2016 United States presidential election in Texas

The 2016 United States presidential election in Texas took place on November 8, 2016, as part of the 2016 United States presidential election. Primary elections were held on March 1, 2016.

2016 United States presidential election in Texas

← 2012 November 8, 2016 2020 →
Turnout59.4% (of registered voters) Increase
46.5% (of voting age population)[1]
 
Nominee Donald Trump Hillary Clinton
Party Republican Democratic
Home state New York New York
Running mate Mike Pence Tim Kaine
Electoral vote 36[a] 0
Popular vote 4,685,047 3,877,868
Percentage 52.23% 43.24%


President before election

Barack Obama
Democratic

Elected President

Donald Trump
Republican

Results by county showing number of votes by size and candidates by color
Treemap of the popular vote by county

Texas was won by Republican Donald Trump and his running mate Mike Pence by a 8.99% margin over Democrats Hillary Clinton and Tim Kaine. Texas assigned its 38 Electoral College votes to the state's popular vote winner, but two faithless electors chose other candidates, making Texas the only state in 2016 to give Trump fewer than the assigned electoral votes. Even then, its 36 electoral votes were Trump's largest electoral prize in 2016.

When the Electoral College met on December 19, 2016, only 36 out of the 38 electors voted for Trump for president. Two electors defected; one voted for Ohio Governor John Kasich, and the other voted for former Congressman Ron Paul, making the latter, at 81 and despite not running, the oldest person to ever receive an electoral vote. For vice president, 37 electors voted for Pence, while one voted for Carly Fiorina. This was the first time since 1976 where a Republican presidential candidate lost a pledged vote via a faithless elector; that year, Gerald Ford lost a Washington state electoral vote to fellow Republican Ronald Reagan. Additionally, this was the first time since 1972 that the winning presidential candidate lost an electoral vote, when Richard Nixon lost a Virginia electoral vote to Libertarian Party nominee John Hospers.

Texas was one of the eleven states (and the District of Columbia) where Clinton improved on Barack Obama's performance in 2012.[4] Clinton lost Texas by a smaller margin than any Democrat since 1996 (though Barack Obama got a slightly larger percentage of the vote in 2008), which analysts attributed to Trump losing ground with college-educated white voters. Trump's performance in Texas was the weakest of any victorious Republican nominee since Richard Nixon became the last Republican to be elected president without Texas in 1968. Trump was the tenth consecutive Republican presidential nominee to win Texas, beginning with Reagan in 1980. Nevertheless, he became the first Republican to win the White House without carrying Bexar County since Richard Nixon in 1968, as well as the first to do so without carrying Fort Bend County since Herbert Hoover in 1928, and to do so without carrying Harris or Dallas County since Calvin Coolidge in 1924.

Primaries edit

Democratic primary edit

The Texas Democratic Party held their state's primary in concurrence with the other Super Tuesday contests on March 1. Eight candidates appeared on the ballot, Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders, dropped-out candidate Martin O'Malley and five minor candidates (Rocky De La Fuente, Willie Wilson, Star Locke, Keith Russell Judd and Calvis Hawes.) The Texas Democratic primary had 251 delegates to the Democratic National Convention: 222 pledged delegates and 29 super delegates. 145 delegates were allocated proportionally based on the results in the state's 31 senatorial districts. The other 77 pledged delegates were allocated proportionally based on the statewide popular vote.[5]

Results edit

2016 Texas Democratic Party presidential primary[6]
Candidate Popular vote Delegates
Count Percentage Pledged delegates Super delegates Total delegates
  Hillary Clinton 936,004 65.19% 147 21 168
Bernie Sanders 476,547 33.19% 75 0 75
Rocky De Le Fuente 8,429 0.59% 0 0 0
Martin O'Malley 5,364 0.37% 0 0 0
Willie Wilson 3,254 0.23% 0 0 0
Keith Russell Judd 2,569 0.18% 0 0 0
Calvis L. Hawes 2,017 0.14% 0 0 0
Star Locke 1,711 0.12% 0 0 0
Uncommitted n/a 8 8
Total: 1,435,895 100% 222 29 251
Key: Withdrew prior to contest

Republican primary edit

2016 Texas Republican presidential primary
 
← 2012 March 1, 2016 (2016-03-01) 2020 →
← TN
VT →
       
Candidate Ted Cruz Donald Trump Marco Rubio
Home state Texas New York Florida
Delegate count 104 48 3
Popular vote 1,241,118 758,762 503,055
Percentage 43.76% 26.75% 17.74%

 
Results by county

Debates and forums edit

February 24, 2016 – Houston, Texas

Megyn Kelly hosted a two-hour town hall event on The Kelly File with Kasich, Cruz, Rubio, and Carson in attendance. Trump did not participate in the forum.[7]

February 25, 2016 – Houston, Texas

Candidate Airtime[8] Polls[9]
Trump 30:23 33.6%
Cruz 19:51 20.4%
Rubio 16:48 16.4%
Kasich 17:36 9.8%
Carson 10:15 7.4%

After the caucus in Nevada, the tenth debate was held at the University of Houston in Houston and broadcast by CNN as its third of four debates, in conjunction with Telemundo. The debate aired five days before 14 states voted on Super Tuesday, March 1. While the debate was to be held in partnership with Telemundo's English-language counterpart NBC, RNC Chairman Reince Priebus announced on October 30, 2015, that it had suspended the partnership in response to CNBC's "bad faith" in handling the October 28, 2015, debate.[10][11] On January 18, 2016, the RNC announced that CNN would replace NBC News as the main host of the debate, in partnership with Telemundo and Salem Communications (CNN's conservative media partner). The debate was shifted a day earlier at the same time.[12] National Review was disinvited by the Republican National Committee from co-hosting the debate over its criticism of GOP front-runner Donald Trump.[13] On February 19, the criteria for invitation to the debate was announced: in addition to having official statements of candidacy with the Federal Election Commission and accepting the rules of the debate, candidates must have received at least 5% support in one of the first four election contests held in Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina, and Nevada.[14] By these criteria, all five remaining candidates, Carson, Cruz, Kasich, Rubio, and Trump, qualified for invitation to the debate. The 155 delegates to the Republican National Convention were allocated in this way. 108 delegates are allocated by congressional district; 3 per district. If a candidate gets over 50% of the vote in a congressional district; they would win all of the district's 3 delegates. If no one had a majority and one candidate had at least 20% of the vote, the candidate winning the plurality would get 2 delegates and the candidate in second place would get 1 delegate. If nobody receives at least 20% of the vote, the top 3 vote-getters each get 1 delegate. There were another 47 at-large delegates. If someone received more than 50% of the vote, they would get all of the at-large delegates. If no one got more than 50% of the vote and there were at least 2 candidates that got over 20% of the vote, the delegates would be allocated proportionally among the candidates receiving more than 20% of the vote. If only one candidate got over 20% of the vote and not a majority, the delegates would be allocated between the candidate that got over 20% of the vote and the candidate who received the 2nd most votes. If no candidate got 20%, they would allocate all of the 47 at-large delegates proportionally.[15]

