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Ice hockey at the 2010 Winter Olympics – Men's tournament

The men's tournament in ice hockey at the 2010 Winter Olympics was held in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, from February 16-28, 2010. Games were hosted at two venues – Canada Hockey Place (renamed from "General Motors Place" for the Olympics due to IOC rules disallowing host venues to be named after non-Olympic sponsors) and UBC Thunderbird Arena. It was the fourth time since the 1998 Winter Olympics in Nagano that the National Hockey League allowed its players to compete. These Olympics were the first to take place in a city with an NHL team since then, which meant players on the Vancouver Canucks who were competing in the Olympics were playing in their home arena: Roberto Luongo for Canada, Ryan Kesler for the United States, Pavol Demitra for Slovakia, Sami Salo for Finland, Christian Ehrhoff for Germany, and Daniel and Henrik Sedin for Sweden.

2010 Winter Olympics
Ice hockey pictogram.svg
Tournament details
Host country Canada
DatesFebruary 16-28
Teams12
Venue(s)2 (in 1 host city)
Final positions
Champions Gold medal blank.svg Canada (8th title)
Runner-up Silver medal blank.svg United States
Third place Bronze medal blank.svg Finland
Fourth place Slovakia
Tournament statistics
Matches played30
Scoring leader(s) Pavol Demitra
(10 points)
MVP Ryan Miller
2006
2014

Teams from twelve national hockey associations competed, seeded into three groups for the preliminary round. The tournament consisted of 30 games: 18 in the preliminary round (teams played the other teams in their own group); 4 qualification playoff games; 4 quarterfinal games; 2 semifinal games; 1 bronze medal game; and 1 gold medal game.[1]

During the tournament, Teemu Selänne of Finland became the all-time leader for points scored in the Olympics.[2][3] He notched an assist in his second game of the tournament for 37 career points, surpassing Valeri Kharlamov of the Soviet Union, Vlastimil Bubník of Czechoslovakia, and Harry Watson of Canada.[2][3] Sweden's goaltender Henrik Lundqvist set a modern-day Olympic shutout streak record of 172 minutes and 34 seconds, continuous from the final of the gold medal game of the 2006 Olympics until Sweden's quarterfinal against Slovakia.[4]

The tournament was won by Canada for the record eighth time (one more than the Soviet Union), which defeated the United States in overtime in the gold medal game. Canada's loss to the U.S. in the preliminary round of the tournament remains, as of the conclusion of the 2016 World Cup of Hockey, their most recent defeat in non-exhibition best-on-best international men's play.

Contents

QualificationEdit

Belarus, Canada, Czech Republic, Finland, Russia, Slovakia, Sweden, Switzerland and the United States qualified as the top nine teams in the IIHF World Ranking. Germany, Latvia and Norway qualified via the qualification tournament for teams ranked 10th through 30th.

RostersEdit

Preliminary roundEdit

Points to each team are awarded as follows:[1]

  • 3 points for a win at the conclusion of regulation time
  • 2 points for an overtime or shootout win
  • 1 point for an overtime or shootout loss
  • 0 points for a loss at the conclusion of regulation

If two or more teams are tied in points, the following tiebreaker criteria will be used:[1]

  • points earned in games involving only tied teams
  • goal difference in games involving only tied teams
  • goals scored in games involving only tied teams
  • goal difference in all group games
  • goals scored in all group games
  • better 2009 IIHF World Ranking position

If a criterion leaves only two teams tied, then those teams will be ranked based on their head-to-head result.

Group AEdit

Team
GP W OTW OTL L GF GA GD Pts
  United States 3 3 0 0 0 14 5 +9 9
  Canada 3 1 1 0 1 14 7 +7 5
   Switzerland 3 0 1 1 1 8 10 −2 3
  Norway 3 0 0 1 2 5 19 −14 1

All times are local (UTC−8).

16 February 2010
12:00
United States  3–1
(1–0, 2–0, 0–1)
   SwitzerlandCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 16,706
16 February 2010
16:30
Canada  8–0
(0–0, 3–0, 5–0)
  NorwayCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 16,652
18 February 2010
12:00
United States  6–1
(2–0, 1–1, 3–0)
  NorwayCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 16,710
18 February 2010
16:30
Switzerland   2–3 (SO)
(0–1, 2–1, 0–0, 0–0, 0–1)
  CanadaCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 17,019
20 February 2010
12:00
Norway  4–5 (OT)
(1–1, 2–2, 1–1, 0–1)
   SwitzerlandCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 16,952
21 February 2010
16:40
Canada  3–5
(1–2, 1–1, 1–2)
  United StatesCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 16,910

Group BEdit

Team
GP W OTW OTL L GF GA GD Pts
  Russia 3 2 0 1 0 13 6 +7 7
  Czech Republic 3 2 0 0 1 10 7 +3 6
  Slovakia 3 1 1 0 1 9 4 +5 5
  Latvia 3 0 0 0 3 4 19 −15 0

All times are local (UTC−8).

