Sweden men's national ice hockey team

The Sweden men's national ice hockey team (Swedish: Sveriges herrlandslag i ishockey) is governed by the Swedish Ice Hockey Association. It is one of the most successful national ice hockey teams in the world and a member of the so-called "Big Six", the unofficial group of the six strongest men's ice hockey nations, along with Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland, Russia and the United States.[5]

Sweden
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)Tre Kronor (Three Crowns)
AssociationSwedish Ice Hockey Association
Head coachJohan Garpenlöv
AssistantsMarkus Åkerblom
Marcus Ragnarsson
CaptainOliver Ekman-Larsson
Most gamesJörgen Jönsson (285)[1]
Most pointsSven Tumba (186)[1]
Home stadiumAvicii Arena
Stockholm, Sweden
Team colors   
IIHF codeSWE
Sweden national ice hockey team jerseys 2022 IHWC.png
Ranking
Current IIHF5 Steady (30 May 2022)[2]
Highest IIHF1 (first in 2006)
Lowest IIHF7 (2021)
First international
Sweden  8–0  Belgium
(Antwerp, Belgium; 23 April 1920)[3]
Biggest win
Sweden  24–1  Belgium
(Prague, Czechoslovakia; 16 February 1947)[3]
Sweden  23–0  Italy
(St. Moritz, Switzerland; 7 February 1948)[4]
Biggest defeat
Canada  22–0  Sweden
(Chamonix, France; 29 January 1924)[3]
IIHF World Championships
Appearances70 (first in 1920)
Best resultGold Gold: (1953, 1957, 1962, 1987, 1991, 1992, 1998, 2006, 2013, 2017, 2018)
World Cup / Canada Cup
Appearances8 (first in 1976)
Best resultSimple silver cup.svg 2nd: (1984)
European Championship
Appearances12
Best resultGold Gold: (1921, 1923, 1932)
Olympics
Appearances23 (first in 1920)
MedalsGold medal.svg Gold: (1994, 2006)
Silver medal.svg Silver: (1928, 1964, 2014)
Bronze medal.svg Bronze: (1952, 1980, 1984, 1988)
International record (W–L–T)
710–198–86
Medal record
Olympic Games
Gold medal – first place 1994 Lillehammer Team
Gold medal – first place 2006 Turin Team
Silver medal – second place 1928 St. Moritz Team
Silver medal – second place 1964 Innsbruck Team
Silver medal – second place 2014 Sochi Team
Bronze medal – third place 1952 Oslo Team
Bronze medal – third place 1980 Lake Placid Team
Bronze medal – third place 1984 Sarajevo Team
Bronze medal – third place 1988 Calgary Team
World Championship
Gold medal – first place 1953 Switzerland
Gold medal – first place 1957 Soviet Union
Gold medal – first place 1962 United States
Gold medal – first place 1987 Austria
Gold medal – first place 1991 Finland
Gold medal – first place 1992 Czechoslovakia
Gold medal – first place 1998 Switzerland
Gold medal – first place 2006 Latvia
Gold medal – first place 2013 Sweden/Finland
Gold medal – first place 2017 Germany/France
Gold medal – first place 2018 Denmark
Silver medal – second place 1947 Czechoslovakia
Silver medal – second place 1951 France
Silver medal – second place 1963 Sweden
Silver medal – second place 1967 Austria
Silver medal – second place 1969 Sweden
Silver medal – second place 1970 Sweden
Silver medal – second place 1973 Soviet Union
Silver medal – second place 1977 Austria
Silver medal – second place 1981 Sweden
Silver medal – second place 1986 Soviet Union
Silver medal – second place 1990 Switzerland
Silver medal – second place 1993 Germany
Silver medal – second place 1995 Sweden
Silver medal – second place 1997 Finland
Silver medal – second place 2003 Finland
Silver medal – second place 2004 Czech Republic
Silver medal – second place 2011 Slovakia
Bronze medal – third place 1954 Sweden
Bronze medal – third place 1958 Norway
Bronze medal – third place 1965 Finland
Bronze medal – third place 1971 Switzerland
Bronze medal – third place 1972 Czechoslovakia
Bronze medal – third place 1974 Finland
Bronze medal – third place 1975 Germany
Bronze medal – third place 1976 Poland
Bronze medal – third place 1979 Soviet Union
Bronze medal – third place 1994 Italy
Bronze medal – third place 1999 Norway
Bronze medal – third place 2001 Germany
Bronze medal – third place 2002 Sweden
Bronze medal – third place 2009 Switzerland
Bronze medal – third place 2010 Germany
Bronze medal – third place 2014 Belarus
European Championship
Gold medal – first place 1921 Sweden
Gold medal – first place 1923 Belgium
Gold medal – first place 1932 Germany
Silver medal – second place 1922 Switzerland
Silver medal – second place 1924 Italy
Canada Cup / World Cup
Silver medal – second place 1984 Edmonton
Bronze medal – third place 1987 Hamilton
Bronze medal – third place 1996 Montreal
Bronze medal – third place 2016 Toronto

