United States men's national ice hockey team

The United States men's national ice hockey team[2] is based in Colorado Springs, Colorado, with its U18 and U17 development program in Plymouth, Michigan. The team is controlled by USA Hockey, the governing body for organized ice hockey in the United States. The U.S. team is currently ranked 4th in the IIHF World Rankings.

United States
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)Team USA
AssociationUSA Hockey
Head coachDavid Quinn
AssistantsJeff Blashill
Don Granato
Mike Hastings
CaptainSeth Jones
Most gamesMark Johnson
Most pointsMark Johnson (146)
Team colors     
IIHF codeUSA
USA national ice hockey team jerseys 2022 IHWC.png
Ranking
Current IIHF4 Steady (September 29, 2022)[1]
Highest IIHF4 (first in 2016)
Lowest IIHF7 (first in 2003)
First international
United States  29–0  Switzerland
(Antwerp, Belgium; April 24, 1920)
Biggest win
United States  31–1  Italy
(St. Moritz, Switzerland; February 1, 1948)
Biggest defeat
Sweden  17–2  United States
(Stockholm, Sweden; March 12, 1963)
Soviet Union  17–2  United States
(Stockholm, Sweden; March 15, 1969)
IIHF World Championships
Appearances73 (first in 1920)
Best resultGold medal world centered-2.svg Gold: (1933, 1960)
Canada Cup / World Cup
Appearances8 (first in 1976)
Best resultSimple gold cup.svg Winner: (1996)
Olympics
Appearances24 (first in 1920)
MedalsGold medal.svg Gold: (1960, 1980)
Silver medal.svg Silver: (1920, 1924, 1932, 1952, 1956, 1972, 2002, 2010)
Bronze medal.svg Bronze: (1936)
International record (W–L–T)
914–471–86
Medal record
Olympic Games
Gold medal – first place 1960 Squaw Valley Team
Gold medal – first place 1980 Lake Placid Team
Silver medal – second place 1920 Antwerp Team
Silver medal – second place 1924 Chamonix Team
Silver medal – second place 1932 Lake Placid Team
Silver medal – second place 1952 Oslo Team
Silver medal – second place 1956 Cortina d'Ampezzo Team
Silver medal – second place 1972 Sapporo Team
Silver medal – second place 2002 Salt Lake City Team
Silver medal – second place 2010 Vancouver Team
Bronze medal – third place 1936 Garmisch-Partenkirchen Team
World Championships
Gold medal – first place 1933 Czechoslovakia
Gold medal – first place 1960 United States Team
Silver medal – second place 1920 Belgium Team
Silver medal – second place 1924 France Team
Silver medal – second place 1931 Poland
Silver medal – second place 1932 United States Team
Silver medal – second place 1934 Italy
Silver medal – second place 1939 Switzerland
Silver medal – second place 1950 Great Britain
Silver medal – second place 1952 Norway Team
Silver medal – second place 1956 Italy Team
Bronze medal – third place 1936 Germany Team
Bronze medal – third place 1949 Sweden
Bronze medal – third place 1962 United States
Bronze medal – third place 1996 Austria
Bronze medal – third place 2004 Czech Republic
Bronze medal – third place 2013 Sweden/Finland
Bronze medal – third place 2015 Czech Republic
Bronze medal – third place 2018 Denmark
Bronze medal – third place 2021 Latvia
Canada Cup / World Cup
Gold medal – first place 1996 Montreal
Silver medal – second place 1991 Hamilton

The U.S. won gold medals at the 1960 and the 1980 Olympics and more recently, silver medals at the 2002 and 2010 Olympics. The U.S. also won the 1996 World Cup of Hockey, defeating Canada in the finals. The team's most recent medal at the World Championships came with a bronze in 2021. They won the tournament in 1933 and 1960. Unlike other nations, the U.S. doesn't typically use its best NHL players in the World Championships. Instead, it provides the younger players with an opportunity to gain international experience.[3] Overall, the team has collected eleven Olympic medals (two of them gold), nineteen World Championship medals (two of them gold), and it reached the semi-final round of the Canada Cup/World Cup five times, twice advancing to the finals and winning gold once.[4] The U.S. has never reached a World Championship gold medal game, having lost in the semi-final round eleven times since the IIHF introduced a playoff system in 1992.

