2020 coronavirus pandemic in Japan

The 2019–20 coronavirus pandemic was confirmed to have spread to Japan on 16 January 2020 from China.[2]

2020 coronavirus pandemic in Japan
COVID-19 outbreak Japan per capita cases map.svg
Confirmed cases per million inhabitants by prefecture
DiseaseCOVID-19
Virus strain2019-nCoV
LocationJapan
First outbreakWuhan, Hubei, China
Index caseKanagawa Prefecture
Arrival date16 January 2020
(2 months, 2 weeks and 3 days)
Confirmed cases2,228[1]
Recovered424
Deaths
66[1]

On 27 February 2020, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe requested that all Japanese elementary, junior high, and high schools close until early April to help contain the virus.[3] The pandemic has been a concern for the 2020 Summer Olympics, which has been postponed to 2021 because of it.[4] The Japanese government has been taking extra precautions to help minimise the outbreak's impact.[5]

TimelineEdit

COVID-19 cases in Japan  ()
     Deaths        Recoveries        Active cases
Date
# of cases
# of deaths
2020-01-16
1(n.a.)
2020-01-17
1(+0%)
2020-01-18
1(+0%)
2020-01-19
1(+0%)
2020-01-20
1(+0%)
2020-01-21
1(+0%)
2020-01-22
1(+0%)
2020-01-23
1(+0%)
2020-01-24
3(+200%)
2020-01-25
3(+0%)
2020-01-26
4(+33%)
2020-01-27
6(+50%)
2020-01-28
7(+16%)
2020-01-29
11(+57%)
2020-01-30
14(+27%)
2020-01-31
17(+21%)
2020-02-01
20(+18%)
2020-02-02
20(+0%)
2020-02-03
20(+0%)
2020-02-04
23(+15%)
2020-02-05
25(+8.7%)
2020-02-06
25(+0%)
2020-02-07
25(+0%)
2020-02-08
26(+4.0%)
2020-02-09
26(+0%)
2020-02-10
26(+0%)
2020-02-11
26(+0%)
2020-02-12
28(+7.7%)
2020-02-13
33(+18%) 1(n.a.)
2020-02-14
41(+24%) 1(=)
2020-02-15
53(+29%) 1(=)
2020-02-16
59(+11%) 1(=)
2020-02-17
65(+10%) 1(=)
2020-02-18
73(+12%) 1(=)
2020-02-19
85(+16%) 1(=)
2020-02-20
93(+9.4%) 1(=)
2020-02-21
105(+13%) 1(=)
2020-02-22
132(+26%) 1(=)
2020-02-23
144(+9.1%) 1(=)
2020-02-24
157(+9.0%) 1(=)
2020-02-25
164(+4.5%) 1(=)
2020-02-26
186(+13%) 3(+200%)
2020-02-27
210(+13%) 4(+33%)
2020-02-28
230(+10%) 5(+20%)
2020-02-29
239(+3.9%) 5(=)
2020-03-01
254(+6.3%) 6(+20%)
2020-03-02
268(+5.5%) 6(=)
2020-03-03
284(+6.0%) 6(=)
2020-03-04
317(+12%) 6(=)
2020-03-05
349(+10%) 6(=)
2020-03-06
408(+17%) 6(=)
2020-03-07
455(+12%) 6
2020-03-08
488(+7.3%) 7(+17%)
2020-03-09
514(+5.3%) 9(+29%)
2020-03-10
568(+11%) 12(+33%)
2020-03-11
620(+9.2%) 15(+25%)
2020-03-12
675(+8.9%) 19(+27%)
2020-03-13
716(+6.1%) 21(+11%)
2020-03-14
780(+8.9%) 22(+4.8%)
2020-03-15
814(+4.6%) 24(+9%)
2020-03-16
829(+1.8%) 28(+17%)
2020-03-17
873(+5.3%) 29(+3.6%)
2020-03-18
914(+4.7%) 31(+7%)
2020-03-19
950(+4.0%) 33(+6%)
2020-03-20
1,007(+6.0%) 35(+6%)
2020-03-21
1,054(+3.9%) 36(+3%)
2020-03-22
1,086(+3.0%) 41(+14%)
2020-03-23
1,128(+3.9%) 42(+2.4%)
2020-03-24
1,193(+5.7%) 43(+2.3%)
2020-03-25
1,291(+8.3%) 45(+5%)
2020-03-26
1,387(+7.4%) 46(+2.2%)
2020-03-27
1,499(+8.1%) 49(+7%)
2020-03-28
1,693(+12.9%) 52(+6%)
2020-03-29
1,866(+10.2%) 52(=)
2020-03-30
1,953(+4.7%) 56(+8%)
2020-03-31
2,178(+11.5%) 57(+1.8%)
2020-04-01
2,384(+9.5%) 57(=)
Data sourced from Japan Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare and World Health Organization, as reported from 10:00|CET on the day to 10:00|CET on the following day (18:00|JST on the day – 18:00|JST the following day).

JanuaryEdit

A resident of Kanagawa Prefecture in his 30's who had previously travelled to Wuhan developed a fever on 3 January and subsequently returned to Japan on 6 January. He tested positive during a hospital admission between 10 and 15 January. He had not visited the Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market, but possibly had close contact with an affected person in Wuhan.[6][7]

On 24 January, a second case was confirmed as a Chinese national who visited from Wuhan.[8] On 25 January, the third case was confirmed as a woman from Wuhan.[9]

Afterwards, Japan took extra precautions, due to the upcoming 2020 Summer Olympics being held in Tokyo.[10] Despite this, on 28 January, the fifth, sixth, and seventh cases were confirmed in Japan, including a man who had not visited Wuhan; he was a tour bus driver who had driven a group from Wuhan earlier in January.[11][12] The tour guide for the group also tested confirmed positive for SARS-CoV-2.[13] On 29 January, a Chinese man and woman in their 40s tested positive in Aichi and in Hokkaido.[14]

On 30 January, three Japanese nationals who arrived at Haneda Airport after being evacuated from Wuhan tested positive.[15] Three other cases were confirmed later that day. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe announced that the two Japanese nationals who came back via Haneda refused further testing and said that officials could not legally force them to do so.[13] It was announced on 31 January that the two had recanted their protests and allowed them to be tested.[16]

FebruaryEdit

On 1 February, a 37-year-old man of the Tokyo Metropolitan Police Department working for the Cabinet Secretariat, which was responsible for the evacuation of citizens from Wuhan and other related matters, died at National Institute of Public Health in Saitama Prefecture. The institute was where some of the evacuees from Wuhan stayed under temporary quarantine. Police are investigating the man's cause of death, but they suspect he was suicidal.[17]

From 3 February, Japan forbade anyone who had had history of travelling to and from Hubei Province or had a Chinese passport officially issued from Hubei.[18] In addition, non-Japanese travellers were required to fill out health declaration questionnaires on whether they had (or would have) travelled to Hubei within the next 14 days.[18]

On 11 February, two evacuees from Wuhan tested positive after an earlier test gave negative results.[19] Another three cases were confirmed over the next two days and brought the total national count to 31.[20]

On 12 February, Japan announced entry restrictions for anyone who had travelled to and from Zhejiang or had a Chinese passport issued from Zhejiang.[21]

On 13 February, a woman in her 80s died in Kanagawa Prefecture, next to Tokyo, marking the first death from COVID-19 in Japan.[22] She was the mother-in-law of a cab driver working in Tokyo who was also confirmed positive for the virus.[23]

On 14 February, a married couple, both in their 60s, tested positive after returning from a ten-day vacation in Hawaii, during which the man began showing symptoms.[24][25] On 16 February, it was reported that they had used Delta Air Lines to return to Tokyo from Oahu and stayed at the Grand Waikikian.[26] Contact tracing was initiated by the airline to confirm whether anyone was infected.[26]

On 18 February, Wakayama Prefecture announced that three people tested positive and one of them was admitted to Saisekai Arida Hospital(済生会有田病院).[27] The other two were a doctor who tested positive and a nurse in his 30s who worked as a member of the Disaster Medical Assistance Team after being deployed to the Diamond Princess.[27]

On 19 February, testing the 3,011 cases on the Diamond Princess was completed.[28]

On 20 February, Fukuoka Prefecture announced its first virus case: a Japanese man in his sixties with no travel history overseas.[29]

On 21 February, two elementary school boys in Hokkaido and one preschool school boy were confirmed to test positive for SARS-CoV-2; the latter had came back from an airlift out of Wuhan with his father, who was also tested.[30] The Diamond Princess' passengers disembarked.

On 22 February, a junior high school teacher working in Chiba Prefecture tested positive for the virus.[31]

On 23 February, the US State Department advised American visitors in Japan to be cautious due to the community spread of the virus.[32] On the same day the Nagoya Expressway Public Corporation announced plans to temporarily close some toll gates and let employees work from their homes after an employee staffing the toll gates was diagnosed positive for SARS-CoV-2.[33] Due to personnel shortages, six toll gates on the Tōkai and Manba routes of the expressway network were closed over the weekend.[33]

 
People in Tokyo wearing masks

On 25 February, the Shikoku region reported its first case in Tokushima Prefecture, a former passenger of the Diamond Princess Cruise Ship who had originally tested negative a week earlier when disembarking from the ship.[34]

On 27 February, Shinzo Abe requested closing all elementary, junior high, and high schools to curb the spread of the infections from 2 March to the end of spring vacations, which usually conclude in early April.[35][36]

MarchEdit

On 4 March, A 50-year-old man refused to wait at home after testing positive for COVID-19, and went to a bar and restaurant until he decided to go to the hospital. A female bar owner in her 30s tested positive on 12 March. A man died in a hospital on 18 March according to JHWLM's official confirmed cases report.[37]

On 5 March, Japan announced new quarantine restrictions to be enforced for all visitors coming from China and South Korea.[38]Shiga Prefecture announced its first case.[34]

On 6 March, South Korea protested against the quarantine measures for South Koreans going to Japan by suspending visas for Japanese citizens travelling to South Korea.[39]

On 8 March, Hiroshima announced that one man in hiroshima confirmed positive after visited 4 Hospital facilities.[40]

On 12 March, 4 fatal cases caused by COVID-19 were found around Japan on Thursday.[41]

On 16 March, NHK reported that the Japanese government planned to expand entry restrictions to foreigners from four new countries. They will apply to three areas in Spain (including Madrid), four areas in Italy (including the northern region of Liguria), Switzerland's Ticino region, and all of Iceland. Japan is currently restricting entry by foreigners who have recently visited China, South Korea, Italy and Iran.[42]

On 19 March, the governors of Osaka and Hyogo prefectures asked residents Thursday to avoid nonessential travel between the two neighbouring western Japan prefectures over the three-day weekend starting Friday to contain the spread of the novel corona-virus.[43][44]

On 21 March, Okayama confirmed that a female patient in their 60s was infected, which was its first case.[45] Okayama announced that citizens have to "refrain as much as possible" from visiting clusters of infected people in Hyogo and Osaka.[46]

On 22 March, Saitama and Gunma prefectures recorded their first deaths from the new coronavirus, while 46 additional cases of infection were confirmed as of 10 p.m. on March 22, including the first patient in Okayama Prefecture.[47]

On 22 March, According to the Japanese Health, Labour and Welfare Ministry official confirmed a total of five deaths in one day.[page needed] An K-1 Grand Prix martial art event was held despite authorities asking the organizers to shut it down.[48]

On 23 March, Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike warned citizens that a lockdown may be enforced if infections surge in Tokyo as she urged cooperation with the people to avoid city lockdown.[49][50][51]

On 25 March, MHLW officials announced 71 person tested positive,[52] including 41 cases in Tokyo, daily.[53] Tokyo governor Yuriko Koike held an emergency press conference in the late afternoon of the day. She said that "the current situation is a serious situation where the number of infected people may explode." Koike also asked "if possible, work at home and refrain from going out at night as much as possible on weekdays." Koike asked people returning from abroad to refrain from going out for 14 days.[54] The request from the governor appears to have punctured the relaxed mood in Tokyo. “Panic buying” began to trend on Twitter, with users posting pictures of empty shelves and lines outside supermarkets. At the Don Qujiote store in Nakameguro on Wednesday, customers flocked to grab instant noodles and canned goods in the minutes immediately following Koike's late-evening speech.[55]

On 26 March, governors around Tokyo, including Chiba, Kanagawa, Saitama, and Yamanashi, strongly urged residents to follow Stay-at-Home Requests to prevent an explosive surge in infections among overflowing clusters causing “critical phase”.[56] In Tokyo, residents were asked to work from home and refrain from going out at night and on the weekend. In Kanagawa, residents were asked to refrain from nonessential travel on the weekend. The residents of Chiba, Yamanashi, Tochigi and Gunma Prefectures were asked to refrain from going to Tokyo over the weekend.[57]

On 27 March, MHLW officials announced 112 person tested positive in a single day, including three Hanshin Tigers professional baseball club's players.[58][59]