The team's nickname Tre Kronor, meaning "Three Crowns", refers to the emblem on the team jersey, which is found in the lesser national coat of arms of the Kingdom of Sweden. The first time this emblem was used on the national team's jersey was on 12 February 1938, during the World Championships in Prague.[6]

The team has won numerous medals at both the World Championships and the Winter Olympics. In 2006, they became the first team to win both tournaments in the same calendar year, by winning the 2006 Winter Olympics in a thrilling final against Finland by 3–2, and the 2006 World Championships by beating Czech Republic in the final, 4–0.[7] In 2013 the team was the first team to win the World Championships at home since the Soviet Union in 1986. In 2018, the Swedish team won its 11th title at the World Championships. In 2021 Sweden failed to reach the playoffs for the first time after the tournament implemented the playoff system, placing 9th, tying their 1937 team for their worst placement in tournament history.

Tournament recordEdit

Olympic GamesEdit

Games GP W L T GF GA Coach Captain Finish
  1920 Antwerp 4 3 1 0 17 20 Raoul Le Mat Einar Lindqvist 4th
  1924 Chamonix 5 2 3 0 21 49 Unknown Unknown 4th
  1928 St. Moritz 5 3 1 1 12 14 Viking Harbom
Sten Mellgren
Carl Abrahamsson Silver
  1932 Lake Placid Did not compete
  1936 Garmisch-Partenkirchen 5 2 3 0 5 7 Vic Lindquist Herman Carlson 5th
  1948 St. Moritz 8 4 4 0 55 28 Unknown Unknown 4th
  1952 Oslo 8 7 2 0 53 22 Sven Bergqvist Unknown Bronze
  1956 Cortina d'Ampezzo 7 2 4 1 17 27 Folke "Masen" Jansson Unknown 4th
  1960 Squaw Valley 7 2 4 1 40 24 Ed Reigle Unknown 5th
  1964 Innsbruck 8 6 2 0 59 18 Arne Strömberg Unknown Silver
  1968 Grenoble 7 4 2 1 23 18 Arne Strömberg Unknown 4th
  1972 Sapporo 6 3 2 1 25 14 Billy Harris Unknown 4th
  1976 Innsbruck Did not compete
  1980 Lake Placid 7 4 1 2 31 19 Tommy Sandlin Mats Waltin Bronze
  1984 Sarajevo 7 4 2 1 36 17 Anders Parmström Håkan Eriksson Bronze
  1988 Calgary 8 4 1 3 33 21 Tommy Sandlin Thomas Rundqvist Bronze
  1992 Albertville 8 5 1 2 30 19 Conny Evensson Thomas Rundqvist 5th
  1994 Lillehammer 8 6 1 1 33 18 Curt Lundmark Charles Berglund Gold
  1998 Nagano 4 2 2 0 12 9 Kent Forsberg Calle Johansson 5th
  2002 Salt Lake City 4 3 1 0 17 8 Hardy Nilsson Mats Sundin 5th
  2006 Turin 8 6 2 0 31 19 Bengt-Åke Gustafsson Mats Sundin Gold
  2010 Vancouver 4 3 1 0 12 6 Bengt-Åke Gustafsson Nicklas Lidström 5th
  2014 Sochi 6 5 1 0 17 9 Pär Mårts Henrik Zetterberg
Niklas Kronwall[8]
Silver
  2018 Pyeongchang 4 3 0 1 11 5 Rikard Grönborg Joel Lundqvist 5th
  2022 Beijing 6 3 0 3 13 13 Johan Garpenlöv Anton Lander 4th
Totals
Games Gold Silver Bronze Total
21 2 3 4 9

