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1992 Men's World Ice Hockey Championships

The 1992 Men's Ice Hockey World Championships was the 56th such event sanctioned by the International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF). Teams representing a record 32 countries participated in several levels of competition. The competition also served as qualifications for group placements in the 1993 competition.

1992 Men's World Ice Hockey Championships
Tournament details
Host country Czechoslovakia
Dates28 April – 10 May
Teams12
Venue(s)2 (in 2 host cities)
Final positions
Champions Gold medal blank.svg Sweden (6th title)
Runner-up Silver medal blank.svg Finland
Third place Bronze medal blank.svg Czechoslovakia
Fourth place  Switzerland
Tournament statistics
Matches played39
Goals scored242 (6.21 per match)
Attendance249,748 (6,404 per match)
Scoring leader(s)Finland Jarkko Varvio 10 points
1991
1993

The top Championship Group A tournament took place in Czechoslovakia from 28 April to 10 May 1992, with games played in Prague and Bratislava. This would be the last championship held in that nation before the dissolution of Czechoslovakia eight months later. Twelve teams took part, with the first round being split into two groups of six, with the four best teams from each group advancing to the quarter-finals. Sweden retained their title, beating Finland 5-2 in the final, and becoming world champions for the sixth time. This was Finland's first medal in a World Championship.

The Championship Group A pools were drawn the same as the 1992 Olympics in Albertville two months earlier, but yielded much different results. Switzerland was able to tie both Russia and Canada to earn a spot in the quarter-finals. Germany, after an opening loss to Finland, won four straight to also advance to the quarter-finals, where they faced Switzerland. The Swiss prevailed, making the top 4 for the first time since 1953, and moved on to meet a Swedish team that had shut-out the Russians. The Swedes led by three after the first and easily moved on to the gold medal game. There was nothing easy about the other semi-final, where the Finns had to come from behind to tie Czechoslovakia in the third period, then advanced to the finals with a shootout win. The Czechoslovaks, playing for the last time as that nation, beat the Swiss to settle for bronze, while Sweden, led by Mats Sundin, beat Finland for gold.[1][2]

New entrants Greece, Israel, Luxembourg and Turkey iced teams in a secondary tier of Group C. South Africa appeared for the first time since 1966. In Group B, the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia made their final World Championship appearance before the breakup of that nation. The Federal Republic of Yugoslavia resumed Yugoslavia's former position in Group C in 1995, while breakaway nations Croatia and Slovenia would appear in the qualifiers for Group C of the 1993 World Championship.

Contents

World Championship Group A (Czechoslovakia)Edit

First RoundEdit

Group 1Edit

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1   Finland 5 5 0 0 32 - 08 10
2   Germany 5 4 0 1 30 - 14 8
3   United States 5 2 1 2 14 - 15 5
4   Sweden 5 1 2 2 14 - 12 4
5   Italy 5 1 1 3 10 - 18 3
6   Poland 5 0 0 5 08 - 41 0
28 AprilSweden  7-0  Poland
28 AprilGermany  3-6  Finland
28 AprilItaly  0-1  United States
29 AprilFinland  11-2  Poland
29 AprilUnited States  3-5  Germany
29 AprilSweden  0-0  Italy
1 MayPoland  5-7  Italy
1 MayGermany  5-2  Sweden
1 MayUnited States  1-6  Finland
3 MayUnited States  5-0  Poland
3 MayItaly  2-6  Germany
3 MayFinland  3-1  Sweden
4 MayPoland  1-11  Germany
4 MayFinland  6-1  Italy
4 MaySweden  4-4  United States

Group 2Edit

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1   Russia 5 4 1 0 23 - 10 9
2   Czechoslovakia 5 4 0 1 18 - 07 8
3    Switzerland 5 2 2 1 12 - 11 6
4   Canada 5 2 1 2 15 - 18 5
5   Norway 5 1 0 4 08 - 16 2
6   France 5 0 0 5 08 - 22 0
28 AprilCanada  4-3  France
28 AprilSwitzerland   2-2  Russia
28 AprilCzechoslovakia  6-1  Norway
30 AprilCanada  1-1   Switzerland
30 AprilCzechoslovakia  3-0  France
30 AprilRussia  3-2  Norway
1 MayFrance  5-6   Switzerland
1 MayNorway  3-4  Canada
1 MayCzechoslovakia  2-4  Russia
3 MayRussia  8-0  France
3 MaySwitzerland   3-1  Norway
3 MayCzechoslovakia  5-2  Canada
4 MayFrance  0-1  Norway
4 MayCanada  4-6  Russia
4 MayCzechoslovakia  2-0   Switzerland

Consolation Round 11-12 PlaceEdit

6 MayFrance  3-1  Poland

Poland was relegated to Group B.

