Open main menu

1993 Men's World Ice Hockey Championships

The 1993 Men's Ice Hockey World Championships was the 57th such event sanctioned by the International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF). Teams representing 32 countries participated in several levels of competition, with an additional six national teams failing to advance from mid-season preliminary qualifying tournaments. The competition also served as qualifications for group placements in the 1994 competition.

1993 Men's World Ice Hockey Championships
Tournament details
Host country Germany
Dates18 April – 2 May
Teams12
Venue(s)2 (in 2 host cities)
Final positions
Champions Gold medal blank.svg Russia (1st title)
Runner-up Silver medal blank.svg Sweden
Third place Bronze medal blank.svg Czech Republic
Fourth place Canada
Tournament statistics
Matches played41
Goals scored235 (5.73 per match)
Attendance226,379 (5,521 per match)
Scoring leader(s)Canada Eric Lindros 17 points
1992
1994

The top Championship Group A tournament took place in Germany from 18 April to 2 May 1994, with games played in Munich and Dortmund. Twelve teams took part, with the first round being split into two groups of six, with the four best teams from each group advancing to the quarter finals. Russia beat the reigning world champions Sweden to win the World Championships for the first time since entering competition after the dissolution of the Soviet Union at the end of 1991.[1] The bronze medal was won by the Czech Republic, defeating Canada in their first major tournament as an independent country after their split with Slovakia at the beginning of the calendar year.

While Latvia had last competed in 1939, this year marked the World Championship debut of three national teams. Kazakhstan, Slovenia, and Ukraine, played for the first time, in Group C. Belarus, Croatia, Estonia, and Lithuania all did not make it out of the autumn qualifiers and had to wait at least another year. Also waiting until the following year was Slovakia, who made their World Championship debut in Group C1 in 1994.

Eleven of the twelve openings for the Lillehammer Olympics were established in Group A. Switzerland, by being relegated, was excluded, and the final nation had to qualify in a tournament the next fall. The top two teams from Group B, the Group C champion, the top Asian nation, and Slovakia all were given the opportunity to fill the final vacancy.[2]

World Championship Group A (Germany)Edit

First RoundEdit

Group 1Edit

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1   Canada 5 5 0 0 31–4 10
2   Sweden 5 3 0 2 17–14 6
3   Russia 5 2 1 2 15–12 5
4   Italy 5 1 2 2 8–20 4
5    Switzerland 5 2 0 3 11–14 4
6   Austria 5 0 1 4 4–22 1
18 AprilItaly  2–2  RussiaMunich
18 AprilSweden  1–0  AustriaMunich
19 AprilCanada  2–0   SwitzerlandMunich
19 AprilRussia  4–2  AustriaMunich
20 AprilSweden  1–4  CanadaMunich
20 AprilSwitzerland   0–1  ItalyMunich
21 AprilItaly  2–6  SwedenMunich
22 AprilSwitzerland   0–6  RussiaMunich
22 AprilAustria  0–11  CanadaMunich
23 AprilSwitzerland   5–1  AustriaMunich
24 AprilRussia  2–5  SwedenMunich
24 AprilCanada  11–2  ItalyMunich
25 AprilSweden  4–6   SwitzerlandMunich
25 AprilCanada  3–1  RussiaMunich
26 AprilItaly  1–1  AustriaMunich

Group 2Edit

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1   Czech Republic 5 4 1 0 17–4 9
2   Germany 5 4 0 1 20–12 8
3   United States 5 2 2 1 14–10 6
4   Finland 5 2 1 2 7–7 5
5   Norway 5 1 0 4 6–17 2
6   France 5 0 0 5 10–24 0
18 AprilGermany  6–0  NorwayDortmund
18 AprilUnited States  1–1  Czech RepublicDortmund
19 AprilFinland  2–0  FranceDortmund
19 AprilGermany  0–5  Czech RepublicDortmund
20 AprilFinland  1–1  United StatesDortmund
21 AprilGermany  5–3  FranceDortmund
21 AprilCzech Republic  2–0  NorwayDortmund
22 AprilUnited States  6–1  FranceDortmund
22 AprilNorway  0–2  FinlandDortmund
23 AprilGermany  3–1  FinlandDortmund
23 AprilCzech Republic  6–2  FranceDortmund
24 AprilUnited States  3–1  NorwayDortmund
25 AprilFinland  1–3  Czech RepublicDortmund
25 AprilGermany  6–3  United StatesDortmund
26 AprilFrance  4–5  NorwayDortmund