Results edit

2016 Texas Republican Party presidential primary[16]
Candidate Popular vote Delegates
Count Percentage
  Ted Cruz 1,241,118 43.76% 104
Donald Trump 758,762 26.75% 48
Marco Rubio 503,055 17.74% 3
John Kasich 120,473 4.25% 0
Ben Carson 117,969 4.16% 0
Jeb Bush 35,420 1.25% 0
Uncommitted 29,609 1.04% 0
Rand Paul 8,000 0.28% 0
Mike Huckabee 6,226 0.22% 0
Elizabeth Gray 5,449 0.19% 0
Chris Christie 3,448 0.12% 0
Carly Fiorina 3,247 0.11% 0
Rick Santorum 2,006 0.07% 0
Lindsey Graham 1,706 0.06% 0
Total: 2,836,488 100% 155
Key: Withdrew prior to contest

Green Party convention edit

The Texas Green Party held its party caucuses at conventions at the precinct level on March 8,[17] the county level on March 12,[18] and the district level on March 19,[19] leading up to the state nominating convention in Grey Forest, Texas, on April 9 and 10.[20]

On April 10 it was announced that Jill Stein had won the state convention.[21]

Texas Green Party presidential caucus, Saturday, April 9, 2016
Candidate Votes Percentage National delegates
  Jill Stein - - 15
Sedinam Moyowasifza-Curry - - 3
Darryl Cherney - - 2
Kent Mesplay - - 2
William Kreml - - 1
Total - 100.00% 23

General election edit

Polling edit

Trump won every single pre-election poll with margins varying from 2 to 14 points. Trump won the last poll 49% to 35% and the average of the last three polls showed Trump leading 50% to 38%.[22]

Predictions edit

The following are final 2016 predictions from various organizations for Texas as of Election Day.

Source Ranking As of
Los Angeles Times[23] Lean R November 6, 2016
CNN[24] Safe R November 8, 2016
Rothenberg Political Report[25] Safe R November 7, 2016
Sabato's Crystal Ball[26] Safe R November 7, 2016
NBC[27] Lean R November 8, 2016
Electoral-vote.com[28] Lean R November 8, 2016
RealClearPolitics[29] Likely R November 8, 2016
Fox News[30] Lean R November 7, 2016
ABC[31] Safe R November 7, 2016

Results edit

The voting age population was 19,307,355, of which 15,101,087 were registered to vote. Turnout was 8,969,226, which is 46.45% of the voting age population and 59.39% of registered voters. The early voting period lasted for two weeks ending November 4, with 43.5% of registered voters casting early or absentee ballots. Out of those who cast votes, 73% cast their ballots early or absentee and 26% voted on Election Day.[32]

Thirteen candidates received write-in votes, of which the large majority (42,366) went to Evan McMullin.

2016 United States presidential election in Texas[33]
Party Candidate Running mate Votes Percentage Electoral votes
Republican Donald Trump Mike Pence 4,685,047 52.23% 36
Democratic Hillary Clinton Tim Kaine 3,877,868 43.24% 0
Libertarian Gary Johnson William Weld 283,492 3.16% 0
Green Jill Stein Ajamu Baraka 71,558 0.80% 0
Write-in Various candidates Various candidates 51,261 0.57% 0
Republican John Kasich[a] Carly Fiorina[a] 0 0.00% 1
Libertarian[34] Ron Paul[a] Mike Pence 0 0.00% 1
Totals 8,969,226 100.00% 38
Turnout (VAP) 46.45%[35]
 
2012-2016 Swing by Precinct
  Trump
  •   >50%
  •   40-50%
  •   30-40%
  •   20-30%
  •   15-20%
  •   10-15%
  •   5-10%
  •   1-5%
  Clinton
  •   1-5%
  •   5-10%
  •   10-15%
  •   15-20%
  •   20-30%
  •   30-40%
  •   40-50%
  •   >50%