The U.S. is one of the most successful national ice hockey teams in the world and a member of the so-called "Big Six", the unofficial group of the six strongest men's ice hockey nations, along with Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland, Russia, and Sweden.[5][6][7]

HistoryEdit

The American ice hockey team's greatest success was the "Miracle on Ice" at the 1980 Winter Olympics in Lake Placid, New York, when American college players defeated the heavily favored seasoned professionals from the Soviet Union on the way to a gold medal. Though ice hockey is not a major sport in most areas of the United States, the "Miracle" is often listed as one of the all-time greatest American sporting achievements.[8][9] The U.S. also won the gold medal in the 1960 Games at Squaw Valley, California, defeating the Soviet Union, Canada, Czechoslovakia, and Sweden along the way. However, since this victory is not as well known as the 1980 win, it has come to be known as the "Forgotten Miracle".[10][11]

The United States hockey experienced a spike in talent in the 1980s and 1990s, with future NHL stars including Tony Amonte, Chris Chelios, Derian Hatcher, Brett Hull, Pat LaFontaine, John LeClair, Brian Leetch, Mike Modano, Mike Richter, Jeremy Roenick, Kevin Stevens, Keith Tkachuk, and Doug Weight. Although the U.S. finished no higher than fourth in any World or Olympic event from 1981 through 1994 (unlike other teams that used professionals, the U.S. team was limited to amateurs at these tournaments), the Americans reached the finals of the 1991 Canada Cup and won the 1996 World Cup. Six years later, after the International Olympic Committee and NHL arranged to accommodate an Olympic break in the NHL schedule, the U.S. earned a silver medal at the 2002 Winter Olympics with a roster that included NHL stars Adam Deadmarsh, Chris Drury, Brian Rafalski, and Brian Rolston. However, by 2006, many of these NHL players had retired or had declined with age. Though the 2006 Olympic team finished a disappointing 8th, it was more of a transitional team, featuring young NHL players like Rick DiPietro, John-Michael Liles, and Jordan Leopold.

The 2010 U.S. Olympic team was composed of much younger and faster players than teams of previous years, including David Backes, Dustin Brown, Jack Johnson, Patrick Kane, Phil Kessel, Zach Parise, Joe Pavelski, Bobby Ryan, Paul Stastny, and Ryan Suter. The team also had a solid group of veterans that included such stars as goalie Ryan Miller, defenseman Brian Rafalski, and team captain Jamie Langenbrunner. The U.S. team upset team Canada 5–3 in the round-robin phase of the tournament and went into the single elimination phase of the tournament as the number-one seeded team. After beating Finland 6–1, the U.S. advanced to the gold medal game, where they lost in overtime 3–2 to Canada to claim the silver medal. The gold medal game between Canada and the U.S. was watched by an estimated 27.6 million U.S. households. This was the most watched hockey game in America since the 1980 "Miracle on Ice" game, including any Stanley Cup final or NHL Winter Classic broadcast.[12]

The NHL pulled out of the Olympics for the 2018 competition in a dispute over insurance and the IOC's ambush marketing restrictions, prohibiting the national teams from inviting any player it held under contract. The American team was put at a particular disadvantage, as more than 31% of NHL players are Americans (in comparison, only 4.1% are Russians). As a result, the U.S. had to enter the tournament with a hastily assembled team of free agents, players from European leagues, AHLers on one-way contracts, and college players.[13] The team proved unsuccessful, losing to Slovenia and the Olympic Athletes from Russia in the preliminary round, and being eliminated by the Czechs in the quarterfinals.[14] The OAR team benefited most from NHL's absence and ultimately won the tournament with a team that was composed primarily of SKA Saint Petersburg and HC CSKA Moscow players from the Russia-based KHL and featured ex-NHL all-stars Pavel Datsyuk, Ilya Kovalchuk and Vyacheslav Voynov (all SKA).[15][16]

