2050s

  (Redirected from 2053)

The 2050s (pronounced "twenty-fifties") is a decade of the Gregorian calendar that will begin on January 1, 2050, and will end on December 31, 2059.

Millennium: 3rd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
  • 2050
  • 2051
  • 2052
  • 2053
  • 2054
  • 2055
  • 2056
  • 2057
  • 2058
  • 2059
Categories:

Notable predictions and known eventsEdit

2050Edit

2051Edit

2052Edit

2053Edit

2054Edit

2057Edit

2058Edit

2059Edit

Population estimatesEdit

2050Edit

  • In November 2001, the United Nations Population Fund reported that the world population is projected to be 9.3 billion in 2050 from 6.1 billion then with most of the increase in developing countries even as the population of industrialized countries will "remain stable".[13] This figure was revised to 9.1 billion in 2005 and 9.2 billion in 2007. In 2008, the United States Census Bureau projected a world population of 9.5 billion.[14]
  • Another study done by the European Commission, community research stated that the world population is expected to grow at a decreasing rate to 8.9 billion in 2050 and after 2030, the population in several countries including those in Europe and China will decrease. Stabilization in the population will happen in the second half of the century.[15]
  • It is calculated there will be 601,000 centenarians (people at least a hundred years old – born before 1950) in the United States by 2050.[16]
  • "The population continues to grow but at a slower pace", summarizes the demographer Thomas Buettner, author of UN report on "World population projections (1950–2050)", presented Thursday, February 24, 2005. According to this study, 9.075 billion people will inhabit Earth in 2050, against 7 billion today.
  • This increase amounts to adding to the current world population the combined populations of China and India, stresses the population division of the United Nations.
  • The general trend is, however, a slowdown in population growth compared to gains of twenty to fifty years, this tends to confirm a gradual stabilization of the overall population.
  • Not surprisingly, population growth will be highest in poor countries already struggling to provide food security for its people. "Births planning and fertility decline explain this difference", stresses the UN report.
  • The United Nations predicts that 2 out of every 9 people in the world will be 60 years or older. World life expectancy at birth is also expected to exceed 76 years.[17]

2051Edit

Fictional eventsEdit

TelevisionEdit

The TV show 2057 on the Discovery Science Channel predicts advances in technology we will have by 2057.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Kuhn, Anthony (2008-07-08). "G-8 pledges to halve emissions by 2050". NPR. Retrieved 2008-09-21.
  2. ^ Kanter, James (2007-10-26). "U.N. Warns of Rapid Decay of Environment". The New York Times.
  3. ^ "Telescopes 'worthless' by 2050". BBC News. 2006-03-02. Retrieved 2008-09-21.
  4. ^ Alok Jha (July 22, 2008). "Saharan sun to power European supergrid". London: guardian.co.uk. Retrieved January 6, 2010.
  5. ^ Ramzy, Austin (July 25, 2016). "New Zealand Vows to Wipe Out Rats and Other Invasive Predators by 2050". The New York Times. Retrieved July 25, 2016.
  6. ^ "ID4 - Rachel, Nevada - Time Capsules on Waymarking.com". www.waymarking.com. Retrieved 2019-01-20.
  7. ^ Valerie Insinna (September 15, 2019). "US Air Force nears battle over next B-52 engine". Defense News. Retrieved March 9, 2020.
  8. ^ "1.7m 'will have dementia by 2051'", BBC News, 27 February 2007
  9. ^ Closest supermoon since 1948!, EarthSky, retrieved 14 November 2016
  10. ^ "Daytona International Speedway signs long-term lease". March 30, 2006.
  11. ^ "Tapped Out". Archived from the original on June 22, 2008. Retrieved 2008-06-18.
  12. ^ Hallman, Kenneth (1963). Speculations on the Coming Millenium. Hornbeck Press. pp. 215–217. [sic]
  13. ^ "U.N. Says Four Billion Will Be Living in Hunger by 2050". The New York Times. 2001-11-08. Retrieved 2008-09-21.
  14. ^ "Total Midyear Population for the World: 1950–2050". U.S. Census Bureau. December 15, 2008. Archived from the original on December 15, 2007. Retrieved March 30, 2009.
  15. ^ "Microsoft Word - WETO-H2 report-final.doc" (PDF). Retrieved 2013-03-18.[permanent dead link]
  16. ^ National Geographic, November 2011.
  17. ^ "The World at Six Billion" (PDF). United Nations. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 6, 2010. Retrieved January 6, 2010.
  18. ^ Haya El Nasser and Paul Overberg (2012-12-12). "Census: Economy slows U.S. population growth". Usatoday.com. Retrieved 2015-11-11.