By county edit

County Donald Trump
Republican
Hillary Clinton
Democratic
Various candidates
Other parties
Margin Total
# % # % # % # %
Anderson 13,201 77.76% 3,369 19.84% 407 2.40% 9,832 57.92% 16,977
Andrews 3,927 79.45% 836 16.91% 180 3.64% 3,091 62.54% 4,943
Angelina 21,668 72.44% 7,538 25.20% 705 2.36% 14,130 47.24% 29,911
Aransas 7,740 73.63% 2,465 23.45% 307 2.92% 5,275 50.18% 10,512
Archer 3,786 88.40% 394 9.20% 103 2.40% 3,392 79.20% 4,283
Armstrong 924 90.50% 70 6.86% 27 2.64% 854 83.64% 1,021
Atascosa 8,618 63.03% 4,651 34.02% 404 2.95% 3,967 29.01% 13,673
Austin 9,637 78.52% 2,320 18.90% 317 2.58% 7,317 59.62% 12,274
Bailey 1,344 74.96% 397 22.14% 52 2.90% 947 52.82% 1,793
Bandera 8,163 79.89% 1,726 16.89% 329 3.22% 6,437 63.00% 10,218
Bastrop 16,328 56.96% 10,569 36.87% 1,768 6.17% 5,759 20.09% 28,665
Baylor 1,267 84.52% 191 12.74% 41 2.74% 1,076 71.78% 1,499
Bee 4,744 55.91% 3,444 40.59% 297 3.50% 1,300 15.32% 8,485
Bell 51,998 54.33% 37,801 39.50% 5,902 6.17% 14,197 14.83% 95,701
Bexar 240,333 40.42% 319,550 53.74% 34,691 5.84% -79,217 -13.32% 594,574
Blanco 4,212 74.09% 1,244 21.88% 229 4.03% 2,968 52.21% 5,685
Borden 330 90.41% 31 8.49% 4 1.10% 299 81.92% 365
Bosque 6,339 80.58% 1,278 16.25% 250 3.17% 5,061 64.33% 7,867
Bowie 24,924 72.03% 8,838 25.54% 840 2.43% 16,086 46.49% 34,602
Brazoria 72,791 60.07% 43,200 35.65% 5,190 4.28% 29,591 24.42% 121,181
Brazos 38,738 57.64% 23,121 34.40% 5,352 7.96% 15,617 23.24% 67,211
Brewster 2,077 48.85% 1,873 44.05% 302 7.10% 204 4.80% 4,252
Briscoe 625 84.92% 91 12.36% 20 2.72% 534 72.56% 736
Brooks 613 23.61% 1,937 74.61% 46 1.78% -1,324 -51.00% 2,596
Brown 12,017 85.68% 1,621 11.56% 388 2.76% 10,396 74.12% 14,026
Burleson 5,316 76.38% 1,491 21.42% 153 2.20% 3,825 54.96% 6,960
Burnet 14,638 76.22% 3,797 19.77% 769 4.01% 10,841 56.45% 19,204
Caldwell 6,691 54.94% 4,795 39.37% 692 5.69% 1,896 15.57% 12,178
Calhoun 4,638 66.50% 2,118 30.37% 218 3.13% 2,520 36.13% 6,974
Callahan 4,865 87.20% 569 10.20% 145 2.60% 4,296 77.00% 5,579
Cameron 29,472 31.80% 59,402 64.10% 3,791 4.10% -29,930 -32.30% 92,665
Camp 3,201 70.48% 1,260 27.74% 81 1.78% 1,941 42.74% 4,542
Carson 2,620 88.39% 249 8.40% 95 3.21% 2,371 79.99% 2,964
Cass 9,726 78.79% 2,391 19.37% 227 1.84% 7,335 59.42% 12,344
Castro 1,414 70.81% 526 26.34% 57 2.85% 888 44.47% 1,997
Chambers 13,339 79.23% 2,948 17.51% 549 3.26% 10,391 61.72% 16,836
Cherokee 12,919 76.94% 3,469 20.66% 402 2.40% 9,450 56.28% 16,790
Childress 1,802 86.47% 253 12.14% 29 1.39% 1,549 74.33% 2,084
Clay 4,377 87.23% 536 10.68% 105 2.09% 3,841 76.55% 5,018
Cochran 679 75.36% 190 21.09% 32 3.55% 489 54.27% 901
Coke 1,265 88.90% 140 9.84% 18 1.26% 1,125 79.06% 1,423
Coleman 3,177 87.21% 388 10.65% 78 2.14% 2,789 76.56% 3,643
Collin 201,014 55.16% 140,624 38.59% 22,792 6.25% 60,390 16.57% 364,430
Collingsworth 983 85.03% 145 12.54% 28 2.43% 838 72.49% 1,156
Colorado 6,325 74.30% 1,987 23.34% 201 2.36% 4,338 50.96% 8,513
Comal 45,136 72.59% 14,238 22.90% 2,804 4.51% 30,898 49.69% 62,178
Comanche 4,333 82.74% 789 15.07% 115 2.19% 3,544 67.67% 5,237
Concho 885 82.87% 148 13.86% 35 3.27% 737 69.01% 1,068
Cooke 13,181 82.61% 2,352 14.74% 422 2.65% 10,829 67.87% 15,955
Coryell 12,225 66.98% 5,064 27.74% 964 5.28% 7,161 39.24% 18,253
Cottle 506 82.68% 92 15.03% 14 2.29% 414 67.65% 612
Crane 1,049 75.79% 299 21.60% 36 2.61% 750 54.19% 1,384
Crockett 980 70.25% 372 26.67% 43 3.08% 608 43.58% 1,395
Crosby 1,181 68.34% 468 27.08% 79 4.58% 713 41.26% 1,728
Culberson 280 36.51% 454 59.19% 33 4.30% -174 -22.68% 767
Dallam 1,261 81.67% 222 14.38% 61 3.95% 1,039 67.29% 1,544
Dallas 262,945 34.34% 461,080 60.22% 41,657 5.44% -198,135 -25.88% 765,682
Dawson 2,636 73.98% 835 23.44% 92 2.58% 1,801 50.54% 3,563
Deaf Smith 2,911 69.05% 1,185 28.11% 120 2.84% 1,726 40.94% 4,216
Delta 1,836 80.49% 400 17.54% 45 1.97% 1,436 62.95% 2,281
Denton 170,603 57.13% 110,890 37.13% 17,152 5.74% 59,713 20.00% 298,645
DeWitt 5,519 80.64% 1,163 16.99% 162 2.37% 4,356 63.65% 6,844
