Knox County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2020 census, its population was 3,353.[1] Its county seat is Benjamin.[2] The county was created in 1858 and later organized in 1886.[3] It is named for Henry Knox, an American Revolutionary War general.[4]

Knox County
The Knox County Courthouse in Benjamin
The Knox County Courthouse in Benjamin
Map of Texas highlighting Knox County
Location within the U.S. state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 33°37′N 99°44′W / 33.61°N 99.74°W / 33.61; -99.74
Country United States
State Texas
Founded1886
Named forHenry Knox
SeatBenjamin
Largest cityMunday
Area
 • Total855 sq mi (2,210 km2)
 • Land851 sq mi (2,200 km2)
 • Water4.9 sq mi (13 km2)  0.6%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total3,353
 • Density3.9/sq mi (1.5/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district13th
Websitewww.knoxcountytexas.org

Geography

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According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 855 sq mi (2,210 km2), of which 4.9 square miles (13 km2) (0.6%) are covered by water.[5]

Major highways

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Adjacent counties

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Notable geographic features

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Demographics

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Historical population
CensusPop.Note
188077
18901,1341,372.7%
19002,322104.8%
19109,625314.5%
19209,240−4.0%
193011,36823.0%
194010,090−11.2%
195010,082−0.1%
19607,857−22.1%
19705,972−24.0%
19805,329−10.8%
19904,837−9.2%
20004,253−12.1%
20103,719−12.6%
20203,353−9.8%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1850–2010[7] 2010[8] 2020[9]
Knox County, Texas - Demographic Profile
(NH = Non-Hispanic)
Race / Ethnicity Pop 2010[8] Pop 2020[9] % 2010 % 2020
White alone (NH) 2,347 1,935 63.11% 57.71%
Black or African American alone (NH) 209 146 5.62% 4.35%
Native American or Alaska Native alone (NH) 14 8 0.38% 0.24%
Asian alone (NH) 7 24 0.19% 0.72%
Pacific Islander alone (NH) 1 3 0.03% 0.09%
Some Other Race alone (NH) 4 5 0.11% 0.15%
Mixed Race/Multi-Racial (NH) 36 102 0.97% 3.04%
Hispanic or Latino (any race) 1,101 1,130 29.60% 33.70%
Total 3,719 3,353 100.00% 100.00%

Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.

As of the census[10] of 2000, 4,253 people, 1,690 households, and 1,166 were families residing in the county. The population density was 5 people/sq mi (1.9 people/km2). The 2,129 housing units had an average density of two units per square mile (0.77 units/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 74.35% White, 6.91% African American, 1.08% Native American, 0.24% Asian, 0.09% Pacific Islander, 14.77% from other races, and 2.56% from two or more races. About 25.09% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Of the 1,690 households, 30.7% had children under 18 living with them, 56.0% were married couples living together, 9.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.0% were not families. About 29.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 17.9% had someone living alone who was 65 or older. The average household size was 2.44, and the average family size was 3.02.

In the county, the age distribution was 27.7% under the age of 18, 5.6% from 18 to 24, 22.9% from 25 to 44, 21.0% from 45 to 64, and 22.7% who were 65 or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females, there were 89.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $25,453, and for a family was $30,602. Males had a median income of $25,571 versus $20,865 for females. The per capita income for the county was $13,443. About 17.1% of families and 22.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 35.2% of those under age 18 and 15.2% of those age 65 or over.

Education

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These school districts serve Knox County:[11]

Goree Independent School District formerly served sections of the county.[12] On July 1, 2003, it merged into Munday CISD.[13]

The county is in the service area of Vernon College.[14]

Bobby Boatright Memorial Music Camp

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The city of Goree in Knox County is the site of the annual Bobby Boatright Memorial Music Camp, an event for aspiring Western Swing musicians of all ages to showcase their musical talents. The camp's namesake was a fiddle player who was originally from Goree. The camp was profiled in a story that aired on July 21, 2010, on National Public Radio's Morning Edition program.[15]

Communities

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Cities

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Town

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Unincorporated communities

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Politics

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Knox County is represented in the Texas House of Representatives by the Republican James Frank, a businessman from Wichita Falls. The 1932 Texas Republican gubernatorial nominee, Orville Bullington, resided in Knox County and served as county attorney early in his career.

