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Charles I of England and his son, the future James II

A dynasty (UK: /ˈdɪnəsti/, US: /ˈdnəsti/) is a sequence of rulers from the same family,[1] usually in the context of a feudal or monarchical system, but sometimes also appearing in elective republics. The dynastic family or lineage may be known as a "noble house",[2] which may be styled as "royal", "princely", "ducal", "comital", etc., depending upon the chief or present title borne by its members. Historians periodize the histories of many sovereign states, such as Ancient Egypt, the Carolingian Empire and Imperial China, using a framework of successive dynasties. As such, the term "dynasty" may be used to delimit the era during which the family reigned and to describe events, trends, and artifacts of that period ("a Ming-dynasty vase"). The word "dynasty" itself is often dropped from such adjectival references ("a Ming vase").

Until the 19th century, it was taken for granted that a legitimate function of a monarch was to aggrandize his dynasty: that is, to increase the territory, wealth, and power of his family members.[3] The longest-surviving dynasty in the world is the Imperial House of Japan, otherwise known as the Yamato dynasty, whose reign is traditionally dated to 660 BC.

Prior to the 20th century, dynasties throughout the world have traditionally been reckoned patrilineally, such as under the Frankish Salic law. In nations where it was permitted, succession through a daughter usually established a new dynasty in her husband's ruling house. This has changed in some places in Europe, where succession law and convention have maintained dynasties de jure through a female. For example, the House of Windsor is maintained through the children of Queen Elizabeth II, similarly with the monarchy of the Netherlands, whose dynasty remained the House of Orange-Nassau through three successive queens regnant. The earliest such example among the major European monarchies was in Russia in the 18th century, where the name of the House of Romanov was maintained through a non-ruling female.

In South Africa's Limpopo Province, Balobedu determined descent matrilineally, while rulers have at other times adopted the name of their mother's dynasty when coming into her inheritance. Less frequently, a monarchy has alternated or been rotated, in a multidynastic (or polydynastic) system – that is, the most senior living members of parallel dynasties, at any point in time, constitute the line of succession.

The word "dynasty" is sometimes used informally for people who are not rulers but are, for example, members of a family with influence and power in other areas, such as a series of successive owners of a major company. It is also extended to unrelated people, such as major poets of the same school or various rosters of a single sports team.[1]

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EtymologyEdit

The word "dynasty" derives from Latin dynastia, which comes from Greek dynastéia (δυναστεία), where it referred to "power", "dominion", and "rule" itself.[4] It was the abstract noun of dynástēs (δυνάστης),[5] the agent noun of dynamis (δύναμις), "power" or "ability",[6] from dýnamai (δύναμαι), "to be able".[7]

DynastsEdit

A ruler in a dynasty is sometimes referred to as a "dynast", but this term is also used to describe any member of a reigning family who retains a right to succeed to a throne. For example, following his abdication, Edward VIII of the United Kingdom ceased to be a dynastic member of the House of Windsor.

A "dynastic marriage" is one that complies with monarchical house law restrictions, so that the descendants are eligible to inherit the throne or other royal privileges. The marriage of Willem-Alexander, Prince of Orange, to Máxima Zorreguieta in 2002 was dynastic, for example, and their eldest child is expected to inherit the Dutch crown eventually. But the marriage of his younger brother Prince Friso to Mabel Wisse Smit in 2003 lacked government support and parliamentary approval. Thus Friso forfeited his place in the order of succession, lost his title as a Prince of the Netherlands, and left his children without dynastic rights.

In historical and monarchist references to formerly reigning families, a "dynast" is a family member who would have had succession rights, were the monarchy's rules still in force. For example, after the 1914 assassinations of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his morganatic wife Sophie von Hohenberg, their son Max was bypassed for the Austrian throne because he was not a Habsburg dynast. Even since abolition of the Austrian monarchy, Max and his descendants have not been considered the rightful pretenders by Austrian monarchists, nor have they claimed that position.

The term "dynast" is sometimes used only to refer to agnatic descendants of a realm's monarchs, and sometimes to include those who hold succession rights through cognatic royal descent. The term can therefore describe overlapping but distinct sets of people. For example, David Armstrong-Jones, 2nd Earl of Snowdon, a nephew of Queen Elizabeth II through her sister, Princess Margaret, is in the line of succession to the British crown: in that sense he is a British dynast. Yet he is not a male-line member of the royal family, and is therefore not a dynast of the House of Windsor.

