (see formannskapsdistrikt law). On 1 January 1906, a small adjacent area of the neighboring municipality of Fåberg (population: 140) was annexed by Lillehammer to make room for more expansion as the town grew. During the 1960s, there were many municipal mergers across Norway due to the work of the Schei Committee. On 1 January 1964, the town of Lillehammer (population: 5,905) was merged with Fåberg Municipality (population: 13,381) to form a new, larger Lillehammer Municipality.[6]

NameEdit

The municipality (originally the parish) was named after the old Hamar farm (Old Norse: Hamarr), since the first Lillehammer Church was built there. The name is identical with the word hamarr which means "rocky hill". To distinguish it from the nearby town of Hamar and Diocese of Hamar, it began to be called "little Hamar": Lilþlæ Hamar and Litlihamarr, and finally Lillehammer. It is also mentioned in the Old Norse sagas as Litlikaupangr ("Little Trading Place").[7][8]

Coat of armsEdit

The coat of arms was granted on 4 April 1898. The arms depict a birkebeiner, carrying a spear and a shield, who is skiing down a silver/white mountainside under a blue sky. The design symbolizes the historical importance of when the Birkebeiners carried the future King Haakon from Lillehammer to Rena on skis.[9][10]

ChurchesEdit

The Church of Norway has six parishes (sokn) within the municipality of Lillehammer. It is part of the Sør-Gudbrandsdal prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Hamar.

Churches in Lillehammer
Parish (sokn) Church name Location of the church Year built
Fåberg Fåberg Church Fåberg 1727
Lillehammer Lillehammer Church Lillehammer 1882
Nordre Ål Nordre Ål Church Lillehammer 1994
Nordseter Church Nordseter 1964
Saksumdal Saksumdal Church Saksumdal 1875
Søre Ål Søre Ål Church Lillehammer 1964
Vingrom Vingrom Church Vingrom 1908

HistoryEdit

The village of Lillehammer is located at the northern end of Norway's largest lake, Mjøsa. There has likely been settlements here since the Iron Age and the market here was mentioned in Håkon Håkonson's saga in 1390. It is also mentioned as a site for Thing assembly in 1390. Tradition states that it was here in Lillehammer where the birkebeiners Torstein Skjevla and Skjervald Skrukka joined up with the King's son (and future King), Haakon, in 1205 before they traveled to Østerdalen (an event which is commemorated in March every year to this day). Since medieval times, the Lillehammer Church has been located here.[11]

The village was granted market town rights on 7 August 1827. At that time, 50 people lived within the boundaries of the newly established town. This site was chosen because there were no other towns in all of Christians amt (county) and this site was located along the Gudbrandsdalslågen river and the whole Gudbrandsdal valley was a major transportation route from the capital to northern Norway. Within two years of the establishment of the town, the population had risen to 360 people. The merchant Ludvig Wiese has been counted as the founder of the town (a statue of him was erected in the town in connection with the town's 100th anniversary in 1927). The laying of the main railway line from the capital in Christiania to Eidsvoll was completed in 1852. This railway line was connected with steamships along the lake Mjøsa which travelled to Lillehammer and from there a newly laid road made connections further up into the Gudbrandsdalen valley. This transport system made the transit of timber and agricultural goods from all over the county to the capital possible, and it contributed to the growth of the town of Lillehammer.[11]

In 1973, Mossad killed a Moroccan waiter, having mistaken him for Palestinian terrorist Ali Hassan Salameh, which became known as the Lillehammer affair.

Lillehammer is known as a typical venue for winter sporting events; it was host city of the 1994 Winter Olympics, and the 2016 Winter Youth Olympics, and was part of a joint bid with applicant host city Oslo to host events part of the 2022 Winter Olympics until Oslo withdrew its bid on 1 October 2014.

Lillehammer is home to the largest literature festival in the Nordic countries and, in 2017, was designated as a UNESCO City of Literature.

EducationEdit

A number of schools are located in Lillehammer, including the Hammartun Primary and Lower Secondary School, Søre Ål Primary School and Kringsjå Primary and Lower Secondary School. Lillehammer Upper Secondary School consists of two branches, North and South, both situated near the city center. The private high school Norwegian College of Elite Sports, NTG, also has a branch in Lillehammer. The Lillehammer campus of Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences is situated just north of the town itself.

Lillehammer is also the home of the Nansen Academy - the Norwegian Humanistic Academy. The Nansen Academy is an educational institution for adult students with varied political, religious, and cultural backgrounds. The Academy was founded on the core principles of humanism and aims at strengthening the knowledge of these principles.

