Ice hockey at the 1924 Winter Olympics

The men's ice hockey tournament at the 1924 Winter Olympics in Chamonix, France, was the second Olympic Championship, also serving as the second World Championships. The competition was held from Monday, January 28, 1924, to Sunday, February 3, 1924. Canada, represented by the Toronto Granites, defended its championship from the 1920 Summer Olympics. The United States and Great Britain took the silver and bronze respectively, while other contenders included Czechoslovakia, France, and Sweden.[1]

Ice hockey at the 1924 Winter Olympics
Toronto Granites 1924 Winter Olympics champions.jpg
The Toronto Granites, representing Canada, won the gold medal
Tournament details
Host country France
DatesJanuary 28–February 3, 1924
Teams8
Venue(s)Stade Olympique de Chamonix (outdoors)
Final positions
Champions Gold medal blank.svg Canada (2nd title)
Runner-up Silver medal blank.svg United States
Third place Bronze medal blank.svg Great Britain
Fourth place Sweden
Tournament statistics
Games played16
Goals scored310 (19.38 per game)
Scoring leader(s)Canada Harry Watson 46 points
← 1920
1928 →

The Bergvall system used in the 1920 Olympics was discarded in favor of a two-level round-robin tournament. Qualifying teams were placed in pools for the opening round, with the top two teams in each pool advancing to the final round. The medals were awarded based on the record in the final round. This format would remain in use until the 1992 Winter Olympics, when the final round-robin was replaced with a medal-round single-elimination tournament.

The Canadian Amateur Hockey Association (CAHA) chose the Toronto Granites as the 1923 Allan Cup champions to represent Canada, and W. A. Hewitt was chosen oversee the national team's finances at the Olympics.[2][3] Hewitt was empowered by the CAHA to name replacement players as needed,[4] and recruited Harold McMunn and Cyril Slater as replacements when four players from the Granites were unable to travel to the Olympics.[5] In his weekly report to the Toronto Daily Star, Hewitt wrote that the Granites would face multiple changes in conditions compared to hockey games in Canada. He did not feel the team would be affected by playing outdoors on natural ice in the morning or afternoon, despite that the team was accustomed to playing indoors with electric lighting on artificial ice. He also felt that the larger ice surface and lack of boards around the sides of the rink would mean more stick handling and less physical play.[6]

MedalistsEdit

Gold Silver Bronze
  Canada (CAN)
Jack Cameron
Ernie Collett
Bert McCaffrey
Harold McMunn
Dunc Munro
Beattie Ramsay
Cyril Slater
Hooley Smith
Harry Watson
  United States (USA)
Clarence Abel
Herbert Drury
Alphonse Lacroix
John Langley
John Lyons
Justin McCarthy
Willard Rice
Irving Small
Frank Synott
  Great Britain (GBR)
William Anderson
Lorne Carr-Harris
Colin Carruthers
Eric Carruthers
Guy Clarkson
Ross Cuthbert
Geoffrey Holmes
Hamilton Jukes
Edward Pitblado
Blane Sexton

Participating nationsEdit

A total of 82(*) ice hockey players from eight nations competed at the Chamonix Games:

(*) NOTE: Only counts players who participated in at least one game. Not all reserve players are known.

Final tournamentEdit

First roundEdit

Group AEdit

Pos Team Pld W L GF GA GD PCT Qualification
1   Canada 3 3 0 85 0 +85 1.000 Advance to final round
2   Sweden 3 2 1 18 25 −7 .667
3   Czechoslovakia 3 1 2 14 41 −27 .333
4   Switzerland 3 0 3 2 53 −51 .000
28 Jan   Sweden 9:0
(3:0,3:0,3:0)
  Switzerland
28 Jan   Canada 30:0
(8:0,14:0,8:0)
  Czechoslovakia
29 Jan   Canada 22:0
(5:0,7:0,10:0)
  Sweden
30 Jan   Canada 33:0
(8:0,11:0,14:0)
  Switzerland
31 Jan   Sweden 9:3
(5:1,1:1,3:1)
  Czechoslovakia
1 Feb   Czechoslovakia 11:2
(4:0,3:2,4:0)
  Switzerland