On the other hand, the German aristocrat Prince Ernst August of Hanover (born 1954), a male-line descendant of George III of the United Kingdom, possesses no legal British name, titles or styles (although he is entitled to re-claim the once-royal dukedom of Cumberland), was born in the line of succession to the British crown and was bound by Britain's Royal Marriages Act 1772 until it was repealed when the Succession to the Crown Act 2013 took effect on 26 March 2015.[8] Thus, in 1999 he requested and obtained formal permission from Elizabeth II to marry the Roman Catholic Princess Caroline of Monaco. Yet a clause of the English Act of Settlement 1701 remained in effect at that time, stipulating that dynasts who marry Roman Catholics are considered "dead" for the purpose of succession to the throne.[9] That exclusion, too, ceased to apply on 26 March 2015, with retroactive effect for those who had been dynasts prior to triggering it by marriage to a Catholic.[8]

List of dynasties by regionEdit

Some dynasties appear more than once in this list, because:

AfricaEdit

ChadEdit

EgyptEdit

Eswatini (Swaziland)Edit

EthiopiaEdit

GuineaEdit

LesothoEdit

  • House of Moshoeshoe (1822–present)

MadagascarEdit

MoroccoEdit

NigeriaEdit

SenegambiaEdit

SomaliaEdit

South AfricaEdit

SudanEdit

AsiaEdit

AfghanistanEdit

ArmeniaEdit

BahrainEdit

BhutanEdit

  • House of Wangchuck (དབང་ཕྱུག་རྒྱལ་བརྒྱུད་) (1907–present)

BruneiEdit

CambodiaEdit

  • Varman dynasty (13th century–present)

Central AsiaEdit

ChampaEdit

  • 1st dynasty (192–336)
  • 2nd dynasty (336–420)
  • 3rd dynasty (420–529)
  • 4th dynasty (529–758)
  • 5th dynasty (758–854)
  • 6th dynasty (854–989)
  • 7th dynasty (989–1044)
  • 8th dynasty (1044–1074)
  • 9th dynasty (1074–1139)
  • 10th dynasty (1139–1145)
  • 11th dynasty (1145–1190)
  • 12th dynasty (1190–1318)
  • 13th dynasty (1318–1390)
  • 14th dynasty (1390–1458)
  • 15th dynasty (1458–1471)
  • vacant (1471–1695)
  • Dynasty of Po Saktiraidaputih (1695–1822)