The 14th World Scout Jamboree was held from 29 July to 7 August 1975 and was hosted by Norway at Lillehammer.

GovernmentEdit

All municipalities in Norway, including Lillehammer, are responsible for primary education (through 10th grade), outpatient health services, senior citizen services, unemployment and other social services, zoning, economic development, and municipal roads. The municipality is governed by a municipal council of elected representatives, which in turn elects a mayor.[12] The municipality falls under the Vestre Innlandet District Court and the Eidsivating Court of Appeal.

Municipal councilEdit

The municipal council (Kommunestyre) of Lillehammer is made up of 47 representatives that are elected to four year terms. The party breakdown of the council is as follows:

Lillehammer Kommunestyre 2020–2023 [13]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)13
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)2
 Green Party (Miljøpartiet De Grønne)4
 Conservative Party (Høyre)9
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Pensioners' Party (Pensjonistpartiet)1
 Red Party (Rødt)3
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)8
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)4
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:47
Lillehammer Kommunestyre 2016–2019 [14][15]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)22
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)2
 Green Party (Miljøpartiet De Grønne)3
 Conservative Party (Høyre)7
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
 Red Party (Rødt)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
 Liberal Party (Venstre)4
Total number of members:47
Lillehammer Kommunestyre 2012–2015 [16]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)19
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)3
 Green Party (Miljøpartiet De Grønne)1
 Conservative Party (Høyre)11
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
 Red Party (Rødt)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)2
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
 Liberal Party (Venstre)5
Total number of members:47
Lillehammer Kommunestyre 2008–2011 [15]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)19
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)6
 Conservative Party (Høyre)5
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
 Pensioners' Party (Pensjonistpartiet)1
 Red Electoral Alliance (Rød Valgallianse)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)3
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)4
 Liberal Party (Venstre)3
 Lillehammer town and local list (Lillehammer by- og bygdeliste)2
Total number of members:47
Lillehammer Kommunestyre 2004–2007 [15]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)18
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)5
 Conservative Party (Høyre)6
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
 Pensioners' Party (Pensjonistpartiet)1
 Red Electoral Alliance (Rød Valgallianse)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)7
 Liberal Party (Venstre)3
Total number of members:47
Lillehammer Kommunestyre 2000–2003 [15][17]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)17
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)3
 Conservative Party (Høyre)9
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
 Pensioners' Party (Pensjonistpartiet)1
 Red Electoral Alliance (Rød Valgallianse)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)5
 Liberal Party (Venstre)3
Total number of members:47
Lillehammer Kommunestyre 1996–1999 [18]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)22
 Conservative Party (Høyre)10
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
 Pensioners' Party (Pensjonistpartiet)1
 Red Electoral Alliance (Rød Valgallianse)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)5
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)4
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:47
Lillehammer Kommunestyre 1992–1995 [19]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)22
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)2
 Conservative Party (Høyre)10
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
 Pensioners' Party (Pensjonistpartiet)1
 Red Electoral Alliance (Rød Valgallianse)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)7
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)8
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:55
Lillehammer Kommunestyre 1988–1991 [20]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)26
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)5
 Conservative Party (Høyre)12
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)4
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:55
Lillehammer Kommunestyre 1984–1987 [21]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)27
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)1
 Conservative Party (Høyre)14
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)4
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:55
Lillehammer Kommunestyre 1980–1983 [22]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)24
 Conservative Party (Høyre)15
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)4