Canada CupEdit

World CupEdit

European ChampionshipEdit

  • 1921 –   Gold
  • 1922 –   Silver
  • 1923 –   Gold
  • 1924 –   Silver
  • 1932 –   Gold

World ChampionshipEdit

  • 1931 – 6th place
  • 1935 – 5th place
  • 1937 – 9th place
  • 1938 – 5th place
  • 1947 –   Silver
  • 1949 – 4th place
  • 1950 – 5th place
  • 1951 –   Silver
  • 1953  Gold
  • 1954 –   Bronze
  • 1955 – 5th place
  • 1957  Gold
  • 1958 –   Bronze
  • 1959 – 5th place
  • 1961 – 4th place
  • 1962  Gold
  • 1963  Silver
  • 1965  Bronze
  • 1966 – 4th place
  • 1967 –   Silver
  • 1969  Silver
  • 1970  Silver
  • 1971 –   Bronze
  • 1972 –   Bronze
  • 1973  Silver
  • 1974  Bronze
  • 1975  Bronze
  • 1976  Bronze
  • 1977  Silver
  • 1978 – 4th place
  • 1979  Bronze
  • 1981  Silver
  • 1982 – 4th place
  • 1983 – 4th place
  • 1985 – 6th place
  • 1986  Silver
  • 1987  Gold
  • 1989 – 4th place
  • 1990  Silver
  • 1991  Gold
  • 1992  Gold
  • 1993  Silver
  • 1994  Bronze
  • 1995  Silver
  • 1996 – 5th place
  • 1997  Silver
  • 1998  Gold
  • 1999  Bronze
  • 2000 – 7th place
  • 2001  Bronze
  • 2002  Bronze
  • 2003  Silver
  • 2004  Silver
  • 2005 – 4th place
  • 2006  Gold
  • 2007 – 4th place
  • 2008 – 4th place
  • 2009  Bronze
Games GP W OTW OTL L GF GA Coach Captain Finish
  2010 Germany 9 7 0 0 2 30 15 Bengt-Åke Gustafsson Magnus Johansson Bronze
  2011 Slovakia 9 6 0 1 2 32 20 Pär Mårts Rickard Wallin Silver
   2012 Finland/Sweden 8 6 0 0 2 32 19 Pär Mårts Daniel Alfredsson 6th
   2013 Sweden/Finland 10 8 0 0 2 28 14 Pär Mårts Staffan Kronwall Gold
  2014 Belarus 10 7 1 1 1 28 15 Pär Mårts Joel Lundqvist Bronze
  2015 Czech Republic 8 4 2 0 2 37 24 Pär Mårts Staffan Kronwall 5th
  2016 Russia 8 3 2 0 3 23 24 Pär Mårts Jimmie Ericsson 6th
   2017 Germany/France 10 7 1 1 1 38 16 Rikard Grönborg Joel Lundqvist Gold
  2018 Denmark 10 8 2 0 0 43 13 Rikard Grönborg Mikael Backlund Gold
  2019 Slovakia 8 5 0 1 2 45 26 Rikard Grönborg Oliver Ekman-Larsson 5th
  2020 Switzerland Cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic[9]
  2021 Latvia 7 3 0 1 3 21 14 Johan Garpenlöv Henrik Tömmernes 9th
  2022 Finland 8 5 1 2 0 30 14 Johan Garpenlöv Oliver Ekman-Larsson 6th
   2023 Finland/Latvia Sam Hallam