Dickens 755 83.06% 128 14.08% 26 2.86% 627 68.98% 909
Dimmit 974 30.20% 2,173 67.38% 78 2.42% -1,199 -37.18% 3,225
Donley 1,225 83.62% 191 13.04% 49 3.34% 1,034 70.58% 1,465
Duval 1,316 31.57% 2,783 66.77% 69 1.66% -1,467 -35.20% 4,168
Eastland 6,011 86.33% 776 11.14% 176 2.53% 5,235 75.19% 6,963
Ector 25,020 68.49% 10,249 28.06% 1,261 3.45% 14,771 40.43% 36,530
Edwards 746 69.52% 303 28.24% 24 2.24% 443 41.28% 1,073
Ellis 44,941 70.10% 16,253 25.35% 2,916 4.55% 28,688 44.75% 64,110
El Paso 55,512 25.71% 147,843 68.47% 12,567 5.82% -92,331 -42.76% 215,922
Erath 11,210 80.69% 2,160 15.55% 523 3.76% 9,050 65.14% 13,893
Falls 3,441 65.57% 1,684 32.09% 123 2.34% 1,757 33.48% 5,248
Fannin 9,548 79.28% 2,132 17.70% 364 3.02% 7,416 61.57% 12,044
Fayette 8,743 78.24% 2,144 19.19% 287 2.57% 6,599 59.05% 11,174
Fisher 1,265 73.16% 403 23.31% 61 3.53% 862 49.85% 1,729
Floyd 1,474 75.24% 435 22.21% 50 2.55% 1,039 53.03% 1,959
Foard 383 74.66% 113 22.03% 17 3.31% 270 52.63% 513
Fort Bend 117,291 44.76% 134,686 51.39% 10,089 3.85% -17,395 -6.63% 262,066
Franklin 3,585 81.85% 665 15.18% 130 2.97% 2,920 66.67% 4,380
Freestone 6,026 78.42% 1,471 19.14% 187 2.44% 4,555 59.28% 7,684
Frio 1,856 42.18% 2,444 55.55% 100 2.27% -588 -13.37% 4,400
Atascosa 3,907 84.57% 597 12.92% 116 2.51% 3,310 71.65% 4,620
Galveston 73,757 60.01% 43,658 35.52% 5,488 4.47% 30,099 24.49% 122,903
Garza 1,225 82.55% 230 15.50% 29 1.95% 995 67.05% 1,484
Gillespie 10,446 79.05% 2,288 17.31% 480 3.64% 8,158 61.74% 13,214
Glasscock 553 91.56% 34 5.63% 17 2.81% 519 85.93% 604
Goliad 2,620 70.66% 973 26.24% 115 3.10% 1,647 44.42% 3,708
Gonzales 4,587 72.25% 1,571 24.74% 191 3.01% 3,016 47.51% 6,349
Gray 6,500 87.78% 701 9.47% 204 2.75% 5,799 78.31% 7,405
Grayson 35,325 74.50% 10,301 21.72% 1,790 3.78% 25,024 52.78% 47,416
Gregg 28,764 68.90% 11,677 27.97% 1,308 3.13% 17,087 40.93% 41,749
Grimes 7,065 74.11% 2,194 23.01% 274 2.88% 4,871 51.10% 9,533
Guadalupe 36,632 63.02% 18,391 31.64% 3,100 5.34% 18,241 31.38% 58,123
Hale 6,366 71.87% 2,101 23.72% 391 4.41% 4,265 48.15% 8,858
Hall 893 81.85% 164 15.03% 34 3.12% 729 66.82% 1,091
Hamilton 3,060 84.53% 479 13.23% 81 2.24% 2,581 71.30% 3,620
Hansford 1,730 88.85% 171 8.78% 46 2.37% 1,559 80.07% 1,947
Hardeman 1,207 79.78% 249 16.46% 57 3.76% 958 63.32% 1,513
Hardin 19,606 86.07% 2,780 12.20% 394 1.73% 16,826 73.87% 22,780
Harris 545,955 41.61% 707,914 53.95% 58,243 4.44% -161,959 -12.34% 1,312,112
Harrison 18,749 70.62% 7,151 26.94% 648 2.44% 11,598 43.68% 26,548
Hartley 1,730 88.63% 173 8.86% 49 2.51% 1,557 79.77% 1,952
Haskell 1,403 79.27% 314 17.74% 53 2.99% 1,089 61.53% 1,770
Hays 33,826 46.87% 33,224 46.04% 5,114 7.09% 602 0.83% 72,164
Hemphill 1,462 85.80% 181 10.62% 61 3.58% 1,281 75.18% 1,704
Henderson 23,650 78.72% 5,669 18.87% 726 2.41% 17,981 59.85% 30,045
Hidalgo 48,642 27.89% 118,809 68.12% 6,957 3.99% -70,167 -40.23% 174,408
Hill 10,108 77.93% 2,547 19.64% 315 2.43% 7,561 58.29% 12,970
Hockley 5,809 79.46% 1,260 17.23% 242 3.31% 4,549 62.23% 7,311
Hood 21,382 81.42% 4,008 15.26% 872 3.32% 17,374 66.16% 26,262
Hopkins 10,707 79.09% 2,510 18.54% 321 2.37% 8,197 60.55% 13,538
Houston 6,205 74.28% 1,978 23.68% 170 2.04% 4,227 50.60% 8,353
Howard 6,637 76.09% 1,770 20.29% 316 3.62% 4,867 55.80% 8,723
Hudspeth 503 57.75% 324 37.20% 44 5.05% 179 20.55% 871
Hunt 23,910 75.77% 6,396 20.27% 1,248 3.96% 17,514 55.50% 31,554
Hutchinson 7,042 86.35% 854 10.47% 259 3.18% 6,188 75.88% 8,155
Irion 660 86.16% 90 11.75% 16 2.09% 570 74.41% 766
Jack 2,973 88.75% 314 9.37% 63 1.88% 2,659 79.38% 3,350
Jackson 4,266 80.46% 904 17.05% 132 2.49% 3,362 63.41% 5,302
Jasper 10,609 79.06% 2,590 19.30% 220 1.64% 8,019 59.76% 13,419
Jeff Davis 695 58.35% 422 35.43% 74 6.22% 273 22.92% 1,191
Jefferson 42,862 48.92% 42,443 48.44% 2,313 2.64% 419 0.48% 87,618
Jim Hogg 430 20.29% 1,635 77.16% 54 2.55% -1,205 -56.87% 2,119
Jim Wells 5,420 43.78% 6,694 54.08% 265 2.14% -1,274 -10.30% 12,379
Johnson 44,382 77.04% 10,988 19.07% 2,236 3.89% 33,394 57.97% 57,606