Playoff roundEdit

 
QuarterfinalsSemifinalsFinal
 
          
 
27 April
 
 
  Sweden5
 
30 April
 
  United States2
 
  Sweden (OT)4
 
28 April
 
  Czech Republic3
 
  Czech Republic8
 
2 May
 
  Italy1
 
  Sweden1
 
28 April
 
  Russia3
 
  Canada5
 
30 April
 
  Finland1
 
  Canada4
 
27 April
 
  Russia7 Third place
 
  Germany1
 
1 May
 
  Russia5
 
  Czech Republic5
 
 
  Canada1
 

QuarterfinalsEdit

27 AprilSweden  5–2  United StatesMunich
27 AprilGermany  1–5  RussiaMunich
28 AprilCanada  5–1  FinlandMunich
28 AprilCzech Republic  8–1  ItalyMunich

Consolation Round 9-12 PlaceEdit

29 AprilSwitzerland   1–3  FranceMunich
29 AprilNorway  2–6  AustriaMunich

SemifinalsEdit

30 AprilSweden  4–3 (OT)  Czech RepublicMunich
30 AprilCanada  4–7  RussiaMunich

Consolation Round 11-12 PlaceEdit

1 MaySwitzerland   2–5  NorwayMunich

Switzerland was relegated to the Group B.

Third Place matchEdit

1 MayCzech Republic  5–1  CanadaMunich

FinalEdit

2 MaySweden  1-3  RussiaMunich

World Championship Group B (Netherlands)Edit

Played in Eindhoven 25 March to 4 April. The British team, just promoted from Group C, won all their games. Their first game was won by either keen strategy, or controversy, depending on how you view it. With the score against tournament favorite Poland tied three all, the British coach, Alex Dampier, asked the referee to measure the opposing goalie's stick. It was found to be illegal, and Great Britain scored the winning goal on the ensuing powerplay.[3]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
13   Great Britain 7 7 0 0 50–13 14
14   Poland 7 6 0 1 71–12 12
15   Netherlands 7 5 0 2 47–20 10
16   Denmark 7 4 0 3 38–24 8
17   Japan 7 3 0 4 34–31 6
18   Romania 7 2 0 5 20–44 4
19   China 7 1 0 6 12–79 2
20   Bulgaria 7 0 0 7 9–58 0

Great Britain was promoted to the Group A while Bulgaria was relegated to the Group C.

25 MarchPoland  3–4  Great Britain
25 MarchDenmark  5–1  Bulgaria
25 MarchJapan  8–1  Romania
25 MarchNetherlands  15–1  China
26 MarchChina  1–21  Poland
26 MarchNetherlands  4–2  Romania
27 MarchDenmark  0–4  Great Britain
27 MarchBulgaria  1–7  Japan
28 MarchPoland  13–0  Romania
28 MarchJapan  4–5  Great Britain
28 MarchNetherlands  14–0  Bulgaria
29 MarchRomania  5–3  China
29 MarchPoland  7–3  Denmark
30 MarchGreat Britain  10–0  Bulgaria
30 MarchDenmark  13–0  China
30 MarchNetherlands  5–3  Japan
31 MarchBulgaria  2–13  Poland
31 MarchNetherlands  2–3  Great Britain
1 AprilRomania  3–4  Denmark
1 AprilChina  3–8  Japan
2 AprilJapan  1–7  Poland
2 AprilNetherlands  6–4  Denmark
3 AprilGreat Britain  10–4  Romania
3 AprilChina  4–3  Bulgaria
4 AprilJapan  3–9  Denmark
4 AprilNetherlands  1–7  Poland
4 AprilBulgaria  2–5  Romania
4 AprilGreat Britain  14–0  China

World Championship Group C (Slovenia)Edit

Qualifying RoundEdit

All qualifiers were played from 6 to 8 November 1992.