On 28 March, PM Abe of Japan held a 1-hour-long press briefing about the economic measures being prepared by the Japanese government[60][61] and considerable concerns of "explosive spread of overflowing infections" which is creating the regional requests around Japan, including Tokyo, Osaka, Hyogo, Aichi where are at "critical phase" and "virtual standstill".[62] Unfortunately for Prime Minister Abe, his wife's distance from social distance and promoting relative deprivation, despite of her position as prime minister's wife and public celebrity, has become a social controversy.[63]

On 29 March, MHLW officials announced 194 person tested positive in a single day, including 58 person relative or disabled facility in Tōnoshō, Chiba Prefecture and 63 in Tokyo.[64] However, a Tokyo municipal government official acknowledged by the end of the day that 63 people in the city tested positive for COVID-19 on March 28 and that a record number of 68 people tested positive on March 29.[65] It was also revealed that Tokyo now had 430 confirmed cases of COVID-19, the largest among Japan's 47 prefectures.[65]

On 30 March, it was announced that on the previous night, famed Japanese comedian Ken Shimura, who was known as "Japan's Robin Williams," died in Shinjuku, Tokyo from severe pneumonia, having been diagnosed with COVID-19.[66][67]

On 30 March, Fukuoka City has announced that it has been confirmed that women in their twenties living in the city and their children under one year old are infected with the new coronavirus. It is unusual for a child under one year to be infected nationwide. Both of them are hospitalized at an infectious disease designated medical institution outside Fukuoka City.[68] On 30 March, it was confirmed that a woman in their 20s in Toyama City was infected with the new coronavirus for the first time in Toyama Prefecture.[69] The woman was a student who attended Kyoto Sangyo University, and Toyama City and Toyama Prefecture are studying the history of women's behavior and the status of close contacts.[69]

Okayama Prefecture announced on the evening of the 30th that one male in their 20s was newly infected with the new coronavirus. Men are students of Kyoto Sangyo University who are highly likely to have the outbreak of the new coronavirus, and only four have been confirmed in Okayama Prefecture.[70] The male student was having a dinner in Kyoto city with his friends from Kyoto University of Technology on the 22nd two days ago, but it was confirmed that two of them who had travel experience in Europe were infected with the new coronavirus.[70]

On 31 March, calls were made for Abe to declare a state of emergency. Several medical experts, local leading politicians, and governors raised their voices, directly or indirectly, calling for Abe to make the declaration.[71][72] However, Prime Minister Abe and Chief Cabinet Secretary Suga deny a state of emergency is rapidly needed.[73] According to the corresponding article in the Asahi Shimbun, one internet post said the state of emergency would be declared on 1 April followed by a lockdown of urban areas the following day.[73] But on 30 March, Suga repeated his past statements that the situation had not reached such a critical point.[73]

Government responseEdit

Phase 1: ContainmentEdit

The initial response of the Japanese government to the COVID-19 outbreak was a policy of containment that focused on the repatriation of Japanese citizens from Wuhan, the point of origin of the pandemic, and the introduction of new border control regulations.

On 24 January, PM Abe convened the "Ministerial Meeting on Countermeasures Related to the Novel Coronavirus" at the Prime Minister's Office with members of his Cabinet in response to a statement released by the World Health Organization (WHO) that morning which confirmed human-to-human transmission of the coronavirus. Abe announced that he would introduce appropriate countermeasures to the disease in coordination with the National Institute of Infectious Diseases (NIID).[74]

On 28 January, PM Abe designated the new coronavirus as an "infectious disease" under the Infectious Diseases Control Law (Japanese: 感染症の予防及び感染症の患者に対する医療に関する法律), which allows the government to order patients with COVID-19 to undergo hospitalization. He also designed the disease as a "quarantinable infectious disease" under the Quarantine Act, which allows the government to quarantine people suspected of infection and order them to undergo diagnosis and treatment.[75]

On 30 January, PM Abe announced the establishment of the "Novel Coronavirus Response Headquarters" (Japanese: 新型コロナウイルス感染症対策本部), which meets at the Prime Minister's Office and is run by a task force led by Deputy Chief Cabinet Secretary for Crisis Management Okita Yoshiki.[76][77] The initial roster of the task force includes 36 high-ranking bureaucrats from several of the Ministries of Japan to coordinate government response to the COVID-19 outbreak. The Headquarters acts as the site of PM Abe's decision-making process on the country's virus countermeasures.

On 31 January, PM Abe announced during the Second Meeting of the Novel Coronavirus Response Headquarters that the government prioritized the repatriation of Japanese citizens from Hubei province. Officials negotiated with Chinese authorities to dispatch five chartered flights to Wuhan from 29 January to 17 February.[78]

On 1 February, PM Abe announced during the Fourth Meeting of the Novel Coronavirus Response Headquarters that he would enact restrictions to deny entry of foreign citizens who had a history of visiting Hubei province within 14 days and those who possess a Chinese passport issued by Hubei province.[79]

On 5 February, PM Abe announced that he would invoke the Quarantine Act to place the cruise ship Diamond Princess under quarantine in Yokohama. Quarantine officers were dispatched to the ship to prevent the disembarkation of crew and passengers, and to escort infected patients to medical facilities.[80]

On 6 February, PM Abe invoked the Immigration Control and Refugee Act to deny the entry of the cruise ship MS Westerdam from Hong Kong after one of its passengers tested positive for COVID-19.[81]

Prevention and treatmentEdit

 
Prime Minister Shinzo Abe convening the first Novel Coronavirus Expert Meeting on 16 February 2020

After the COVID-19 outbreak on the cruise ship Diamond Princess, the Japanese government shifted its focus from a containment policy to a prevention and treatment one because it anticipated rising numbers of community spreads within Japan. This policy prioritized the creation of a COVID-19 testing and consultation system based on the National Institute of Infectious Diseases (NIID) and the government's existing 83 municipal and prefectural public health institutions that is separate from the civilian hospital system. The new system handles the transfer of COVID-19 patients to mainstream medical facilities to facilitate patient flow, triage, and the management of limited testing kits on their behalf to prevent a rush of infected and uninfected patients from overwhelming healthcare providers and transmitting diseases to them. By regulating COVID-19 testing at the national level, the Abe Administration integrated the activities of the national government, the local governments, medical professionals, business operators, and the public in treating the disease.

On 1 February, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare instructed the municipal and prefectural governments to establish specialized COVID-19 consultation centres and outpatient wards at their local public health facilities by the first half of the month.[82] Such wards would provide medical examinations and testing for suspected carriers of the disease to protect general hospitals from infection.

On 5 February, PM Abe announced during the Fifth Meeting of the Novel Coronavirus Response Headquarters that the government would begin preparations to strengthen COVID-19 testing capabilities at the NIID and 83 municipal and prefectural public health institutions that are designated by the government as official testing sites. Without any uniform diagnosis kit for the disease, the government has relied on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests to check for infections. As few mainstream medical facilities in Japan had the ability to conduct PCR tests, Abe also promised to increase the number of institutions with such kits, including universities and private companies [83]

On 12 February, PM Abe announced during the Seventh Meeting of the Novel Coronavirus Headquarters that the government would expand the scope of COVID-19 testing to include patients with symptoms based on the discretion of local governments. Previously, testing was restricted to those with a history of travelling to Hubei Province.[84][85] On the same day, the Ministry of Health and NIID also contracted SRL Inc to handle PCR clinical laboratory testing.[86] Since then, the government has partnered with several more private companies to expand laboratory testing capabilities and to work towards the development of a rapid testing kit.[87]

On 14 February, PM Abe introduced the Japanese government's coronavirus consultation system to coordinate medical testing and response with the public. The Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare worked with local governments to establish 536 consultation centres (Japanese: 帰国者・接触者相談センター) that covered every prefecture within the country to provide concerned citizens with instructions on how to receive COVID-19 testing and treatment. The general public needs to contact a consultation centre by phone to get tested at one of the government's specialized outpatient wards (Japanese: 帰国者・接触者外来).[88][89]

On 16 February, PM Abe convened the government's first Novel Coronavirus Expert Meeting (Japanese: 新型コロナウイルス感染症対策専門家会議) at the Prime Minister's Office to draft national guidelines for COVID-19 testing and treatment.[90] The meeting was chaired by Dr. Wakita Takaji, Director of the NIID, who brought together ten public health experts and medical professionals from across Japan to coordinate a response to the virus with PM Abe and the government's coronavirus task force in a roundtable format. The main concern of the Japanese medical establishment was an overcrowding of hospitals by uninfected patients with light cold symptoms who believed that they had COVID-19. Medical representatives claimed that such a panic would strain medical resources and risk exposing those uninfected patients to the disease itself.[91][92]

On 17 February, the Ministry of Health released its consultation guidelines (Japanese: 新型コロナウイルス感染症についての相談・受診の目安について) to each of the municipal and prefectural governments and their public health centers.[93] The document instructs doctors and public health nurses who staff the consultation centres to limit consultations to people with the following conditions: (1) cold symptoms and a fever of at least 37.5 Celsius for over four days while taking antipyretic medication; and (2) extreme fatigue and breathing difficulties. The elderly, people with pre-existing conditions, and pregnant women with cold symptoms can receive consultation if they have had them for two days. The guidelines also note that people who are dissatisfied with their consultation results can visit one of the specialized outpatient wards (帰国者・接触者外来) for further talks.

Phase 2: MitigationEdit

 
The objective of the Japanese government's basic policies for control is to "flatten the curve".

On 25 February, the Abe Administration introduced the "Basic Policies for Novel Coronavirus Disease Control" (Japanese: 新型コロナウイルス感染症対策の基本方針) to act as the government's uniform basic policy on COVID-19 control.[94] After a spike of infections in Italy, Iran, and South Korea, PM Abe decided that the government's disease countermeasures would prioritize the prevention of large-scale clusters in Japan. This includes the government's controversial requests to suspend such large-scale gatherings as community events and school operations, as well as its policy to limit patients with light cold symptoms from visiting medical facilities to prevent them from overwhelming hospital resources.[95]

On 23 February, PM Abe instructed the government's coronavirus task force to quickly draft a comprehensive basic policy.[96] Health Minister Katsunobu Kato reconvened the medical experts from the first Novel Coronavirus Expert Meeting on 24 February to draft this policy.[97] During the meeting, the medical establishment presented its policy recommendations in the form of a views report (Japanese: 新型コロナウイルス感染症対策の基本方針の具体化に向けた見解), concluding that the most important objective of PM Abe's basic policy must be the prevention of large-scale disease clusters and a decrease in the outbreak and death of patients with severe symptoms. They stated that it is not possible for the government to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in Japan on a person-to-person basis, but that there is a possibility that it can regulate the overall speed of infection.[98]  They cited the next week or two as a "critical moment" on whether the country would experience a large cluster that could result in the collapse of the medical system and socio-economic chaos. After reviewing and discussing the existing data on the disease, the committee stated that universal PCR testing was impossible due to a shortage of testing facilities and providers, and recommended that the government instead limit the application of available test kits to patients that are at a high risk of complications in order to stockpile for a large cluster.  Participants also noted that Japan's medical facilities are vulnerable to "chaos," elaborating that several of the hospital beds and resources in the Tokyo area are already preoccupied with caring for the surge of 700 infected patients from the Diamond Princess. They reiterated their warning that a rush of alarmed uninfected outpatients with light symptoms of the disease could overwhelm hospitals and turn waiting rooms into "breeding grounds" of COVID-19.[99]

On 25 February, the Abe Administration adopted the "Basic Policies for Novel Coronavirus Disease Control" based on the advice that it received from the Expert Meeting.

First, the new policies advised local medical institutions that it is better for people with lighter, cold-like symptoms to rely on bed rest at home, rather than seeking medical help from clinics or hospitals. The policy also recommends people at a higher risk of infection -including the elderly and patients with pre-existing conditions – to avoid hospital visits for such non-treatment purposes as completing prescription orders by letting them fill the forms over the telephone instead of in person.[99]

Second, the new policies allow general medical facilities in areas of a rapid COVID-19 outbreak to accept patients suspected of infection. Before this, patients could only get tested at specialized clinics after making an appointment with consultation centres to prevent the transmission of the disease. Government officials revised the previous policy after acknowledging that such specialized institutions would be overwhelmed during a large cluster.

Third, the policy asks those with any cold symptoms to take time off from work and avoid leaving their homes. Government officials urged companies to let employees work from home and commute at off-peak hours. The Japanese government also made an official request to local governments and businesses to cancel large-scale events.

