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Germany men's national ice hockey team

The German men's national ice hockey team first participated in serious international competition at the 1911 European Hockey Championship. When Germany was split after World War II, a separate East Germany national ice hockey team existed until 1990. By 1991, the East German teams and players were merged into the Deutscher Eishockey-Bund association.

Germany
Shirt badge/Association crest
The Coat of arms of Germany is the badge used on the players jerseys
Nickname(s)Träger der Adler (The Eagle Carriers)
AssociationDeutscher Eishockey-Bund
Head coachToni Söderholm
AssistantsTobias Abstreiter
Patrick Dallaire
Cory Murphy
Steven Reinprecht
CaptainMoritz Müller
Most gamesUdo Kießling (320)
Most pointsErich Kühnhackl (210)
Team colors              
IIHF codeGER
Germany national ice hockey team jerseys 2018 (WOG).png
Ranking
Current IIHF8 Decrease 1 (21 May 2018)[1]
Highest IIHF7 (first in 2018)
Lowest IIHF13 (first in 2014)
First international
England  1–0  Germany
(Montreux, Switzerland; 10 January 1910)
Biggest win
Germany  14–0 Flag of Serbia and Montenegro (1992–2006).svg Yugoslavia
(Ljubljana, Slovenia; 10 February 2000)
Biggest defeat
Soviet Union  10–0  Germany
(Zug, Switzerland; 7 December 1990)
 Canada 10–0 Germany 
(Prague, Czech Republic; 3 May 2015)
IIHF World Championships
Appearances64 (first in 1930)
Best result2nd, silver medalist(s) (1930, 1953)
European Championships
Appearances8 (first in 1910)
Best result2nd, silver medalist(s) (1910, 1911, 1914)
Olympics
Appearances20 (first in 1928)
MedalsSilver medal.svg Silver (2018)
Bronze medal.svg Bronze (1932, 1976)
Medal record
Olympic Games
Silver medal – second place 2018 Pyeongchang Team
Bronze medal – third place 1932 Lake Placid Team
Bronze medal – third place 1976 Innsbruck Team
World Championship
Silver medal – second place 1930 Austria/France/Germany
Silver medal – second place 1953 Switzerland
Bronze medal – third place 1934 Italy
Pool B / Division I
Gold medal – first place 1966 Yugoslavia
Gold medal – first place 2000 Poland
Gold medal – first place 2006 France (Group A)
Silver medal – second place 1970 Romania
Silver medal – second place 1975 Japan
European Championship
Silver medal – second place 1910 Switzerland
Silver medal – second place 1911 Germany
Silver medal – second place 1912 Austria-Hungary
Silver medal – second place 1914 Germany
Bronze medal – third place 1913 Germany
Bronze medal – third place 1927 Austria

Contents

HistoryEdit

West GermanyEdit

The biggest accomplishment from the West German team, came in 1976 at the Winter Olympics, when the team went 2–3–0 and won the bronze medal. The team's wins came against the United States (4–1) and Poland (7–4). The team also played well against the silver medalists, Czechoslovakia, and the gold medalists, the USSR.

In 1980, the team didn't do as well and only won one game in the preliminary round, which kept them from advancing. They finished 10th out of 12.

In 1984, the team was invited to the Canada Cup. By 1991, the reunification of East and West Germany meant the inclusion of players from the former East Germany.

Post-unificationEdit

The team is not considered to be as elite as Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland, Russia, Slovakia, Sweden or the United States, but they are ranked 8th in the world (2017) by the IIHF. Since re-unification, their best recent results include finishing 6th place at the 2003 World Championships where they lost a close quarter-final match in overtime to Canada, and 4th at the 2010 World Championships where they lost to Sweden in the bronze medal game. Previously, they finished third in the European Group and qualified for the quarter-finals at the 1996 World Cup after a surprising 7–1 victory against the Czech Republic. In the 1992 Olympics, they lost to Canada 4–3 in an overtime shoot-out in the quarter-finals.

Germany has never won an international competition, and their most recent medal was silver in the 2018 Olympic Winter Games, when they lost to the Olympic Athletes From Russia 4–3 in overtime. It was the first time that Germany had reached the Gold Medal Game at the Winter Olympics. This was their best result, tied with a silver medal at the 1930 World Championships.

There are 25,934 registered players in Germany (0.03% of its population).

Team Germany finished in 4th place at the 2010 IIHF World Championship, their best placement since 1953.