Group BEdit

 
Match between France and the United States
Pos Team Pld W L GF GA GD PCT Qualification
1   United States 3 3 0 52 0 +52 1.000 Advance to final round
2   Great Britain 3 2 1 34 16 +18 .667
3   France 3 1 2 9 42 −33 .333
4   Belgium 3 0 3 8 45 −37 .000
28 Jan   United States 19:0
(9:0,6:0,4:0)
  Belgium
29 Jan   France 2:15
(1:5,1:3,0:7)
  Great Britain
30 Jan   Great Britain 19:3
(8:1,6:1,5:1)
  Belgium
30 Jan   France 0:22
(0:12,0:1,0:9)
  United States
31 Jan   France 7:5
(3:3,3:1,1:1)
  Belgium
31 Jan   United States 11:0
(6:0,2:0,3:0)
  Great Britain

Final roundEdit

 
Canada and Great Britain in the final round.
 
The final game, between Canada and the United States.
Pos Team Pld W L GF GA GD PCT
    Canada 3 3 0 47 3 +44 1.000
    United States 3 2 1 32 6 +26 .667
    Great Britain 3 1 2 6 33 −27 .333
4   Sweden 3 0 3 3 46 −43 .000

Note: The CAN v SWE and USA v GBR games were carried forward from the previous round.

When the Olympics organizers wanted to select hockey referees by drawing names out of a hat, Hewitt and United States Amateur Hockey Association president William S. Haddock agreed to a coin toss to decide on the referee for the game between Canada and the United States men's national team. Hewitt feared having an inexperienced referee for the game, and his suggested to have Ligue Internationale de Hockey sur Glace (LIHG) president Paul Loicq officiate the game was confirmed by the coin toss.[7] The Granites defeated the United States team by a 6–1 score, and won all six games played to be the Olympic gold medallists.[8]

1 Feb   Canada 19:2
(6:2,6:0,7:0)
  Great Britain
1 Feb   United States 20:0
(5:0,7:0,8:0)
  Sweden
2 Feb   Great Britain 4:3
(0:1,2:2,2:0)
  Sweden
3 Feb   Canada 6:1
(2:1,3:0,1:0)
  United States

StatisticsEdit

Average ageEdit

Team Czechoslovakia was the oldest team in the tournament, averaging 31 years and 5 months. Team Belgium was the youngest team in the tournament, averaging 24 years and 1 months. Gold medalists Canada averaged 25 years and 2 months. Tournament average was 27 years and 11 months.[9]

Top scorerEdit

Team GP G A Pts
  Harry Watson 5 37 9 46

Final rankingEdit

 
The French national team.
1   Canada (CAN)
2   United States (USA)
3   Great Britain (GBR)
4   Sweden (SWE)
5   Czechoslovakia (TCH)
5   France (FRA)
7   Belgium (BEL)
7   Switzerland (SUI)

These standings are presented as the IIHF has them,[10] however the IOC does not rank the teams below 4th[11]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Ice Hockey at the 1924 Chamonix Winter Games". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 17 April 2020. Retrieved 10 May 2019.
  2. ^ "J. H. Crocker Is Olympic Head". The Winnipeg Tribune. Winnipeg, Manitoba. 24 October 1923. p. 13. 
  3. ^ "Billy Hewitt Again In Charge of Hockey Team; Granites Sail January 11". The Brandon Sun. Brandon, Manitoba. 17 October 1923. p. 4. 
  4. ^ "Bar Commercial Teams From Race For Allan Cup". Lethbridge Herald. Lethbridge, Alberta. 5 December 1923. p. 6. 
  5. ^ Rodden, Mike (13 September 1966). "Sports Highways". The Kingston Whig-Standard. Kingston, Ontario. p. 9. 
  6. ^ "Canadian Team Find Change In Match Conditions". Brandon Daily Sun. Brandon, Manitoba. 22 January 1924. p. 4. 
  7. ^ Podnieks, Andrew (1997), p. 16
  8. ^ Podnieks, Andrew (1997), p. 17
  9. ^ "Team Canada - Olympics - Chamonix 1924 - Player Stats". QuantHockey. Retrieved 23 April 2020.
  10. ^ IIHF Media Guide and Record Book (2011) p. 103
  11. ^ IOC database of results

SourcesEdit

External linksEdit