Jones County, Texas

Jones County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2020 census, its population was 19,663.[1] Its county seat is Anson.[2] The county was created in 1858 and organized in 1881.[3] Both the county and its county seat are named for Anson Jones, the fourth and final president of the Republic of Texas.[4]

Jones County
Jones County Courthouse in Anson, Texas
Jones County Courthouse in Anson, Texas
Map of Texas highlighting Jones County
Location within the U.S. state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 32°44′N 99°53′W / 32.74°N 99.88°W / 32.74; -99.88
Country United States
State Texas
Founded1881
Named forAnson Jones
SeatAnson
Largest cityStamford
Area
 • Total937.1 sq mi (2,427 km2)
 • Land928.6 sq mi (2,405 km2)
 • Water8.6 sq mi (22 km2)  0.9%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total19,663
 • Density21/sq mi (8.1/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district19th
Websitewww.co.jones.tx.us

Jones County is included in the Abilene, Texas, metropolitan statistical area.

GeographyEdit

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 937 square miles (2,430 km2), of which 929 square miles (2,410 km2) are land and 8.6 square miles (22 km2) (0.9%) are covered by water.[5]

Major highwaysEdit

Adjacent countiesEdit

DemographicsEdit

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880546
18903,797595.4%
19007,05385.8%
191024,299244.5%
192022,323−8.1%
193024,2338.6%
194023,378−3.5%
195022,147−5.3%
196019,299−12.9%
197016,106−16.5%
198017,2687.2%
199016,490−4.5%
200020,78526.0%
201020,202−2.8%
202019,663−2.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1850–2010[7] 2010[8] 2020[9]
Jones County, Texas - Demographic Profile
(NH = Non-Hispanic)
Race / Ethnicity Pop 2010[8] Pop 2020[9] % 2010 % 2020
White alone (NH) 12,549 11,485 62.12% 58.41%
Black or African American alone (NH) 2,292 1,978 11.35% 10.06%
Native American or Alaska Native alone (NH) 62 66 0.31% 0.34%
Asian alone (NH) 76 111 0.38% 0.56%
Pacific Islander alone (NH) 1 4 0.00% 0.02%
Some Other Race alone (NH) 27 41 0.13% 0.21%
Mixed Race/Multi-Racial (NH) 186 474 0.92% 2.41%
Hispanic or Latino (any race) 5,009 5,504 24.79% 27.99%
Total 20,202 19,663 100.00% 100.00%

Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.

As of the census[10] of 2000, 20,785 people, 6,140 households, and 4,525 families resided in the county. The population density was 22 people per square mile (9/km2). The 7,236 housing units averaged 8 per mi2 (3/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 78.80% White, 11.51% Black or African American, 0.49% Native American, 0.47% Asian, 7.47% from other races, and 1.27% from two or more races. About 20.9% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Of the 6,140 households, 33.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.60% were married couples living together, 10.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.30% were not families. About 24.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 13.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the county, theage distribution was 22.50% under 18, 11.10% from 18 to 24, 31.50% from 25 to 44, 21.00% from 45 to 64, and 14.00% who were 65 or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 150.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 159.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $29,572, and for a family was $35,391. Males had a median income of $26,892 versus $17,829 for females. The per capita income for the county was $13,656. About 13.10% of families and 16.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.70% of those under age 18 and 16.60% of those age 65 or over.

Government and infrastructureEdit

The Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ) operates the Robertson Unit, located 10 miles from downtown.[11] The state Middleton Unit transfer unit is located partially in Abilene and also in Jones County.[12][13]

Since 2007 Republican Susan King has represented Jones, Nolan, and Taylor Counties in the state house.[14]

PoliticsEdit

“From their first presidential election in 1884 through 1992 the voters in Jones County have generally chosen Democratic candidates. They supported Republican candidates in 1928, 1952, 1972, 1984, and 1988.“ [15]

Since 2000, the majority of voters selected Republican presidential candidates, with the margin of victory for the party's candidates increasing in each election.

United States presidential election results for Jones County, Texas[16]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 5,660 83.96% 999 14.82% 82 1.22%
2016 4,819 80.86% 936 15.70% 205 3.44%
2012 4,262 76.56% 1,226 22.02% 79 1.42%
2008 4,203 72.37% 1,528 26.31% 77 1.33%
2004 4,254 71.72% 1,658 27.95% 19 0.32%
2000 4,080 67.46% 1,899 31.40% 69 1.14%
1996 2,351 43.46% 2,422 44.77% 637 11.77%
1992 2,088 35.20% 2,400 40.46% 1,444 24.34%
1988 3,000 50.71% 2,898 48.99% 18 0.30%
1984 4,017 62.93% 2,343 36.71% 23 0.36%
1980 2,765 47.07% 3,043 51.80% 66 1.12%
1976 2,072 38.26% 3,318 61.26% 26 0.48%
1972 3,202 75.11% 1,050 24.63% 11 0.26%
1968 1,676 33.66% 2,372 47.64% 931 18.70%
1964 1,295 26.32% 3,622 73.62% 3 0.06%
1960 2,196 44.04% 2,772 55.60% 18 0.36%
1956 2,073 44.32% 2,594 55.46% 10 0.21%
1952 2,941 52.21% 2,680 47.58% 12 0.21%
1948 432 10.34% 3,599 86.16% 146 3.50%
1944 361 8.77% 3,417 83.00% 339 8.23%
1940 401 9.79% 3,688 90.08% 5 0.12%
1936 305 8.24% 3,396 91.71% 2 0.05%
1932 224 7.03% 2,934 92.03% 30 0.94%
1928 1,995 55.95% 1,563 43.83% 8 0.22%
1924 566 15.39% 3,010 81.86% 101 2.75%
1920 270 11.83% 1,792 78.53% 220 9.64%
1916 114 5.34% 1,798 84.18% 224 10.49%
1912 63 3.89% 1,301 80.36% 255 15.75%

CommunitiesEdit

CitiesEdit

Unincorporated communitiesEdit

Notable residentsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Jones County, Texas". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ "Texas: Individual County Chronologies". Texas Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2008. Retrieved May 24, 2015.
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. pp. 170.
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved May 2, 2015.
  6. ^ "Decennial Census of Population and Housing by Decades". US Census Bureau.
  7. ^ "Texas Almanac: Population History of Counties from 1850–2010" (PDF). Texas Almanac. Archived (PDF) from the original on October 9, 2022. Retrieved May 2, 2015.
  8. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2010: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Jones County, Texas". United States Census Bureau.
  9. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Jones County, Texas". United States Census Bureau.
  10. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  11. ^ "Robertson Unit Archived 2010-07-25 at the Wayback Machine." Texas Department of Criminal Justice. Retrieved on July 23, 2010.
  12. ^ "Super Neighborhood Areas Archived 2011-06-09 at the Wayback Machine." (Direct map link Archived 2011-06-09 at the Wayback Machine) City of Abilene. Retrieved on July 23, 2010.
  13. ^ "Middleton Unit Archived 2010-07-25 at the Wayback Machine." Texas Department of Criminal Justice. Retrieved on July 23, 2010.
  14. ^ "Susan King". Texas Legislative Reference Library. Retrieved March 12, 2014.
  15. ^ “TSHA“
  16. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved April 11, 2018.

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 32°44′N 99°53′W / 32.74°N 99.88°W / 32.74; -99.88