Competition resultsEdit

Olympic GamesEdit

Games Coach Captain Finish
  1928 St. Moritz Erich Römer Walter Sachs 9th
  1932 Lake Placid Erich Römer Gustav Jaenecke   Bronze
  1936 Garmisch-Partenkirchen   Val Hoffinger Rudi Ball 5th
Since 1945, Germany has been split and was succeeded by   West Germany and   East Germany
  1948 St. Moritz Did not compete
  1952 Oslo   Joe Aitken Herbert Schibukat 8th
  1956 Cortina d'Ampezzo As United Team of Germany
  Frank Trottier Paul Ambros 6th
  1960 Squaw Valley As United Team of Germany
Karl Wild Heinz Henschel 6th
  1964 Innsbruck As United Team of Germany
Egen, Holderied, Unsinn Ernst Trautwein 7th
  1968 Grenoble   Ed Reigle Heinz Bader 7th
  1972 Sapporo Gerhard Kießling Alois Schloder 7th
  1976 Innsbruck Xaver Unsinn Alois Schloder   Bronze
  1980 Lake Placid Hans Rampf Rainer Philipp 10th
  1984 Sarajevo Xaver Unsinn Erich Kühnhackl 5th
  1988 Calgary Xaver Unsinn Udo Kießling 5th
Since 1990, West and East has been united back to   Germany
  1992 Albertville   Luděk Bukač Gerd Truntschka 7th
  1994 Lillehammer   Luděk Bukač Uli Hiemer 6th
  1998 Nagano   George Kingston Dieter Hegen 9th
  2002 Salt Lake City Hans Zach Jürgen Rumrich 8th
  2006 Turin Uwe Krupp Marcel Goc 10th
  2010 Vancouver Uwe Krupp Marcel Goc 11th
  2014 Sochi Did not qualify
  2018 Pyeongchang Marco Sturm Marcel Goc   Silver
  2022 Beijing   Toni Söderholm
Totals
Games Gold Silver Bronze Total
16 0 1 2 3

World ChampionshipEdit

  • 1930Won silver medal
  • 1933 – Finished in 5th place
  • 1934Won bronze medal
  • 1935 – Finished in 9th place
  • 1937 – Finished in 4th place
  • 1938 – Finished in 4th place
  • 1939 – Finished in 5th place
  • 1953Won silver medal
  • 1954 – Finished in 5th place
  • 1955 – Finished in 6th place
  • 1959 – Finished in 7th place
  • 1961 – Finished in 8th place
  • 1962 – Finished in 6th place
  • 1963 – Finished in 7th place
  • 1965 – Finished in 11th place (3rd in "B" Pool)
  • 1966 – Finished in 9th place (Won "B" Pool)
  • 1967 – Finished in 8th place
  • 1969 – Finished in 10th place (4th in "B" Pool)
  • 1970 – Finished in 8th place (2nd in "B" Pool)
  • 1971 – Finished in 5th place
  • 1972 – Finished in 5th place
  • 1973 – Finished in 6th place
  • 1974 – Finished in 9th place (3rd in "B" Pool)
  • 1975 – Finished in 8th place (2nd in "B" Pool)
  • 1976 – Finished in 6th place
  • 1977 – Finished in 7th place
  • 1978 – Finished in 5th place
  • 1979 – Finished in 6th place
  • 1981 – Finished in 7th place
  • 1982 – Finished in 6th place
  • 1983 – Finished in 5th place
  • 1985 – Finished in 7th place
  • 1986 – Finished in 7th place
  • 1987 – Finished in 6th place
  • 1989 – Finished in 7th place
  • 1990 – Finished in 7th place
  • 1991 – Finished in 8th place
  • 1992 – Finished in 6th place
  • 1993 – Finished in 5th place
  • 1994 – Finished in 9th place
  • 1995 – Finished in 9th place
  • 1996 – Finished in 8th place
  • 1997 – Finished in 11th place
  • 1998 – Finished in 11th place
  • 1999 – Finished in 20th place (4th in "B" Pool)
  • 2000 – Finished in 17th place (Won "B" Pool)
  • 2001 – Finished in 8th place
  • 2002 – Finished in 8th place
  • 2003 – Finished in 7th place
  • 2004 – Finished in 9th place
  • 2005 – Finished in 15th place
  • 2006 – Finished in 17th place (Won Division I, Group A)
  • 2007 – Finished in 9th place
  • 2008 – Finished in 10th place
  • 2009 – Finished in 15th place
  • 2010 – Finished in 4th place
  • 2011 – Finished in 7th place
  • 2012 – Finished in 12th place
  • 2013 – Finished in 9th place
  • 2014 – Finished in 14th place
  • 2015 – Finished in 10th place
  • 2016 – Finished in 7th place
  • 2017 – Finished in 8th place
  • 2018 – Finished in 11th place
  • 2019 – Finished in 6th place

European ChampionshipEdit

Games GP W T L GF GA Coach Captain Finish Rank
  1910 Les Avants 3 2 0 1 17 5 ? ? Round-robin  
  1911 Berlin 3 3 0 0 20 1 ? ? Round-robin  
  1912 Prague* 2 1 1 0 6 3 ? ? Round-robin  
  1913 Munich 3 1 0 2 21 16 ? ? Round-robin  
  1914 Berlin 2 1 0 1 4 3 ? ? Round-robin  
1915–1920 No Championships (World War I).
  1921 Stockholm Did not participate.
  1922 St. Moritz Did not participate.
  1923 Antwerp Did not participate.
  1924 Milan Did not participate.
  1925 Štrbské Pleso, Starý Smokovec Did not participate.
  1926 Davos Did not participate.
  1927 Wien 5 3 0 2 10 7 ? ? Round-robin  
  1929 Budapest 2 0 0 2 1 3 ? ? First round 8th
  1932 Berlin 6 1 4 1 5 5 ? ? Final round 4th
  • 1912 Championship was later annulled because Austria was not a member of the IIHF at the time of the competition.