Jones 4,819 80.86% 936 15.70% 205 3.44% 3,883 65.16% 5,960
Karnes 2,965 70.63% 1,145 27.27% 88 2.10% 1,820 43.36% 4,198
Kaufman 29,587 71.70% 10,278 24.91% 1,400 3.39% 19,309 46.79% 41,265
Kendall 15,700 77.40% 3,643 17.96% 940 4.64% 12,057 59.44% 20,283
Kenedy 84 45.16% 99 53.23% 3 1.61% -15 -8.07% 186
Kent 360 82.95% 59 13.59% 15 3.46% 301 69.36% 434
Kerr 17,727 76.09% 4,681 20.09% 889 3.82% 13,046 56.00% 23,297
Kimble 1,697 86.94% 206 10.55% 49 2.51% 1,491 76.39% 1,952
King 149 93.71% 5 3.14% 5 3.15% 144 90.57% 159
Kinney 936 65.45% 458 32.03% 36 2.52% 478 33.42% 1,430
Kleberg 4,367 45.55% 4,716 49.19% 504 5.26% -349 -3.64% 9,587
Knox 1,078 78.86% 247 18.07% 42 3.07% 831 60.79% 1,367
Lamar 14,561 77.81% 3,583 19.15% 570 3.04% 10,978 58.66% 18,714
Lamb 3,111 77.87% 771 19.30% 113 2.83% 2,340 58.57% 3,995
Lampasas 6,385 77.82% 1,483 18.07% 337 4.11% 4,902 59.75% 8,205
La Salle 872 42.35% 1,129 54.83% 58 2.82% -257 -12.48% 2,059
Lavaca 7,347 84.79% 1,170 13.50% 148 1.71% 6,177 71.29% 8,665
Lee 4,997 76.20% 1,372 20.92% 189 2.88% 3,625 55.28% 6,558
Leon 6,391 85.91% 909 12.22% 139 1.87% 5,482 73.69% 7,439
Liberty 18,892 77.85% 4,862 20.04% 513 2.11% 14,030 57.81% 24,267
Limestone 5,796 74.89% 1,778 22.97% 165 2.14% 4,018 51.92% 7,739
Lipscomb 1,159 87.01% 135 10.14% 38 2.85% 1,024 76.87% 1,332
Live Oak 3,464 80.52% 742 17.25% 96 2.23% 2,722 63.27% 4,302
Llano 8,299 79.44% 1,825 17.47% 323 3.09% 6,474 61.97% 10,447
Loving 58 89.23% 4 6.15% 3 4.62% 54 83.08% 65
Lubbock 65,651 66.31% 28,023 28.30% 5,339 5.39% 37,628 38.01% 99,013
Lynn 1,546 76.95% 403 20.06% 60 2.99% 1,143 56.89% 2,009
Madison 3,351 78.13% 881 20.54% 57 1.33% 2,470 57.59% 4,289
Marion 2,983 70.39% 1,165 27.49% 90 2.12% 1,818 42.90% 4,238
Martin 1,455 82.58% 266 15.10% 41 2.32% 1,189 67.48% 1,762
Mason 1,656 80.51% 354 17.21% 47 2.28% 1,302 63.30% 2,057
Matagorda 8,366 68.60% 3,500 28.70% 330 2.70% 4,866 39.90% 12,196
Maverick 2,816 20.72% 10,397 76.52% 375 2.76% -7,581 -55.80% 13,588
McCulloch 2,552 82.24% 482 15.53% 69 2.23% 2,070 66.71% 3,103
McLennan 48,260 61.03% 27,063 34.22% 3,752 4.75% 21,197 26.81% 79,075
McMullen 454 90.98% 40 8.02% 5 1.00% 414 82.96% 499
Medina 12,085 70.07% 4,634 26.87% 527 3.06% 7,451 43.20% 17,246
Menard 682 78.94% 154 17.82% 28 3.24% 528 61.12% 864
Midland 36,973 75.13% 10,025 20.37% 2,214 4.50% 26,948 54.76% 49,212
Milam 6,364 73.45% 2,051 23.67% 249 2.88% 4,313 49.78% 8,664
Mills 1,951 86.90% 243 10.82% 51 2.28% 1,708 76.08% 2,245
Mitchell 1,780 81.06% 354 16.12% 62 2.82% 1,426 64.94% 2,196
Montague 7,526 87.47% 885 10.29% 193 2.24% 6,641 77.18% 8,604
Montgomery 150,314 73.00% 45,835 22.26% 9,755 4.74% 104,479 50.74% 205,904
Moore 3,977 75.26% 1,098 20.78% 209 3.96% 2,879 54.48% 5,284
Morris 3,446 69.29% 1,425 28.65% 102 2.06% 2,021 40.64% 4,973
Motley 566 92.03% 40 6.50% 9 1.47% 526 85.53% 615
Nacogdoches 14,771 65.29% 6,846 30.26% 1,005 4.45% 7,925 35.03% 22,622
Navarro 11,994 72.99% 4,002 24.35% 437 2.66% 7,992 48.64% 16,433
Newton 4,288 77.48% 1,156 20.89% 90 1.63% 3,132 56.59% 5,534
Nolan 3,552 73.13% 1,029 21.19% 276 5.68% 2,523 51.94% 4,857
Nueces 50,766 48.62% 49,198 47.12% 4,441 4.26% 1,568 1.50% 104,405
Ochiltree 2,628 87.54% 274 9.13% 100 3.33% 2,354 78.41% 3,002
Oldham 850 89.19% 78 8.18% 25 2.63% 772 81.01% 953
Orange 25,513 79.73% 5,735 17.92% 752 2.35% 19,778 61.81% 32,000
Palo Pinto 8,284 80.66% 1,708 16.63% 278 2.71% 6,576 64.03% 10,270
Panola 8,445 81.08% 1,835 17.62% 136 1.30% 6,610 63.46% 10,416
Parker 46,473 81.79% 8,344 14.69% 2,000 3.52% 38,129 67.10% 56,817
Parmer 1,915 77.66% 485 19.67% 66 2.67% 1,430 57.99% 2,466
Pecos 2,468 58.97% 1,554 37.13% 163 3.90% 914 21.84% 4,185
Polk 15,176 76.45% 4,187 21.09% 489 2.46% 10,989 55.36% 19,852
Potter 19,630 68.09% 7,657 26.56% 1,544 5.35% 11,973 41.53% 28,831
Presidio 652 29.53% 1,458 66.03% 98 4.44% -806 -36.50% 2,208
Rains 3,968 84.41% 628 13.36% 105 2.23% 3,340 71.05% 4,701
Randall 43,462 80.03% 8,367 15.41% 2,476 4.56% 35,095 64.62% 54,305