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)5
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)4
 Liberal Party (Venstre)3
Total number of members:55
Lillehammer Kommunestyre 1976–1979 [23]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)27
 Conservative Party (Høyre)11
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)5
 New People's Party (Nye Folkepartiet)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)6
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)4
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:55
Lillehammer Kommunestyre 1972–1975 [24]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)27
 Conservative Party (Høyre)10
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)4
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)7
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
 Socialist common list (Venstresosialistiske felleslister)5
Total number of members:55
Lillehammer Kommunestyre 1968–1971 [25]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)29
 Conservative Party (Høyre)11
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)6
 Socialist People's Party (Sosialistisk Folkeparti)3
 Liberal Party (Venstre)3
Total number of members:55
Lillehammer Kommunestyre 1964–1967 [26]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)30
 Conservative Party (Høyre)11
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)1
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)5
 Socialist People's Party (Sosialistisk Folkeparti)2
 Liberal Party (Venstre)3
Total number of members:55
Lillehammer Bystyre 1960–1963 [27]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)20
 Conservative Party (Høyre)12
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)1
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:37
Lillehammer Bystyre 1956–1959 [28]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)19
 Conservative Party (Høyre)11
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)2
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
 Liberal Party (Venstre)3
Total number of members:37
Lillehammer Bystyre 1952–1955 [29]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)17
 Conservative Party (Høyre)10
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)3
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
 Liberal Party (Venstre)3
Total number of members:36
Lillehammer Bystyre 1948–1951 [30]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)17
 Conservative Party (Høyre)9
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)4
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
 Joint list of the Liberal Party (Venstre) and
the Radical People's Party (Radikale Folkepartiet)
3
Total number of members:36
Lillehammer Bystyre 1945–1947 [31]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)16
 Conservative Party (Høyre)8
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)5
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
 Joint list of the Liberal Party (Venstre) and
the Radical People's Party (Radikale Folkepartiet)
4
Total number of members:36
Lillehammer Bystyre 1938–1940* [32]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)16
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)13
 Local List(s) (Lokale lister)7
Total number of members:36
Note: Due to the German occupation of Norway during World War II, no elections were held for new municipal councils until after the war ended in 1945.
Lillehammer Bystyre 1935–1937 [33]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)15
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)16
 Local List(s) (Lokale lister)5
Total number of members:36
Lillehammer Bystyre 1932–1934 [34]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)13
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)1
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)18
 Local List(s) (Lokale lister)4
Total number of members:36
Lillehammer Bystyre 1929–1931 [35]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)15
 Free-minded Liberal Party (Frisinnede Venstre)4
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)1
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)14
Total number of members:36
Lillehammer Bystyre 1926–1928 [36]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)8
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)2
 Social Democratic Labour Party
(Socialdemokratiske Arbeiderparti)
3
 Joint list of the Conservative Party (Høyre)
and the Free-minded Liberal Party (Frisinnede Venstre)
19
 Local List(s) (Lokale lister)4
Total number of members:36
Lillehammer Bystyre 1923–1925 [37]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)10
 Social Democratic Labour Party
(Socialdemokratiske Arbeiderparti)
2
 Liberal Party (Venstre)5
 Joint list of the Conservative Party (Høyre)
and the Free-minded Liberal Party (Frisinnede Venstre)
19
Total number of members:36
Lillehammer Bystyre 1920–1922 [38]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)9
 Joint list of the Liberal Party and Temperance Party
(Venstre og avholdspartiet)
2
 Joint list of the Conservative Party (Høyre)
and the Free-minded Liberal Party (Frisinnede Venstre)
14
 Local List(s) (Lokale lister)3
Total number of members:28

