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Nueces County is a county in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 340,223.[1] The county seat is Corpus Christi.[2] The county was formed in 1846 from portions of San Patricio County and organized the following year.[3] It is named for the Nueces River, which flows through the county.

Nueces County
The Nueces County Courthouse in Corpus Christi
The Nueces County Courthouse in Corpus Christi
Official seal of Nueces County
Seal
Map of Texas highlighting Nueces County
Location within the U.S. state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 27°44′N 97°31′W / 27.74°N 97.52°W / 27.74; -97.52
Country United States
State Texas
Founded1847
Named forNueces River
SeatCorpus Christi
Largest cityCorpus Christi
Area
 • Total1,166 sq mi (3,020 km2)
 • Land838 sq mi (2,170 km2)
 • Water327 sq mi (850 km2)  28%%
Population
 (2010)
 • Total340,223
 • Density406/sq mi (157/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district27th
Websitewww.co.nueces.tx.us

Nueces County is part of the Corpus Christi, TX Metropolitan Statistical Area.

GeographyEdit

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has an area of 1,166 square miles (3,020 km2), of which 838 square miles (2,170 km2) are land and 327 square miles (850 km2) (28%) are covered by water.[4] It borders the Gulf of Mexico.

Major highwaysEdit

Adjacent countiesEdit

DemographicsEdit

Census Pop.
1850698
18602,906316.3%
18703,97536.8%
18807,67393.0%
18908,0935.5%
190010,43929.0%
191021,955110.3%
192022,8073.9%
193051,779127.0%
194092,66179.0%
1950165,47178.6%
1960221,57333.9%
1970237,5447.2%
1980268,21512.9%
1990291,1458.5%
2000313,6457.7%
2010340,2238.5%
Est. 2016361,350[5]6.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1850–2010[7] 2010–2014[1]

As of the census[8] of 2000, 313,645 people, 110,365 households, and 79,683 families resided in the county. The population density was 375 people per square mile (145/km²). The 123,041 housing units averaged 147 per square mile (57/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 72.03% White, 4.24% African American, 0.64% Native American, 1.16% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 18.74% from other races, and 3.13% from two or more races. About 55.78% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Of the 110,365 households, 36.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.80% were married couples living together, 15.30% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.80% were not families. About 22.60% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.79 and the average family size was 3.30.

In the county, the population was distributed as 28.40% under the age of 18, 10.50% from 18 to 24, 28.90% from 25 to 44, 21.10% from 45 to 64, and 11.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $35,959, and for a family was $41,066. Males had a median income of $31,571 versus $22,324 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,036. About 14.70% of families and 18.20% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24.00% of those under age 18 and 15.80% of those age 65 or over.

CommunitiesEdit

PoliticsEdit

Historically, Nueces County leaned Democratic in presidential elections, though in recent years has voted Republican. Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1952 became the first Republican candidate to carry the county. Prior to that year, the only times Nueces County did not vote for the national Democratic candidate was in its first presidential election in 1848 for Whig Zachary Taylor, and in 1860, supporting Southern Democratic John C. Breckinridge. Since Eisenhower's election, the only other Republicans to carry the county in the 20th century were Richard Nixon in 1972 and Ronald Reagan in 1984. So far, Bill Clinton remains the last Democratic candidate to win Nueces County, having done so in 1996.

Since 2000, Nueces County has voted for every Republican presidential candidate, with only George W. Bush in 2004 having carried it by a double digit margin, and his 56.8% of the vote is also the highest for any Republican in the county's history. In 2016, Donald Trump defeated Hillary Clinton in the county 48.6% to 47.1%, or 1,568 votes, the closest race since 1956.

Democratic strength is concentrated within downtown Corpus Christi plus the city's heavily Hispanic neighborhoods, Robstown, and communities in the western part of the county. Republicans generally do well in the southeast suburbs, Flour Bluff, and Port Aransas.[9]

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results[10]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 48.6% 50,766 47.1% 49,198 4.3% 4,441
2012 51.0% 48,966 47.6% 45,772 1.4% 1,366
2008 51.8% 52,391 47.3% 47,912 0.9% 927
2004 56.8% 59,359 42.5% 44,439 0.7% 762
2000 51.3% 49,906 46.6% 45,349 2.1% 2,071
1996 40.2% 37,470 53.7% 50,009 6.1% 5,689
1992 36.5% 36,781 46.0% 46,317 17.6% 17,693
1988 48.3% 46,337 51.3% 49,209 0.4% 386
1984 53.7% 54,333 46.2% 46,721 0.2% 159
1980 46.8% 40,586 50.1% 43,424 3.0% 2,634
1976 38.0% 32,797 61.1% 52,755 0.9% 773
1972 55.4% 41,682 44.2% 33,277 0.4% 291
1968 31.6% 21,307 57.8% 39,025 10.6% 7,159
1964 25.8% 14,048 74.1% 40,426 0.2% 84
1960 39.1% 18,907 60.7% 29,361 0.2% 100
1956 49.9% 19,985 49.7% 19,912 0.4% 162
1952 48.6% 19,124 51.2% 20,156 0.2% 79
1948 25.6% 5,577 70.0% 15,240 4.4% 966
1944 24.2% 3,819 70.3% 11,091 5.5% 863
1940 23.9% 3,065 75.8% 9,740 0.3% 37
1936 15.5% 1,234 83.1% 6,597 1.4% 109
1932 12.6% 967 86.9% 6,659 0.5% 36
1928 45.4% 2,481 54.6% 2,985 0.1% 3
1920 21.6% 383 70.1% 1,246 8.3% 148
1916 16.9% 404 76.4% 1,830 6.8% 163
1912 6.5% 85 69.6% 910 23.9% 312

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on October 18, 2011. Retrieved December 22, 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. ^ "Texas: Individual County Chronologies". Texas Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2008. Retrieved May 25, 2015.
  4. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved May 5, 2015.
  5. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 5, 2015.
  7. ^ "Texas Almanac: Population History of Counties from 1850–2010" (PDF). Texas Almanac. Retrieved May 5, 2015.
  8. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14.
  9. ^ Rohla, Ryne. "2016 Presidential General Election Maps". Ryne Rohla.
  10. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 6 April 2018.

External linksEdit