Gjøvik  is a municipality in Innlandet county, Norway. It is located in the traditional district of Toten. The administrative centre of the municipality is town of Gjøvik. Some of the villages in Gjøvik include Biri, Bybrua, and Hunndalen.

Gjøvik kommune
View of the town of Gjøvik
View of the town of Gjøvik
Flag of Gjøvik kommune
Coat of arms of Gjøvik kommune
Official logo of Gjøvik kommune
Gjøvik within Innlandet
Gjøvik within Innlandet
Coordinates: 60°47′33″N 10°41′42″E / 60.79250°N 10.69500°E / 60.79250; 10.69500Coordinates: 60°47′33″N 10°41′42″E / 60.79250°N 10.69500°E / 60.79250; 10.69500
CountryNorway
CountyInnlandet
DistrictVestoppland
Established1 Jan 1861
 • Preceded byVardal Municipality
Administrative centreGjøvik
Government
 • Mayor (2019)Torvild Sveen (Centre Party)
Area
 • Total671.12 km2 (259.12 sq mi)
 • Land628.91 km2 (242.82 sq mi)
 • Water42.21 km2 (16.30 sq mi)  6.3%
 • Rank#169 in Norway
Population
 (2022)
 • Total30,267
 • Rank#35 in Norway
 • Density48.1/km2 (125/sq mi)
 • Change (10 years)
Increase +3.6%
DemonymsGjøvikenser
Gjøvikensar[1]
Official language
 • Norwegian formBokmål
Time zoneUTC+01:00 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+02:00 (CEST)
ISO 3166 codeNO-3407
WebsiteOfficial website

The 671-square-kilometre (259 sq mi) municipality is the 169th largest by area out of the 356 municipalities in Norway. Gjøvik is the 35th most populous municipality in Norway with a population of 30,267. The municipality's population density is 48.1 inhabitants per square kilometre (125/sq mi) and its population has increased by 3.6% over the previous 10-year period.[3][4]

General informationEdit

Historically, the village of Gjøvik was part of the parish and municipality of Vardal. On 1 January 1861, the village was granted kjøpstad (town) status. At that time, the village was separated from Vardal to form a separate municipality given its new status as a town. Initially, the new town and municipality of Gjøvik had 626 residents. On 1 July 1921, a part of Vardal municipality located just outside the town of Gjøvik (population: 723) was annexed into the town. Again, on 1 January 1955, another part of Vardal (population: 1,372) was transferred to the town. During the 1960s, there were many municipal mergers across Norway due to the work of the Schei Committee. On 1 January 1964, the neighboring rural municipalities of Biri (population: 3,274), Snertingdal (population: 2,471), and most of Vardal (population: 9,612) were all merged with the town of Gjøvik (population: 8,251) to form the new, larger Gjøvik Municipality.[5]

EtymologyEdit

The town and municipality is named after the old Gjøvik farm (Old Norse: Djúpvík). The first element is djúpr which means "deep" and the second element is vík which means "inlet".[6]

Coat of armsEdit

The coat of arms was granted on 2 September 1960. The official blazon is "On an azure background, an argent swimming swan" (Norwegian: På blå bunn en svømmende sølv svane). This means the arms have a blue field (background) and the charge is a dexter swan (Cygnus cygnus) with a naiant attitude. The swan has a tincture of argent which means it is colored white most of the time, but if it is made out of metal, then silver is used. The swan is a symbol for the side-wheel steamer Skiblander, often called the "white swan of Mjøsa", which is usually docked in the town harbor.[7][8]

The former coat of arms from 1922-1960 was a linden tree, with the statement Vis et voluntas (meaning "Force and will") on the lower part of the shield. The following design was a so-called "potpourri" vase, the most significant design of the glassworks that was the funding industry of the town.[7]

ChurchesEdit

 
Gjøvik Church

The Church of Norway has seven parishes (sokn) within the municipality of Gjøvik. It is part of the Toten prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Hamar.