United States presidential election results for Knox County, Texas[16]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 1,180 81.04% 265 18.20% 11 0.76%
2016 1,078 78.86% 247 18.07% 42 3.07%
2012 1,160 76.82% 332 21.99% 18 1.19%
2008 986 72.08% 367 26.83% 15 1.10%
2004 1,081 69.65% 464 29.90% 7 0.45%
2000 947 60.09% 617 39.15% 12 0.76%
1996 599 38.97% 785 51.07% 153 9.95%
1992 521 28.71% 854 47.05% 440 24.24%
1988 765 42.93% 1,013 56.85% 4 0.22%
1984 1,027 52.61% 921 47.18% 4 0.20%
1980 783 39.79% 1,163 59.10% 22 1.12%
1976 551 26.75% 1,498 72.72% 11 0.53%
1972 1,148 63.78% 638 35.44% 14 0.78%
1968 580 27.27% 1,222 57.45% 325 15.28%
1964 439 19.81% 1,773 80.01% 4 0.18%
1960 729 34.75% 1,365 65.06% 4 0.19%
1956 835 39.76% 1,262 60.10% 3 0.14%
1952 1,033 39.88% 1,556 60.08% 1 0.04%
1948 157 7.82% 1,792 89.24% 59 2.94%
1944 156 7.28% 1,785 83.33% 201 9.38%
1940 253 12.96% 1,699 87.04% 0 0.00%
1936 171 8.55% 1,823 91.15% 6 0.30%
1932 102 5.98% 1,600 93.79% 4 0.23%
1928 992 55.70% 784 44.02% 5 0.28%
1924 455 23.51% 1,399 72.30% 81 4.19%
1920 159 15.44% 773 75.05% 98 9.51%
1916 64 6.07% 884 83.79% 107 10.14%
1912 32 3.74% 643 75.12% 181 21.14%

See also

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References

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  1. ^ "Knox County, Texas". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 23, 2021.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ "Texas: Individual County Chronologies". Texas Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2008. Retrieved May 24, 2015.
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Government Printing Office. p. 177.
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved May 2, 2015.
  6. ^ "Decennial Census of Population and Housing by Decades". US Census Bureau.
  7. ^ "Texas Almanac: Population History of Counties from 1850–2010" (PDF). Texas Almanac. Archived (PDF) from the original on October 9, 2022. Retrieved May 2, 2015.
  8. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2010: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Knox County, Texas". United States Census Bureau.
  9. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Knox County, Texas". United States Census Bureau.
  10. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  11. ^ "2020 CENSUS - SCHOOL DISTRICT REFERENCE MAP: Knox County, TX" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Archived (PDF) from the original on October 9, 2022. Retrieved June 29, 2022. - Text list
  12. ^ "Knox County". Texas Education Agency. March 11, 2001. Archived from the original on March 11, 2001. Retrieved July 1, 2022.
  13. ^ "CONSOLIDATIONS, ANNEXATIONS AND NAME CHANGES FOR TEXAS PUBLIC SCHOOLS" (PDF). Texas Education Agency. Archived (PDF) from the original on October 9, 2022. Retrieved July 1, 2022.
  14. ^ Texas Education Code, Sec. 130.207. VERNON REGIONAL JUNIOR COLLEGE DISTRICT SERVICE AREA.
  15. ^ Highlights, transcript, and audio links to NPR story on the Bobby Boatright Memorial Music Camp that aired 07/21/10
  16. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved July 26, 2018.
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33°37′N 99°44′W / 33.61°N 99.74°W / 33.61; -99.74