Reagan 709 78.43% 167 18.47% 28 3.10% 542 59.96% 904
Real 1,382 82.21% 262 15.59% 37 2.20% 1,120 66.62% 1,681
Red River 3,926 76.07% 1,149 22.26% 86 1.67% 2,777 53.81% 5,161
Reeves 1,417 44.50% 1,659 52.10% 108 3.40% -242 -7.60% 3,184
Refugio 1,830 62.08% 1,034 35.07% 84 2.85% 796 27.01% 2,948
Roberts 524 94.58% 20 3.61% 10 1.81% 504 90.97% 554
Robertson 4,668 66.35% 2,203 31.31% 164 2.34% 2,465 35.04% 7,035
Rockwall 28,451 70.81% 9,655 24.03% 2,074 5.16% 18,796 46.78% 40,180
Runnels 3,250 85.93% 453 11.98% 79 2.09% 2,797 73.95% 3,782
Rusk 14,675 76.70% 3,935 20.57% 524 2.73% 10,740 56.13% 19,134
Sabine 3,998 85.96% 614 13.20% 39 0.84% 3,384 72.76% 4,651
San Augustine 2,622 73.47% 910 25.50% 37 1.03% 1,712 47.97% 3,569
San Jacinto 8,059 77.92% 2,038 19.70% 246 2.38% 6,021 58.22% 10,343
San Patricio 13,030 60.17% 7,871 36.35% 755 3.48% 5,159 23.82% 21,656
San Saba 2,025 85.91% 293 12.43% 39 1.66% 1,732 73.48% 2,357
Schleicher 821 77.53% 208 19.64% 30 2.83% 613 57.89% 1,059
Scurry 4,410 83.02% 733 13.80% 169 3.18% 3,677 69.22% 5,312
Shackelford 1,378 91.62% 103 6.85% 23 1.53% 1,275 84.77% 1,504
Shelby 7,179 79.01% 1,758 19.35% 149 1.64% 5,421 59.66% 9,086
Sherman 807 86.31% 96 10.27% 32 3.42% 711 76.04% 935
Smith 58,930 69.52% 22,300 26.31% 3,538 4.17% 36,630 43.21% 84,768
Somervell 3,206 82.27% 541 13.88% 150 3.85% 2,665 68.39% 3,897
Starr 2,224 18.94% 9,289 79.12% 227 1.94% -7,065 -60.18% 11,740
Stephens 3,034 87.44% 348 10.03% 88 2.53% 2,686 77.41% 3,470
Sterling 549 86.73% 70 11.06% 14 2.21% 479 75.67% 633
Stonewall 555 79.17% 135 19.26% 11 1.57% 420 59.91% 701
Sutton 1,075 75.92% 313 22.10% 28 1.98% 762 53.82% 1,416
Swisher 1,671 75.82% 462 20.96% 71 3.22% 1,209 54.86% 2,204
Tarrant 345,921 51.74% 288,392 43.14% 34,201 5.12% 57,529 8.60% 668,514
Taylor 33,250 72.66% 10,085 22.04% 2,424 5.30% 23,165 50.62% 45,759
Terrell 288 65.75% 140 31.96% 10 2.29% 148 33.79% 438
Terry 2,459 73.29% 753 22.44% 143 4.27% 1,706 50.85% 3,355
Throckmorton 715 88.49% 84 10.40% 9 1.11% 631 78.09% 808
Titus 6,511 69.13% 2,597 27.57% 311 3.30% 3,914 41.56% 9,419
Tom Green 27,494 71.45% 9,173 23.84% 1,812 4.71% 18,321 47.61% 38,479
Travis 127,209 27.14% 308,260 65.77% 33,251 7.09% -181,051 -38.63% 468,720
Trinity 4,737 79.15% 1,154 19.28% 94 1.57% 3,583 59.87% 5,985
Tyler 6,624 82.63% 1,248 15.57% 144 1.80% 5,376 67.06% 8,016
Upshur 13,209 82.49% 2,380 14.86% 424 2.65% 10,829 67.63% 16,013
Upton 1,007 74.76% 286 21.23% 54 4.01% 721 53.53% 1,347
Uvalde 4,835 53.94% 3,867 43.14% 262 2.92% 968 10.80% 8,964
Val Verde 5,890 43.25% 6,964 51.14% 763 5.61% -1,074 -7.89% 13,617
Van Zandt 18,473 84.39% 2,799 12.79% 618 2.82% 15,674 71.60% 21,890
Victoria 21,275 67.92% 8,866 28.30% 1,183 3.78% 12,409 39.62% 31,324
Walker 12,884 65.08% 6,091 30.77% 821 4.15% 6,793 34.31% 19,796
Waller 10,531 62.74% 5,748 34.25% 505 3.01% 4,783 28.49% 16,784
Ward 2,547 73.93% 783 22.73% 115 3.34% 1,764 51.20% 3,445
Washington 10,945 73.79% 3,382 22.80% 505 3.41% 7,563 50.99% 14,832
Webb 12,947 22.48% 42,307 73.47% 2,331 4.05% -29,360 -50.99% 57,585
Wharton 10,149 68.89% 4,238 28.77% 345 2.34% 5,911 40.12% 14,732
Wheeler 2,087 90.50% 194 8.41% 25 1.09% 1,893 82.09% 2,306
Wichita 27,631 72.49% 8,770 23.01% 1,718 4.50% 18,861 49.48% 38,119
Wilbarger 3,166 77.13% 809 19.71% 130 3.16% 2,357 57.42% 4,105
Willacy 1,547 30.36% 3,422 67.16% 126 2.48% -1,875 -36.80% 5,095
Williamson 104,175 50.90% 84,468 41.27% 16,016 7.83% 19,707 9.63% 204,659
Wilson 13,998 72.17% 4,790 24.70% 607 3.13% 9,208 47.47% 19,395
Winkler 1,403 74.79% 420 22.39% 53 2.82% 983 52.40% 1,876
Wise 20,670 83.43% 3,412 13.77% 694 2.80% 17,258 69.66% 24,776
Wood 15,700 83.84% 2,630 14.04% 397 2.12% 13,070 69.80% 18,727
Yoakum 1,797 78.03% 426 18.50% 80 3.47% 1,371 59.53% 2,303
Young 6,601 85.65% 876 11.37% 230 2.98% 5,725 74.28% 7,707
Zapata 1,029 32.75% 2,063 65.66% 50 1.59% -1,034 -32.91% 3,142
Zavala 694 20.44% 2,636 77.62% 66 1.94% -1,942 -57.18% 3,396
Totals 4,685,047 52.09% 3,877,868 43.12% 430,940 4.79% 807,179 8.97% 8,993,855
 