Churches in Gjøvik
Parish (sokn) Church name Location of the church Year built
Biri Biri Church Biri 1777
Bråstad Bråstad Church Bråstad 1963
Engehaugen Engehaugen Church Gjøvik 1994
Gjøvik Gjøvik Church Gjøvik 1994
Hunn Hunn Church Hunndalen 1968
Snertingdal Nykirke Ålset in Snertingdal 1872
Seegård Church Seegård 1997
Vardal Vardal Church Øverbygda 1803

Gjøvik Church is the main church for the municipality. It was designed by architect Jacob Wilhelm Nordan. The wooden structure was built between 1881-82. Both the church buildings and fixtures are designed in Gothic Revival architecture. The exterior of the church has contrasting colors on wall surfaces and bearing structures. The altarpiece was painted by artist, Asta Nørregaard. The churchyard has a monument dedicated to the memory of Lutheran missionary, Paul Olaf Bodding. The church was restored during 1927, 1960, 2004-2005 and in 2009.[9][10]

GeographyEdit

Number of minorities (1st and 2nd generation) in Gjøvik by country of origin in 2022[11]
Ancestry Number
  Poland 453
  Eritrea 334
  Somalia 309
  Syria 265
  Iran 225
  Iraq 219
  Lithuania 192
  Bosnia-Herzegovina 168
  China 159
  Afghanistan 145
  Sweden 143
  Thailand 125
  Vietnam 120
  Germany 118
  Kosovo 105
  Myanmar 105
  Russia 101

Along with Hamar, Lillehammer, Brumunddal, and Moelv, Gjøvik is one of the many towns bordering Norway's biggest lake, Mjøsa. The town administration of Gjøvik also includes the suburb area Hunndalen and the rural districts of Biri, Snertingdal, and Vardal.

Gjøvik is bordered on the north by Lillehammer Municipality, in the south by Østre Toten Municipality and Vestre Toten Municipality, and in the west by Søndre Land Municipality and Nordre Land Municipality. Across Lake Mjøsa to the east lies Ringsaker Municipality.

The highest point is Ringsrudåsen with a height of 842 metres (2,762 ft).

EconomyEdit

Gjøvik owes much of its early growth to the local glassworks, which were established there by Caspar Kauffeldt in 1807. In the early 19th century, there was considerable immigration there from Valdres and Western Norway, aiding Gjøvik's growth. The village of Gjøvik was granted kjøpstad status in 1861, making it a town and self-governing municipality. Later, O. Mustad & Son became one of the world's largest manufacturers of fish hooks.[12]

Today Hoff Potetindustrier, Hunton Fiber, and Natre Vinduer are some of the industrial companies operating from Gjøvik. The town is also a port for the former traffic ship, Skibladner, which is now a tourist ship.

The local paper is the Oppland Arbeiderblad. It was formerly a Labour Party newspaper. Defunct newspapers include Oplændingen and Velgeren (Labour Democrat/Liberal), Samhold (Liberal, later Agrarian) and Ny Dag (Communist).

Gjøvik has two notable hotels, the Grand hotel and the Strand hotel.

There have been three notable concerts held in Gjøvik's history, which starred Toto, Robbie Williams and Bryan Adams (June 2011).

GovernmentEdit

All municipalities in Norway, including Gjøvik, are responsible for primary education (through 10th grade), outpatient health services, senior citizen services, welfare and other social services, zoning, economic development, and municipal roads and utilities. The municipality is governed by a municipal council of elected representatives, which in turn elect a mayor.[13]

Municipal councilEdit

The municipal council (Kommunestyre) of Gjøvik is made up of representatives that are elected to four year terms. X|The party breakdown of the municipal council is as follows:

Gjøvik kommunestyre 2020–2023 [14]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)14
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)2
 Green Party (Miljøpartiet De Grønne)2
 Conservative Party (Høyre)8
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Red Party (Rødt)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)9
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:41
Gjøvik kommunestyre 2016–2019 [15][16]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)19
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)2
 Green Party (Miljøpartiet De Grønne)1
 Conservative Party (Høyre)9
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
 Pensioners' Party (Pensjonistpartiet)2
 Red Party (Rødt)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)5
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)1
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:45
Gjøvik kommunestyre 2012–2015 [17]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)20
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)2
 Conservative Party (Høyre)11
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
 Pensioners' Party (Pensjonistpartiet)2
 Red Party (Rødt)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)3
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)1
 Liberal Party (Venstre)3
Total number of members:45
Gjøvik kommunestyre 2008–2011 [16]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)19
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)6
 Conservative Party (Høyre)6
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
 Pensioners' Party (Pensjonistpartiet)2
 Red Electoral Alliance (Rød Valgallianse)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)3
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)3
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:45
Gjøvik kommunestyre 2004–2007 [16]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)21
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)6
 Conservative Party (Høyre)5
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
 Red Electoral Alliance (Rød Valgallianse)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)3
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)5
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:45
Gjøvik kommunestyre 2000–2003 [16][18]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)22
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)5
 Conservative Party (Høyre)6
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)4
 Red Electoral Alliance (Rød Valgallianse)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)3
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)3
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:45
Gjøvik kommunestyre 1996–1999 [19]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)24
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)5
 Conservative Party (Høyre)5
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)5
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:45
Gjøvik kommunestyre 1992–1995 [20]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)24
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)2
 Conservative Party (Høyre)10
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)4
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)7
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)9
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
 [[Bygdeliste|Grassroots list]] (Grasrotlista)3
Total number of members:61
Gjøvik kommunestyre 1988–1991 [21]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)33
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)6
 Conservative Party (Høyre)9
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)4
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)3
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:61
Gjøvik kommunestyre 1984–1987 [22]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)36
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)2
 Conservative Party (Høyre)10
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)4
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)3
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:61
Gjøvik kommunestyre 1980–1983 [23]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)34
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)1
 Conservative Party (Høyre)12
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)5
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
 Liberal Party (Venstre)3
Total number of members:61
Gjøvik kommunestyre 1976–1979 [24]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)37
 Conservative Party (Høyre)7
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)6
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)7
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:61
Gjøvik kommunestyre 1972–1975 [25]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)37
 Conservative Party (Høyre)6
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)6
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)7
 Liberal Party (Venstre)3
 Socialist common list (Venstresosialistiske felleslister)2
Total number of members:61
Gjøvik kommunestyre 1968–1971 [26]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)38
 Conservative Party (Høyre)7
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)4
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)6
 Socialist People's Party (Sosialistisk Folkeparti)3
 Liberal Party (Venstre)3
Total number of members:61
Gjøvik kommunestyre 1964–1967 [27]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)40
 Conservative Party (Høyre)7
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)1
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)4
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)6
 Liberal Party (Venstre)3
Total number of members:61
Gjøvik bystyre 1960–1963 [28]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)23
 Conservative Party (Høyre)7
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)2
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:37
Gjøvik bystyre 1956–1959 [29]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)22
 Conservative Party (Høyre)7
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)3
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:37
Gjøvik bystyre 1952–1955 [30]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)20
 Conservative Party (Høyre)7
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)3
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
 Liberal Party (Venstre)3
Total number of members:36
Gjøvik bystyre 1948–1951 [31]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)18
 Conservative Party (Høyre)5
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)5
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)4
 Joint list of the Liberal Party (Venstre) and
the Radical People's Party (Radikale Folkepartiet)
4
Total number of members:36
Gjøvik bystyre 1945–1947 [32]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)17
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)8
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)4
 Joint list of the Liberal Party (Venstre) and
the Radical People's Party (Radikale Folkepartiet)
3
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)4
Total number of members:36
Gjøvik bystyre 1938–1940* [33]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)22
 Nasjonal Samling Party (Nasjonal Samling)1
 Liberal Party (Venstre)5
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)8
Total number of members:36
Note: Due to the German occupation of Norway during World War II, no elections were held for new municipal councils until after the war ended in 1945.
Gjøvik bystyre 1935–1937 [34]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)20
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)1
 Nasjonal Samling Party (Nasjonal Samling)4
 Liberal Party (Venstre)4
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)7
Total number of members:36
Gjøvik bystyre 1932–1934 [35]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)18
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)1
 Liberal Party (Venstre)5
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)12
Total number of members:36
Gjøvik bystyre 1929–1931 [36]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)17
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)2
 Joint list: Temperance Party, Democrats, and Liberal Party (Avholdsfolk, demokrater, og Venstre)5
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)12
Total number of members:36
Gjøvik bystyre 1926–1928 [37]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)14
 Social Democratic Labour Party
(Socialdemokratiske Arbeiderparti)
1
 Joint list: Liberal Party and Temperance Party (Venstre og avholdspartiet)5
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)13
 Workers' Common List (Arbeidernes fellesliste)3
Total number of members:36
Gjøvik bystyre 1923–1925 [38]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)13
 Labour Democrats (Arbeiderdemokratene)3
 Social Democratic Labour Party
(Socialdemokratiske Arbeiderparti)
2
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)10
Total number of members:28
Gjøvik bystyre 1920–1922 [39]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)11
 Temperance Party (Avholdspartiet)3
 Gjøvik workers' list (Gjøvik arbeidere)3
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)11
Total number of members:28