Playoff roundEdit

 
QuarterfinalsSemifinalsFinal
 
          
 
6 May
 
 
  Russia0
 
9 May
 
  Sweden2
 
  Sweden4
 
7 May
 
   Switzerland1
 
  Germany1
 
10 May
 
   Switzerland3
 
  Sweden5
 
7 May
 
  Finland2
 
  Czechoslovakia8
 
9 May
 
  United States1
 
  Czechoslovakia2
 
6 May
 
  Finland (GWS)3 Third place
 
  Finland4
 
10 May
 
  Canada3
 
  Czechoslovakia5
 
 
   Switzerland2
 

QuarterfinalsEdit

6 MayFinland  4-3  Canada
6 MayRussia  0-2  Sweden
7 MayGermany  1-3   Switzerland
7 MayCzechoslovakia  8-1  United States

SemifinalsEdit

9 MayCzechoslovakia  2-3 s.o.  Finland
9 MaySweden  4-1   Switzerland

Match for third placeEdit

10 MayCzechoslovakia  5-2   Switzerland

FinalEdit

10 MaySweden  5-2
(1-0, 3-0, 1-2)
  FinlandPrague
Attendance: 14,000

Ranking and statisticsEdit

 


 1992 IIHF World Championship Winners 
 
Sweden
6th title

Tournament AwardsEdit

Final standingsEdit

The final standings of the tournament according to IIHF:

    Sweden
    Finland
    Czechoslovakia
4    Switzerland
5   Russia
6   Germany
7   United States
8   Canada
9   Italy
10   Norway
11   France
12   Poland

Scoring leadersEdit

List shows the top skaters sorted by points, then goals.

Player GP G A Pts +/− PIM POS
  Jarkko Varvio 8 9 1 10 +3 4 F
  Mikko Mäkelä 8 2 8 10 +11 0 F
  Dieter Hegen 6 7 2 9 +3 10 F
  Tomáš Jelínek 8 4 5 9 +10 10 F
  Róbert Švehla 8 4 4 8 +12 14 D
  Mika Nieminen 8 3 5 8 +5 2 F
  Mats Sundin 8 2 6 8 +5 8 F
  Timo Saarikoski 8 3 4 7 +4 4 F
  Rauli Raitanen 7 2 5 7 +8 2 F
  Timo Jutila 8 2 5 7 +16 10 D

Source: [1]

Leading goaltendersEdit

Only the top five goaltenders, based on save percentage, who have played 50% of their team's minutes are included in this list.

Player MIP GA GAA SVS% SO
  Tommy Söderström 300 7 1.40 .936 2
  David Delfino 149 7 2.82 .932 1
  Markus Ketterer 309 13 2.52 .927 0
  Petr Bříza 490 12 1.47 .921 2
  Ron Hextall 273 13 2.86 .909 0

Source: [2]

World Championship Group B (Austria)Edit

Played in Klagenfurt Austria 2–12 April. The hosts went undefeated to return to Group A for the first time since 1957.[1]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
13   Austria 7 7 0 0 73 - 04 14
14   Netherlands 7 5 1 1 53 - 16 11
15   Japan 7 4 0 3 30 - 24 8
16   Denmark 7 4 0 3 23 - 24 8
17   Bulgaria 7 3 0 4 14 - 38 6
18   Romania 7 1 3 3 13 - 26 5
19   China 7 1 1 5 15 - 50 3
20   Yugoslavia 7 0 1 6 07 - 46 1

Austria was promoted to Group A, while Yugoslavia was relegated to Group C but would not play there until 1995.