ChinaEdit

  • Three Sovereigns and Five Emperors (三皇五帝) (c. 2852–2070 BC) – Mythical
  • Xia dynasty (夏朝) (c. 2070–1600 BC) – Legendary; Ruled by the House of Si (姒)
  • Shang dynasty (商朝) (c. 1600–1046 BC) – Ruled by the House of Zi (子)
  • Zhou dynasty (周朝) (c. 1046–256 BC) – Ruled by the House of Ji (姬)
  • Spring and Autumn period (春秋时代/春秋時代) (c. 771–476 BC)
  • Warring States period (战国时代/戰國時代) (c. 445–221 BC)
    • Qi (齐/齊) (c. 1046–221 BC)
    • Chu (楚) (c. 1030–223 BC)
    • Yan (燕) (11th century BC–222 BC)
    • Qin (秦) (c. 897–207 BC)
    • Han (韩/韓) (c. 403–230 BC)
    • Wei (魏) (c. 403–225 BC)
    • Zhao (赵/趙) (c. 403–222 BC)
    • 13 other minor dynastic states existed during the Warring States period
  • Minyue (闽越/閩越) (c. 334–111 BC) – Ruled by the House of Zou (驺/騶)
  • Dian Kingdom (滇国/滇國) (c. 278–109 BC)
  • Qin dynasty (秦朝) (c. 221–206 BC) – Ruled by the House of Ying (贏) of Han Chinese descent
  • Eighteen Kingdoms (十八国/十八國) (206 BC)
  • Han dynasty (汉朝/漢朝) (c. 206 BC–9 AD, c. 23–220 AD) – Ruled by the House of Liu (刘/劉) of Han Chinese descent
  • Nanyue (南越) (c. 204–111 BC) – Ruled by the House of Zhao (赵/趙) of Han Chinese descent
  • Dong'ou (东瓯/東甌) (c. 191–138 BC) – Ruled by the House of Zou (驺/騶)
  • Xin dynasty (新朝) (c. 9–23 AD) – Interrupted the Han dynasty; Ruled by the House of Wang (王) of Han Chinese descent
  • Three Kingdoms (三国/三國) (c. 220–280 AD)
    • Cao Wei (曹魏) (c. 220–266 AD) – Ruled by the House of Cao (曹) of Han Chinese descent
    • Shu Han (蜀汉/蜀漢) (c. 221–263 AD) – Ruled by the House of Liu (刘/劉) of Han Chinese descent
    • Eastern Wu (东吴/東吳) (c. 222–280 AD) – Ruled by the House of Sun (孙/孫) of Han Chinese descent
  • Jin dynasty (晋朝/晉朝) (c. 265–420 AD) – Ruled by the House of Sima (司马/司馬) of Han Chinese descent
    • Western Jin (西晋/西晉) (c. 266–316 AD)
    • Eastern Jin (东晋/東晉) (c. 317–420 AD)
  • Tuyuhun (吐谷浑/吐谷渾) (c. 284–670 AD) – Ruled by the House of Murong (慕容) of Xianbei descent
  • Chouchi (仇池) (c. 296–371 AD, c. 385–442 AD, c. 443–477 AD, c. 478–580 AD) – Ruled by the House of Yang (杨/楊) of Di descent
    • Former Chouchi (前仇池) (c. 296–371 AD)
    • Later Chouchi (后仇池/後仇池) (c. 385–442 AD)
    • Wudu Kingdom (武都国/武都國) (c. 443–477 AD)
    • Wuxing Kingdom (武兴国/武興國) (c. 478–506 AD, c. 529–553 AD)
    • Yinping Kingdom (阴平国/陰平國) (c. 479–580 AD)
  • Sixteen Kingdoms (十六国/十六國) (c. 304–439 AD)
    • Han Zhao (汉赵/漢趙) (c. 304–329 AD) – Ruled by the House of Liu (刘/劉) of Xiongnu descent
      • Northern Han (北汉/北漢) (c. 304–319 AD)
      • Former Zhao (前赵/前趙) (c. 319–329 AD)
    • Cheng Han (成汉/成漢) (c. 304–347 AD) – Ruled by the House of Li (李) of Ba descent
      • Cheng (成) (c. 304–338 AD)
      • Han (汉/漢) (c. 338–347 AD)
    • Later Zhao (后赵/後趙) (c. 319–351 AD) – Ruled by the House of Shi (石) of Jie descent
    • Former Liang (前凉/前涼) (c. 320–376 AD) – Ruled by the House of Zhang (张/張) of Han Chinese descent
    • Former Yan (前燕) (c. 337–370 AD) – Ruled by the House of Murong (慕容) of Xianbei descent
    • Former Qin (前秦) (c. 351–394 AD) – Ruled by the House of Fu (苻) of Di descent
    • Later Yan (后燕/後燕) (c. 384–409 AD) – Ruled by the House of Murong (慕容) of Xianbei descent
    • Later Qin (后秦/後秦) (c. 384–417 AD) – Ruled by the House of Yao (姚) of Qiang descent
    • Western Qin (西秦) (c. 385–400 AD, c. 409–431 AD) – Ruled by the House of Qifu (乞伏) of Xianbei descent
    • Later Liang (后凉/後涼) (c. 386–403 AD) – Ruled by the House of Lü (吕/呂) of Di descent