16 February 2010
21:00
Russia  8–2
(3–0, 1–0, 4–2)
  LatviaCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 16,862
17 February 2010
21:00
Czech Republic  3–1
(1–0, 2–1, 0–0)
  SlovakiaCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 16,924
18 February 2010
21:00
Slovakia  2–1 (SO)
(0–0, 0–1, 1–0, 0–0, 1–0)
  RussiaCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 17,202
19 February 2010
16:30
Czech Republic  5–2
(3–0, 1–2, 1–0)
  LatviaCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 16,984
20 February 2010
16:30
Latvia  0–6
(0–3, 0–2, 0–1)
  SlovakiaCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 17,023
21 February 2010
12:00
Russia  4–2
(1–1, 1–0, 2–1)
  Czech RepublicCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 17,114

Group CEdit

Team
GP W OTW OTL L GF GA GD Pts
  Sweden 3 3 0 0 0 9 2 +7 9
  Finland 3 2 0 0 1 10 4 +6 6
  Belarus 3 1 0 0 2 8 12 −4 3
  Germany 3 0 0 0 3 3 12 −9 0

All times are local (UTC−8).

17 February 2010
12:00
Finland  5–1
(2–0, 1–1, 2–0)
  BelarusCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 16,639
17 February 2010
16:30
Sweden  2–0
(0–0, 2–0, 0–0)
  GermanyCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 16,966
19 February 2010
12:00
Belarus  2–4
(0–2, 1–1, 1–1)
  SwedenCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 16,878
19 February 2010
21:00
Finland  5–0
(1–0, 2–0, 2–0)
  GermanyCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 16,662
20 February 2010
21:00
Germany  3–5
(1–1, 0–1, 2–3)
  BelarusCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 16,979
21 February 2010
21:00
Sweden  3–0
(1–0, 2–0, 0–0)
  FinlandCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 17,410

Ranking after preliminary roundEdit

Team advances to Quarterfinals
Team must play in Qualification playoffs
Rank Team GP GS Pts GD GF WR
1D   United States 3 1 9 +9 14 5
2D   Sweden 3 1 9 +7 9 3
3D   Russia 3 1 7 +7 13 1
4D   Finland 3 2 6 +6 10 4
5D   Czech Republic 3 2 6 +3 10 6
6D   Canada 3 2 5 +7 14 2
7D   Slovakia 3 3 5 +5 9 9
8D    Switzerland 3 3 3 −2 8 7
9D   Belarus 3 3 3 −4 8 8
10D   Norway 3 4 1 −14 5 11
11D   Germany 3 4 0 −9 3 12
12D   Latvia 3 4 0 −15 4 10

Playoff roundEdit

Following the completion of the preliminary round, all teams will be ranked 1D through 12D. To determine this ranking, the following criteria will be used in the order presented:[1]

  • higher position in the group
  • higher number of points
  • better goal difference
  • higher number of goals scored for
  • better 2009 IIHF World Ranking.

BracketEdit

  Qualification playoffs Quarterfinals Semifinals Gold medal game
                                     
       
  1D   United States 2  
    E4    Switzerland 0  
8D    Switzerland 3
9D   Belarus 2  
  F1   United States 6  
  F4   Finland 1  
       
       
  4D   Finland 2
    E1   Czech Republic 0  
5D   Czech Republic 3
12D   Latvia 2  
  F1   United States 2
  F3   Canada 3
       
       
  3D   Russia 3 Bronze medal game
    E2   Canada 7  
6D   Canada 8 F4   Finland 5
11D   Germany 2   F2   Slovakia 3
  F3   Canada 3
  F2   Slovakia 2  
       
       
  2D   Sweden 3
    E3   Slovakia 4  
7D   Slovakia 4
10D   Norway 3  
Indicates overtime victory
Indicates shootout victory

Qualification playoffsEdit

The top four ranked teams (1D–4D) received byes to and were deemed the home team in the quarterfinals as they are seeded to advance, with the remaining eight teams (5D–12D) playing qualification playoff games as follows:

Should the score remain even after regulation an overtime period of at most ten minutes is to be played. Should neither team score, a shoot out of three rounds of penalty shots decides the winner. The four winners of these qualification playoff games advanced to the quarterfinal round, while the losers of the qualification playoff games received a final ranking of 9 through 12 based on their preliminary round ranking.[1]

