Germany men's national ice hockey team

The German men's national ice hockey team is the national ice hockey team of Germany and is controlled by the German Ice Hockey Federation. It first participated in serious international competition at the 1911 European Hockey Championship. When Germany was split after World War II, a separate East Germany national ice hockey team existed until 1990. By 1991, the West and East German teams and players were merged into the United German team. The team's head coach is Harold Kreis.

Germany
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)Träger der Adler (Bearers of the Eagle)
AssociationDeutscher Eishockey-Bund
Head coachHarold Kreis
AssistantsPekka Kangasalusta
Alexander Sulzer
CaptainMoritz Müller
Most gamesUdo Kießling (320)
Most pointsErich Kühnhackl (210)
Team colors     
IIHF codeGER
Ranking
Current IIHF5 Increase 4 (28 May 2023)[1]
Highest IIHF5 (first in 2021)
Lowest IIHF13 (first in 2014)
First international
England  1–0  Germany
(Montreux, Switzerland; 10 January 1910)
Biggest win
Germany  14–0  Yugoslavia
(Ljubljana, Slovenia; 10 February 2000)
Biggest defeat
Soviet Union  10–0  Germany
(Zug, Switzerland; 7 December 1990)
 Canada 10–0 Germany 
(Prague, Czech Republic; 3 May 2015)
IIHF World Championships
Appearances68 (first in 1930)
Best resultSilver (1930, 1953, 2023)
European Championships
Appearances8 (first in 1910)
Best resultSilver (1910, 1911, 1914)
Olympics
Appearances21 (first in 1928)
Medals Silver (2018)
Bronze (1932, 1976)
International record (W–L–T)
570–808–119
Medal record
Olympic Games
Silver medal – second place 2018 Pyeongchang Team
Bronze medal – third place 1932 Lake Placid Team
Bronze medal – third place 1976 Innsbruck Team
World Championship
Silver medal – second place 1930 Austria/France/Germany
Silver medal – second place 1953 Switzerland
Silver medal – second place 2023 Finland/Latvia
Bronze medal – third place 1934 Italy
Pool B / Division I
Gold medal – first place 1966 Yugoslavia
Gold medal – first place 2000 Poland
Gold medal – first place 2006 France (Group A)
Silver medal – second place 1970 Romania
Silver medal – second place 1975 Japan
European Championship
Silver medal – second place 1910 Switzerland
Silver medal – second place 1911 Germany
Silver medal – second place 1912 Austria-Hungary
Silver medal – second place 1914 Germany
Bronze medal – third place 1913 Germany
Bronze medal – third place 1927 Austria

Germany has won several medals at the World Championships, including three silver medals in 1930, 1953 and 2023, as well as a silver medal at the 2018 Winter Olympics, the team's biggest success in the 21st century.[2]

History edit

West Germany edit

The West German team's greatest success came in 1976 at the Winter Olympics, when the team went 2–3–0 and won the bronze medal. The Swedish and Canadian teams, traditionally two hockey powerhouses, had boycotted the 1976 Games in protest of the amateur rules that allowed Eastern Bloc countries to send their best players while keeping Western nations from doing the same.

West Germany's wins in the 1976 Games came against the United States (4–1) and Poland (7–4).

In 1980, the team didn't do as well and only won one game in the preliminary round, which kept them from advancing. They finished 10th out of 12.

In 1984, the team was invited to the Canada Cup. By 1991, the reunification of East and West Germany meant the inclusion of players from the former East Germany.

Post-unification edit

The team is not considered to be as elite as Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland, Russia, Sweden or the United States; they are ranked 9th in the world (2022) by the IIHF. Since re-unification, their best recent results include finishing 6th place at the 2003 World Championships where they lost a close quarter-final match in overtime to Canada, and 4th at the 2010 World Championships where they lost to Sweden in the bronze medal game. Previously, they finished third in the European Group and qualified for the quarter-finals at the 1996 World Cup after a surprising 7–1 victory against the Czech Republic. In the 1992 Olympics, they lost to Canada 4–3 in an overtime shoot-out in the quarter-finals.