MayorsEdit

The mayors of Gjøvik:

  • 1861–1872: Adolph Martin Lund
  • 1873-1873: Peter Soelberg
  • 1874-1874: Martin Opsahl
  • 1875–1879: Adolph Martin Lund
  • 1879–1884: Haagen Skattum (H)
  • 1885–1888: Mathias Wildaasen (V)
  • 1889-1889: Hans O. Eger (V)
  • 1890-1890: Andreas Slettum
  • 1891–1893: Fredrik Fischer (H)
  • 1894-1894: Christian Nygaard (V)
  • 1895–1896: Anders Østbye (V)
  • 1897-1898: Fredrik Fischer (H)
  • 1898–1899: Anders Østbye (V)
  • 1900-1900: Fredrik Fischer (H)
  • 1901-1901: Anders Østbye (V)
  • 1902–1904: Alf Mjøen (V)
  • 1905-1905: Fredrik Fischer (H)
  • 1906-1906: Adolf Houg (V)
  • 1907-1907: Fredrik Fischer (H)
  • 1908-1908: Leif Castberg (AD)
  • 1909-1909: Adolf Skattum (H)
  • 1910–1916: Leif Castberg (AD)
  • 1917–1922: Johan Granvin (H)
  • 1923–1941: Niels Ødegaard (Ap)
  • 1941–1945: John Lærum (NS)
  • 1945–1967: Niels Ødegaard (Ap)
  • 1968–1978: Nils Røstadstuen (Ap)
  • 1978–1981: Alf Iversen (Ap)
  • 1982–1991: Martin Stikbakke (Ap)
  • 1992–2000: Tore Hagebakken (Ap)
  • 2000–2001: Kåre Haugen (Ap)
  • 2001–2005: Tore Hagebakken (Ap)
  • 2005–2007: Kåre Haugen (Ap)
  • 2007–2019: Bjørn Iddberg (Ap)
  • 2019–present: Torvild Sveen (Sp)

AttractionsEdit

Notable peopleEdit

 
Baltazar Mathias Keilhau, 1857
 
Paul Olaf Bodding, 1925

Public Service & public thinkingEdit

The ArtsEdit

 
Per Elvestuen, 2015

SportEdit

 
Ingvild Flugstad Oestberg, 2019

Twin towns – sister citiesEdit

Gjøvik has sister city agreements with the following places:[42]