    • Southern Liang (南凉/南涼) (c. 397–414 AD) – Ruled by the House of Tufa (秃发/禿髮) of Xianbei descent
    • Northern Liang (北凉/北涼) (c. 397–460 AD) – Ruled by the House of Juqu (沮渠) of Xiongnu descent
    • Southern Yan (南燕) (c. 398–410 AD) – Ruled by the House of Murong (慕容) of Xianbei descent
    • Western Liang (西凉/西涼) (c. 400–421 AD) – Ruled by the House of Li (李) of Han Chinese descent
    • Xia (夏) (c. 407–431 AD) – Ruled by the House of Helian (赫连/赫連) of Xiongnu descent
    • Northern Yan (北燕) (c. 407–436 AD) – Ruled by the House of Feng (冯/馮) of Han Chinese descent
  • Dai (代) (c. 310–376 AD) – Ruled by the House of Tuoba (拓拔) of Xianbei descent
  • Ran Wei (冉魏) (c. 350–352 AD) – Ruled by the House of Ran (冉) of Han Chinese descent
  • Duan Qi (段齐/段齊) (c. 350–356 AD) – Ruled by the House of Duan (段) of Xianbei descent
  • Western Yan (西燕) (c. 384–394 AD) – Ruled by the House of Murong (慕容) of Xianbei descent
  • Zhai Wei (翟魏) (c. 388–392 AD) – Ruled by the House of Zhai (翟) of Dingling descent
  • Huan Chu (桓楚) (c. 401–404 AD) – Ruled by the House of Huan (桓) of Han Chinese descent
  • Western Shu (西蜀) (c. 405–413 AD) – Ruled by the House of Qiao (谯/譙) of Han Chinese descent
  • Northern and Southern dynasties (南北朝) (c. 420–589 AD)
    • Northern dynasties (北朝)
      • Northern Wei (北魏) (c. 386–535 AD) – Ruled by the House of Tuoba (拓拔) of Xianbei descent
      • Eastern Wei (东魏/東魏) (c. 534–550 AD) – Ruled by the House of Yuan (元) of Xianbei descent
      • Western Wei (西魏) (c. 535–557 AD) – Ruled by the House of Yuan (元) of Xianbei descent
      • Northern Qi (北齐/北齊) (c. 550–577 AD) – Ruled by the House of Gao (高) of Han Chinese descent
      • Northern Zhou (北周) (c. 557–581 AD) – Ruled by the House of Yuwen (宇文) of Xianbei descent
    • Southern dynasties (南朝)
      • Liu Song (刘宋/劉宋) (c. 420–479 AD) – Ruled by the House of Liu (刘/劉) of Han Chinese descent
      • Southern Qi (南齐/南齊) (c. 479–502 AD) – Ruled by the House of Xiao (萧/蕭) of Han Chinese descent
      • Liang dynasty (梁朝) (c. 502–557 AD) – Ruled by the House of Xiao (萧/蕭) of Han Chinese descent
      • Chen dynasty (陈朝/陳朝) (c. 557–589 AD) – Ruled by the House of Chen (陈/陳) of Han Chinese descent
  • Sui dynasty (隋朝) (c. 581–618 AD) – Ruled by the House of Yang (杨/楊) of Han Chinese descent
  • Tang dynasty (唐朝) (c. 618–690 AD, c. 705–907 AD) – Ruled by the House of Li (李) of Han Chinese descent
    • Second Zhou dynasty (武周) (c. 690–705 AD) – Interrupted the Tang dynasty; Ruled by the House of Wu (武) of Han Chinese descent
  • Balhae (渤海国/渤海國) (c. 698–926 AD) – Ruled by the House of Dae (大) of Mohe descent
  • Nanzhao (南诏/南詔) (c. 738–937 AD) – Ruled by the House of Meng (蒙) of Bai descent
  • Dachanghe (大长和/大長和) (c. 902–928 AD) – Ruled by the House of Zheng (郑/鄭) of Han Chinese descent
  • Qi (岐) (c. 907–924 AD) – Ruled by the House of Li (李) of Han Chinese descent
  • Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms (五代十国/五代十國) (c. 907–960 AD)
    • Five Dynasties (五代)
      • Later Liang (后梁/後梁) (c. 907–923 AD) – Ruled by the House of Zhu (朱) of Han Chinese descent
      • Later Tang (后唐/後唐) (c. 923–937 AD) – Ruled by the House of Li (李) of Shatuo descent
        • Jin (晋/晉) (c. 907–923 AD)
      • Later Jin (后晋/後晉) (c. 936–947 AD) – Ruled by the House of Shi (石) of Shatuo descent
      • Later Han (后汉/後漢) (c. 947–951 AD) – Ruled by the House of Liu (刘/劉) of Shatuo descent
      • Later Zhou (后周/後周) (c. 951–960 AD) – Ruled by the House of Guo (郭) of Han Chinese descent