On March 31, 2021, Stan Bowman was appointed the general manager of the U.S. Olympic men's hockey team for the 2022 Beijing Games.[17] On October 26, 2021, Bowman resigned in response to the results of an independent investigation into allegations of sexual assault committed by a member of the Blackhawks' video coaching staff.[18] The lead investigator stated that Bowman's failure to report the alleged assault had eventually led to the perpetrator committing further acts of sexual abuse.[19]

Competitive recordEdit

Olympic GamesEdit

Games[4][20] GP W L T GF GA Coach Captain Round Position
  1920 Antwerp 4 3 1 0 52 2 Cornelius Fellowes
Roy Schooley
Joe McCormick Silver medal round   Silver
  1924 Chamonix 5 4 1 0 73 6 William Haddock Irving Small Final round   Silver
  1928 St. Moritz Did not participate
  1932 Lake Placid 6 4 1 1 27 5 Alfred Winsor John Chase Final round   Silver
  1936 Garmisch-Partenkirchen 8 5 2 1 10 4 Albert Prettyman John Garrison Final round   Bronze
  1948 St. Moritz 8 5 3 0 86 33 John Garrison Goodwin Harding Round-robin 4th, DSQ
  1952 Oslo 8 6 1 1 43 21 Connie Pleban Allen Van Round-robin   Silver
  1956 Cortina d'Ampezzo 7 5 2 0 33 16 John Mariucci Gene Campbell Final round   Silver
  1960 Squaw Valley 7 7 0 0 48 17 Jack Riley Jack Kirrane Final round   Gold
  1964 Innsbruck 7 2 5 0 29 33 Eddie Jeremiah Herb Brooks
Bill Reichart
Round-robin 5th
  1968 Grenoble 7 2 4 1 23 28 Murray Williamson Lou Nanne Round-robin 6th
  1972 Sapporo 6 4 2 0 23 18 Murray Williamson Tim Sheehy Round-robin   Silver
  1976 Innsbruck 6 3 3 0 23 25 Bob Johnson John Taft Round-robin 5th
  1980 Lake Placid 7 6 0 1 33 15 Herb Brooks Mike Eruzione Final round   Gold
  1984 Sarajevo 6 2 2 2 23 21 Lou Vairo Phil Verchota 7th place game 7th
  1988 Calgary 6 3 3 0 35 31 Dave Peterson Brian Leetch 7th place game 7th
  1992 Albertville 8 5 2 1 25 19 Dave Peterson Clark Donatelli Bronze medal game 4th
  1994 Lillehammer 8 1 4 3 28 32 Tim Taylor Peter Laviolette 7th place game 8th
  1998 Nagano 4 1 3 0 9 14 Ron Wilson Chris Chelios Quarter-finals 6th
  2002 Salt Lake City 6 4 1 1 26 10 Herb Brooks Chris Chelios Gold medal game   Silver
  2006 Turin 6 1 4 1 16 17 Peter Laviolette Chris Chelios Quarter-finals 8th
  2010 Vancouver 6 5 1 24 9 Ron Wilson Jamie Langenbrunner Gold medal game   Silver
  2014 Sochi 6 4 2 20 12 Dan Bylsma Zach Parise Bronze medal game 4th
  2018 Pyeongchang 5 2 3 11 12 Tony Granato Brian Gionta Quarter-finals 7th
  2022 Beijing 4 3 1 17 7 David Quinn Andy Miele Quarter-finals 5th
  2026 Milan/Cortina To be determined

Results by "Big Six" opponentEdit

Opponents Played Won Tied Lost Biggest victory Biggest defeat
  Canada 19 4 3 12 4:1 3:12
  Czechoslovakia/
  Czech Republic
21 10 0 11 16:0 1:7
  Finland 13 7 2 4 8:2, 6:0 1:6, 0:5
  Soviet Union/
  CIS/
  Russia
14 4 1 9 4:3, 3:2 (x3) 2:10
  Sweden 15 6 2 7 20:0 1:5
Total 81 30 8 43 20:0 3:12