Media galleryEdit

A panorama of Gjøvik

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Navn på steder og personer: Innbyggjarnamn" (in Norwegian). Språkrådet.
  2. ^ "Forskrift om målvedtak i kommunar og fylkeskommunar" (in Norwegian). Lovdata.no.
  3. ^ Statistisk sentralbyrå. "Table: 06913: Population 1 January and population changes during the calendar year (M)" (in Norwegian).
  4. ^ Statistisk sentralbyrå. "09280: Area of land and fresh water (km²) (M)" (in Norwegian).
  5. ^ Jukvam, Dag (1999). "Historisk oversikt over endringer i kommune- og fylkesinndelingen" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Statistisk sentralbyrå.
  6. ^ Rygh, Oluf (1900). Norske gaardnavne: Kristians amt (Anden halvdel) (in Norwegian) (4 ed.). Kristiania, Norge: W. C. Fabritius & sønners bogtrikkeri. p. 40.
  7. ^ a b "Civic heraldry of Norway - Norske Kommunevåpen". Heraldry of the World. Retrieved 6 November 2022.
  8. ^ "Godkjenning av våpen og flagg". Lovdata.no (in Norwegian). Norges kommunal- og arbeidsdepartementet. 27 March 1987. Retrieved 6 November 2022.
  9. ^ Anne Wichstrøm. "Asta Nørregaard". Norsk biografisk leksikon. Retrieved 1 February 2018.
  10. ^ Torstein Jørgensen. "Paul Olaf Bodding". Norsk biografisk leksikon. Retrieved 1 February 2018.
  11. ^ "Immigrants and Norwegian-born to immigrant parents, by immigration category, country background and percentages of the population". ssb.no. Archived from the original on 28 April 2022. Retrieved 28 April 2022.
  12. ^ Stagg, Frank Noel (1956). East Norway and its Frontier. George Allen & Unwin, Ltd.
  13. ^ Hansen, Tore; Vabo, Signy Irene, eds. (20 September 2022). "kommunestyre". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Kunnskapsforlaget. Retrieved 14 October 2022.
  14. ^ "Tall for Norge: Kommunestyrevalg 2019 - Innlandet". Valg Direktoratet. Retrieved 9 October 2022.
  15. ^ "Tall for Norge: Kommunestyrevalg 2015 - Oppland". Valg Direktoratet.
  16. ^ a b c d "Table: 04813: Members of the local councils, by party/electoral list at the Municipal Council election (M)" (in Norwegian). Statistics Norway.
  17. ^ "Tall for Norge: Kommunestyrevalg 2011 - Oppland". Valg Direktoratet.
  18. ^ Kommunestyrevalget 1999 (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 2000. ISBN 8253748531. ISSN 0332-8023.
  19. ^ Kommunestyrevalget 1995 (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1996. ISBN 8253743351. ISSN 0332-8023.
  20. ^ Kommunestyrevalget 1991 (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1993. ISBN 8253737939. ISSN 0332-8023.
  21. ^ Kommunestyrevalget 1987 (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1988. ISBN 8253726325. ISSN 0332-8023.
  22. ^ Kommunestyrevalget 1983 (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1984. ISBN 8253720378. ISSN 0332-8023.
  23. ^ Kommunestyrevalget 1979 (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1979. ISBN 8253710836. ISSN 0332-8023.
  24. ^ Kommunevalgene 1975 (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1977. ISBN 8253705646.
  25. ^ Kommunevalgene 1972 (PDF) (in Norwegian). Vol. I. Oslo, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1973. ISBN 8253701144.
  26. ^ "Kommunevalgene 1967" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1967.
  27. ^ "Kommunevalgene 1963" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1964.
  28. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1959" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1960.
  29. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1955" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1957.
  30. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1951" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1952.
  31. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1947" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1948.
  32. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1945" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1947.
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