On 27 February, PM Abe requested the closures of all schools from 2 March to the end of spring vacations, which usually conclude in early April. The next day, the Japanese government announced plans to create a fund to help companies subsidize workers who need to take days off to look after their children while schools are closed.[100]

On 27 February, the Japanese government also announced plans to expand the national health insurance system so that it covers COVID-19 tests.[101]

On 9 March, the Ministry of Health reconvened the Expert Meeting after the two week "critical moment." The panel of medical experts concluded that Japan was currently not on track to experience a large-scale cluster, but stated that there is a two-week time lag in analysing COVID-19 trends and that the country would continue to see more infections. Consequently, the participants asked the government to remain vigilant in quickly identifying and containing smaller clusters. With more COVID-19 outbreaks around the world, the panel also proposed that new infections from abroad could initiate a "second wave" of the disease in Japan.[102][103]

On 9 March, the Health Ministry published a disease forecast of each prefecture and instructed their local governments to prepare their hospitals to accommodate its patient estimates. It predicts that the virus peak of each prefecture will occur three months after their first reported case of local transmission. The Ministry estimates that during its peak, Tokyo will see 45,400 outpatients and 20,500 inpatients per day, of whom 700 will be in severe condition. For Hokkaido, the figure is 18,300 outpatients and 10,200 inpatients daily, of whom about 340 will be in severe condition.[104]

Novel Coronavirus Expert MeetingEdit

On 16 February, PM Abe convened the Novel Coronavirus Expert Meeting to incorporate members of the Japanese medical community into his decision-making process.[90] The panel acts as the main medical advisory body of the Japanese government during the COVID-19 crisis.

Chair

Vice Chair

Members

Cluster countermeasuresEdit

On 25 February, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare established a "Cluster Response Section" (Japanese: クラスター対策班) in accordance to the Basic Policies for Novel Coronavirus Disease Control.[105] The purpose of the new section is to quickly identify and contain small-scale clusters of COVID-19 infections before they turn into large-scale ones. It is led by university professors Oshitani Hitoshi and Nishiura Hiroshi and consists of a contact trace team and a surveillance team from the National Institute of Infectious Diseases (NIID), a data analysis team from Hokkaido University, a risk management team from Tohoku University, and an administration team.[106] Whenever a local government determines the existence of a cluster from hospital reports, the Ministry of Health dispatches the Section to that area to conduct an epidemiological survey and contact tracing. After the teams determine the original source of infection, the Ministry and local government officials enact countermeasures to locate, test, and place under medical surveillance anybody who may have come into contact with an infected person. They can also file requests to suspend infected businesses or restrict events from taking place there.

On 15 March, the Ministry of Health reported fifteen COVID-19 clusters in Japan.[107] The largest cluster involves more than 80 people across four live music clubs in Osaka from concerts held in mid-February.[108] Another cluster of 50 people occurred at an elderly day care centre in Nagoya in early March, which resulted in 12 deaths.[109]

Legislative reformsEdit

To provide a stronger legal basis for its COVID-19 countermeasures, the Abe Administration has proposed an amendment to the "Special Measures Act to Counter New Types of Influenza of 2012" that will allow it to declare a "state of emergency" and mandate the prohibition of large-scale gatherings and the movement of people during a disease outbreak. Currently, school closures and event cancellations are voluntary responses by the public and local governments.

On 5 February 2020, the Abe Administration's coronavirus task force initiated political debate on the introduction of emergency measures to combat the COVID-19 outbreak a day after the British cruise ship Diamond Princess was asked to quarantine. Initial debate focused on constitutional reform due to the task force's apprehension that the Japanese Constitution may restrict the government's ability to enact such compulsory measures as quarantines on the grounds that it violated human rights. After lawmakers representing almost all of the major political parties – including the Liberal Democratic Party, Constitutional Democratic Party of Japan, and Democratic Party for the People – voiced their strong opposition towards this proposal and asserted that the Constitution allowed for emergency measures, the Abe Administration moved forward with legislative reform instead.[110]

On 5 March 2020, Prime Minister Abe introduced a draft amendment to the "Special Measures Act to Counter New Types of Influenza of 2012". He met separately with the heads of five opposition parties on 4 March to promote a "united front" in passing the reforms. The new law would allow the national and prefectural governors to instruct residents to avoid unnecessary outings and to close such facilities as schools, day care centres, and social welfare facilities for the elderly. To allay the concerns of the opposition parties, Abe said he would include a two-year limit on the power to declare a state of emergency.[111]

The Abe Administration plans to submit the revision bill to the National Diet on 10 March, and has coordinated with the opposition parties to have it passed by the Lower House on 12 March, and the Upper House on 13 March.[112]

Government support measuresEdit

On 12 February, PM Abe announced during the Eighth Meeting of the Novel Coronavirus Response Headquarters that the government would secure a total of 500 billion yen for emergency lending and loan guarantees to small and medium enterprises affected by the COVID-19 outbreak.[113] He also declared that his Cabinet would set aside 15.3 billion yen from contingency funds to facilitate the donation of isolated virus samples to relevant research institutions across the globe.

On 1 March, PM Abe evoked the Act on Emergency Measures for Stabilizing Living Conditions of the Public to regulate the sale and distribution of facial masks in Hokkaido. Under this policy, the Japanese government instructed manufactures to sell facial masks directly to the government, which would then deliver it to residents.[114]

On 5 March, the Japanese government announced that it is organizing an emergency package by using a 270 billion yen ($2.5 billion) reserve fund for the current fiscal year through March to contain the virus and minimize its impact on the economy.

Controversies and criticismsEdit

From 17 February, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare asked people who have a fever over 37.5 ℃ for more than 4 days or those who have recognized strong helplessness and difficulty breathing severer than such conditions for influenza are necessary to find and consult with the coronavirus-related 'Return and Contact Consultation Center' installed in local governments around the country before get tested for novel coronavirus.[115][116] However, some media outlets assert that restrictive and deliberate standards would rather delay response and create a socially loose atmosphere, leading to the spread of the disease, which could later lead to the collapse of the health care system and the medically protected regional community.[117][118]

In late February, several Japanese media outlets reported that there were people with fever or other symptoms who could not be tested through the consultation centre system and had become "test refugees" (Japanese: 検査難民).[119][120][121][122] Some of these cases involved patients with severe pneumonia.[123] In reaction to this problem, the chairman of the Institute for Healthcare Governance Masahiro Kami claimed that many patients were refused to be tested due to their mild symptoms and criticized the Japanese government for setting testing standards that were too high and for lacking a response to patient anxiety.[124]

On 26 February, the Minister of Health Katsunobu stated in the National Diet that a total of 6,300 samples were tested between 18 and 24 February, averaging 900 samples per day. Some representatives questioned the discrepancy of the actual number of people tested and the claim in the prior week that 3,800 samples could be tested per day.[125]

South Korean media outlets have also compared the number of samples tested and the number of confirmed cases between Japan and South Korea, leading them to believe that there are more cases of the virus in Japan. This has led to speculations in South Korea that the decision not to increase the number of samples tested was influenced by the country's plans to host the 2020 Summer Olympics and 2020 Summer Paralympics.[126][127]

On the same day, more doctors reported that they were refused by the public health centres to test the patients. The Japan Medical Association announced that it would start a nationwide investigation and plan to cooperate with the government to improve the situation.[128] The Ministry of Health also stated that it would look into the situation with the local governments.[129]

According to an NHK News poll conducted from 6 to 9 March 2020, 6% of respondents strongly approved of the national government's response, while 43% somewhat approved, 34% somewhat disapproved and 13% strongly disapproved of the government response. Specifically, 69% viewed the closure of most schools as unavoidable, while 24% viewed the action as too drastic. Regarding the entry restrictions from China and South Korea, 36% strongly approved, 41% somewhat approved, 13% somewhat disapproved and 5% strongly disapproved.[130] On the other hand, the South Korean government criticized the Japanese government for restricting Koreans from entering the country to prevent the disease, saying, "unreasonable and excessive measures".[131][132]

Regional infection developmentEdit

HokkaidoEdit

The first case was identified in Hokkaido on January 28, 2020[133][134], and the first case of an infected person in Hokkaido was on February 14.[133][135] To limit the spread of infection in Hokkaido, the governor of Hokkaido, Naomichi Suzuki, announced the Declaration of a New Coronavirus Emergency on February 28 of the same year, calling on locals to refrain from going out.[136]

As of March 30, 2020, 177 infected people, 7 fatalities, and 131 recovery were confirmed.[137][138]

KantoEdit

On 13 February 2020, three cases of confirmed infection were announced in the Kanto region, and one case was confirmed in Kanagawa, Tokyo, and Chiba. On 6 March 2020, it was confirmed that 121 infected people were reported in 5 prefectures including Tochigi and Saitama in total. On March 21, a total of 136 people were identified as infected in Tokyo, and a total of 311 people were confirmed in the Kanto region.

As of March 31, a total of 521 people were confirmed infected in Tokyo, and a total of 993 people were confirmed in the Kanto region.

AichiEdit

The first case was identified in Aichi on January 26, 2020[139], and the first case of an infected person in Aichi was on February 14.[139] As the spread of the new coronavirus continues, Governor Omura of Aichi Prefecture has recognized that there are two groups of infected people called "clusters" in the prefecture, mainly in Nagoya City.[140] He emphasized the idea of ​​working with Nagoya City to prevent the spread of infection.[140]

As of March 26, 2020, 18 fatalities were reported.[141] As of March 30, 2020, 170 infected people were confirmed.[142]

Restriction on domestic travelEdit

 
An announcement urging travellers to wash their hands in Tokaido Shinkansen

Apart from individual quarantine measures, Japan does not have any laws that allow the government to restrict the movement of people in order to contain the virus. Compliance with government requests to restrict movements is based on "asking for public cooperation to ‘protect people’s lives’ and minimize further damage to [the economy]".[143]

Socio-economic impactEdit

 
Shelves in a pharmacy in Japan sold out of masks on 3 February 2020

Prime Minister Shinzō Abe said that "the new coronavirus is having a major impact on tourism, the economy and our society as a whole".[144][145] Face masks have sold out across the nation and stocks of face masks are depleted within a day of new arrivals.[146] There has been pressure placed on the healthcare system as demands for medical checkups increase.[147] Chinese people have reported increasing discrimination.[148] The health minister has pointed out that the situation has not reached a point where mass gatherings must be called off.[149]

Aviation, retail and tourism sectors have reported decreased sales and some manufacturers have complained about disruption to Chinese factories, logistics and supply chains.[150] Prime Minister Abe has considered using emergency funds to mitigate the outbreak's impact on tourism, of which Chinese nationals account for 40%.[151] S&P Global noted that the worst hit shares were from companies spanning travel, cosmetics and retail sectors which are most exposed to Chinese tourism.[152] Nintendo announced that they would delay shipment of the Nintendo Switch, which is manufactured in China, to Japan.[153]

On 28 February 2020, according to Oriental Land, a leisure and amusement company confirmed report, Tokyo Disneyland, Tokyo DisneySea and Tokyo Disney Resort were temporarily closed from 29 February, at the start, they had been trying to plan to begin to operation in 15 march, however, with rescheduling operations to resume in early April.[154][155][156] The Comcast-owned Universal Studios Japan also announced a closure on the same day. The latter would also resume on 16 March.[157] Currently, Tokyo Disney Resort stated that they will remain closed by extending the temporary closure due to the coronavirus outbreak.[158]

The governor of Hokkaido, Naomichi Suzuki, declared a state of emergency due to the high number of new infections and asked citizens to stay at home that following weekend.[159]

Sports EventsEdit

The outbreak itself has been a concern for the 2020 Summer Olympics which is scheduled to take place in Tokyo starting at the end of July. The national government has thus been taking extra precautions to help minimise the outbreak's impact.[160][161] The Tokyo organising committee and the International Olympic Committee have been monitoring the outbreak's impact in Japan.[160]

Additionally, the outbreak has affected professional sports in Japan. Nippon Professional Baseball's preseason games and the Haru Basho sumo tournament in Osaka were announced to be held behind closed doors, while the J.League (soccer) and Top League (rugby) suspended or postponed play entirely.[162] Horseracing, Keirin, Kyotei and Auto race events remain on their usual schedule, but spectators cannot enter racecourse and cannot bet at offtrack betting. Customers can only bet over the internet and by telephone.[163]

EntertainmentEdit

On February 26, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has suggested that major sporting, cultural and other events should be canceled, delayed or scaled down for about two weeks amid the new coronavirus outbreak.[164]

On 27 February, AnimeJapan 2020, originally scheduled to be held in Tokyo Big Sight in late March, was announced to be cancelled.[165]

On 28 February, Legoland Japan Resort was closed for three weeks to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. The park reopened on 23 March 2020 with short business hours, staff wearing masks, and temperature checks. Reopening was decided by confined space, density, and social distance.[166][167]

Affected by the shortage of outsourced staff due to the COVID-19 outbreak, many Japanese animated films and TV shows announced changes or postponed broadcasts due to production problems, including A Certain Scientific Railgun T (deferred for broadcast, changed to rebroadcast), Asteroid in Love, A3! (Delay extension), Kukuriraige -Sanxingdui Fantasy- (Delay extension), etc.[168][169]