    • Ten Kingdoms (十国/十國)
      • Former Shu (前蜀) (c. 907–925 AD) – Ruled by the House of Wang (王) of Han Chinese descent
      • Yang Wu (杨吴/楊吳) (c. 907–937 AD) – Ruled by the House of Yang (杨/楊) of Han Chinese descent
      • Ma Chu (马楚/馬楚) (c. 907–951 AD) – Ruled by the House of Ma (马/馬) of Han Chinese descent
      • Wuyue (吴越/吳越) (c. 907–978 AD) – Ruled by the House of Qian (钱/錢) of Han Chinese descent
      • Min (闽/閩) (c. 909–945 AD) – Ruled by the House of Wang (王) of Han Chinese descent
        • Yin (殷) (c. 943–945 AD)
      • Southern Han (南汉/南漢) (c. 917–971 AD) – Ruled by the House of Liu (刘/劉) of Han Chinese descent
      • Jingnan (荊南) (c. 924–963 AD) – Ruled by the House of Gao (高) of Han Chinese descent
      • Later Shu (后蜀/後蜀) (c. 934–965 AD) – Ruled by the House of Meng (孟) of Han Chinese descent
      • Southern Tang (南唐) (c. 937–976 AD) – Ruled by the House of Li (李) of Han Chinese descent
      • Northern Han (北汉/北漢) (c. 951–979 AD) – Ruled by the House of Liu (刘/劉) of Shatuo descent
  • Liao dynasty (辽朝/遼朝) (c. 907–1125 AD) – Ruled by the House of Yelü (耶律) of Khitan descent
    • Northern Liao (北辽/北遼) (c. 1122–1123 AD)
    • Western Liao (西辽/西遼) (c. 1124–1218 AD)
    • Eastern Liao (东辽/東遼) (c. 1213–1269 AD)
    • Later Liao (后辽/後遼) (c. 1216–1219 AD)
  • Zhao (赵/趙) (c. 910–921 AD) – Ruled by the House of Wang (王) of Han Chinese descent
  • Yan (燕) (c. 911–914 AD) – Ruled by the House of Liu (刘/劉) of Han Chinese descent
  • Dongdan Kingdom (东丹/東丹) (c. 926–936 AD) – Ruled by the House of Yelü (耶律) of Khitan descent
  • Datianxing (大天兴/大天興) (c. 928–929 AD) – Ruled by the House of Zhao (赵/趙)
  • Dayining (大义宁/大義寧) (c. 929–937 AD) – Ruled by the House of Yang (杨/楊) of Han Chinese descent
  • Dali Kingdom (大理国/大理國) (c. 937–1094 AD, c. 1096–1253 AD) – Ruled by the House of Duan (段) of Bai descent
    • Later Dali (后理/後理) (c. 1096–1253 AD)
  • Song dynasty (宋朝) (c. 960–1279 AD) – Ruled by the House of Zhao (赵/趙) of Han Chinese descent
  • Western Xia (西夏) (c. 1038–1227 AD) – Ruled by the House of Tuoba (拓跋) of Tangut descent
  • Dazhong Kingdom (大中) (c. 1094–1096 AD) – Interrupted the Dali Kingdom; Ruled by the House of Gao (高) of Bai descent
  • Jin dynasty (金朝) (c. 1115–1234 AD) – Ruled by the House of Wanyan (完颜/完顏) of Jurchen descent
  • Eastern Xia (东夏/東夏) (c. 1215–1233 AD) – Ruled by the House of Puxian (蒲鲜/蒲鮮) of Jurchen descent
  • Yuan dynasty (元朝) (c. 1271–1368 AD) – Ruled by the House of Borjigin (孛儿只斤/孛兒只斤) of Mongol descent
  • Zhou (周) (c. 1354–1367 AD) – Ruled by the House of Zhang (张/張) of Han Chinese descent
  • Chen Han (陈汉/陳漢) (c. 1360–1364 AD) – Ruled by the House of Chen (陈/陳) of Han Chinese descent
  • Ming dynasty (明朝) (c. 1368–1644 AD) – Ruled by the House of Zhu (朱) of Han Chinese descent
  • Qing dynasty (清朝) (c. 1636–1912 AD) – Ruled by the House of Aisin Gioro (爱新觉罗/愛新覺羅) of Manchu descent
    • Later Jin (后金/後金) (c. 1616–1636 AD)
  • Shun dynasty (顺朝/順朝) (c. 1644–1645 AD) – Ruled by the House of Li (李) of Han Chinese descent
  • Great Zhou (吴周/吳周) (c. 1678–1681 AD) – Ruled by the House of Wu (吴/吳) of Han Chinese descent
  • Taiping Heavenly Kingdom (太平天国/太平天國) (c. 1851–1864 AD) – Ruled by the House of Hong (洪) of Han Chinese descent
  • Kingdom of Tungning (东宁王国/東寧王國) (c. 1661–1683 AD) – Ruled by the House of Zheng (郑/鄭) of Han Chinese descent
  • Empire of China (中华帝国/中華帝國) (c. 1915–1916 AD) – Ruled by the House of Yuan (袁) of Han Chinese descent