All times are local (UTC−8)

23 February 2010
12:00
Switzerland   3–2 (SO)
(1–1, 1–1, 0–0, 0–0, 1–0)
  BelarusCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 17,397
23 February 2010
16:30
Canada  8–2
(1–0, 3–1, 4–1)
  GermanyCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 17,723
23 February 2010
19:00
Czech Republic  3–2 (OT)
(2–0, 0–0, 0–2, 1–0)
  LatviaUBC Thunderbird Arena, Vancouver
Attendance: 5,448
23 February 2010
21:00
Slovakia  4–3
(3–1, 0–2, 1–0)
  NorwayCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 17,583

QuarterfinalsEdit

Teams seeded D1 to D4 are the home teams. Should the teams be tied after 60 minutes of regulation, an overtime period of at most ten minutes would decide the winner immediately upon the next goal. If the game remains tied after the overtime period, a penalty shot competition determines the winning team.

Following the quarterfinal games, the winning teams will be re-ranked F1 through F4, with the winner of 1D vs. E4 re-ranked as F1, the winner of 2D vs. E3 re-ranked as F2, the winner of 3D vs. E2 re-ranked as F3, and the winner of 4D vs. E1 re-ranked as F4. The losers of the quarterfinal round games will receive a final ranking of 5 through 8 based on their preliminary round ranking.[1]

All times are local (UTC−8).

24 February 2010
12:00
United States  2–0
(0–0, 0–0, 2–0)
   SwitzerlandCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 17,536
24 February 2010
16:30
Russia  3–7
(1–4, 2–3, 0–0)
  CanadaCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 17,740
24 February 2010
19:00
Finland  2–0
(0–0, 0–0, 2–0)
  Czech RepublicUBC Thunderbird Arena, Vancouver
Attendance: 5,461
24 February 2010
21:00
Sweden  3–4
(0–0, 2–3, 1–1)
  SlovakiaCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 17,493

SemifinalsEdit

All times are local (UTC−8).

26 February 2010
12:00
United States  6–1
(6–0, 0–0, 0–1)
  FinlandCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 17,602
26 February 2010
18:30
Canada  3–2
(2–0, 1–0, 0–2)
  SlovakiaCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 17,799

Bronze medal gameEdit

All times are local (UTC−8).

27 February 2010
19:00
  Finland  5–3
(1–0, 0–3, 4–0)
  SlovakiaCanada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 17,322

Gold medal gameEdit

All times are local (UTC−8).

28 February 2010
12:15
  United States  2–3 (OT)
(0–1, 1–1, 1–0, 0–1)
  Canada  Canada Hockey Place, Vancouver
Attendance: 17,748
 
Crowds take to the streets of Vancouver to celebrate Canada's win in the gold medal game
 
The Canadian team celebrating after winning the gold medal

The gold medal game was a rematch of the men's tournament in ice hockey at the 2002 Winter Olympics held in Salt Lake City, United States. In addition, Chris Pronger, Scott Niedermayer, Martin Brodeur and Jarome Iginla of Team Canada were returnees from the 2002 gold-winning squad and collected their second gold medal. Brian Rafalski and Chris Drury were the only players remaining from USA's 2002 silver squad.

The final score was a 3–2 win for Team Canada. Goal scorers for Canada were Jonathan Toews, Corey Perry and Sidney Crosby, with the winning goal scored in overtime. For USA, the goal scorers were Ryan Kesler and Zach Parise, the latter tying the game with 25 seconds left, forcing it to go into sudden death.

Sidney Crosby scored the game-winning goal off a pass from Jarome Iginla, seven minutes and forty seconds into overtime for Canada, gaining victory over the United States.[5] The puck has been sent to the Hockey Hall of Fame in Toronto;[6] in Canadian media, Crosby's goal has been compared in significance to the ones scored by Paul Henderson in the 1972 Summit Series and Mario Lemieux in the 1987 Canada Cup.[7]

The referees for the final were Bill McCreary (Canada) and Dan O'Halloran (Canada), while the linesmen were Stefan Fonselius (Finland) and Jean Morin (Canada).

The gold medal game was the last competitive event at the Olympics before the closing ceremony.