Group 1 (Latvia)Edit

Played in Riga. The winner would play in Group C, the other two nations had to play each other the following year for inclusion into Group C2.

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1   Latvia 2 2 0 0 19–5 4
2   Estonia 2 1 0 1 9–7 2
3   Lithuania 2 0 0 2 3–19 0

Latvia qualified for the Group C.

6 November 1992Estonia  6–1  Lithuania
7 November 1992Latvia  13–2  Lithuania
8 November 1992Latvia  6–3  Estonia

Group 2 (Belarus)Edit

Played in Minsk. The top two teams moved on to Group C in the spring, last place was included in Group C1 in 1994. Azerbaijan had the option of playing in this group, but did not.[3]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1   Ukraine 2 1 0 1 8–6 2
2   Kazakhstan 2 1 0 1 6–7 2
3   Belarus 2 1 0 1 4–5 2

Ukraine and Kazakhstan both qualified for Group C.

6 November 1992Kazakhstan  5–4  Ukraine
7 November 1992Belarus  1–4  Ukraine
8 November 1992Belarus  3–1  Kazakhstan

Group 3 (Croatia/Slovenia)Edit

Played as a home and home series in Zagreb and Ljubljana. The winner would go on to Group C, the loser would have to try to qualify next year for Group C2. Originally Luxembourg was to play in this group but declined.[3]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1   Slovenia 2 2 0 0 22–3 4
2   Croatia 2 0 0 2 3–22 0

Slovenia qualified for the Group C.

7 November 1992Croatia  1–15  Slovenia
8 November 1992Slovenia  7–2  Croatia

Group 4 (Turkey)Edit

Played in Ankara. Originally South Africa was to be in this group as well, but they went directly to the Group C instead.[3]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1   Israel 2 2 0 0 22–6 4
2   Greece 2 1 0 1 12–10 2
3   Turkey 2 0 0 2 6–24 0

Israel qualified for Group C.

6 November 1992Turkey  2–10  Greece
7 November 1992Greece  2–8  Israel
8 November 1992Turkey  4–14  Israel

First RoundEdit

Played from 12–18 March. The first and second place from each group of six advanced to the semifinals, and then finals, with the winner gaining promotion to the Group B. The three other semi-finalists, together with the two third place teams, would remain to form Group C1 in 1994. The remaining six nations would comprise Group C2, effectively being relegated. At the time of this tournament, the expected format for 1994 was different. South Korea beat Spain seven to three to win what was expected to be a battle to remain in the Group C. Instead, Group C was divided into two parts putting them both in the bottom tier.[3]

Group 1Edit

Played in Bled.

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1   Ukraine 5 4 1 0 102–10 9
2   Latvia 5 4 1 0 94–8 9
3   North Korea 5 3 0 2 30–26 6
4   Belgium 5 2 0 3 19–74 4
5   South Korea 5 1 0 4 16–60 2
6   Israel 5 0 0 5 8–91 0

Belgium, South Korea, and Israel were relegated to the Group C2.

12 MarchNorth Korea  14–2  Israel
12 MarchUkraine  16–1  South Korea
12 MarchLatvia  26–3  Belgium
13 MarchSouth Korea  8–5  Israel
13 MarchBelgium  2–37  Ukraine
13 MarchNorth Korea  0–4  Latvia
15 MarchBelgium  5–3  South Korea
15 MarchIsrael  0–32  Latvia
15 MarchUkraine  15–2  North Korea
16 MarchBelgium  8–1  Israel
16 MarchSouth Korea  4–7  North Korea
16 MarchLatvia  5–5  Ukraine
18 MarchSouth Korea  0–27  Latvia
18 MarchIsrael  0–29  Ukraine
18 MarchNorth Korea  7–1  Belgium

Group 2Edit

Played in Ljubljana.