On March 25, the news that Japanese entertainment giant Ken Shimura has become infected is known all over Japan and around the world.[170][171] It was the day after Tokyo announced that a lockdown was also possible to prevent the medical collapse caused by the explosive spread of overflowing cluster. Shimura died on March 29 at the age of 70.[172][173][174]

On March 31, a press conference held by TV Asahi revealed that Rio Komiya, the actor of Jūru Atsuta in Mashin Sentai Kiramager, had been tested positive for COVID-19.[175][176] The production of Kiramager had stopped since the previous week as Toei Studios shut down for disinfection. However, according to Toei, there are episodes already filmed and available for airing until the middle of May.[177][178]

Aid to ChinaEdit

On 26 January, Japanese people donated a batch of epidemic prevention masks and delivered them to Wuhan after Sichuan Airlines arrived in Chengdu.[179] According to "liberal digital times" of Taiwan, it believes that instead of donating from Japan, China bought from Japan,[180] but according to Japanese media reports and the Japanese Consulate General in Chongqing [ja] stated that it was a donation.[181][182]

On 3 February, four organizations, the Japan Pharmaceutical NPO Corporation, the Japan Hubei Federation, Huobi Global, and Incuba Alpha, donated materials to Hubei and wrote, "Is it clothesless? With the same clothes." (From "Book of Songs · Qin Feng · No Clothes") and "An Exotic Mountain and River, Same Wind and Moon".[183]

On 10 February, Liberal Democratic Party's Secretary General Toshihiro Nikai said at a press conference after the cadre meeting that the outbreak of coronavirus in mainland China has expanded, The Liberal Democratic Party will deduct 5,000 yen from the March funding of members of the party to provide mainland China with support funds.[184]


Festivals and contestsEdit

As following to cancelled for major festival

Sanja festival, originally schedule from 15 to 17 May, change to October in Tokyo[page needed]

As following to cancelled for major contests

International restrictions on entry from JapanEdit

The following countries and territories have restricted entry from Japan:

Additional information on casesEdit

Confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection cases in Japan by prefecture,
as of 2020/03/31[notes 1] ()

National 2232 66
Island Region Pref. Cases Deaths
Hokkaidō 176 7
Honshū Tōhoku Aomori 8
Akita 6
Iwake 0
Miyagi 7
Yamagata 1
Fukushima 4
Kantō Tochigi 14
Ibaraki 24
Chiba 174 1
Tōkyō 521 16
Kanagawa 141 5
Saitama 100 2
Gunma 19 1
Chūbu Niigata 31
Toyama 2
Nagano 8
Yamanashi 6
Shizuoka 11
Aichi 178 19
Ishikawa 13
Fukui 20
Gifu 26
Kinki (Kansai) Mie 11
Shiga 7
Wakayama 18 1
Nara 11
Kyōto 69
Ōsaka 244 2
Hyōgo 148 12
Chūgoku Okayama 4
Tottori 0
Shimane 0
Hiroshima 6
Yamaguchi 6
Shikoku Kagawa 2
Tokushima 3
Kōchi 17
Ehime 9
Kyūshū Ōita 29
Fukuoka 46
Saga 2
Nagasaki 2
Kumamoto 14
Miyazaki 3
Kagoshima 1
Okinawa 9
[Other] Airport 56
Cruise govt
employees
9
Repatriated 15
Abroad 1

Confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection cases in Japan by date[notes 1] ()
as of 2020/03/26

Date
[notes 2]
New
cases
Case
total
Death
total
Disch.
total
Tested
Total
Source
16 Jan 2020 1 1 0 N/A N/A
24 Jan 2020 1 2 0 N/A N/A
25 Jan 2020 1 3 0 N/A N/A
26 Jan 2020 1 4 0 N/A N/A
28 Jan 2020 3 7 0 N/A N/A
29 Jan 2020 1 8 0 N/A N/A
30 Jan 2020 6 14 0 N/A N/A
31 Jan 2020 3 17 0 N/A N/A
1 Feb 2020 3 20 0 N/A N/A
4 Feb 2020 3 23 0 2 N/A [195]
5 Feb 2020 2 25 0 4 N/A [196]
8 Feb 2020 1 26 0 N/A N/A
11 Feb 2020 2 28 0 10 954 [197]
12 Feb 2020 1 29 0 11 964 [198]
13 Feb 2020 4 33 1 12 978 [199]
14 Feb 2020 7 41 1 N/A N/A [200]
15 Feb 2020 12 53 1 N/A N/A [201]
16 Feb 2020 6 59 1 16 1,251 [202]
17 Feb 2020 7 66 1 16 1,287 [203]
18 Feb 2020 8 74 1 18 1,296 [204]
19 Feb 2020 10 84 1 20 1,432 [205]
20 Feb 2020 9 93 1 20 1,522 [206]
21 Feb 2020 12 105 1 21 1,607 [207]
22 Feb 2020 27 132 1 24 1,703 [208]
23 Feb 2020 12 144 1 26 1,742 [209]
24 Feb 2020 12 156 1 27 1,846 [210]
25 Feb 2020 15 171 1 32 1,890 [211]
26 Feb 2020 24 186 3 40 2,058 [212]
27 Feb 2020 26 210 4 41 2,209 [213]
28 Feb 2020 10 220 5 42 2,339 [214]
29 Feb 2020 9 239 5 42 2,517 [215]
1 Mar 2020 15 254 6 43 2,613 [216]
2 Mar 2020 14 268 6 46 2,684 [217]
3 Mar 2020 16 284 6 48 6,519 [218]
4 Mar 2020 33 317 6 49 6,777 [219]
5 Mar 2020 31 333 6 60 7,476 [220]
6 Mar 2020 59 407 6 67 8,029 [221]
7 Mar 2020 47 454 6 80 8,176 [222]
8 Mar 2020 33 487 7 101 8,286 [223]
9 Mar 2020 26 513 9 102 9,600 [224]
10 Mar 2020 54 567 12 118 10,024 [225]
11 Mar 2020 52 619 15 123 10,205 [226]
12 Mar 2020 56 675 19 135 12,060 [227]
13 Mar 2020 41 716 21 144 12,919 [228]
14 Mar 2020 64 780 22 157 13,026 [229]
15 Mar 2020 34 814 24 164 13,068 [230]
16 Mar 2020 15 829 28 171 15,151 [231]
17 Mar 2020 44 873 29 191 15,354 [232]
18 Mar 2020 41 914 31 214 14,901

[notes 3]

[233]
19 Mar 2020 36 950 33 227 18,844 [234]
20 Mar 2020 57 1007 35 232 18,963 [235]
21 Mar 2020 39 1046 36 272 20,228 [236]
22 Mar 2020 43 1089 41 285 20,340 [237]
23 Mar 2020 39 1128 42 301 24,430 [238]
24 Mar 2020 65 1193 43 310 23,521 [239]
25 Mar 2020 98 1291 45 359 25,171 [240]
26 Mar 2020 73 1364 46 tbd tbd [241]
Notes:
  1. ^ a b Excludes cases detected on the Diamond Princess.
  2. ^ As reported from 12:00 JST that day to 12:00 JST the next day.
  3. ^ Decrease from previous count due to Chiba prefecture previously reporting
    number of tests performed, not number of persons tested.

New COVID-19 cases in Japan by prefecture ()

Date
Hokkaidō
Honshū Shikoku Kyūshū
Okinawa
Other Cases Deaths Total
disch.
[i 1]
Total
tested
[i 1]
Sources
Tōhoku Kantō Chūbu Kinki (Kansai) Chūgoku
Aomori
Akita
Iwate
Miyagi
Yamagata
Fukushima
Tochigi
Ibaraki
Chiba
Tōkyō
Kanagawa
Saitama
Gunma
Niigata
Toyama
Nagano
Yamanashi
Shizuoka
Aichi
Ishikawa
Fukui
Gifu
Mie
Shiga
Wakayama
Nara
Kyōto
Ōsaka
Hyōgo
Okayama
Tottori
Shimane
Hiroshima
Yamaguchi
Kagawa
Tokushima
Kōchi
Ehime
Ōita
Fukuoka
Saga
Nagasaki
Kumamoto
Miyazaki
Kagoshima
Airport
Repatriated
Abroad
new cml new cml
2020/01/16 (1) 1 1 - - N/A N/A
2020/01/24 (1) 1 2 - - N/A N/A
2020/01/25 (1) 1 3 - - N/A N/A
2020/01/26 (1) 1 4 - - N/A N/A
2020/01/28 (1) (1) 1 3 7 - - N/A N/A
2020/01/29 1 1 8 - - N/A N/A
2020/01/30 (1) (1) (1) (3) 6 14 - - N/A N/A
2020/01/31 1 (2) 3 17 - - N/A N/A
2020/02/01 (3) 3 20 - - N/A N/A
2020/02/04 (1) (1) (1)
[i 2]
3 23 - - 2 N/A
2020/02/05 (1) 1 2 25 - - 4 N/A
2020/02/08 (1) 1 26 - - N/A N/A
2020/02/11 (2) 2 28 - - 10 954
2020/02/12 1[i 3] 1 29 - - 11 964
2020/02/13 1 1 1[d 1] 1 4 33 1 1 12 978
2020/02/14 1 2 1 1 1[d 2] 1 (1) 8 41 - 1 N/A N/A
2020/02/15 8 1 3 12 53 - 1 N/A N/A
2020/02/16 4 1 1 6 59 - 1 16 1,251
2020/02/17 1 1 4 1[i 4] 7 66 - 1 16 1,287
2020/02/18 3[d 3] 1[d 4] 1 3 8 74 - 1 18 1,296
2020/02/19 2 3 2 1 1 (1) 10 84 - 1 20 1,432
2020/02/20 1 1 2 1 2 1 2[i 5] 10 94 - 1 20 1,522
2020/02/21 3 1 3 3[d 5] 2 1 1 (1) 15 109 - 1 21 1,607
2020/02/22 9[d 6] 1 2 2 4 4 1 1 2 26 135 - 1 24 1,703
2020/02/23 9 1 2 12 147 - 1 26 1,742
2020/02/24 4 3 1 2 1 2 13 160 - 1 27 1,846
2020/02/25 5[d 7] 1 3 1 1 11 171 - 1 32 1,890
2020/02/26 4[d 8] 2 3 1 1 5 1 1 18 189 2 3 40 2,058
2020/02/27 15 1 3 2 1 1 1 1 25 214 1 4 41 2,209
2020/02/28 12 2 1 1 1 2 1 20 234 2 5 42 2,339
2020/02/29 4 1 1 1 1[d 9] 1 9 243 - 5 42 2,517
Date
Hokkaidō
Aomori
Akita
Iwate
Miyagi
Yamagata
Fukushima
Tochigi
Ibaraki
Chiba
Tōkyō
Kanagawa
Saitama
Gunma
Niigata
Toyama
Nagano
Yamanashi
Shizuoka
Aichi
Ishikawa
Fukui
Gifu
Mie
Shiga
Wakayama
Nara
Kyōto
Ōsaka
Hyōgo
Okayama
Tottori
Shimane
Hiroshima
Yamaguchi
Kagawa
Tokushima
Kōchi
Ehime
Ōita
Fukuoka
Saga
Nagasaki
Kumamoto
Miyazaki
Kagoshima
Okinawa
Airport
Repatriated
Abroad
N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
2020/03/01 2 1 2 3 3 1 1 1 14 257 1 6 43 2,613
2020/03/02 5 1 4 4 2 1 1 18 275 - 6 46 2,684
2020/03/03 2 1 1 9 1 2 2 1 19 294 - 6 48 6,519
2020/03/04 3 1 4 8[d 10] [d 11] 2 9[d 12] 1 4 1 1 1 1[i 6] 36 330 - 6 49 6,777
2020/03/05 1 1 8 3 2 1 8 1 1 1 1 1 2 31 361 - 6 60 7,476
2020/03/06 7 1, 1 3[242] 6[d 13] 6 3 1 1 5 1, 2 1 13 4 2 57 418 - 6 67 8,029
2020/03/07 8 1 5 5[d 14] 1 1 1[i 7] 7 1 10 2[d 15] 1 1 44 462 - 6 80 8,176
2020/03/08 3 1 11[d 16] [d 17] 14 2[d 18] 2 33 495 1 7 101 8,286
2020/03/09 7 1 2 6[d 19] 1 3 4 4 28 523 2 9 102 9,600
2020/03/10 3 1 3 2 5[d 20] 3 1 13[d 21] [d 22] 1 1 18[d 23] 8 59 582 3 12 118 10,024
2020/03/11 7 2 6 3 2 5 5 1 2 7 13[d 24] [d 25] 53 635 3 15 123 10,205
2020/03/12 10 2 2[d 26] 3 6 2 3 1 7 2 9 9 56 691 4 19 135 12,060
2020/03/13 9 2 3 1 2 3 3 10 1 2[i 8] 36 727 2 21 144 12,919
2020/03/14 7 1 2 9 7 2 2 1 7[d 27] 1[i 9] 10 11[d 28] 1 1[i 10] 62 789 1 22 157 13,026
2020/03/15 4 3 6 1 1 4 11[d 29] [d 30] 2[i 11] 32 821 2 24 164 13,068
2020/03/16 4 1 1 2 1 2 4 15 836 4 28 171 15,151
2020/03/17 1 12 1 4 4 4 2 1 2 4 4 1 1 2 2[i 12] 46 882 2 29 191 15,354 [243]
2020/03/18 2 1 2 2 9 4 1 5 1 1 2 5 5[d 31] 41 923 2 31 214 14,901[i 13] [244]
2020/03/19 3 6 7 5 4 4 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 38 961 2 33 227 18,844 [245]
2020/03/20 1 1 11 1 3 1 4 5 1 1 1 4 9 1 5 4[i 14] 53 1014 2 35 232 18,963
2020/03/21 1 1 2 7 3 3 2 2 1 2 6 1 5 5[i 15] 41 1055 1 36 272 20,228
2020/03/22 3 1 3 2 5 6 2 2 1 1 6 4[d 32] 1 1 8 1[i 16] 46 1101 5 41 285 20,340
2020/03/23 2 1 1 16[d 33] 1 1 2[d 34] 3 1 1 3 2 1 1 1 1[i 17] 38 1139 1 42 301 24,430
2020/03/24 1 2 5 5 17[d 35] 6 7 2 1 1 2 3 3 2 8 5 1 3 1 75 1214 1 43 310 23,521
2020/03/25 4 4 4 4 41[d 36] 4 1 1 1 6 2 1 4 7 1 1 2 1 1 5[i 18] 95 1309 2 45 359 25,171
2020/03/26 1 1 1 6 47 6 7 3 3 3 1 3 7 1 1 1 3 1 1 97 1406 1 46
2020/03/27 1 2 3 5 40 11 6 1 1 3 3 2 1 20 3 1 1 1 2 4 2 8[i 19] 121 1527 2 48
2020/03/28 2 1 3 62 63 12 6 4 1 1 4 1 3 2 2 5 15 3 1 6 1 2 200 1727 3 51
2020/03/29 4 2 1 33 68 9 5 2 3 1 1 7 17 7 2 1 1 4 1 169 1896 6 57
2020/03/30 1 1 1 2 4 13 3 1 1 1 4 3 2 2 2 2 1 9 8 4 1 1 2 1 3 2 1 20[i 20] 96 1992 2 59
2020/03/31 1 1 1 2 2 4 13 78 14 15 1 1 1 3 8 2 5 4 1 13 28 11 2 5 1 17 1 5[i 21] 240 2232 7 66 472 34,508 [246]
2020/04/01 4 1 11 1 2 3 18 14 66 19 4 1 1 3 1 3 2 5 2 1 5 1 4 7 34 14 1 3 32 1 3 1 1 4[i 22] 273 2505 3 69 [247]
Total 180 8 7 0 18 2 6 17 42 188 587 160 104 20 32 5 9 9 13 183 15 21 31 11 7 19 15 76 278 162 5 0 0 6 6 2 3 20 9 29 78 3 5 15 3 2 9 60 9 15 1 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Date
Hokkaidō
Aomori
Akita
Iwate
Miyagi
Yamagata
Fukushima
Tochigi
Ibaraki
Chiba
Tōkyō
Kanagawa
Saitama
Gunma
Niigata
Toyama
Nagano
Yamanashi
Shizuoka
Aichi
Ishikawa
Fukui
Gifu
Mie
Shiga
Wakayama
Nara
Kyōto
Ōsaka
Hyōgo
Okayama
Tottori
Shimane
Hiroshima
Yamaguchi
Kagawa
Tokushima
Kōchi
Ehime
Ōita
Fukuoka
Saga
Nagasaki
Kumamoto
Miyazaki
Kagoshima
Okinawa
Airport
Repatriated
Abroad
new cml new cml Total
disch.
[i 1]
Total
tested
[i 1]
Sources
Tōhoku Kantō Chūbu Kinki (Kansai) Chūgoku Shikoku Kyūshū Other Cases Deaths
Honshū
Sources [248] [249] [250] [251] [252] [253] [254] [255] [256] [257] [258] [259] [260] [261] [262] [263] [264] [265] [266] [267] [268] [269] [270] [271] [272] [273] [274] [275] [276] [277] [278] [279] [280] [281] [282] [283] [284] [285] [286] [287] [288] [289] [290] [291]
  • Notes:

^ A single number enclosed in parenthesis indicates cases with China travel history.

Underlining indicates cases previously passengers of Diamond Princess.

* Deaths (MM/DD):
  1. ^ The patient in her 80s died on 02/13.
  2. ^ The patient in his 70s died on 02/28.
  3. ^ A patient in his 80s died on 02/26.
  4. ^ The patient in his 80s died on 03/16.
  5. ^ A patient in his 80s, from Sagamihara, died on 03/09.
  6. ^ A patient in his 80s, from Shiriuchi, died on 02/27.
  7. ^ A patient in his 70s, from Kushiro, died on 02/29.
  8. ^ A senior patient, from Hakodate, died on 02/25, whose test returned positive on 02/26.
  9. ^ The patient in her 70s died on 03/12.
  10. ^ A patient in his 80s, from Nagoya, died on 03/11.[Ref]
  11. ^ A patient in his 50s, from Gamagori, died on 03/18. [Ref]
  12. ^ A patient in his 70s died on 03/19.
  13. ^ The patient in his 90s died on 03/09.
  14. ^ A patient in his 70s died on 03/20.
  15. ^ A patient in her 80s, from Nishinomiya, died on 03/19.
  16. ^ One patient in his 80s, from Nagoya, died in the early morning of 03/07, who tested positive later on 7 Mar. Case published on 8 Mar with the family's consent. No particular symptoms were present by the late evening of 6 Mar.
  17. ^ A patient in his 90s, from Nagoya, died on 03/12.
  18. ^ A patient in his 80s, from Itami, died on 03/16.
  19. ^ A patient in her 80s, from Nagoya, died on 03/12.[Ref]
  20. ^ A patient in her 60s, from Kawagoe, died on 03/27.
  21. ^ A patient, from Nagoya, tested positive after death on 03/10.
  22. ^ A patient in his 90s, from Nagoya, died on 03/13.
  23. ^ A patient in his 70s died on 03/22.
  24. ^ A patient in his 80s, from Takarazuka, died on 03/10, whose test returned positive on 03/11.
  25. ^ A patient in his 70s, from Takarazura, died on 03/22.
  26. ^ A patient in her 80s died on 03/21.
  27. ^ A patient in her 70s died on 03/25.
  28. ^ A patient in his 80s, from Takarazura, died on 03/25. The case was published on 03/27.
  29. ^ A patient in her 80s, from Itami, died on 03/22.
  30. ^ A patient in his 80s, from Takarazura, died on 03/27.
  31. ^ A patient in his 70s, from Gamagori, tested positive after death on 03/18.
  32. ^ A patient in his 70s, from Himeji, died on 03/28.
  33. ^ A patient in his 70s died on 03/29.
  34. ^ A patient in his 80s, from Okazaki, tested positive after death on 03/23.
  35. ^ A patient in his 70s died on 03/24.
  36. ^ A patient in his 50s died on 03/27. Case published on 03/28.
The following 21 deaths have no additional details per the request of their families:

03/09: one in Kanagawa (death on 03/08),[292]

03/10: one in Aichi,[293]

03/11: one in Aichi (80s, M),[294]

03/12: one in Hokkaidō,[295]

03/13: one in Aichi (senior, M),[296]

03/14: one in Aichi (senior, F),[297]

03/15: two; one in Aichi (senior, M)[298] and one in Hokkaidō (80s, F),[299]

03/16: three; two in Aichi (70s, M;[300] 80s, M[301]) and one in Hokkaidō (80s, M),[302]

03/20: one in Aichi (senior, M);[303]

03/22: two; one in Gunma (senior, M) and one in Saitama.[304]

03/25: one in Hokkaidō (senior, M).[305]

03/26: one in Aichi (70s, M).[306]

03/27: one in Tōkyō.[307]

03/28: one in Chiba.[308]

03/29: three: two in Hyōgo[309] and one in Tōkyō (90s, M).[310]

  • Miscellaneous case information:
  1. ^ a b c d As of 12:00 JST on the day.
  2. ^ Diagnosis made with a sample of the patient when the patient had already left Japan.
  3. ^ Medical examiner of the Diamond Princess cruise ship.
  4. ^ Employee of the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, working on the cruise ship.
  5. ^ Employees of the MHLW and Cabinet Secretariat working on the cruise ship.
  6. ^ The patient tested positive at Chūbu Centrair International Airport after travelling from Vietnam, the Philippines, and Cambodia.
  7. ^ The first patient in Japan to have tested positive via spinal cord fluid and the first in Japan to have acquired meningitis via SARS-CoV-2.[Ref]
  8. ^ One tested positive at Haneda Airport after returning from Italy, having been in Lombardy in the past 14 days; the first imported cases from Italy in Japan. The other returned from a conference in France as a member of the SDF.
  9. ^ Re-tested positive with symptoms after previously testing negative and discharged on 2 March.
  10. ^ The patient tested positive at Narita International Airport after travelling from Italy (regions of Lombardy and Veneto).
  11. ^ Tested positive at Haneda Airport. Both have been in Northern Italy, with one also been in Paris.
  12. ^ Travel history of Italy.[Ref]
  13. ^ Decrease from previous count due to Chiba prefecture previously reporting number of tests performed, not number of persons tested.
  14. ^ 1 had been in Italy (incl. Lombardy), and 3 in Spain and Italy.[Ref]
  15. ^ 1 from Italy, 1 from France, 3 from Spain.[Ref]
  16. ^ Travel history of UK (London).[Ref]
  17. ^ Travel history of Italy (Lombardy).[Ref]
  18. ^ 1 Switzerland; 1 Thailand (Bangkok); 2 Ethiopia; 1 Europe.[Ref]
  19. ^ 1 Spain and UK; 1 Switzerland; 1 US; 4 UK; 1 Spain, UK, and Ireland.[Ref]
  20. ^ 5 Europe, 4 France, 3 Germany, 3 Ireland, 1 Italy, 2 Spain, 2 South America.[Ref]
  21. ^ 3 France, 1 Germany, 1 Netherlands.[Ref]
  22. ^ 3 Europe, 1 Germany.[Ref]


 
 
 
 
 
 

NotesEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare
  2. ^ "WHO | Novel Coronavirus – Japan (ex-China)". WHO. Retrieved 18 March 2020.
  3. ^ NEWS, KYODO. "PM Abe asks all schools in Japan to temporarily close over coronavirus". Kyodo News+.
  4. ^ "Tokyo 2020 Olympics officially postponed until 2021". ESPN. 24 March 2020.
  5. ^ "Coronavirus could see the Tokyo Olympics cancelled. Is Japan's handling of the outbreak to blame?". ABC News. 3 March 2020.
  6. ^ Walter, Sim (16 January 2020). "Japan confirms first case of infection from Wuhan coronavirus; Vietnam quarantines two tourists". The Straits Times. Archived from the original on 16 January 2020. Retrieved 16 January 2020.
  7. ^ "WHO | Novel Coronavirus – Japan (ex-China)". WHO. Retrieved 17 January 2020.
  8. ^ "Japan confirms 2nd new virus case, braces for Chinese tourist influx". Kyodo News. 24 January 2020. Archived from the original on 1 February 2020. Retrieved 8 February 2020.
  9. ^ "Japan confirms third case of new coronavirus infection". Japan Times. 25 January 2020.
  10. ^ Swift, Rocky (23 January 2020). "Coronavirus spotlights Japan contagion risks as Olympics loom". Reuters. Archived from the original on 24 January 2020. Retrieved 24 January 2020.
  11. ^ "Japan sees 1st coronavirus case not linked to recent travel to China". Kyodo News. 28 January 2020. Archived from the original on 29 January 2020. Retrieved 8 February 2020.
  12. ^ "Japan reports new coronavirus cases as it moves to evacuate nationals from Wuhan". Japan Times. 28 January 2020. Archived from the original on 28 January 2020. Retrieved 8 February 2020.
  13. ^ a b "Wuhan virus: Evacuation of Japanese citizens from China in spotlight after two returnees refuse testing". The Straits Times. 30 January 2020. Archived from the original on 31 January 2020. Retrieved 8 February 2020.
  14. ^ "Japan confirms 1st domestic case of coronavirus infection". Archived from the original on 2 February 2020. Retrieved 8 February 2020.
  15. ^ "New Coronavirus Detected in 3 Japanese Returnees from Wuhan". nippon.com. 30 January 2020. Archived from the original on 30 January 2020. Retrieved 8 February 2020.
  16. ^ "Japan gov't criticized over initial coronavirus response". Archived from the original on 3 February 2020. Retrieved 8 February 2020.
  17. ^ "Japanese official looking after Wuhan returnees found dead". The Japan Times Online. The Japan Times. 2 February 2020. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  18. ^ a b "Important Notice on New Restrictions related to Novel Coronavirus : Embassy of Japan in the Philippines". ph.emb-japan.go.jp. 3 February 2020. Archived from the original on 3 February 2020. Retrieved 8 February 2020.
  19. ^ Nohara, Yoshiaki; Furukawa, Yuki (11 February 2020). "Two Japan Evacuees Get Coronavirus After First Testing Negative". Bloomberg. Retrieved 12 February 2020.
  20. ^ "Tokyo taxi driver and Wakayama surgeon test positive for COVID-19". The Japan Times Online. 13 February 2020. Retrieved 13 February 2020.
  21. ^ "Japan expands entry restrictions to virus-hit Zhejiang". Nikkei Asian Review. Retrieved 15 February 2020.
  22. ^ "Japan confirms its first COVID-19 death: Health minister". CNA. 13 February 2020. Retrieved 13 February 2020.
  23. ^ "Japan reports first COVID-19 death as three more domestic infection cases logged". Japan Times. 13 February 2020. ISSN 0447-5763. Retrieved 15 February 2020.
  24. ^ "Japanese man who visited Hawaii confirmed with coronavirus". The Mainichi. 15 February 2020. Retrieved 16 February 2020.
  25. ^ "Couple Tests Positive for Coronavirus After Returning From Vacation in Hawaii". The New York Times. 14 February 2020. Retrieved 16 February 2020.
  26. ^ a b "Couple from Japan later diagnosed with coronavirus took Delta Airlines flight". khon2.com. 17 February 2020.
  27. ^ a b "3 More in Japan's Wakayama Confirmed Infected with Coronavirus". nippon.com. 18 February 2020.
  28. ^ "横浜港で検疫中のクルーズ船内で確認された新型コロナウイルス感染症について(第13報)". www.mhlw.go.jp.
  29. ^ "First COVID-19 Coronavirus in Fukuoka". Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  30. ^ "(Update) 2 Hokkaido Boys Infected with New Coronavirus – JIJI PRESS". jen.jiji.com.
  31. ^ "(Update 2) Teacher in Chiba Found Infected with Coronavirus – JIJI PRESS". jen.jiji.com.
  32. ^ NEWS, KYODO. "U.S. raises travel alert to Japan due to "community spread" of virus". Kyodo News+.
  33. ^ a b "名古屋高速 料金所事務員が新型コロナ感染 6料金所を閉鎖". NHKニュース.
  34. ^ a b "Coronavirus outbreak hits Shikoku, Nagano for first time". The Asahi Shimbun. 26 February 2020. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  35. ^ "PM Abe asks all schools in Japan to temporarily close over coronavirus". Kyodo News, 27 February 2020.
  36. ^ "All schools in Japan told to close until April over virus outbreak". The Japan Times Online. The Japan Times. 27 February 2020. Retrieved 27 February 2020.
  37. ^ "Man who tried to scatter coronavirus dies". NHK World-Japan. Retrieved 29 March 2020.
  38. ^ "Japan to quarantine visitors from China, South Korea: Report". CNA. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  39. ^ "South Korea suspends visas for Japanese in tit-for-tat coronavirus curbs". reuters.com. 7 March 2020. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  40. ^ "広島市「受診先の濃厚接触1人」 医療機関名公表求める声" (in Japanese). Yahoo! Japan. 9 March 2020. Retrieved 28 March 2020.
  41. ^ "4 More Fatal Coronavirus Cases Confirmed in Japan". Jiji Press. 13 March 2020. Retrieved 28 March 2020.
  42. ^ "Japan to expand entry ban to more European regions". njk.or.jp. 16 March 2020. Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  43. ^ "People asked to refrain from Osaka-Hyogo travel". NHK World. 19 March 2020. Retrieved 26 March 2020.
  44. ^ "Residents Asked to Refrain from Osaka-Hyogo Travel". Nippon.com. 19 March 2020. Retrieved 26 March 2020.
  45. ^ "岡山で新型コロナ感染初確認 市長ら「感染拡大防止に全力」" (in Japanese). Sanyo Shimbun. 22 March 2020. Retrieved 28 March 2020.
  46. ^ "新型コロナ 知事・市長「拡大防止、全力挙げる」 岡山60代女性感染で /岡山" (in Japanese). Mainichi Shimbun. 24 March 2020. Retrieved 28 March 2020.
  47. ^ "First deaths in Saitama and Gunma due to new coronavirus". Asahi Shimbun. 22 March 2020. Retrieved 28 March 2020.
  48. ^ "コロナ禍の中で強行開催 K-1はKYだったのか". 23 March 2020.
  49. ^ "As virus cases surge, Tokyo governor says lockdown may be only way to stem rise". Japan Times.
  50. ^ "Koike warns of 'lockdown' option if infections surge in Tokyo". Asahi Shimbun.
  51. ^ "Governor of Japan's capital urges cooperation to avoid city lockdown". Reuters.
  52. ^ "Tokyo now the hot spot for virus infections with 171 cases". Asahi Shimbun.
  53. ^ "Tokyo governor urges people to stay indoors over weekend as virus cases spike". Japan Times.
  54. ^ "Tokyo residents asked to stay indoors at weekend due to coronavirus". The Mainichi.
  55. ^ "Tokyo Edges Toward Tougher Approach A-s Virus Cases Spread". Bloomberg L.P.
  56. ^ "Kanagawa Pref. to Also Issue Stay-at-Home Request". Jiji Press. 26 March 2020. Retrieved 28 March 2020.
  57. ^ "Prefectures urging residents to avoid travel to virus-hit Tokyo". Asahi Shimbun. 26 March 2020. Retrieved 28 March 2020.
  58. ^ "3 Hanshin Tigers players test positive for coronavirus". The Japan Times. 27 March 2020. Retrieved 29 March 2020.
  59. ^ "3 Hanshin Tigers Players Test Positive for Coronavirus". Jiji Press. 27 March 2020. Retrieved 29 March 2020.
  60. ^ "Japan's Abe vows unprecedented stimulus as Tokyo coronavirus cases rise". Reuters. 28 March 2020.
  61. ^ "Japan Set for Biggest-Ever Stimulus to Battle Virus, Abe Says". Bloomberg L.P. 28 March 2020.
  62. ^ "Tokyo and Osaka at virtual standstill as PM Abe warns of explosive surge in coronavirus cases". The Strait Times. 28 March 2020.
  63. ^ "PM Abe defends wife after claim she went to sakura party amid call for social distancing". The Mainichi. 28 March 2020.
  64. ^ "Tokyo reports largest daily case total". NHK World-Japan. 29 March 2020.
  65. ^ a b "Tokyo confirms 68 new coronavirus cases, record daily increase". Kyodo News. 29 March 2020. Retrieved 29 March 2020.
  66. ^ "コメディアンの志村けんさん死去 新型コロナ感染で肺炎発症". NHKニュース.
  67. ^ Grater, Tom (30 March 2020). "Comedian Ken Shimura, 'Japan's Robin Williams', Dies Of Coronavirus". Deadline.com. Retrieved 30 March 2020.
  68. ^ "福岡 1歳未満の女児と母親感染確認 新型コロナ" (in Japanese). NHK. 30 March 2020. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  69. ^ a b "富山県で初感染 京産大卒業祝賀会に参加の20代女性" (in Japanese). NHK. 30 March 2020. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  70. ^ a b "岡山 京産大卒業生の感染確認 友人と会食 感染は県内4人目" (in Japanese). NHK. 31 March 2020. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  71. ^ "Calls grow for Japan PM Abe to declare state of emergency over virus". Mainichi Shimbun.
  72. ^ "Koike urges Abe to decide on emergency declaration". NHK World-Japan.
  73. ^ a b c "Abe, Suga flatly deny a state of emergency is imminent". The Asahi Shimbun.
  74. ^ "Ministerial Meeting on Countermeasures Related to the Novel Coronavirus". Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet.
  75. ^ "Japan will label coronavirus as infectious disease to fight spread:The Asahi Shimbun". The Asahi Shimbun. Retrieved 11 March 2020.
  76. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症対策本部幹事会の構成員の官職の指定について (On the Specification of the Official Positions of the Members of the Novel Corovirus Response Headquarters)" (PDF). Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet. 30 January 2020.
  77. ^ "Novel Coronavirus Response Headquarters". Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet. 30 January 2020. Retrieved 6 March 2020.
  78. ^ "Second Meeting of the Novel Coronavirus Response Headquarters". Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet, 31 January 2020.
  79. ^ "Fourth Meeting of the Novel Coronavirus Response Headquarters". Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet, 1 February 2020.
  80. ^ "Fifth Meeting of the Novel Coronavirus Response Headquarters". Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet, 5 February 2020.
  81. ^ [Sixth Meeting of the Novel Coronavirus Response Headquarters "Sixth Meeting of the Novel Coronavirus Response Headquarters", Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet, 6 February 2020]
  82. ^ "新型肺炎「帰国者・接触者相談センター」設置へ 専門外来への受診を促す". 毎日新聞 (Mainichi) (in Japanese). 3 February 2020. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  83. ^ "Fifth Meeting of the Novel Coronavirus Response Headquarters". Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet. 5 February 2020. Retrieved 6 March 2020.
  84. ^ "Seventh Meeting of the Novel Coronavirus Response Headquarters". Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet, 12 February 2020.
  85. ^ "Japan, alarmed by new cases, to expand, speed up coronavirus tests". The Asahi Shimbun. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  86. ^ SRL (12 February 2020). "新型コロナウイルス検査の受託について" (PDF).
  87. ^ "Corporate Japan rushes to devise quick coronavirus tests". Nikkei Asian Review. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  88. ^ "Ninth Meeting of the Novel Coronavirus Response Headquarters". Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet, 14 February 2020.
  89. ^ "新型コロナウイルスに関する帰国者・接触者相談センター". Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare. 13 February 2020.
  90. ^ a b "新型コロナウイルス感染症対策専門家会議の開催について (On the Opening of the First Novel Coronavirus Expert Meeting)" (PDF). Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet. 14 February 2020. Retrieved 6 March 2020.
  91. ^ Saitō, Katsuhisa (19 February 2020) "Early Stage of a Japan Outbreak: The Policies Needed to Support Coronavirus Patients". Nippon.com.
  92. ^ "First Novel Coronavirus Expert Meeting". Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet, 19 February 2020.
  93. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症についての相談・受診の目安について (Criterion for Consultation and Medical Examination in regard to the Novel Coronavirus Disease)" (PDF). Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare. 17 February 2020.
  94. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症対策の基本方針 (Basic Policies for Novel Coronavirus Disease Control)" (PDF). Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet. 25 February 2020. Retrieved 6 March 2020.
  95. ^ "Basic Policies for Novel Coronavirus Disease Control". Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet, 25 February 2020.
  96. ^ "Abe Orders Basic Coronavirus Policy with Eye on Epidemic". Nippon.com, 23 February 2020
  97. ^ "Japanese Experts Discuss Basic Coronavirus Policy". nippon.com. 24 February 2020. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  98. ^ 新型コロナウイルス感染症対策専門家会議 (Novel Coronavirus Expert Meeting) (24 February 2020). "新型コロナウイルス感染症対策の基本方針の具体化に向けた見解 (Opinion on the Realization of Basic Policies for Novel Coronavirus Disease Control)". Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare.
  99. ^ a b "Coronavirus Basic Policy Impacts Japan’s Health, Education Systems". Nippon.com, 2 March 2020
  100. ^ "Japan to create fund to subsidize parents during school closure-Nikkei". Financial Post, 28 February 2020.
