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Hale County, Texas

Hale County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 36,273.[1] The county seat is Plainview.[2] The county was created in 1876 and organized in 1888.[3] It is named for Lt. John C. Hale,[4] a hero of the Battle of San Jacinto. Hale County comprises the Plainview, Texas micropolitan statistical area.

Hale County
The Hale County Courthouse in Plainview
The Hale County Courthouse in Plainview
Map of Texas highlighting Hale County
Location within the U.S. state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 34°04′N 101°50′W / 34.07°N 101.83°W / 34.07; -101.83
Country United States
State Texas
Founded1888
SeatPlainview
Largest cityPlainview
Area
 • Total1,005 sq mi (2,600 km2)
 • Land1,005 sq mi (2,600 km2)
 • Water0.1 sq mi (0.3 km2)  0.01%%
Population
 (2010)
 • Total36,273
 • Density36/sq mi (14/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district19th
Websitewww.halecounty.org

HistoryEdit

In 7000 BC, Paleo-Indians were the first county inhabitants. Later Native American inhabitants included the Comanche.[5] The Texas Legislature formed Hale County from Bexar County in 1876.[5] A few years later (1881), brothers T.W. and T.N. Morrison, and W.D. Johnson, established the Cross L Ranch and the XIT to raise cattle.[6] In 1883, New York Methodist minister Horatio Graves became the first white permanent settler in the county.[6]

The city of Plainview has its beginnings in 1886 when rancher Zachery Taylor Maxwell moved his family and 2,000 sheep from Floyd County to the site of two hackberry groves[7] on the old military trail established by Col. Ranald S. Mackenzie. The city’s name comes from the area’s vista.[8] The county was organized in 1888, with Plainview as the county seat.[9] By 1900, the county had 259 farms and ranches, with a population of 1,680.[5]

The Santa Fe Railway came to Plainview in 1906,[10] and Wayland Baptist College was founded the same year.[11] In 1909, businessman Levi Schick opened the Schick Opera House.[12] The county's first motor-driven irrigation well was drilled five years later.[5] The Texas Land and Development Company was organized in Plainview in 1912. Its purpose was to entice settlers by dividing a large tract of land into individual farms, and preparing each farm for occupancy.[13]

The Plainview Site was discovered in 1944. In addition to bone and man-made artifacts, archeologists found the remains of 100 extinct bison about twice the size of modern "buffalo".[14]

Oil was discovered in 1946 in the Anton-Irish field of Lamb and Hale Counties.[15]

Country artist Jimmy Dean, his brother Don Dean, and cousin-in-law Troy Pritchard founded the Jimmy Dean Sausage Company and opened the Jimmy Dean Meat Company in 1969.[16] As of 2010, Hale County was one of 62 counties in Texas still legally barring the sale of alcohol.[17]

GeographyEdit

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,005 square miles (2,600 km2), of which 1,005 square miles (2,600 km2) are land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km2) (0.01%) is covered by water.[18]

Major highwaysEdit

Adjacent countiesEdit

DemographicsEdit

Census Pop.
1890721
19001,680133.0%
19107,566350.4%
192010,10433.5%
193020,18999.8%
194018,813−6.8%
195028,21150.0%
196036,79830.4%
197034,137−7.2%
198037,59210.1%
199034,671−7.8%
200036,6025.6%
201036,227−1.0%
Est. 201734,134[19]−5.8%
U.S. Decennial Census[20]
1850–2010[21] 2010–2014[1]

As of the census[22] of 2000, 36,602 people, 11,975 households, and 9,136 families resided in the county. The population density was 36 people per mi2 (14/km2). The 13,526 housing units averaged 14 per mi2 (5/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 66.77% White, 5.79% African American, 0.92% Native American, 0.30% Asian, 23.80% from other races, and 2.42% from two or more races. About 47.90% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Of the 11,975 households, 40.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.30% were married couples living together, 11.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.70% were not families. About 21% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.86 and the average family size was 3.32.

In the county, the population was distributed as 30.20% under the age of 18, 11.40% from 18 to 24, 27.20% from 25 to 44, 18.30% from 45 to 64, and 12.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females there were 102.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 101.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $31,280, and for a family was $35,250. Males had a median income of $26,007 versus $20,057 for females. The per capita income for the county was $13,655. About 14.30% of families and 18.00% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.30% of those under age 18 and 14.80% of those age 65 or over.