Game summaryEdit

Period (time) Action Team Player Score Canada – USA
1 – 00:00 Goalkeeper in   Canada Roberto Luongo
Goalkeeper in   United States Ryan Miller
1 – 12:50 Goal   Canada Jonathan Toews 1–0
1 – 14:02 Penalty   United States Bobby Ryan
2 – 02:33 Penalty   United States Ryan Malone
2 – 04:41 Penalty   Canada Eric Staal
2 – 07:13 Goal   Canada Corey Perry 2–0
2 – 08:25 Penalty   Canada Jonathan Toews
2 – 12:44 Goal   United States Ryan Kesler 2–1
3 – 18:33 Goalkeeper out   United States Ryan Miller
3 – 19:35 Goal   United States Zach Parise 2–2
Goalkeeper in   United States Ryan Miller
OT – 07:40 Goal   Canada Sidney Crosby 3–2
Goalkeeper out   Canada Roberto Luongo
Goalkeeper out   United States Ryan Miller

Television ratingsEdit

The gold medal game drew a big hockey audience in both Canada and the United States.

In Canada, the game drew an average 16.6 million viewers while 26.5 million Canadians watched at least part of the game.[8][9] Canada's Olympic Broadcast Media Consortium claims that 22 million people – or two thirds of the Canadian population – were watching the gold medal game when Sidney Crosby scored in overtime, making the game the most-watched television broadcast in Canadian history.[10] However, a new ratings system intended to better track out-of-home viewership was only implemented in August 2009, making it difficult to accurately compare these results with ratings prior to that date – specifically, the 2002 Canada–USA gold medal game in Salt Lake City, the record holder under the previous system.[11] There was some speculation that the final game of the 1972 Summit Series had as many as 18 million viewers, although recently recovered Nielsen ratings archives indicate that only 4.255 million Canadians watched that game live.[12]

In the United States, NBC said that the game was the most-watched hockey game in the U.S. in 30 years, drawing 27.6 million, the largest since the United States–Finland game that decided the gold medal at the 1980 Winter Olympics.[8][13]

Final rankingsEdit

The final standings of the tournament according to the IIHF:

    Canada
    United States
    Finland
4   Slovakia
5   Sweden
6   Russia
7   Czech Republic
8    Switzerland
9   Belarus
10   Norway
11   Germany
12   Latvia

StatisticsEdit

Leading scorersEdit

Rankings based upon points

Rank Player GP G A Pts PIM +/-
1   Pavol Demitra (SVK) 7 3 7 10 2 0
2   Marián Hossa (SVK) 7 3 6 9 6 0
3   Zach Parise (USA) 6 4 4 8 0 +4
  Brian Rafalski (USA) 6 4 4 8 2 +7
  Jonathan Toews (CAN) 7 1 7 8 2 +9
6   Jarome Iginla (CAN) 7 5 2 7 0 +5
7   Sidney Crosby (CAN) 7 4 3 7 4 +2
  Dany Heatley (CAN) 7 4 3 7 4 +1
9   Ryan Getzlaf (CAN) 7 3 4 7 2 +2
10   Niklas Hagman (FIN) 6 4 2 6 2 −3

Hat trick scorers

Leading goaltendersEdit

Goalkeepers with 40% or more of their team's total minutes.[14]

Rank Goaltender Minutes GA GAA SV% Saves SO
1   Ryan Miller (USA) 355:07 8 1.35 94.56 139 1
2   Ilya Bryzgalov (RUS) 100:53 3 1.78 94.23 49 0
3   Tomáš Vokoun (CZE) 303:35 9 1.78 93.57 131 0
4   Henrik Lundqvist (SWE) 179:05 4 1.34 92.73 51 2
5   Roberto Luongo (CAN) 307:40 9 1.76 92.68 114 1

Shutout posters

AwardsEdit

United States' Ryan Miller was named the most valuable player and received the Directorate Award for best goaltender of the tournament.[15] Directorate Awards also went to Brian Rafalski (United States) for best defenceman, and to Jonathan Toews (Canada) for best forward.[15]

The tournament all-star team was voted on by the international media at the conclusion of the event. The following players were named:[15]

Position Player Team
G Ryan Miller   United States
D Brian Rafalski   United States
D Shea Weber   Canada
F Jonathan Toews   Canada
F Zach Parise   United States
F Pavol Demitra   Slovakia

Toews, along with Brent Seabrook and Duncan Keith would become the fourth, fifth and sixth players to win both Olympic gold medal and Stanley Cup (with the Chicago Blackhawks) in the same year, following Ken Morrow 1980, and Steve Yzerman and Brendan Shanahan (2002). Patrick Kane would become the fourth player to win both Olympic silver medal and Stanley Cup in the same year, following Red Wings Sergei Fedorov in 1998, and Chris Chelios and Brett Hull in 2002.