Germany has never won an international competition, and their most recent medal was silver in the 2018 Olympic Winter Games, when they lost to the Olympic Athletes From Russia 4–3 in overtime. It was the first time that Germany had reached the Gold Medal Game at the Winter Olympics. This was their best result, tied with a silver medal at the 1930 World Championships.

There are 25,934 registered players in Germany (0.03% of its population).

Team Germany finished in 4th place at the 2010 IIHF World Championship, their best placement since 1953.

Competition results edit

Olympic Games edit

Games Coach Captain Finish
  1928 St. Moritz Erich Römer Walter Sachs 9th
  1932 Lake Placid Erich Römer Gustav Jaenecke   Bronze
  1936 Garmisch-Partenkirchen   Val Hoffinger Rudi Ball 5th
In 1949, Germany was split and was succeeded by   West Germany and   East Germany
  1948 St. Moritz did not compete
  1952 Oslo   Joe Aitken Herbert Schibukat 8th
  1956 Cortina d'Ampezzo As United Team of Germany
  Frank Trottier Paul Ambros 6th
  1960 Squaw Valley As United Team of Germany
Karl Wild Heinz Henschel 6th
  1964 Innsbruck As United Team of Germany
Egen, Holderied, Unsinn Ernst Trautwein 7th
  1968 Grenoble   Ed Reigle Heinz Bader 7th
  1972 Sapporo Gerhard Kießling Alois Schloder 7th
  1976 Innsbruck Xaver Unsinn Alois Schloder   Bronze
  1980 Lake Placid Hans Rampf Rainer Philipp 10th
  1984 Sarajevo Xaver Unsinn Erich Kühnhackl 5th
  1988 Calgary Xaver Unsinn Udo Kießling 5th
In 1990 West and East Germany united back to   Germany
  1992 Albertville   Luděk Bukač Gerd Truntschka 7th
  1994 Lillehammer   Luděk Bukač Uli Hiemer 6th
  1998 Nagano   George Kingston Dieter Hegen 9th
  2002 Salt Lake City Hans Zach Jürgen Rumrich 8th
  2006 Turin Uwe Krupp Marcel Goc 10th
  2010 Vancouver Uwe Krupp Marcel Goc 11th
  2014 Sochi did not qualify
  2018 Pyeongchang Marco Sturm Marcel Goc   Silver
  2022 Beijing   Toni Söderholm Moritz Müller 10th
Totals
Games Gold Silver Bronze Total
16 0 1 2 3