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1   Slovenia 5 5 0 0 74–4 10
2   Kazakhstan 5 4 0 1 76–6 8
3   Hungary 5 3 0 2 36–31 6
4   Australia 5 2 0 3 19–51 4
5   Spain 5 1 0 4 18–39 2
6   South Africa 5 0 0 5 8–100 0

Australia, Spain, and South Africa were relegated to the Group C2.

12 MarchSouth Africa  2–20  Hungary
12 MarchKazakhstan  14–0  Spain
12 MarchSlovenia  15–2  Australia
13 MarchHungary  1–7  Kazakhstan
13 MarchSlovenia  12–0  Spain
13 MarchAustralia  9–3  South Africa
15 MarchKazakhstan  23–1  Australia
15 MarchHungary  6–5  Spain
15 MarchSlovenia  29–0  South Africa
16 MarchSpain  3–4  Australia
16 MarchSouth Africa  0–32  Kazakhstan
16 MarchSlovenia  14–2  Hungary
18 MarchSpain  10–3  South Africa
18 MarchAustralia  3–7  Hungary
18 MarchSlovenia  4–0  Kazakhstan

SemifinalsEdit

19 MarchUkraine  3–2  Kazakhstan
19 MarchSlovenia  1–5  Latvia

Relegation matchEdit

21 MarchSpain  3–7  South Korea

Third Place matchEdit

21 MarchSlovenia  3–7  Kazakhstan

FinalEdit

21 MarchUkraine  0–2  Latvia

Latvia was promoted to the Group B.

Ranking and statisticsEdit

 


 1993 IIHF World Championship Winners 
 
Russia
1st/23rd[4] title

Tournament AwardsEdit

Final standingsEdit

The final standings of the tournament according to IIHF:

    Russia
    Sweden
    Czech Republic
4   Canada
5   Germany
6   United States
7   Finland
8   Italy
9   Austria
10   France
11   Norway
12    Switzerland

Scoring leadersEdit

List shows the top skaters sorted by points, then goals.

Player GP G A Pts +/− PIM POS
  Eric Lindros 8 11 6 17 +16 10 F
  Andrei Khomutov 8 5 7 12 +8 10 F
  Shayne Corson 8 3 7 10 +14 6 F
  Dave Manson 8 3 7 10 +13 22 D
  Valeri Karpov 8 4 5 9 +6 0 F
  Petr Rosol 8 4 5 9 +10 10 F
  Paul Kariya 8 2 7 9 +10 0 F
  Dieter Hegen 6 6 2 8 +5 10 F
  Mikael Renberg 8 5 3 8 +5 6 F
  Martin Hosták 8 4 4 8 +5 0 F

Source: [1]

Leading goaltendersEdit

Only the top five goaltenders, based on save percentage, who have played 50% of their team's minutes are included in this list.

Player MIP GA GAA SVS% SO
  Petr Bříza 488 10 1.23 .949 2
  Brian Stankiewicz 239 8 2.01 .946 0
  Bill Ranford 355 11 1.86 .933 2
  Reto Pavoni 298 12 2.42 .921 0
  Markus Ketterer 296 10 2.03 .919 1

Source: [2]

CitationsEdit

  1. ^ Podnieks pg.15. Note that the IIHF encyclopedia does not group Russian and Soviet Union medals in ice hockey, however their writers often do, which would make this their 23rd title.
  2. ^ Olympic qualifier
  3. ^ a b c d e Summary at Passionhockey.com
  4. ^ If 22 World Championship titles won by the Soviet Union are included, this total comes to 23.

ReferencesEdit

  • Complete results
  • Duplacey, James (1998). Total Hockey: The official encyclopedia of the National Hockey League. Total Sports. pp. 498–528. ISBN 0-8362-7114-9.
  • Podnieks, Andrew (2010). IIHF Media Guide & Record Book 2011. Moydart Press. pp. 156–7.