World ChampionshipsEdit

Note: Between 1920 and 1968, the Olympic ice hockey tournament was also considered the World Championship for that year.[21]
Note: World War II forced cancellation of all tournaments from 1940 to 1946.
Note: In 1972, a separate tournament was held both for the World Championships and the Winter Olympics for the first time.
Note: No World Championships were held during the Olympic years 1980, 1984, and 1988.
Note: the 2020 tournament was cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[22]
  • 1920  Silver
  • 1924  Silver
  • 1928did not participate
  • 1930did not participate
  • 1931  Silver
  • 1932  Silver
  • 1933  Gold
  • 1934  Silver
  • 1935did not participate
  • 1936  Bronze
  • 1937did not participate
  • 1938 – 7th place
  • 1939  Silver
  • 1947 – 5th place
  • 1948 – 4th place
  • 1949  Bronze
  • 1950  Silver
  • 1951 – 6th place
  • 1952  Silver
  • 1953did not participate
  • 1954did not participate
  • 1955 – 4th place
  • 1956  Silver
  • 1957did not participate
  • 1958 – 5th place
  • 1959 – 4th place
  • 1960  Gold
  • 1961 – 6th place
  • 1962  Bronze
  • 1963 – 8th place
  • 1964 – 5th place
  • 1965 – 6th place
  • 1966 – 6th place
  • 1967 – 5th place
  • 1968 – 6th place
  • 1969 – 6th place (relegated to Group B)
  • 1970 – 7th place (1st in Group B, promoted to Group A)
  • 1971 – 6th place (relegated to Group B)
  • 1972 – 8th place (2nd in Group B)
  • 1973 – 8th place (2nd in Group B)
  • 1974 – 7th place (1st in Group B, promoted to Group A)
  • 1975 – 6th place
  • 1976 – 4th place
  • 1977 – 6th place
  • 1978 – 6th place
  • 1979 – 7th place
  • 1981 – 5th place
  • 1982 – 8th place (relegated to Group B)
  • 1983 – 9th place (1st in Group B, promoted to Group A)
  • 1985 – 4th place
  • 1986 – 6th place
  • 1987 – 7th place
  • 1989 – 6th place
  • 1990 – 5th place
  • 1991 – 4th place
  • 1992 – 7th place
  • 1993 – 6th place
  • 1994 – 4th place
  • 1995 – 6th place
  • 1996  Bronze
  • 1997 – 6th place
  • 1998 – 12th place
  • 1999 – 6th place
  • 2000 – 5th place
  • 2001 – 4th place
  • 2002 – 7th place
  • 2003 – 13th place
  • 2004  Bronze
  • 2005 – 6th place
  • 2006 – 7th place
  • 2007 – 5th place
  • 2008 – 6th place
  • 2009 – 4th place
  • 2010 – 13th place
  • 2011 – 8th place
  • 2012 – 7th place
  • 2013  Bronze
  • 2014 – 6th place
  • 2015  Bronze
  • 2016 – 4th place
  • 2017 – 5th place
  • 2018  Bronze
  • 2019 – 7th place
  • 2021  Bronze
  • 2022 – 4th place

Canada Cup / World Cup of HockeyEdit

Games[23] GP W L T GF GA Coach Captain Round Position
1976 5 1 3 1 14 21 Bob Pulford Bill Nyrop Group stage 5th
1981 6 2 3 1 18 23 Bob Johnson Robbie Ftorek Semi-finals 4th
1984 6 3 2 1 23 22 Bob Johnson Rod Langway Semi-finals 4th
1987 5 2 3 0 13 14 Bob Johnson Rod Langway Group stage 5th
1991 8 5 3 0 29 26 Bob Johnson Joel Otto Finals   Silver
1996 7 6 1 0 37 18 Ron Wilson Brian Leetch Finals   Gold
2004 5 2 3 0 11 11 Ron Wilson Chris Chelios Semi-finals 4th
2016 3 0 3 5 11 John Tortorella Joe Pavelski Group stage 7th