World Championship edit

Year Location Coach Result
1930 Chamonix,   France / Vienna,   Austria / Berlin,   Germany ? Silver
1931 Did not participate
1933 Prague,   Czechoslovakia ? 5th place
1934 Milan,   Italy ? Bronze
1935 Davos,    Switzerland ? 9th place
1937 London,   Great Britain ? 4th place
1938 Prague,   Czechoslovakia ? 4th place
1939 Basel / Zürich,    Switzerland ? 5th place
1947-1951 Did not participate
In 1949, Germany was split and was succeeded by   West Germany and   East Germany
1953 Basel / Zürich,    Switzerland ? Silver
1954 Stockholm,   Sweden ? 5th place
1955 Düsseldorf / Dortmund / Krefeld / Cologne,   West Germany ? 6th place
1957-1958 Did not participate
1959 Prague / Brno / Ostrava,   Czechoslovakia ? 7th place
1961 Geneva / Lausanne,    Switzerland ? 8th place
1962 Colorado Springs / Denver,   United States ? 6th place
1963 Stockholm,   Sweden ? 7th place
1965 Turku / Rauma / Pori,   Finland ? 11th place (3rd place in Group B)
1966 Zagreb,   Yugoslavia ? 9th place (1st place in Group B)
1967 Vienna,   Austria ? 8th place (Relegated)
1969 Ljubljana,   Yugoslavia ? 10th place (4th place in Group B)
1970 Bucharest,   Romania ? 8th place (2nd place in Group B)
1971 Bern / Geneva,    Switzerland ? 5th place
1972 Prague,   Czechoslovakia ? 5th place
1973 Moscow,   Soviet Union ? 6th place (Relegated)
1974 Ljubljana,   Yugoslavia ? 9th place (3rd place in Group B)
1975 Sapporo,   Japan ? 8th place (2nd place in Group B)
1976 Katowice,   Poland ? 6th place
1977 Vienna,   Austria ? 7th place
1978 Prague,   Czechoslovakia ? 5th place
1979 Moscow,   Soviet Union ? 6th place
1981 Stockholm,   Sweden ? 7th place
1982 Helsinki / Tampere,   Finland ? 6th place
1983 Munich / Dortmund / Düsseldorf,   West Germany ? 5th place
1985 Prague,   Czechoslovakia ? 7th place
1986 Moscow,   Soviet Union ? 7th place
1987 Vienna,   Austria ? 6th place
1989 Stockholm / Södertälje,   Sweden ? 7th place
1990 Bern / Fribourg,    Switzerland ? 7th place
In 1990 West and East Germany united back to   Germany
1991 Turku / Helsinki / Tampere,   Finland Erich Kühnhackl 8th place
1992 Prague / Bratislava,   Czechoslovakia   Luděk Bukač 6th place
1993 Dortmund / Munich,   Germany   Luděk Bukač 5th place
1994 Bolzano / Canazei / Milan,   Italy   Luděk Bukač 9th place
1995 Stockholm / Gävle,   Sweden   George Kingston 9th place
1996 Vienna,   Austria   George Kingston 8th place
1997 Helsinki / Turku / Tampere,   Finland   George Kingston 11th place
1998 Zürich / Basel,    Switzerland   George Kingston 11th place (Relegated)
1999 Odense / Rødovre,   Denmark Hans Zach 20th place (4th place in Pool B)
2000 Katowice / Kraków,   Poland Hans Zach 17th place (Won Pool B)
2001 Cologne / Hanover / Nuremberg,   Germany Hans Zach 8th place
2002 Gothenburg / Karlstad / Jönköping,   Sweden Hans Zach 8th place
2003 Helsinki / Tampere / Turku,   Finland Hans Zach 7th place
2004 Prague / Ostrava,   Czech Republic Hans Zach 9th place
2005 Innsbruck / Vienna,   Austria   Greg Poss 15th place (Relegated)
2006 Amiens,   France Uwe Krupp 17th place (Won Division I, Group A)
2007 Moscow / Mytishchi,   Russia Uwe Krupp 7th place
2008 Quebec City / Halifax,   Canada Uwe Krupp 10th place
2009 Bern / Kloten,    Switzerland Uwe Krupp 15th place
2010 Cologne / Mannheim / Gelsenkirchen,   Germany Uwe Krupp 4th place
2011 Bratislava / Košice,   Slovakia Uwe Krupp 7th place
2012 Helsinki,   Finland / Stockholm,   Sweden   Jakob Kölliker 12th place
2013 Stockholm,   Sweden / Helsinki,   Finland   Pat Cortina 9th place
2014 Minsk,   Belarus   Pat Cortina 14th place
2015 Prague / Ostrava,   Czech Republic   Pat Cortina 10th place
2016 Moscow / Saint Petersburg,   Russia Marco Sturm 7th place
2017 Cologne,   Germany / Paris,   France Marco Sturm 8th place
2018 Copenhagen / Herning,   Denmark Marco Sturm 11th place
2019 Bratislava / Košice,   Slovakia   Toni Söderholm 6th place
2020 Zürich / Lausanne,    Switzerland Cancelled[3]
2021 Riga,   Latvia   Toni Söderholm 4th place
2022 Tampere / Helsinki,   Finland   Toni Söderholm 7th place
2023 Tampere,   Finland / Riga,   Latvia Harold Kreis Silver
2024 Prague / Ostrava,   Czech Republic