CommunitiesEdit

CitiesEdit

TownEdit

Census-designated placeEdit

Unincorporated communityEdit

Ghost townEdit

PoliticsEdit

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results[23]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 71.9% 6,366 23.7% 2,101 4.4% 391
2012 73.3% 6,490 25.3% 2,243 1.4% 121
2008 72.1% 7,171 27.2% 2,708 0.6% 64
2004 79.0% 8,025 20.5% 2,078 0.5% 51
2000 75.4% 6,868 23.7% 2,158 0.9% 84
1996 60.6% 5,905 32.9% 3,204 6.5% 637
1992 59.6% 6,098 27.0% 2,761 13.4% 1,375
1988 64.1% 6,284 35.7% 3,502 0.3% 25
1984 70.4% 7,670 29.4% 3,202 0.2% 19
1980 65.9% 7,277 32.7% 3,610 1.5% 163
1976 49.0% 5,390 50.7% 5,580 0.3% 37
1972 76.0% 7,051 23.0% 2,135 0.9% 87
1968 45.6% 4,696 32.0% 3,293 22.4% 2,309
1964 38.2% 3,666 61.6% 5,910 0.2% 18
1960 56.1% 4,784 43.3% 3,695 0.6% 53
1956 49.6% 3,804 50.2% 3,848 0.1% 11
1952 59.1% 4,858 40.7% 3,351 0.2% 17
1948 19.1% 1,013 75.2% 3,995 5.7% 302
1944 16.3% 712 70.0% 3,066 13.7% 601
1940 21.0% 906 78.8% 3,405 0.3% 12
1936 12.6% 451 86.8% 3,109 0.6% 22
1932 10.7% 369 88.1% 3,029 1.1% 39
1928 66.0% 2,143 33.8% 1,098 0.2% 7
1924 24.8% 507 70.9% 1,446 4.3% 88
1920 21.0% 352 76.2% 1,279 2.9% 48
1916 7.7% 80 87.5% 908 4.8% 50
1912 3.7% 26 79.7% 554 16.5% 115

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on October 18, 2011. Retrieved December 17, 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. ^ "Texas: Individual County Chronologies". Texas Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2008. Retrieved May 24, 2015.
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 147.
  5. ^ a b c d Leffler, John. "Hale County, Texas". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 16 December 2010.
  6. ^ a b "Minister Horatio Graves". Plainsview and Hill County History. Plainview Chamber of Commerce. Archived from the original on 18 June 2011. Retrieved 16 December 2010.
  7. ^ Turner, Matt Warnock (2009). Remarkable Plants of Texas: Uncommon Accounts of Our Common Natives. University of Texas Press. p. 19. ISBN 978-0-292-71851-7.
  8. ^ Davis, Charles G. "Plainview". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Society. Retrieved 16 December 2010.
  9. ^ "Plainview, Texas". Texas Escapes. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved 16 December 2010.
  10. ^ "Santa Fe Railway". Texas Escapes. Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved 16 December 2010.
  11. ^ Brackney, William H (2008). Congregation and Campus: Baptists in Higher Education. Mercer University Press. p. 240. ISBN 978-0-88146-130-5.
  12. ^ "Schick Opera House - Plainview, Hale County, Texas". Texas Historical Markers. William Nienke, Sam Morrow. Archived from the original on 28 September 2011. Retrieved 16 December 2010.
  13. ^ Brunson, B R. "Texas Land and Development Company". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 16 December 2010.
  14. ^ Gibbon, Guy E (1998). Archaeology of Prehistoric Native America : An Encyclopedia. Routledge. p. 655. ISBN 978-0-8153-0725-9.
  15. ^ Totten, Robert T (1956). "General Geology and Historical Development, Texas and Oklahoma Panhandles: ABSTRACT". AAPG Bulletin. 40. doi:10.1306/5ceae382-16bb-11d7-8645000102c1865d.
  16. ^ Calhoun, Fryar (August 1983). "Jimmy Dean". Texas Monthly: 120–123, 198–200, 206.
  17. ^ "Wet/Dry Status of Texas Counties as of November 2010". Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission. Retrieved 16 December 2010.
  18. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved April 28, 2015.
  19. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  20. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 28, 2015.
  21. ^ "Texas Almanac: Population History of Counties from 1850–2010" (PDF). Texas Almanac. Retrieved April 28, 2015.
  22. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14.
  23. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-07-25.

External linksEdit