CyprusEdit

GeorgiaEdit

IndiaEdit

IndonesiaEdit

Iran (Persia)Edit

IsraelEdit

Kingdom of JerusalemEdit

JapanEdit

JordanEdit

KoreaEdit

  • Gojoseon (고조선/古朝鮮) (2333 BC (legendary)–108 BC)
  • Jin (진/辰) (c. 4th century BC–2nd century BC)
  • Dongye (동예/東濊) (c. 3rd century BC–5th century AD)
  • Buyeo (부여/夫餘) (c. 2nd century BC–494 AD)
  • Okjeo (옥저/沃沮) (c. 2nd century BC–5th century AD)
  • Han dynasty (한나라/漢朝) (c. 108 BC–9 AD, 23–220 AD) – Ruled by the House of Liu (유/劉); Chinese rule over the Korean Peninsula as far south as the Han River under the Four Commanderies of Han (한사군/漢四郡)
  • Samhan (삼한/三韓) (c. 1st century BC–5th century AD)
    • Jinhan (진한/辰韓) (c. 1st century BC–4th century AD)
    • Mahan (마한/馬韓) (c. 1st century BC–5th century AD)
    • Byeonhan (변한/弁韓) (c. 1st century AD–4th century AD)
  • Three Kingdoms of Korea (삼국시대/三國時期) (57 BC–668 AD)
    • Silla (신라/新羅) (57 BC–935 AD)
    • Goguryeo (고구려/高句麗) (37 BC–668 AD) – Ruled by the House of Go (고/高)
    • Baekje (백제/百濟) (18 BC–660 AD) – Ruled by the House of Buyeo (부여/扶餘)
  • Xin dynasty (신나라/新朝) (9–23 AD) – Interrupted the Han dynasty; Ruled by the House of Wang (왕/王)
  • Gaya (가야/伽倻) (42–562 AD)
  • Cao Wei (조위/曹魏) (c. 236–265 AD) – Ruled by the House of Cao (조/曹); Chinese rule over the Korean Peninsula under the Daifang Commandery (대방군/帶方郡)
  • Jin dynasty (진(위진)/晉朝) (c. 265–314 AD) – Ruled by the House of Sima (사마/司馬); Chinese rule over the Korean Peninsula under the Daifang Commandery
  • Tang dynasty (당나라/唐朝) (668–690, 705–761 AD) – Ruled by the House of Li (이/李); Chinese rule over the Korean Peninsula under the Protectorate General to Pacify the East (안동도호부/安東都護府)
    • Second Zhou dynasty (무주/武周) (690–705 AD) – Interrupted the Tang dynasty; Ruled by the House of Wu (무/武)
  • North-South States period (남북국시대/南北國時代) (698–892 AD)
    • Later Silla (후신라/後新羅) (668–935 AD)
    • Balhae (발해/渤海) (698–926 AD) – Ruled by the House of Dae (대/大)
  • Later Three Kingdoms (후삼국시대/後三國時代) (892–936 AD)
    • Later Silla (후신라/後新羅) (668–935 AD)
    • Taebong (태봉/泰封) (901–918 AD) – Ruled by the House of Gung (궁/弓)
    • Later Baekje (후백제/後百濟) (892–936 AD) – Ruled by the House of Gyeon (견/甄)
  • Goryeo (고려/高麗) (918–392 AD) – Ruled by the House of Wang (왕/王)
  • Jeongan (정안/定安) (938–986 AD)
  • Heungyo (흥요/興遼) (1029–1030 AD) – Ruled by the House of Dae (대/大)
  • Yuan dynasty (원나라/元朝) (1270–1356 AD) – Ruled by the House of Borjigin (보르지긴/孛兒只斤); Goryeo ruled as the Zhengdong Province (정동등처행중서성/征東等處行中書省) of the Yuan dynasty
  • Joseon (조선/朝鮮) (1392–1897 AD) – Ruled by the House of Yi (이/李)