  101. ^ Coronavirus: National Health Insurance to Cover Virus Test. Nippon.com, 27 February 2020
  102. ^ The Government of Japan, Expert Meeting on the Novel Coronavirus Disease Control (9 March 2020). "Views on the Novel Coronavirus Disease Control (Summary Version)" (PDF). Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (in English). Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  103. ^ 新型コロナウイルス感染症対策専門家会議 (9 March 2020). "新型コロナウイルス感染症対策の見解" (PDF) (in Japanese). Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  104. ^ NEWS, KYODO. "Japan local gov'ts urged to prepare for peak of coronavirus infections". Kyodo News+. Retrieved 12 March 2020.
  105. ^ "新型コロナウイルス クラスター対策班の設置について" (in Japanese). Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. Retrieved 18 March 2020.
  106. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症 クラスター対策による感染拡大防止" (PDF) (in Japanese). Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. 25 February 2020. Retrieved 18 March 2020.
  107. ^ "新型コロナ、クラスター全国15カ所 厚労省が地図公表" (in Japanese). Nihon Keizai Shimbun. Retrieved 18 March 2020.
  108. ^ Sim, Walter (16 March 2020). "Japan identifies 15 clusters as Covid-19 cases mount". The Straits Times. Retrieved 18 March 2020.
  109. ^ "Coronavirus cluster in Japan's Nagoya tied to elderly day care center". Reuters. 17 March 2020. Retrieved 18 March 2020.
  110. ^ "Lawmakers slammed for using coronavirus to justify emergency clause for Japan's Constitution, curbing rights". The Japan Times, 5 February 2020.
  111. ^ Revised influenza law to allow Japan PM to declare state of emergency over coronavirus. The Mainichi, 5 March 2020
  112. ^ "Japan's emergency coronavirus bill set to clear Lower House on March 5". The Japan Times, 5 February 2020.
  113. ^ Eighth Meeting of the Novel Coronavirus Response Headquarters. Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet, 12 February 2020.
  114. ^ "16th Meeting of the Novel Coronavirus Response Headquarters". Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet, 1 March 2020.
  115. ^ "People with Fever for 4 Days Asked to Seek Advice on Coronavirus". Jiji Press. 17 February 2020. Retrieved 28 March 2020.
  116. ^ "Japan PM Abe urges people with cold-like symptoms to avoid work, school". Kyodo News. 18 February 2020. Retrieved 28 March 2020.
  117. ^ "In Graying Japan, Many Are Vulnerable but Few Are Being Tested". 2 March 2020. Retrieved 29 March 2020.
  118. ^ "Japan's Virus Success Has Puzzled the World. Is Its Luck Running Out?". 26 March 2020. Retrieved 29 March 2020.
  119. ^ 関西テレビ放送, KTV. 「検査できない」一般の医療機関も困惑 新型コロナウイルス. ktv.jp (in Japanese).
  120. ^ 病院4回...でも検査できず 新型肺炎 不安の声. FNN.jp (in Japanese).
  121. ^ 「発熱 続いてるのに・・・」"検査難民"の不安. TBS NEWS (in Japanese).
  122. ^ 新型ウイルス「検査受けられず」の声相次ぐ いま現場では. NHK (in Japanese).
  123. ^ ウイルス検査できない 病院悲鳴. TBS NEWS (in Japanese).
  124. ^ 医療機関たらい回しも 疑い受診、断られ―「検査基準あいまい」・新型肺炎:時事ドットコム. 時事通信 (in Japanese).
  125. ^ 暮らしを守れ 新型コロナ 受けたくてもなぜ "検査難民". FNN.jp (in Japanese).
  126. ^ 日本、重症だけコロナ検査…感染者縮小疑惑. donga.com (in Japanese). 26 February 2020.
  127. ^ 韓国よりも感染者少ない米・日…検査件数が少なく、過小集計の疑惑も. japan.hani.co.kr (in Japanese).
  128. ^ ウイルス検査依頼も拒否される事例 日本医師会が調査へ. NHK (in Japanese).
  129. ^ 厚労省、PCR検査の不適切事例把握へ. TBS NEWS (in Japanese).
  130. ^ "安倍内閣「支持する」43% 「支持しない」41% NHK世論調査". NHK (in Japanese). 9 March 2020. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  131. ^ "Coronavirus quarantine plans ignite row between South Korea and Japan". The Guardian. 6 March 2020.
  132. ^ "Japan and Korea Won't Let A Pandemic Stop Them Fighting". Foreign Policy. 12 March 2020.
  133. ^ a b "新型コロナ:道内の発生状況 | 保健福祉部健康安全局地域保健課". www.pref.hokkaido.lg.jp. Retrieved 20 February 2020.
  134. ^ 新型肺炎患者、道内で初確認 中国人女性、道内で入院”. 北海道新聞 電子版 (2020年1月28日). 2020年3月25日閲覧。
  135. ^ 新型肺炎 道民が初感染 50代男性、容体は重篤”. 苫小牧民報 電子版 (2020年2月15日). 2020年3月25日閲覧。
  136. ^ 新たなステージへ(コロナ)|総合政策部知事室広報広聴課”. 北海道庁. 2020年3月25日閲覧。
  137. ^ 新型コロナウイルス感染症(COVID-19)に関する情報”. 北海道庁. 2020年3月25日閲覧。
  138. ^ 北海道における新型コロナウイルスに関連した患者等の発生状況(R2.3.24現在)”. 北海道庁. 2020年3月30日閲覧。
  139. ^ a b "愛知県内の感染者・遺伝子検査件数 - 愛知県". www.pref.aichi.jp. Retrieved 18 March 2020.
  140. ^ a b "「クラスター 名古屋市中心に2つ発生」愛知県知事". NHK (in Japanese). 5 March 2020.
  141. ^ "愛知 死亡は18人 感染確認は154人に 新型コロナウイルス". NHK. 26 March 2020.
  142. ^ 新型コロナウイルス感染症 県内発生事例”. 愛知道庁. 2020年3月30日閲覧。
  143. ^ Tomohiro Osaki "How far can Japan go to curb the coronavirus outbreak? Not as far as you may think. The Japan Times, 1 March 2020.
  144. ^ "Japan reports 20th case of coronavirus as Abe vows new steps to combat outbreak". Japan Times. 1 February 2020. ISSN 0447-5763. Archived from the original on 1 February 2020. Retrieved 1 February 2020.
  145. ^ "South Korea says Chinese tour guide arriving from Japan found to be infected with coronavirus". Japan Times. 1 February 2020. ISSN 0447-5763. Archived from the original on 1 February 2020. Retrieved 1 February 2020.
  146. ^ Takahashi, Ryusei (31 January 2020). "Amid virus outbreak, Japan stores scramble to meet demand for face masks". Japan Times. ISSN 0447-5763. Archived from the original on 1 February 2020. Retrieved 1 February 2020.
  147. ^ "Japan seeks to contain economic impact of virus, new measures come into effect". Reuters. 1 February 2020. Archived from the original on 1 February 2020. Retrieved 1 February 2020.
  148. ^ Pfanner, Eric (30 January 2020). "Chinese tourists finding they are no longer welcome as fear over coronavirus takes hold". Japan Times. ISSN 0447-5763. Archived from the original on 31 January 2020. Retrieved 31 January 2020.
  149. ^ "3 Japanese returnees from Wuhan test positive for new coronavirus". Japan Today. Archived from the original on 30 January 2020. Retrieved 1 February 2020.
  150. ^ Siripala, Thisanka (13 February 2020). "Will Japan's Economy Buckle Under the Coronavirus Outbreak?". thediplomat.com. Retrieved 14 February 2020.
  151. ^ Nohara, Yoshiaki (31 January 2020). "Japan Considers Extra Spending Over Coronavirus's Impact on Tourism". MSN. Archived from the original on 31 January 2020.
  152. ^ "Chinese coronavirus fear spreads over luxury, retail sectors". spglobal.com. Archived from the original on 1 February 2020. Retrieved 1 February 2020.
  153. ^ "Coronavirus Delays Nintendo Switch Production, Shipments for Japan". Anime News Network.
  154. ^ "Tokyo Disneyland to stay closed through early April due to virus". Reuters.
  155. ^ "Tokyo Disneyland Extends Shutdown, May See Longest-Ever Closure". Bloomberg L.P.
  156. ^ "Tokyo Disneyland, Universal Studios Japan extend park closures over coronavirus". USA Today.
  157. ^ Coronavirus: Tokyo Disneyland, Universal Studios Japan close for weeks. Usatoday.com, 28 February 2020.
  158. ^ "Tokyo Disneyland won't reopen before April 20, operator says". Reuters.
  159. ^ Hokkaido declares state of emergency over coronavirus. Kyodo News, 28 February 2020.
  160. ^ a b News, A. B. C. "Abe brushes aside worries of virus impact on Tokyo Olympics". ABC News. Archived from the original on 4 February 2020. Retrieved 10 February 2020.
  161. ^ McCurry, Justin (1 February 2020). "Tokyo 2020 organizers fight false rumours Olympics cancelled over coronavirus crisis". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 6 February 2020. Retrieved 10 February 2020.
  162. ^ "Sumo: Spring meet unlikely to be held in "regular" fashion: JSA". Kyodo News. 28 February 2020. Retrieved 28 February 2020.
  163. ^ Coronavirus Forces Bettors Online in Japan
  164. ^ "Abe: Next 2 weeks 'crucial' in virus battle NHK WORLD-JAPAN News". NHK World Japan. 26 February 2020. Retrieved 16 March 2020.
  165. ^ アニメイベント「AnimeJapan 2020」も中止 新型コロナウイルスの拡大で. IT Media (in Japanese). 27 February 2020. Retrieved 6 March 2020.
  166. ^ "Theme parks and attractions reopen in Japan". blooloop.com. 23 March 2020. Retrieved 23 March 2020.
  167. ^ Bevil, Dewayne (20 March 2020). "Legoland Japan set to reopen Monday after 3-week coronavirus closure". Orlando Sentinel. Retrieved 23 March 2020.
  168. ^ 東京MX、新型肺炎でアニメ「とある科学の超電磁砲T」放送延期 「制作上の都合がつかず」. IT Media (in Japanese). 17 February 2020. Retrieved 6 March 2020.
  169. ^ TVアニメ『A3!』「SEASON SPRING & SUMMER」第4話以降の放送が延期に. Animate Times (in Japanese). Retrieved 6 March 2020.
  170. ^ "Japanese comedian Ken Shimura tests positive for COVID-19". Mainichi Shimbun.
  171. ^ "Japan's Ken Shimura Infected by Coronavirus, 'God of Cinema' Filming Halted". Variety.com.
  172. ^ "Japan comedian Ken Shimura dies after coronavirus infection". Nikkei Asian Review. 29 March 2020. Retrieved 30 March 2020.
  173. ^ "Japanese comedian Ken Shimura dies from coronavirus". Reuters. 29 March 2020. Retrieved 30 March 2020.
  174. ^ "Japanese Comedian Ken Shimura Dies From Coronavirus at 70". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved 30 March 2020.
  175. ^ "「魔進戦隊キラメイジャー」主人公役の小宮璃央が新型コロナ感染" (in Japanese). Livedoor. 31 March 2020. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  176. ^ "ACTOR NEWSKiramaRed Actor Rio Komiya Tests Positive for COVID-19". Tokusatsu Network. 31 March 2020. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  177. ^ "東映東京撮影所は消毒作業 レッド役がコロナ陽性" (in Japanese). Nikkan Sports. 31 March 2020. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  178. ^ "Japan's Toei Closes Tokyo Studio After Coronavirus Infection". Variety. 31 March 2020. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  179. ^ 龙玥. "日本民间捐100万口罩驰援武汉". 观察者网 (in Chinese). Shanghai. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  180. ^ "《武漢肺炎》中國自嗨?日媒:日本捐百萬口罩 事主出面打臉 - 國際 - 自由時報電子報". 自由電子報 (in Chinese). 27 January 2020. Archived from the original on 28 January 2020. Retrieved 4 February 2020.
  181. ^ "中国に100万枚以上のマスク寄付。日本企業や市、新型コロナウイルス感染拡大で" (in Japanese). Yahoo! Japan. 28 January 2020.
  182. ^ Consulate General of Japan in Chongqing (28 January 2020). "日本水户市向重庆市捐赠50000份医用口罩" (in Chinese). Archived from the original on 30 January 2020. Retrieved 7 February 2020.
  183. ^ ""山川異域,風月同天":外交部感謝日本協助抗疫的暖心舉動" (in Chinese). 4 February 2020. Archived from the original on 5 February 2020. Retrieved 6 February 2020.
  184. ^ "日本執政黨國會議員每人將向中國捐款5000日元" (in Chinese). The Nikkei. Archived from the original on 15 February 2020. Retrieved 14 February 2020.
  185. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "18 countries, regions restricting entry from Japan over virus". Mainichi Daily News. 3 March 2020. Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  186. ^ a b c d e f g h "新型コロナウイルス(日本からの渡航者・日本人に対する 各国・地域の入国制限措置及び入国・入域後の行動制限)". Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan. Archived from the original on 7 March 2020. Retrieved 6 March 2020.
  187. ^ "Coronavirus outbreak: Bangladesh restricts passengers from 4 countries". Dhaka Tribune. 4 March 2020. Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  188. ^ "North Korea suspends foreign tourism over coronavirus fears: tour companies". Reuters. 22 January 2020. Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  189. ^ "Seven provinces in Italy, Japan, and Iran added to Malaysia's Covid-19 travel ban list". thestar.com.my. Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  190. ^ "Kazakhstan bars entry for nationals of China, Japan, Iran, Italy, South Korea". akipress.com. Retrieved 7 March 2020.
  191. ^ "Tajikistan shuts border to nationals of 35 countries: sources". Reuters. 2 March 2020. Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  192. ^ a b c d e "7 countries restrict entry from Japan to thwart new virus spread". Mainichi Daily News. 25 February 2020. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  193. ^ "Papua New Guinea bans travellers from all 'Asian ports'". news.yahoo.com. Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  194. ^ a b c "IATA - International Travel Document News". iatatravelcentre.com. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  195. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況と厚生労働省の対応について(令和2年2月5日版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 10 March 2020.
  196. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況と厚生労働省の対応について(令和2年2月6日版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 10 March 2020.
  197. ^ "Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) – Situation Report – 23" (PDF). WHO. 12 February 2020. Archived (PDF) from the original on 16 February 2020. Retrieved 16 February 2020.
  198. ^ "Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) – Situation Report – 24" (PDF). WHO. 13 February 2020. Archived (PDF) from the original on 17 February 2020. Retrieved 16 February 2020.
  199. ^ "Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) – Situation Report – 25" (PDF). WHO. 14 February 2020. Archived (PDF) from the original on 18 February 2020. Retrieved 16 February 2020.
  200. ^ "Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) – Situation Report – 26" (PDF). WHO. 15 February 2020. Archived (PDF) from the original on 16 February 2020. Retrieved 16 February 2020.
  201. ^ "Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) – Situation Report – 27" (PDF). WHO. 16 February 2020. Archived (PDF) from the original on 17 February 2020. Retrieved 16 February 2020.