County Flips:

Counties that flipped from Democratic to Republican edit

Counties that flipped from Republican to Democratic edit

By congressional district edit

Trump won 22 of 36 congressional districts, while Clinton won 14, including three held by Republicans [36]

District Trump Clinton Representative
1st 72% 25% Louie Gohmert
2nd 52% 43% Ted Poe
3rd 54% 40% Sam Johnson
4th 75% 22% John Ratcliffe
5th 63% 34% Jeb Hensarling
6th 54% 42% Joe Barton
7th 47% 48% John Culberson
8th 72% 24% Kevin Brady
9th 18% 79% Al Green
10th 52% 43% Michael McCaul
11th 78% 19% Mike Conaway
12th 62% 33% Kay Granger
13th 80% 17% Mac Thornberry
14th 58% 38% Randy Weber
15th 40% 56% Rubén Hinojosa
Vicente Gonzalez
16th 27% 67% Beto O'Rourke
17th 56% 38% Bill Flores
18th 20% 76% Sheila Jackson Lee
19th 72% 23% Randy Neugebauer
Jodey Arrington
20th 34% 60% Joaquín Castro
21st 52% 42% Lamar Smith
22nd 52% 44% Pete Olson
23rd 46% 49% Will Hurd
24th 51% 43% Kenny Marchant
25th 55% 40% Roger Williams
26th 60% 34% Michael Burgess
27th 60% 36% Blake Farenthold
28th 38% 58% Henry Cuellar
29th 25% 71% Gene Green
30th 18% 79% Eddie Bernice Johnson
31st 53% 40% John Carter
32nd 47% 48% Pete Sessions
33rd 24% 73% Marc Veasey
34th 38% 59% Filemon Vela Jr.
35th 30% 64% Lloyd Doggett
36th 72% 25% Brian Babin

Analysis edit

While he continued the Republican 10-cycle winning streak in Texas,[37] Trump's winning margin was down from Mitt Romney's 16% in 2012 to 8.99%, a 7.01% drop, making 2016 the closest Democrats had come to winning Texas since 1996 (though the Democrats also received a smaller percentage of the vote in Texas in this election than in the 2008 presidential election). The surge in Democratic votes can partly be attributed to a growing population of Hispanics/Latinos, Trump's relatively weak performance with college-educated white voters, and the growth of cities and their respective suburbs in the Texas Triangle region, which are heavily populated with both college-educated voters and minorities and thus swung more Democratic compared to 2012.[38] These were Clinton's main sources of votes. She swept the Rio Grande region counties, such as El Paso, Webb, Hidalgo and Cameron as they have sizable Hispanic populations. Clinton scored a 38-point sweep in Travis County, home to the state capital and heavily liberal city of Austin, the best Democratic performance in the county since 1964. She became the first Democrat to break 60% of the vote in Dallas County since 1944. Furthermore, she outperformed Obama in the minority-heavy counties of Bexar (San Antonio) and Harris County (Houston), shifting his slim victories into double-digit leads.[39] In fact, the Presidential vote in Texas' 7th Congressional District, which includes Houston's inner-west suburbs, had the biggest change in margin towards Clinton compared to Obama's 2012 performance outside of Utah, shifting 23 points left.[40] Clinton also won suburban Fort Bend County for the first time since Texas native Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964, which was attributed to the county's large immigrant population and negative perception of Trump by female Republican voters.[41] While Clinton didn't win suburban counties such as Denton County, Williamson County, Collin County, or Hays County, her margin of defeat was much narrower than other Democratic presidential nominees.[42] Places that had large numbers of young voters in the state were a stronghold for Clinton as well.[43] Texas Lieutenant Governor Dan Patrick suggested that Trump's relatively small margin of victory could have been largely due to many moderate Republican voters who had supported Romney in 2012 staying home. In an interview conducted the morning after the election, Patrick said in reference to these voters, "Had they turned out, he would've been in the low teens".[44]

In total, Clinton beat Trump in 27 counties by a total of 883,819 votes, and had the best percentage performance than any other Democrat running statewide. Conversely, Trump, who won 227 of the state's 254 counties, got the smallest percentage of the vote of all Republicans running in the state.[45]

See also edit

Notes edit

  1. ^ a b c d Trump earned 38 pledged electoral votes, but lost two due to faithless electors. Bill Greene voted for Ron Paul (who was not a candidate) for president and Mike Pence (who was on the Republican ticket) as vice president, while Christopher Suprun voted for John Kasich for president and Carly Fiorina for vice president (both not candidates).[2][3]