MayorsEdit

The mayors of Lillehammer (incomplete list):

GeographyEdit

Lillehammer is situated in the lower part of the Gudbrandsdal valley, at the northern end of lake Mjøsa. It is located to the south of Øyer Municipality, to the southeast of Gausdal Municipality, northeast of Nordre Land Municipality, to the north of Gjøvik Municipality, and to the southeast of Ringsaker Municipality. The mountain Nevelfjell lies in the northeast part of the municipality.

ClimateEdit

Lillehammer has a humid continental climate (Dfb), with the Scandinavian mountain chain to the west and north limiting oceanic influences. The record high of 34 °C (93 °F) was recorded in June 1970. The record low of −31 °C (−24 °F) was recorded in December 1978 and January 1979, and the same low was recorded in January 1987. There has been no overnight air frost in the month of August since 1978 with the record low for that month being −0.6 °C (30.9 °F) (a sufficient temperature for air frost). The coldest recorded temperature after 2000 is −26.2 °C (−15.2 °F) in January 2010. The current weather station Lillehammer-Sætherengen became operational in 1982; extremes are also from two earlier weather stations in Lillehammer.

Climate data for Lillehammer 1991-2020 (240 m; extremes 1957 - 2018)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 10.4
(50.7)
12.5
(54.5)
16.0
(60.8)
23.4
(74.1)
28.5
(83.3)
34.0
(93.2)
32.4
(90.3)
33.0
(91.4)
26.4
(79.5)
19.5
(67.1)
16.2
(61.2)
11.3
(52.3)
34.0
(93.2)
Average high °C (°F) −3.3
(26.1)
−1.8
(28.8)
3.7
(38.7)
9.4
(48.9)
15.4
(59.7)
19.3
(66.7)
21.7
(71.1)
19.9
(67.8)
14.9
(58.8)
7.2
(45.0)
1.2
(34.2)
−2.8
(27.0)
8.7
(47.7)
Daily mean °C (°F) −6.1
(21.0)
−5.4
(22.3)
−1.2
(29.8)
4
(39)
9.4
(48.9)
13.7
(56.7)
16.1
(61.0)
14.5
(58.1)
10.1
(50.2)
4.1
(39.4)
−1.2
(29.8)
−5.5
(22.1)
4.4
(39.9)
Average low °C (°F) −8.4
(16.9)
−8.1
(17.4)
−4.6
(23.7)
0
(32)
4.5
(40.1)
8.8
(47.8)
11.4
(52.5)
10.1
(50.2)
6.4
(43.5)
1.4
(34.5)
−3.0
(26.6)
−7.6
(18.3)
0.9
(33.6)
Record low °C (°F) −31.0
(−23.8)
−29.5
(−21.1)
−24.1
(−11.4)
−14.0
(6.8)
−5.4
(22.3)
−2.2
(28.0)
0.5
(32.9)
−0.6
(30.9)
−5.8
(21.6)
−14.5
(5.9)
−22.5
(−8.5)
−31.0
(−23.8)
−31.0
(−23.8)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 52
(2.0)
35
(1.4)
35
(1.4)
35
(1.4)
64
(2.5)
70
(2.8)
80
(3.1)
96
(3.8)
65
(2.6)
69
(2.7)
69
(2.7)
47
(1.9)
717
(28.3)
Mean monthly sunshine hours 28 68 126 168 212 242 237 195 136 83 44 18 1,557
Source 1: [39]
Source 2: [40]

Populated placesEdit

Lillehammer Municipality is subdivided into the following populated places (i.e.: neighborhoods, quarters, villages, localities, settlements, communities, hamlets, etc.):

EconomyEdit

The basis for the economy of the municipality is its position as the northernmost point of the lake Mjøsa and as the gateway for the Gudbrandsdal region, through which the historical highway from Oslo to Trondheim passes. The Mesna river has provided the basis for several small industries through the years, but Lillehammer is now all but industry-less.

TransportEdit

One of the major Norwegian rail lines, the Dovre Line, runs from Hamar to the north through Lillehammer on its way up the Gudbrandsdal valley, to terminate in the city of Trondheim. The European route E6 highway also passes through Lillehammer.

AttractionsEdit

 
Storgata shopping area

In addition to the Olympic site, Lillehammer offers a number of other tourist attractions:

SportEdit

 
Olympic ski jump

Sports clubsEdit

Notable residentsEdit

 
Sigrid Undset, 1928

ArtsEdit

Public serviceEdit

 
Anne Stine Moe Ingstad, 1963

SportEdit

 
Robert Johansson, 2019

In popular cultureEdit

Twin towns – sister citiesEdit

Lillehammer has sister city agreements with the following places:[44]

Friendly citiesEdit

Lillehammer has also friendly relations with:[44]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Navn på steder og personer: Innbyggjarnamn" (in Norwegian). Språkrådet.
  2. ^ "Forskrift om målvedtak i kommunar og fylkeskommunar" (in Norwegian). Lovdata.no.
  3. ^ Statistisk sentralbyrå (2021). "Table: 06913: Population 1 January and population changes during the calendar year (M)" (in Norwegian).
  4. ^ Statistisk sentralbyrå (2021). "09280: Area of land and fresh water (km²) (M)" (in Norwegian).
  5. ^ "Lillehammer awarded 2016 Winter Youth Olympic Games".
  6. ^ Jukvam, Dag (1999). "Historisk oversikt over endringer i kommune- og fylkesinndelingen" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Statistisk sentralbyrå.
  7. ^ Rygh, Oluf (1900). Norske gaardnavne: Kristians amt (in Norwegian) (4 ed.). Kristiania, Norge: W. C. Fabritius & sønners bogtrikkeri. p. 219.
  8. ^ "Lillehammers historie" (in Norwegian). Lillehammer kommune. Archived from the original on 11 October 2007. Retrieved 4 January 2009.
  9. ^ "Kommunevåpen Lillehammer" (in Norwegian). National Archives of Norway. Retrieved 6 July 2022.
  10. ^ "Civic heraldry of Norway - Norske Kommunevåpen". Heraldry of the World. Retrieved 6 July 2022.
  11. ^ a b Herberg, Kari B. "Lillehammers historie". Lillehammer kommune (in Norwegian). Retrieved 6 July 2022.
  12. ^ Hansen, Tore, ed. (12 May 2016). "kommunestyre". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Kunnskapsforlaget. Retrieved 30 January 2022.
  13. ^ "Tall for Norge: Kommunestyrevalg 2019 - Innlandet". Valg Direktoratet. Retrieved 7 June 2022.
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