2 AprilNetherlands  12-2  China
2 AprilYugoslavia  3-3  Romania
2 AprilAustria  18-0  Bulgaria
2 AprilJapan  4-2  Denmark
3 AprilChina  4-1  Yugoslavia
3 AprilAustria  9-0  Romania
4 AprilDenmark  0-8  Netherlands
4 AprilJapan  2-5  Bulgaria
5 AprilAustria  16-0  China
5 AprilJapan  5-1  Romania
5 AprilYugoslavia  2-4  Denmark
6 AprilNetherlands  7-1  Bulgaria
6 AprilChina  3-3  Romania
7 AprilYugoslavia  1-4  Bulgaria
7 AprilAustria  5-1  Denmark
8 AprilRomania  2-2  Netherlands
8 AprilChina  3-10  Japan
9 AprilBulgaria  1-7  Denmark
9 AprilAustria  3-0  Japan
9 AprilYugoslavia  0-11  Netherlands
10 AprilBulgaria  3-1  China
10 AprilRomania  2-4  Denmark
11 AprilJapan  6-0  Yugoslavia
11 AprilAustria  8-3  Netherlands
12 AprilDenmark  5-2  China
12 AprilNetherlands  10-3  Japan
12 AprilBulgaria  0-2  Romania
12 AprilAustria  14-0  Yugoslavia

World Championship Group C1 (Great Britain)Edit

Played in Hull Great Britain 18–24 March. The hosts, led by Scot Tony Hand and Canadian Kevin Conway, won all five games easily.[1]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
21   Great Britain 5 5 0 0 62 - 10 10
22   North Korea 5 3 0 2 25 - 28 6
23   Australia 5 2 1 2 24 - 26 5
24   Hungary 5 2 0 3 18 - 33 4
25   Belgium 5 2 0 3 17 - 24 4
26   South Korea 5 0 1 4 18 - 43 1

Great Britain was promoted to Group B while no team was relegated.

18 MarchBelgium  5-4  North Korea
18 MarchSouth Korea  6-10  Hungary
18 MarchGreat Britain  10-2  Australia
19 MarchHungary  3-1  Belgium
19 MarchNorth Korea  8-3  Australia
19 MarchGreat Britain  15-0  South Korea
21 MarchAustralia  5-5  South Korea
21 MarchHungary  1-4  North Korea
21 MarchBelgium  3-7  Great Britain
22 MarchHungary  1-8  Australia
22 MarchSouth Korea  4-6  Belgium
22 MarchNorth Korea  2-16  Great Britain
24 MarchNorth Korea  7-3  South Korea
24 MarchAustralia  6-2  Belgium
24 MarchGreat Britain  14-3  Hungary

World Championship Group C2 (South Africa)Edit

Played in Johannesburg South Africa 21–28 March. Though called 'C2' it was no different from being in 'Group D'. Spain completely dominated, playing against five essentially new hockey nations. Only South Africa had participated before, and they last played in 1966.[1]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
27   Spain 5 5 0 0 114 - 5 10
28   South Africa 5 4 0 1 55 - 18 8
29   Greece 5 3 0 2 36 - 31 6
30   Israel 5 1 1 3 22 - 42 3
31   Luxembourg 5 1 1 3 20 - 73 3
32   Turkey 5 0 0 5 11 - 89 0

Spain and later South Africa qualified for 1993 Group C. The others had to play in qualification tournaments in November 1992.

21 MarchSouth Africa  23-0  Luxembourg
21 MarchTurkey  3-15  Greece
22 MarchIsrael  4-23  Spain
22 MarchSouth Africa  18-1  Turkey
23 MarchLuxembourg  5-9  Greece
24 MarchIsrael  8-2  Turkey
24 MarchSpain  10-1  Greece
25 MarchSouth Africa  5-1  Israel
25 MarchLuxembourg  0-31  Spain
26 MarchLuxembourg  10-5  Turkey
26 MarchSouth Africa  9-4  Greece
27 MarchGreece  7-4  Israel
27 MarchTurkey  0-38  Spain
28 MarchSouth Africa  0-12  Spain
28 MarchIsrael  5-5  Luxembourg

CitationsEdit

  1. ^ a b c d Summary at Passionhockey.com
  2. ^ Duplacey page 508

ReferencesEdit

  • Complete results
  • Duplacey, James (1998). Total Hockey: The official encyclopedia of the National Hockey League. Total Sports. pp. 498–528. ISBN 0-8362-7114-9.
  • Podnieks, Andrew (2010). IIHF Media Guide & Record Book 2011. Moydart Press. pp. 155–6.

See also: World Juniors, Women's Championships