Triple Gold ClubEdit

The Triple Gold Club, made up of individuals who have won the Stanley Cup plus gold medals at the Olympics and World Championships, gained two new members:[16]

  • Team Canada centre Eric Staal became the 23rd player to win all three competitions. He had previously won the Stanley Cup in 2006 with the Carolina Hurricanes and the World Championships in 2007.
  • Team Canada head coach Mike Babcock became the first coach in the Triple Gold Club. He had led Team Canada to World Championships gold in 2004 and the Detroit Red Wings to the Stanley Cup in 2008.

Later the same season, Team Canada centre Jonathan Toews would go on to become the 24th and youngest player in the Triple Gold Club, following up his Olympic gold medal with the Stanley Cup with the Chicago Blackhawks just four months after winning Olympic gold. He had previously won the World Championships in 2007.

OfficialsEdit

Games were primarily officiated by NHL referees, a stipulation by the NHL if most Olympic players are NHLers, according to the IIHF (not NHL) rules.[17]

Referees
Name National affiliation League
Vyacheslav Bulanov   Russia KHL
Paul Devorski   Canada NHL
Marc Joannette   Canada NHL
Danny Kurmann   Switzerland National League A
Dennis LaRue   United States NHL
Bill McCreary   Canada NHL
Dan O'Halloran   Canada NHL
Peter Ország   Slovakia Slovak Extraliga
Guy Pellerin   Canada QMJHL
Brent Reiber   Switzerland National League A
Jyri Rönn   Finland SM-liiga
Chris Rooney   United States NHL
Marcus Vinnerborg   Sweden Elitserien
Brad Watson   Canada NHL
Linesmen
Name National affiliation League
Petr Blümel   Czech Republic Czech Extraliga
Peter Feola   United States AHL, ECACHL
Stefan Fonselius   Finland SM-liiga
Shane Heyer   Canada NHL
Andriy Kicha   Ukraine Ukrainian Major League
Sylvain Losier   Canada QMJHL
Jean Morin   Canada NHL
Brian Murphy   United States NHL
Thor Nelson   United States NHL
Milan Novák   Slovakia Slovak Extraliga
Tim Nowak   United States NHL
Yuriy Oskirko   Russia KHL
Jay Sharrers   Canada NHL
Felix Winnekens   Germany Deutsche Eishockey Liga

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f "2010 OWG Men's Tournament Playing Format". International Ice Hockey Federation. Archived from the original on 26 February 2010. Retrieved 18 February 2010.
  2. ^ a b "Ice hockey: Selanne sets Olympic scoring record". Vancouver. 19 February 2010. Retrieved 10 March 2010.
  3. ^ a b "Selanne's 37th point tops Games mark". ESPN.com. The Associated Press. 20 February 2010. Retrieved 27 September 2010.
  4. ^ "Gaborik scores as Slovaks top Swedes". newyorkrangers.com. 25 February 2010. Retrieved 1 March 2010.
  5. ^ Allen, Kevin (28 February 2010). "Crosby golden as Canada defeats USA 3-2 in OT". USA Today. Retrieved 1 March 2010.
  6. ^ "Sidney Crosby's Olympic puck set to join several others at Hockey Hall". NHL.com. Canadian Press. 16 March 2010. Retrieved 27 September 2010.
  7. ^ "Crosby makes leap from superstar to legend". CBC.ca. 28 February 2010. Retrieved 27 September 2010.
  8. ^ a b "Olympic hockey final draws big hockey audience north and south of the border". Yahoo! Canada Sports. Canadian Press. 1 March 2010. Retrieved 1 March 2010.
  9. ^ "Oh Canada! 80 Percent of Canadians watch gold medal game". TSN. 1 March 2010. Retrieved 2 March 2010.
  10. ^ http://www.digitalhome.ca/2010/03/record-numbers-watch-canada-win-hockey-gold/
  11. ^ Bill Brioux, Olympics score big TV ratings, helped by new way of calculating size of audience, The Canadian Press, 2010-02-17.
  12. ^ 2010 Gold Medal Game Is the Apex of TV Viewing in Canada as Legend of '72 Summit Series Finally Laid to Rest, COBMC press release, 2010-03-12.
  13. ^ [1]
  14. ^ "Goalkeepers" (PDF). International Ice Hockey Federation. Retrieved 3 August 2011.
  15. ^ a b c "Vancouver Olympics All-Tournament Team". USA Hockey Magazine. 28 February 2010. Retrieved 14 May 2011.
  16. ^ "Triple gold for Eric Staal" (Press release). International Ice Hockey Federation. 2010-02-28. Archived from the original on 2011-06-04. Retrieved 2010-07-26.
  17. ^ "Zebras named to Vancouver 2010". International Ice Hockey Federation. 7 December 2009. Retrieved 28 February 2010.

External linksEdit