Current rosterEdit

Roster for the 2022 IIHF World Championship.[10]

Head coach: Johan Garpenlöv[11]

No. Pos. Name Height Weight Birthdate Team
6 D Adam LarssonA 1.89 m (6 ft 2 in) 94 kg (207 lb) (1992-11-12) 12 November 1992 (age 29)   Seattle Kraken
7 D Henrik Tömmernes 1.86 m (6 ft 1 in) 84 kg (185 lb) (1990-08-28) 28 August 1990 (age 31)   Genève-Servette HC
8 D Marcus Pettersson 1.94 m (6 ft 4 in) 80 kg (180 lb) (1996-05-08) 8 May 1996 (age 26)   Pittsburgh Penguins
12 F Max Friberg 1.79 m (5 ft 10 in) 86 kg (190 lb) (1992-11-20) 20 November 1992 (age 29)   Frölunda HC
17 F Oskar Lang 1.70 m (5 ft 7 in) 75 kg (165 lb) (1996-12-04) 4 December 1996 (age 25)   Leksands IF
23 D Oliver Ekman-LarssonC 1.87 m (6 ft 2 in) 92 kg (203 lb) (1991-07-17) 17 July 1991 (age 31)   Vancouver Canucks
26 D Rasmus Dahlin 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in) 94 kg (207 lb) (2000-04-13) 13 April 2000 (age 22)   Buffalo Sabres
28 F Anton Bengtsson 1.86 m (6 ft 1 in) 88 kg (194 lb) (1993-05-13) 13 May 1993 (age 29)   Rögle BK
32 F Lucas Wallmark 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in) 83 kg (183 lb) (1995-09-05) 5 September 1995 (age 26)   CSKA Moscow
35 G Linus Ullmark 1.93 m (6 ft 4 in) 88 kg (194 lb) (1993-07-31) 31 July 1993 (age 29)   Boston Bruins
40 F Jacob Peterson 1.86 m (6 ft 1 in) 82 kg (181 lb) (1999-07-19) 19 July 1999 (age 23)   Dallas Stars
42 F Joakim NordströmA 1.88 m (6 ft 2 in) 93 kg (205 lb) (1992-02-25) 25 February 1992 (age 30)   CSKA Moscow
45 G Magnus Hellberg 1.97 m (6 ft 6 in) 85 kg (187 lb) (1991-04-04) 4 April 1991 (age 31)   Detroit Red Wings
48 F Carl Klingberg 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) 102 kg (225 lb) (1991-01-28) 28 January 1991 (age 31)   EV Zug
54 D Anton Lindholm 1.81 m (5 ft 11 in) 90 kg (200 lb) (1994-11-29) 29 November 1994 (age 27)   Dinamo Minsk
56 D Erik Gustafsson 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) 90 kg (200 lb) (1992-03-14) 14 March 1992 (age 30)   Chicago Blackhawks
62 F Joel Kellman 1.79 m (5 ft 10 in) 85 kg (187 lb) (1994-05-25) 25 May 1994 (age 28)   Växjö Lakers HC
63 G Marcus Högberg 1.96 m (6 ft 5 in) 99 kg (218 lb) (1994-11-25) 25 November 1994 (age 27)   Linköping HC
64 D Jonathan Pudas 1.79 m (5 ft 10 in) 81 kg (179 lb) (1993-04-26) 26 April 1993 (age 29)   Skellefteå AIK
66 F Nils Åman 1.89 m (6 ft 2 in) 84 kg (185 lb) (2000-02-07) 7 February 2000 (age 22)   Leksands IF
72 F Emil Bemström 1.82 m (6 ft 0 in) 90 kg (200 lb) (1999-06-01) 1 June 1999 (age 23)   Columbus Blue Jackets
74 F Rasmus Asplund 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) 86 kg (190 lb) (1997-12-03) 3 December 1997 (age 24)   Buffalo Sabres
86 F Mathias Bromé 1.82 m (6 ft 0 in) 82 kg (181 lb) (1994-07-29) 29 July 1994 (age 28)   HC Davos
88 F William Nylander 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in) 86 kg (190 lb) (1996-05-01) 1 May 1996 (age 26)   Toronto Maple Leafs
91 F Carl Grundström 1.84 m (6 ft 0 in) 91 kg (201 lb) (1997-12-01) 1 December 1997 (age 24)   Los Angeles Kings