European Championship edit

Year GP W T L GF GA Finish Rank
  1910 Les Avants 3 2 0 1 17 5 Round-robin  
  1911 Berlin 3 3 0 0 20 1 Round-robin  
  1912 Prague* 2 1 1 0 6 3 Round-robin  
  1913 Munich 3 1 0 2 21 16 Round-robin  
  1914 Berlin 2 1 0 1 4 3 Round-robin  
1915–1920 No Championships (World War I).
1921-1926 Did not participate.
  1927 Wien 5 3 0 2 10 7 Round-robin  
  1929 Budapest 2 0 0 2 1 3 First round 8th
  1932 Berlin 6 1 4 1 5 5 Final round 4th
1933–1991 After 1932, the European Championship medals were awarded based on the results of the Ice Hockey World Championships, with Germany receiving   Gold in 1930 and 1934.
  • 1912 Championship was later annulled because Austria was not a member of the IIHF at the time of the competition.

World Cup of Hockey edit

Canada Cup edit

  • 1984 – Finished in 6th place

Other tournaments edit

Team edit

Current roster edit

Roster for the 2023 IIHF World Championship.[4][5]

Head coach: Harold Kreis

No. Pos. Name Height Weight Birthdate Team
1 G Dustin Strahlmeier 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in) 96 kg (212 lb) (1992-05-17) 17 May 1992 (age 31)   Grizzlys Wolfsburg
6 D Kai Wissmann 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in) 88 kg (194 lb) (1996-10-22) 22 October 1996 (age 27)   Providence Bruins
7 F Maximilian Kastner 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) 84 kg (185 lb) (1993-01-03) 3 January 1993 (age 31)   EHC Red Bull München
9 D Leon Gawanke 1.86 m (6 ft 1 in) 90 kg (200 lb) (1999-05-31) 31 May 1999 (age 24)   Manitoba Moose
27 D Maksymilian Szuber 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) 92 kg (203 lb) (2002-08-25) 25 August 2002 (age 21)   EHC Red Bull München
28 F Samuel Soramies 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) 88 kg (194 lb) (1998-06-30) 30 June 1998 (age 25)   Augsburger Panther
33 F JJ Peterka 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) 85 kg (187 lb) (2002-01-14) 14 January 2002 (age 22)   Buffalo Sabres
35 G Mathias Niederberger 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) 80 kg (180 lb) (1992-11-26) 26 November 1992 (age 31)   EHC Red Bull München
37 G Maximilian Franzreb 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in) 98 kg (216 lb) (1996-08-18) 18 August 1996 (age 27)   Fischtown Pinguins
38 D Fabio Wagner 1.82 m (6 ft 0 in) 83 kg (183 lb) (1995-09-17) 17 September 1995 (age 28)   ERC Ingolstadt
40 F Alexander Ehl 1.75 m (5 ft 9 in) 76 kg (168 lb) (1999-11-28) 28 November 1999 (age 24)   Düsseldorfer EG
41 D Jonas Müller 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in) 88 kg (194 lb) (1995-11-19) 19 November 1995 (age 28)   Eisbären Berlin
53 D Moritz Seider 1.92 m (6 ft 4 in) 90 kg (200 lb) (2001-04-06) 6 April 2001 (age 22)   Detroit Red Wings
56 F Manuel Wiederer 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in) 82 kg (181 lb) (1996-11-21) 21 November 1996 (age 27)   Eisbären Berlin
57 D Leon Hüttl 1.82 m (6 ft 0 in) 80 kg (180 lb) (2000-09-21) 21 September 2000 (age 23)   ERC Ingolstadt
60 F Wojciech Stachowiak 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) 85 kg (187 lb) (1999-07-03) 3 July 1999 (age 24)   ERC Ingolstadt
62 F Parker Tuomie 1.76 m (5 ft 9 in) 77 kg (170 lb) (1995-10-31) 31 October 1995 (age 28)   Straubing Tigers
72 F Dominik KahunA 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) 79 kg (174 lb) (1995-07-02) 2 July 1995 (age 28)   SC Bern
74 F Justin Schütz 1.81 m (5 ft 11 in) 82 kg (181 lb) (2000-06-24) 24 June 2000 (age 23)   EHC Red Bull München
77 F Daniel Fischbuch 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) 80 kg (180 lb) (1993-08-19) 19 August 1993 (age 30)   Düsseldorfer EG
78 F Nico Sturm 1.89 m (6 ft 2 in) 85 kg (187 lb) (1995-05-03) 3 May 1995 (age 28)   San Jose Sharks
91 D Moritz MüllerC 1.87 m (6 ft 2 in) 92 kg (203 lb) (1986-11-19) 19 November 1986 (age 37)   Kölner Haie
92 F Marcel NoebelsA 1.92 m (6 ft 4 in) 92 kg (203 lb) (1992-03-14) 14 March 1992 (age 31)   Eisbären Berlin
95 F Frederik Tiffels 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in) 87 kg (192 lb) (1995-05-20) 20 May 1995 (age 28)   EHC Red Bull München
97 F Filip Varejcka 1.81 m (5 ft 11 in) 85 kg (187 lb) (2001-01-09) 9 January 2001 (age 23)   EHC Red Bull München