KuwaitEdit

MalaysiaEdit

MaldivesEdit

Middle EastEdit

MongoliaEdit

Myanmar (Burma)Edit

  • Pyu dynasty (c. 3000 BC – c. 400 AD)
  • Sarekhitara dynasty (c. 400 – 1044)
  • Bagan dynasty (1044–1287)
  • Pinya dynasty (1287–1365)
  • Innwa dynasty (1365–1486)
  • Toungoo dynasty (တောင်ငူမင်းဆက်) (1486–1752)
  • Nyaung Yan dynasty (1752–1824)
  • Konbaung dynasty (ကုန်းဘောင်ခေတ်) (1824–1885)
  • House of Hanover (1824–1901) – Myanmar under British rule
  • House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (1901–1917) – Myanmar under British rule
  • House of Windsor (1917–1942, 1945–1948) – Myanmar under British rule

NepalEdit

OmanEdit

The PhilippinesEdit

Royal families

QatarEdit

RyūkyūEdit

Saudi ArabiaEdit

SiberiaEdit

SingaporeEdit

Sri LankaEdit

Thailand (Siam)Edit

  • Lavachakkaraj dynasty (638–1292)
  • Phra Ruang dynasty (1238–1438)
  • Mangrai dynasty (1296–1558)
  • Uthong dynasty (1350–1370, 1388–1409)
  • Suphannaphum dynasty (1370–1388, 1409–1569)
  • Sukhothai dynasty (1569–1629)
  • Prasart Thong dynasty (1629–1688)
  • Baan Plu Luang dynasty (1688–1767)
  • Tipchakratiwong dynasty (1732–1932)
  • Thonburi dynasty (1767–1782)
  • Chakri dynasty (ราชวงศ์จักรี) (1782–present)

TibetEdit

TurkeyEdit

United Arab EmiratesEdit

VietnamEdit

EuropeEdit

AlbaniaEdit

AustriaEdit

BarbariansEdit

BavariiEdit
FranksEdit
HunsEdit

This is a list of rulers of the Huns. Period Ruler

  • Vund c. 360
  • Balamber 360–378
  • Baltazár (Alypbi) 378–390
  • Uldin (Khan of the Western Huns) 390–410
  • Donatus (Khan of the Eastern Black Sea Huns & beyond) 410–412
  • Charaton (Aksungur) 412–422
  • Octar[1] 422–432
  • Rugila 432–434
  • Bleda with Attila c. 434 – c. 445
  • Attila "the Hun" c. 434–453
  • Ellac 453 – c. 455
  • Tuldila fl. c. 457
  • Dengizich (Sabirs attack c. 460–463) ?-469 with Hernach/BelkErmak
  • Hernach/BelkErmak[2] 469–503
  • House of Dulo Bulgaria (390–503) A Nominalia of the Bulgarian khans genealogy claims that the Dulo clan is descended from Attila the Hun.
SciriiEdit
  • Edeko
  • Odoacer (435–493), was the 5th-century King of Italy
AvarsEdit
LombardsEdit
OstrogothsEdit
SuebiEdit
VandalsEdit
VisigothsEdit

BelgiumEdit

Medieval feudal states[10]Edit
Kingdom of Belgium (1831)Edit

Bohemia/CzechiaEdit

Great MoraviaEdit
Duchy of BohemiaEdit
Kingdom of BohemiaEdit

BosniaEdit

British IslesEdit

EnglandEdit
WalesEdit
IrelandEdit
ScotlandEdit
Kingdoms after the Union of the Crowns (1603–1707)Edit