References edit

  1. ^ "Turnout and Voter Registration Figures (1970-current)".
  2. ^ Walsh, Sean Collins (December 19, 2016). "All but 2 Texas members of the Electoral College choose Donald Trump". Statesman. Archived from the original on December 21, 2016.
  3. ^ Which candidates did the seven "faithless" electors support? CBS News (December 21, 2016). Retrieved December 9, 2023.
  4. ^ "Vote Swing - 2016 Presidential General Election Data - National". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved October 27, 2018.
  5. ^ "Texas Democratic Delegation 2016". www.thegreenpapers.com. Retrieved February 23, 2017.
  6. ^ "Race Summary Report: 2016 Democratic Party Primary Election". Texas Secretary of State. March 1, 2016. Retrieved July 14, 2016.
  7. ^ "Inside the Beltway: Donald Trump won't participate in Megyn Kelly's Fox News candidate forum". The Washington Times.
  8. ^ SPRUNT, BARBARA (February 25, 2016). "On The Clock: Trump Dominated Debate In Speaking Time". NPR. Retrieved February 25, 2016.
  9. ^ "Election 2016 - 2016 Republican Presidential Nomination". RealClearPolitics. Retrieved November 13, 2016.
  10. ^ "Debate fallout: GOP suspends debate partnership with NBC". Washington Examiner. October 30, 2015. Retrieved October 30, 2015.
  11. ^ "RNC CANCELS ONLY DEBATE TO AIR ON SPANISH-LANGUAGE TV". Newsweek.com. October 30, 2015. Retrieved January 14, 2016.
  12. ^ "NBC replaced by CNN for GOP's Super Tuesday debate". CNN Money. January 18, 2016. Retrieved January 18, 2016.
  13. ^ "National Review Kicked Out of GOP Debate After Anti-Trump Stand". Wall Street Journal. January 22, 2016.
  14. ^ Watkins, Eli (February 19, 2016). "CNN's Wolf Blitzer will moderate Republican debate in Houston". CNN. Retrieved February 22, 2016.
  15. ^ "Texas Republican Delegation 2016". www.thegreenpapers.com. Retrieved February 23, 2017.
  16. ^ "Race Summary Report: 2016 Republican Party Primary Election". Texas Secretary of State. March 1, 2016. Retrieved July 14, 2016.
  17. ^ "Time to Vote Green- March 8". Green Party of Texas. August 21, 2015. Retrieved March 12, 2016.
  18. ^ "2016 County Nominating Conventions". Green Party of Texas. December 4, 2015. Retrieved March 12, 2016.
  19. ^ "2016 District Nominating Conventions". Green Party of Texas. December 4, 2015. Retrieved March 12, 2016.
  20. ^ "2016 State Nominating Convention". Green Party of Texas. August 21, 2015. Retrieved March 12, 2015.
  21. ^ "Stein wins majority of Texas convention delegates". Retrieved April 11, 2016.
  22. ^ "RealClearPolitics - Election 2016 - Texas: Trump vs. Clinton".
  23. ^ "Our final map has Clinton winning with 352 electoral votes. Compare your picks with ours". Los Angeles Times. November 6, 2016. Retrieved November 13, 2016.
  24. ^ "Road to 270: CNN's general election map - CNNPolitics.com". Cnn.com. November 8, 2016. Retrieved November 13, 2016.
  25. ^ "Presidential Ratings". The Rothenberg Political Report. Retrieved August 16, 2021.
  26. ^ "Larry J. Sabato's Crystal Ball » 2016 President". Centerforpolitics.org. November 7, 2016. Retrieved November 13, 2016.
  27. ^ Todd, Chuck. "NBC's Final Battleground Map Shows Clinton With a Significant Lead". NBC News. Retrieved November 13, 2016.
  28. ^ "ElectoralVote". ElectoralVote. December 31, 2000. Retrieved November 13, 2016.
  29. ^ "2016 Election Maps - Battle for White House". RealClearPolitics. Retrieved November 13, 2016.
  30. ^ "Electoral Scorecard: Map shifts again in Trump's favor, as Clinton holds edge". Fox News. November 7, 2016. Retrieved November 13, 2016.
  31. ^ "Electoral Map 2016: Forecast Who Will Win-Clinton or Trump". Abcnews.go.com. Retrieved November 13, 2016.
  32. ^ "Texas hits record high for early voting turnout". October 27, 2020.
  33. ^ "Race Summary Report, 2016 General Election". Texas Secretary of State. Retrieved December 1, 2016.
  34. ^ Lau, Ryan (February 3, 2018). "Ron Paul Attacks Libertarian Leadership in Response to Controversy". 71Republic. Archived from the original on February 4, 2018. Retrieved February 3, 2018. I paid my lifetime membership, in 1987, with a gold coin, to make a point.
  35. ^ "Turnout and Voter Registration Figures (1970-current)". www.sos.state.tx.us. Retrieved January 3, 2017.
  36. ^ "Introducing the 2017 Cook Political Report Partisan Voter Index". The Cook Political Report.
  37. ^ "Texas - 270toWin".
  38. ^ Rogers, Mary Beth (January 31, 2016). "Turning Texas blue?: 3 trends could undo the 20 years of Republican rule Texas has endured since the days of Ann Richards". Salon. Retrieved March 10, 2017.
  39. ^ Tribune, The Texas (November 11, 2016). "There's no shading it, Harris County went undeniably blue". The Texas Tribune. Retrieved March 9, 2017.
  40. ^ "Daily Kos Elections 2012, 2016 & 2020 presidential election results for congressional districts used in 2020 elections". Google Docs. Retrieved January 27, 2023.
  41. ^ Quinn, Kevin (November 9, 2016). "Political shift in Ft. Bend leans toward Clinton". KTRK-TV.
  42. ^ "Texas County Elects Black Woman Sheriff and Votes for Trump".
  43. ^ "Trump across Texas, visualized". Houston Chronicle. Retrieved March 9, 2017.
  44. ^ Svitek, Patrick (November 9, 2016). "Donald Trump wins Texas, leads Hillary Clinton by 9 points". The Texas Tribune. Retrieved December 25, 2018.
  45. ^ Tribune, The Texas (November 11, 2016). "Analysis: The blue dots in Texas' red political sea". The Texas Tribune. Retrieved March 9, 2017.

Further reading edit

External links edit