Results by "Big Six" opponentEdit

Opponents Played Won Tied Lost Biggest victory Biggest defeat
  Canada 14 3 1 10 5:2 (x2) 3:8
  Czechoslovakia/
  Czech Republic
6 3 1 2 6:2 1:3
  Finland 6 4 1 1 7:3 1:2
  Soviet Union/
  CIS/
  Russia
9 4 0 5 5:2 (x2) 0:5
  Sweden 6 4 0 2 7:1 2:9
Total 41 18 3 20 7:1 2:9

TeamEdit

Current rosterEdit

Roster for the 2022 IIHF World Championship.[24]

Head coach: David Quinn[25]

No. Pos. Name Height Weight Birthdate Team
1 G Jeremy Swayman 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) 91 kg (201 lb) (1998-11-24) 24 November 1998 (age 24)   Boston Bruins
2 D Andrew Peeke 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) 93 kg (205 lb) (1998-03-17) 17 March 1998 (age 24)   Columbus Blue Jackets
4 D Seth JonesC 1.93 m (6 ft 4 in) 100 kg (220 lb) (1994-10-03) 3 October 1994 (age 28)   Chicago Blackhawks
5 D Jon Merrill 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) 93 kg (205 lb) (1992-02-03) 3 February 1992 (age 30)   Minnesota Wild
7 D Nick Blankenburg 1.75 m (5 ft 9 in) 79 kg (174 lb) (1998-05-12) 12 May 1998 (age 24)   Columbus Blue Jackets
11 F Riley Barber 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in) 93 kg (205 lb) (1994-02-07) 7 February 1994 (age 28)   Grand Rapids Griffins
12 F Matthew Boldy 1.88 m (6 ft 2 in) 91 kg (201 lb) (2001-04-05) 5 April 2001 (age 21)   Minnesota Wild
14 F T. J. Tynan 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in) 75 kg (165 lb) (1992-02-25) 25 February 1992 (age 30)   Ontario Reign
15 F John Hayden 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) 101 kg (223 lb) (1995-02-14) 14 February 1995 (age 27)   Buffalo Sabres
16 F Austin WatsonA 1.93 m (6 ft 4 in) 93 kg (205 lb) (1992-01-13) 13 January 1992 (age 30)   Ottawa Senators
17 F Adam Gaudette 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) 77 kg (170 lb) (1996-10-03) 3 October 1996 (age 26)   Ottawa Senators
22 F Kieffer Bellows 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) 88 kg (194 lb) (1998-06-10) 10 June 1998 (age 24)   New York Islanders
24 F Sam Lafferty 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) 88 kg (194 lb) (1995-03-06) 6 March 1995 (age 27)   Chicago Blackhawks
25 F Karson Kuhlman 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in) 86 kg (190 lb) (1995-09-26) 26 September 1995 (age 27)   Seattle Kraken
26 F Sean Farrell 1.75 m (5 ft 9 in) 79 kg (174 lb) (2001-11-02) 2 November 2001 (age 21)   Harvard Crimson
27 F Alex Galchenyuk 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) 88 kg (194 lb) (1994-02-12) 12 February 1994 (age 28)   Arizona Coyotes
28 F Vinni Lettieri 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) 84 kg (185 lb) (1995-02-06) 6 February 1995 (age 27)   Anaheim Ducks
31 G Strauss Mann 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in) 79 kg (174 lb) (1998-08-18) 18 August 1998 (age 24)   Skellefteå AIK
32 G Jon Gillies 1.97 m (6 ft 6 in) 101 kg (223 lb) (1994-01-22) 22 January 1994 (age 28)   New Jersey Devils
34 F Thomas Bordeleau 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in) 79 kg (174 lb) (2002-01-03) 3 January 2002 (age 20)   San Jose Sharks
38 F Ryan Hartman 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in) 87 kg (192 lb) (1994-09-20) 20 September 1994 (age 28)   Minnesota Wild
43 D Luke Hughes 1.88 m (6 ft 2 in) 83 kg (183 lb) (2003-09-09) 9 September 2003 (age 19)   Michigan Wolverines
44 D Jaycob Megna 1.98 m (6 ft 6 in) 100 kg (220 lb) (1992-12-10) 10 December 1992 (age 29)   San Jose Sharks
59 F Ben Meyers 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) 91 kg (201 lb) (1998-11-15) 15 November 1998 (age 24)   Colorado Avalanche
88 D Nate SchmidtA 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in) 88 kg (194 lb) (1991-07-16) 16 July 1991 (age 31)   Winnipeg Jets