The crown of the Kingdom of England and Ireland merged with that of the Kingdom of Scotland to form a personal union between England-Ireland and Scotland (the former a personal union itself)

Personal union between Great Britain and Ireland (1707–1801)Edit
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1801–1921)Edit
Personal union of the UK [of GB and NI] and several other Irish states (1921–1949)Edit
UK [of GB and NI] (without the personal union with Ireland) (1949–present)Edit

BulgariaEdit

CroatiaEdit

DenmarkEdit

FinlandEdit

FranceEdit

GermanyEdit

BavariaEdit
SaxonyEdit

GreeceEdit

HungaryEdit

IcelandEdit

IrelandEdit

ItalyEdit

LiechtensteinEdit

LuxembourgEdit

MaltaEdit

MonacoEdit

MontenegroEdit

NetherlandsEdit

NorwayEdit

PolandEdit

PortugalEdit

County of PortugalEdit
Kingdom of PortugalEdit

Roman EmpireEdit

RomaniaEdit

Before the UnificationEdit
MoldaviaEdit
WallachiaEdit
After the UnificationEdit

RussiaEdit

SerbiaEdit

SpainEdit

Before the UnificationEdit
AragonEdit
AsturiasEdit
BarcelonaEdit
CastileEdit
LeónEdit
NavarreEdit
After the Unification (1516)Edit

SwedenEdit

UkraineEdit

North AmericaEdit

AlaskaEdit

Antigua and BarbudaEdit

The BahamasEdit

BarbadosEdit

BelizeEdit

CanadaEdit

CubaEdit

El SalvadorEdit

GreenlandEdit

GrenadaEdit

HaitiEdit

JamaicaEdit

MayaEdit

MexicoEdit

South AmericaEdit

ArgentinaEdit

BrazilEdit

ChileEdit

PeruEdit

OceaniaEdit

AustraliaEdit

HawaiiEdit

New ZealandEdit

Papua New GuineaEdit

Solomon IslandsEdit

TahitiEdit

TongaEdit

TuvaluEdit

AntarcticaEdit

Political families in republicsEdit

Though in elected governments, rule does not pass automatically by inheritance, political power often accrues to generations of related individuals in republics. Eminence, influence, tradition, genetics, and nepotism may contribute to the phenomenon.

Family dictatorships are a different concept in which political power passes within a family because of the overwhelming authority of the leader, rather than informal power accrued to the family.

Some political dynasties:

Influential/wealthy familiesEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Oxford English Dictionary, 1st ed. "dynasty, n." Oxford University Press (Oxford), 1897.
  2. ^ Oxford English Dictionary, 3rd ed. "house, n.¹ and int, 10. b." Oxford University Press (Oxford), 2011.
  3. ^ Thomson, David (1961). "The Institutions of Monarchy". Europe Since Napoleon. New York: Knopf. pp. 79–80. The basic idea of monarchy was the idea that hereditary right gave the best title to political power...The dangers of disputed succession were best avoided by hereditary succession: ruling families had a natural interest in passing on to their descendants enhanced power and prestige...Frederick the Great of Prussia, Catherine the Great of Russia, Maria Theresa of Austria, were alike infatuated with the idea of strengthening their power, centralizing government in their own hands as against local and feudal privileges, and so acquiring more absolute authority in the state. Moreover, the very dynastic rivalries and conflicts between these eighteenth-century monarchs drove them to look for ever more efficient methods of government
  4. ^ Liddell, Henry George & al. A Greek–English Lexicon: "δυναστεία". Hosted by Tufts University's Perseus Project.
  5. ^ Liddell & al. A Greek–English Lexicon: "δυνάστης".
  6. ^ Liddell & al. A Greek–English Lexicon: "δύναμις".
  7. ^ Liddell & al. "δύναμαι".
  8. ^ a b Statement by Nick Clegg MP, UK parliament website, 26 March 2015 (retrieved on same date).
  9. ^ "Monaco royal taken seriously ill". BBC News. London. 8 April 2005. Retrieved January 27, 2013.
  10. ^ including County of Flanders, Marquisate of Namur, Duchy of Brabant, County of Hainaut, Duchy of Limburg, County of Luxembourg