  202. ^ "Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) – Situation Report – 28" (PDF). WHO. 17 February 2020. Archived (PDF) from the original on 17 February 2020. Retrieved 17 February 2020.
  203. ^ "Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) – Situation Report – 29" (PDF). WHO. 18 February 2020. Archived (PDF) from the original on 18 February 2020. Retrieved 18 February 2020.
  204. ^ "報道発表一覧(新型コロナウイルス)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 19 February 2020.
  205. ^ "感染症情報のトピックス". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 19 February 2020.
  206. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況と厚生労働省の対応について(令和2年2月21日版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  207. ^ "国内の状況について(2月22日12時時点版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  208. ^ "国内の状況について(2月23日12時時点版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  209. ^ "国内の状況について(2月24日12時時点版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  210. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況と厚生労働省の対応について(令和2年2月25日版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  211. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況と厚生労働省の対応について(令和2年2月26日版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  212. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況と厚生労働省の対応について(令和2年2月27日版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  213. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況と厚生労働省の対応について(令和2年2月28日版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  214. ^ "国内の状況について(2月29日12時時点版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 10 March 2020.
  215. ^ "国内の状況について(3月1日12時時点版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  216. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況と厚生労働省の対応について(令和2年3月2日版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  217. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況と厚生労働省の対応について(令和2年3月3日版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  218. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況と厚生労働省の対応について(令和2年3月4日版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  219. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況と厚生労働省の対応について(令和2年3月5日版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  220. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況と厚生労働省の対応について(令和2年3月6日版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 10 March 2020.
  221. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況について(3月7日12時時点版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 10 March 2020.
  222. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況について(3月8日12時時点版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 10 March 2020.
  223. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況と厚生労働省の対応について(令和2年3月9日版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 10 March 2020.
  224. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況と厚生労働省の対応について(令和2年3月10日版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 12 March 2020.
  225. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況と厚生労働省の対応について(令和2年3月11日版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 12 March 2020.
  226. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況と厚生労働省の対応について(令和2年3月12日版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 13 March 2020.
  227. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況と厚生労働省の対応について(令和2年3月13日版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  228. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況について(3月14日12時時点版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  229. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況について(3月15日12時時点版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  230. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況と厚生労働省の対応について(令和2年3月16日版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  231. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況と厚生労働省の対応について(令和2年3月17日版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 18 March 2020.
  232. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況と厚生労働省の対応について(令和2年3月18日版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 18 March 2020.
  233. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況と厚生労働省の対応について(令和2年3月19日版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 20 March 2020.
  234. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況について(令和2年3月20日版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 21 March 2020.
  235. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況について(令和2年3月21日版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 23 March 2020.
  236. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況について(令和2年3月22日版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 23 March 2020.
  237. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況と厚生労働省の対応について(令和2年3月23日版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 24 March 2020.
  238. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況と厚生労働省の対応について(令和2年3月24日版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 26 March 2020.
  239. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況と厚生労働省の対応について(令和2年3月25日版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 26 March 2020.
  240. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況と厚生労働省の対応について(令和2年3月26日版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 27 March 2020.
  241. ^ "新型コロナウイルスに関連した患者等の発生について(3月26日公表分)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 27 March 2020.
  242. ^ "新型コロナウイルス 日本国内の最新感染状況マップ". NewsDigest (in Japanese). Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  243. ^ "新型コロナウイルスに関連した患者等の発生について(3月17日公表分)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 18 March 2020.
  244. ^ "新型コロナウイルスに関連した患者等の発生について(3月18日公表分)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  245. ^ "新型コロナウイルスに関連した患者等の発生について(3月19日公表分)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 20 March 2020.
  246. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症の現在の状況と厚生労働省の対応について(令和2年4月1日版)". www.mhlw.go.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 2 April 2020.
  247. ^ "【新型コロナ】国内の感染状況". 西日本新聞ニュース (in Japanese). Archived from the original on 2 April 2020. Retrieved 2 April 2020.
  248. ^ "新型コロナ:道内の発生状況 | 保健福祉部健康安全局地域保健課". www.pref.hokkaido.lg.jp. Retrieved 20 February 2020.
  249. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症について - 青森県庁ホームページ". www.pref.aomori.lg.jp. Retrieved 24 March 2020.
  250. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症について". 美の国あきたネット (in Japanese). Retrieved 7 March 2020.
  251. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症(COVID-19)について - 宮城県公式ウェブサイト". www.pref.miyagi.jp. Retrieved 29 February 2020.
  252. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症に関連するポータルサイト — 山形県ホームページ". www.pref.yamagata.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  253. ^ "福島県新型コロナウイルス発生動向調査速報 - 福島県ホームページ". www.pref.fukushima.lg.jp. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  254. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症について". 栃木県. Retrieved 22 February 2020.
  255. ^ 茨城県. "新型コロナウイルス感染症(対策・相談窓口等)について". 茨城県 (in Japanese). Retrieved 18 March 2020.
  256. ^ 千葉県. "感染症発生情報". 千葉県 (in Japanese). Retrieved 20 February 2020.
  257. ^ "東京都新型コロナウイルス感染症対策本部報|東京都防災ホームページ". www.bousai.metro.tokyo.lg.jp. Retrieved 20 February 2020.
  258. ^ 神奈川県. "新型コロナウイルスに感染した患者の発生状況". 神奈川県 (in Japanese). Retrieved 20 February 2020.
  259. ^ 埼玉県. "新型コロナウイルスに関連した肺炎について". 埼玉県 (in Japanese). Retrieved 20 February 2020.
  260. ^ "群馬県 - 新型コロナウイルス感染症について". www.pref.gunma.jp. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  261. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症について - 新潟県ホームページ". www.pref.niigata.lg.jp. Retrieved 29 February 2020.
  262. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症に関する情報|富山県". www.pref.toyama.jp. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  263. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症対策について/長野県". www.pref.nagano.lg.jp. Retrieved 25 February 2020.
  264. ^ 山梨県. "新型コロナウイルス感染症に関する総合情報". 山梨県 (in Japanese). Retrieved 7 March 2020.
  265. ^ "静岡県/新型コロナウイルスに関連した肺炎について". www.pref.shizuoka.jp. Retrieved 28 February 2020.
  266. ^ "愛知県内の感染者・遺伝子検査件数 - 愛知県". www.pref.aichi.jp. Retrieved 18 March 2020.
  267. ^ 石川県. "新型コロナウイルス感染症について". 石川県 (in Japanese). Retrieved 21 February 2020.
  268. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症について | 福井県ホームページ". www.pref.fukui.lg.jp. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  269. ^ "岐阜県:新型コロナウイルス感染症について". www.pref.gifu.lg.jp. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  270. ^ "三重県|新型コロナウイルス感染症について". www.pref.mie.lg.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 20 February 2020.
  271. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症に関する滋賀県の状況について|滋賀県ホームページ". 滋賀県ホームページ (in Japanese). Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  272. ^ "和歌山県ホームページ Wakayama Prefecture Web Site". www.pref.wakayama.lg.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 20 February 2020.
  273. ^ "防災統括室/奈良県公式ホームページ". www.pref.nara.jp. Retrieved 20 February 2020.
  274. ^ 京都府. "新型コロナウイルス感染症に関連する情報について". 京都府 (in Japanese). Retrieved 20 February 2020.
  275. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症について". 大阪府 (in Japanese). Retrieved 20 February 2020.
  276. ^ 兵庫県. "新型コロナウイルスの対応について". 兵庫県 (in Japanese). Retrieved 1 March 2020.
  277. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症について - 岡山県ホームページ(健康推進課)". www.pref.okayama.jp. Retrieved 24 March 2020.
  278. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症に関する情報 - 広島県". 広島県公式ホームページ (in Japanese). Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  279. ^ "山口県/健康増進課/感染症対策等・新型コロナウイルスに関連した感染症について" [Yamaguchi / Health Promotion Division / Countermeasures against Infectious Diseases / Infectious Diseases Associated with New Coronavirus]. www.pref.yamaguchi.lg.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  280. ^ "香川県 | 新型コロナウイルス感染症(COVID-19)に関する情報" [Kagawa | Information on New Coronavirus Infection (COVID-19)]. www.pref.kagawa.lg.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 18 March 2020.
  281. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症について|徳島県ホームページ" [New coronavirus infectious disease | Tokushima homepage]. 徳島県ホームページ (in Japanese). Retrieved 25 February 2020.
  282. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症に関する情報(Information about new Coronavirus) | 高知県庁ホームページ". www.pref.kochi.lg.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 29 February 2020.
  283. ^ "愛媛県庁/新型コロナウイルス感染症に関する情報" [Ehime Prefectural Office / Information on New Coronavirus Infections]. www.pref.ehime.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  284. ^ "新型コロナウイルスに関するお知らせ - 大分県ホームページ". www.pref.oita.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 4 March 2020.
  285. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症について(県民のみなさま、医療機関・事業者の方への注意喚起) - 福岡県庁ホームページ". www.pref.fukuoka.lg.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 20 February 2020.
  286. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症について". 佐賀県 (in Japanese). Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  287. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症について | 長崎県" [New type of coronavirus infection | Nagasaki]. www.pref.nagasaki.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  288. ^ "新型コロナウイルス関連肺炎 / 熊本県" [New type coronavirus-associated pneumonia / Kumamoto]. www.pref.kumamoto.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 21 February 2020.
  289. ^ 宮崎県. "新型コロナウイルス感染症について" [About New Coronavirus Infections]. 宮崎県 (in Japanese). Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  290. ^ 鹿児島県. "新型コロナウイルス感染症に関する情報". 鹿児島県 (in Japanese). Retrieved 28 March 2020.
  291. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症について(一般の方向け)/沖縄県" [New Coronavirus Infections (for General Public) / Okinawa]. www.pref.okinawa.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 20 February 2020.
  292. ^ 日本放送協会. "新型ウイルス 神奈川県内で2人目の死者". NHKニュース. Retrieved 11 March 2020.
  293. ^ 日本放送協会. "名古屋市で感染者が2人死亡 愛知県内の感染確認は99人". NHKニュース. Retrieved 11 March 2020.
  294. ^ "新型コロナウイルスに関連した患者の死亡について" (PDF).
  295. ^ "新型コロナウイルスに関連した患者の死亡について" (PDF).
  296. ^ "新型コロナウイルスに関連した患者の死亡について" (PDF).
  297. ^ "新型コロナウイルスに関連した患者の死亡について" (PDF).
  298. ^ "新型コロナウイルスに関連した患者の死亡について" (PDF).
  299. ^ "新型コロナウイルスに関連した患者の死亡について(13 例目)" (PDF).
  300. ^ "新型コロナウイルスに関連した患者の死亡について(13 例目)" (PDF).
  301. ^ "新型コロナウイルスに関連した患者の死亡について(14 例目)" (PDF).
  302. ^ "新型コロナウイルスに関連した患者の死亡について" (PDF).
  303. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染者の死亡(15 例目)等について" (PDF).
  304. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症患者の死亡について" (PDF).
  305. ^ "新型コロナウイルスに関連した患者の死亡について" (PDF).
  306. ^ "新型コロナウイルス感染症患者の死亡について" (PDF).
  307. ^ "(第128報)新型コロナウイルスに関連した患者の死亡について". 東京都防災ホームページ (in Japanese). Retrieved 30 March 2020.
  308. ^ "新型コロナウイルスに関連した患者の死亡について" (PDF).
  309. ^ "新型コロナウイルスに関連した患者等の発生について(3月29日公表分)".
  310. ^ "(第132報)新型コロナウイルスに関連した患者の死亡について". 東京都防災ホームページ (in Japanese). Retrieved 30 March 2020.

External linksEdit