IIHF World Championship directorate awardsEdit

The IIHF has given awards for each year's championship tournament to the top goalie, defenseman, and forward (all since 1954), and most valuable player (since 2004). The following American team members have won awards.

Uniform evolutionEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "IIHF Men's World Ranking". IIHF. September 29, 2022. Retrieved September 29, 2022.
  2. ^ Men's Teams and Events at USAHockey.com
  3. ^ Mount, Dan (May 6, 2019). "Team USA IIHF Roster for Worlds Full of Promise".
  4. ^ a b "Men's Teams and Events". teamusa.usahockey.com.
  5. ^ "NHL announces World Cup of Hockey for 2016". The Canadian Press. January 24, 2015. Retrieved January 29, 2015.
  6. ^ "Membership Statistics". usahockey.com.
  7. ^ Peters, Chris (June 18, 2014). "U.S. Hockey Participation Numbers for 2013–14".
  8. ^ J. N. Washburn (July 21, 1974). "Soviet Amateur Athlete: A Real Pro". The New York Times.
  9. ^ "Sports in Soviet Union Only for Elite : There Are Top Athletes, and Then There Are Those Who Sunbathe and Watch Drawbridges Go Up". Los Angeles Times. July 22, 1986.
  10. ^ Burnside, Scott (February 8, 2010). "Hockey's miracle before the 'Miracle'". ESPN. Retrieved October 7, 2011.
  11. ^ "The Morning Skate: The Forgotten Miracle of 1960". The New York Times. December 11, 2009. Retrieved October 7, 2011.
  12. ^ "Hockey Game Seen by 27.6 Million" The New York Times, March 1, 2010. Retrieved March 1, 2010.
  13. ^ "New-Look 2018 U.S. Olympic Men's Ice Hockey Team Named, Led By 2006 Olympian Brian Gionta". Team USA.
  14. ^ Thompson, Harry (February 21, 2018). "Shoot Out The Lights". Team USA Hockey.
  15. ^ Reevell, Patrick (February 12, 2018). "N.H.L.'s Retreat from the Olympics Makes Russia a Hockey Favorite". The New York Times.
  16. ^ "Without NHL, Olympic Athletes from Russia are podium favorites". Reuters. February 10, 2018 – via www.reuters.com.
  17. ^ Leahy, Sean (March 31, 2021). "Stan Bowman named GM of 2022 U.S. Olympic team". NBC Sports. Retrieved March 31, 2021.
  18. ^ Pope, Ben (October 26, 2021). "Blackhawks' Stan Bowman resigns in overhaul over sexual assault cover-up". Chicago Sun-Times. Retrieved October 26, 2021.
  19. ^ Cohen, Jay; Whyno, Stephen (October 26, 2021). "Blackhawks GM Bowman Resigns After Sexual Assault Probe". NBC Chicago. Retrieved October 26, 2021.
  20. ^ "Men's Olympic Teams". teamusa.usahockey.com.
  21. ^ "Men's World Championship". teamusa.usahockey.com.
  22. ^ Steiss, Adam. "2020 IIHF Ice Hockey World Championship cancelled". iihf.com. IIHF. Retrieved March 21, 2020.
  23. ^ "World Cup of Hockey". teamusa.usahockey.com.
  24. ^ "USA Hockey Announces Roster for 2022 U.S. Men's National Team". teamusa.usahockey.com. May 5, 2022.
  25. ^ "Team Roster United States" (PDF). iihf.com. May 15, 2021.

External linksEdit