Retired numbers edit

80 - Robert Müller

Notable players edit

Notable executives edit

Uniform evolution edit

All-time record edit

As of 9 November 2023.
Opponent Played Won Drawn Lost GF GA GD
  Australia 1 1 0 0 15 1 +14
  Austria 50 33 4 13 161 77 +84
  Belarus 29 10 2 17 69 83 -14
  Belgium 14 9 1 4 69 32 +37
  Bohemia 4 0 1 3 5 12 -7
  Bulgaria 1 1 0 0 13 1 +12
  Canada 132 19 7 106 251 674 -423
  China 1 1 0 0 3 2 +1
  Czech Republic 54 8 2 44 115 223 −108
  Czechoslovakia 65 10 6 49 120 364 −244
  Denmark 28 19 0 9 84 59 +25
  East Germany 20 12 4 4 73 54 +19
  England 10 6 1 3 40 23 +17
  Estonia 2 2 0 0 7 3 +4
  Finland 122 26 14 82 309 537 −228
  France 44 25 4 15 125 86 +39
  Great Britain 15 11 1 3 65 26 +39
  Hungary 22 17 4 1 72 32 +40
  Israel 1 1 0 0 11 2 +9
  Italy 59 33 9 17 230 157 +73
  Japan 23 21 0 2 138 57 +81
  Kazakhstan 10 5 0 5 28 24 +4
  Latvia 40 21 4 15 97 95 +2
  Netherlands 11 10 1 0 79 23 +56
  Norway 49 33 2 14 238 145 +93
  Poland 53 30 7 16 188 159 +29
  Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia 1 0 0 1 1 5 −4
  Romania 21 17 0 4 100 57 +43
  Russia 33 5 3 25 62 111 −49
  Serbia and Montenegro 1 1 0 0 14 0 +14
  Slovakia 76 35 2 39 176 192 -16
  Slovenia 11 8 2 1 41 15 +26
  South Korea 2 2 0 0 10 4 +6
  Soviet Union 71 0 1 70 111 581 -470
  Sweden 110 12 5 93 198 514 −316
   Switzerland 160 72 16 72 527 451 +76
  Ukraine 7 3 2 2 18 15 +3
  United States 112 31 9 72 310 440 −130
  Yugoslavia 33 21 5 7 173 111 +62
Total 1 497 570 119 808 4 343 5 436 -1 103

See also edit

References edit

  1. ^ "IIHF Men's World Ranking". IIHF. 28 May 2023. Retrieved 28 May 2023.
  2. ^ "Happy medal winners". International Ice Hockey Federation. 15 August 2018.
  3. ^ Steiss, Adam. "2020 IIHF Ice Hockey World Championship cancelled". iihf.com. IIHF. Retrieved 21 March 2020.
  4. ^ "WM-Kader steht fest / Abreise nach Tampere am heutigen Mittwoch" (in German). deb-online.de. 10 May 2023.
  5. ^ "Team Roster Germany" (PDF). iihf.com. 12 May 2023.

External links edit