All-time team recordEdit

The following table shows Sweden's all-time international record in official matches (WC, OG, EC), correct as of 21 May 2015.[12] Teams named in italics are no longer active.

Against Played Won Drawn Lost GF GA
  Austria 18 13 2 3 82 12
  Belarus 10 9 0 1 38 19
  Belgium 3 3 0 0 41 2
  Canada 82 26 11 45 216 320
  Czech Republic 24 13 7 4 74 49
  Denmark 9 9 0 0 49 13
  Finland 76 44 15 17 281 181
  France 17 15 0 2 78 22
  Germany 16 14 1 1 72 26
  Great Britain 9 5 0 4 42 19
  Hungary 1 1 0 0 3 0
  Italy 19 16 3 0 127 26
  Japan 4 4 0 0 44 1
  Kazakhstan 1 1 0 0 7 2
  Latvia 14 12 2 0 66 22
  Netherlands 2 2 0 0 16 0
  Norway 18 16 2 0 99 26
  Poland 28 23 2 3 192 46
  Romania 4 4 0 0 35 4
  Russia 21 7 3 11 55 69
  Slovakia 12 5 3 4 31 29
  Slovenia 3 3 0 0 15 2
  Spain 1 1 0 0 Walkover
   Switzerland 47 35 6 6 244 88
  Ukraine 5 5 0 0 26 6
  United States 67 43 8 16 301 195
  Czechoslovakia 74 27 11 36 193 206
  East Germany 16 15 0 1 110 29
  Soviet Union 58 7 8 43 118 279
  West Germany 33 30 2 1 190 57
  Yugoslavia 2 2 0 0 19 1
Totals: 694 410 86 198 2864 1751

AwardsEdit

Uniform evolutionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Includes Professional ice hockey world championships and the 1998 and 2002 Olympics only.
  2. ^ "IIHF Men's World Ranking". IIHF. 30 May 2022. Retrieved 30 May 2022.
  3. ^ a b c Includes Olympics, World Championships, World Cups, Canada Cups and Summit Series.
  4. ^ http://library.la84.org/6oic/OfficialReports/1948/ORW1948.pdf[bare URL PDF]
  5. ^ "NHL announces World Cup of Hockey for 2016". The Canadian Press. 24 January 2015. Retrieved 29 January 2015.
  6. ^ Feltenmark, Anders. "Tre Kronor en poppis 69-åring" (PDF) (in Swedish). Swedish Ice Hockey Association. Archived from the original (PDF) on 29 May 2008. Retrieved 21 April 2008.
  7. ^ "Sweden complete golden double". Eurosport. 21 May 2006. Archived from the original on 9 October 2006. Retrieved 21 May 2006.
  8. ^ Due to Zetterberg's injury
  9. ^ Steiss, Adam. "2020 IIHF Ice Hockey World Championship cancelled". iihf.com. IIHF. Retrieved 21 March 2020.
  10. ^ "Landslagstrupper i maj" (in Swedish). swehockey.se. 11 May 2022.
  11. ^ "Team Roster Sweden" (PDF). iihf.com. 15 May 2021.
  12. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 3 January 2016.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)

External linksEdit