World Cup of HockeyEdit

  • 1996 – lost in quarterfinals
  • 2004 – lost in quarterfinals

Canada CupEdit

  • 1984 – Finished in 6th place

Other tournamentsEdit

TeamEdit

Current rosterEdit

Roster for the 2019 IIHF World Championship.[2][3]

Head coach: Toni Söderholm

No. Pos. Name Height Weight Birthdate Team
2 D Denis Reul 1.93 m (6 ft 4 in) 110 kg (240 lb) (1989-06-29) 29 June 1989 (age 29)   Adler Mannheim
5 D Korbinian Holzer 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in) 94 kg (207 lb) (1988-02-16) 16 February 1988 (age 31)   Anaheim Ducks
11 D Marco Nowak 1.89 m (6 ft 2 in) 93 kg (205 lb) (1990-07-23) 23 July 1990 (age 28)   Düsseldorfer EG
15 F Stefan Loibl 1.86 m (6 ft 1 in) 83 kg (183 lb) (1996-06-24) 24 June 1996 (age 22)   Straubing Tigers
19 D Benedikt Schopper 1.89 m (6 ft 2 in) 90 kg (200 lb) (1985-02-18) 18 February 1985 (age 34)   Straubing Tigers
21 D Moritz Seider 1.92 m (6 ft 4 in) 90 kg (200 lb) (2001-04-06) 6 April 2001 (age 18)   Adler Mannheim
22 F Matthias Plachta 1.88 m (6 ft 2 in) 100 kg (220 lb) (1991-05-16) 16 May 1991 (age 28)   Adler Mannheim
28 F Frank Mauer 1.84 m (6 ft 0 in) 90 kg (200 lb) (1988-04-12) 12 April 1988 (age 31)   EHC Red Bull München
29 F Leon DraisaitlA 1.89 m (6 ft 2 in) 96 kg (212 lb) (1995-10-27) 27 October 1995 (age 23)   Edmonton Oilers
30 G Philipp Grubauer 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) 84 kg (185 lb) (1991-11-25) 25 November 1991 (age 27)   Colorado Avalanche
31 G Niklas Treutle 1.87 m (6 ft 2 in) 85 kg (187 lb) (1991-04-29) 29 April 1991 (age 28)   Thomas Sabo Ice Tigers
35 G Mathias Niederberger 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) 80 kg (180 lb) (1992-11-26) 26 November 1992 (age 26)   Düsseldorfer EG
36 D Yannic Seidenberg 1.72 m (5 ft 8 in) 82 kg (181 lb) (1984-01-11) 11 January 1984 (age 35)   EHC Red Bull München
41 D Jonas Müller 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in) 88 kg (194 lb) (1995-11-19) 19 November 1995 (age 23)   Eisbären Berlin
42 F Yasin Ehliz 1.77 m (5 ft 10 in) 84 kg (185 lb) (1992-12-30) 30 December 1992 (age 26)   EHC Red Bull München
43 F Gerrit Fauser 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in) 89 kg (196 lb) (1989-07-13) 13 July 1989 (age 29)   Grizzlys Wolfsburg
50 F Patrick HagerA 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in) 82 kg (181 lb) (1988-09-08) 8 September 1988 (age 30)   EHC Red Bull München
54 F Lean Bergmann 1.87 m (6 ft 2 in) 93 kg (205 lb) (1998-10-04) 4 October 1998 (age 20)   Iserlohn Roosters
58 F Markus Eisenschmid 1.84 m (6 ft 0 in) 82 kg (181 lb) (1995-01-22) 22 January 1995 (age 24)   Adler Mannheim
65 F Marc Michaelis 1.77 m (5 ft 10 in) 79 kg (174 lb) (1995-07-31) 31 July 1995 (age 23)   Minnesota State Univ.
72 F Dominik Kahun 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) 82 kg (181 lb) (1995-07-02) 2 July 1995 (age 23)   Chicago Blackhawks
83 F Leonhard Pföderl 1.82 m (6 ft 0 in) 87 kg (192 lb) (1993-09-01) 1 September 1993 (age 25)   Thomas Sabo Ice Tigers
91 D Moritz MüllerC 1.87 m (6 ft 2 in) 92 kg (203 lb) (1986-11-19) 19 November 1986 (age 32)   Kölner Haie
92 F Marcel Noebels 1.92 m (6 ft 4 in) 92 kg (203 lb) (1992-03-14) 14 March 1992 (age 27)   Eisbären Berlin
95 F Frederik Tiffels 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) 91 kg (201 lb) (1995-05-20) 20 May 1995 (age 24)   Kölner Haie

Notable playersEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "IIHF Men's World Ranking". IIHF. 21 May 2018. Retrieved 21 May 2018.
  2. ^ "Bundestrainer Toni Söderholm gibt Kader für die WM bekannt". deb-online.de. 8 May 2019.
  3. ^ 2019 IIHF World Championship roster

External linksEdit