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Menard County is a town located on the Edwards Plateau in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 2,242.[1] Its seat is Menard.[2] The county was created in 1858 and later organized in 1871.[3] It is named for Michel Branamour Menard, the founder of Galveston, Texas.[4]

Menard County, Texas
Menard county courthouse 2010.jpg
The Menard County Courthouse in Menard
Map of Texas highlighting Menard County
Location within the U.S. state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location within the U.S.
Founded1871
Named forMichel Branamour Menard
SeatMenard
Largest cityMenard
Area
 • Total902 sq mi (2,336 km2)
 • Land902 sq mi (2,336 km2)
 • Water0.2 sq mi (1 km2), 0.03%
Population
 • (2010)2,242
 • Density2.5/sq mi (1.0/km2)
Congressional district11th
Time zoneCentral: UTC−6/−5
Websiteco.menard.tx.us
Historic Pioneer Rest Cemetery in Menard has graves dating to the 19th century.

Contents

HistoryEdit

Around 8000 , early Native American inhabitants arrived. Later Native Americans included Comanche and Lipan Apache.[5] In 1757, Father Alonso Giraldo de Terreros founded Presidio San Luis de las Amarillas, as a support for Santa Cruz de San Sabá Mission, for the Apache Indians.[6] In the 1830s, James Bowie and Rezin P. Bowie, scoured the San Saba valley seeking a silver mine that the Spanish had believed to be in the area. They are unsuccessful, but the legend of the Lost Bowie Mine, also known as the Lost San Saba Mine or the Los Almagres Mine, fed the imagination of treasure-seekers for the next 150 years.[7][8]

Camp San Saba was established in 1852 to protect settlers from Indian attacks.[9][10] The state legislature formed Menard County from Bexar County in 1858. The county was named for Michel Branamour Menard, the founder of Galveston. Menardville, later known as Menard, became the county seat.[11]

By 1870, the county population was 667: 295 were white, and 372 were black, possibly due to the Buffalo Soldiers at Fort McKavett.[5][9] The next year, county residents elected their own officials.[5] The county had an immigrant influx from Mexico.[5] In 1911, the Fort Worth and Rio Grande Railroad Company arrived.[5] Gas deposits were tapped in 1929, but plugged for lack of a market.[5] The local Parent-Teacher Association offered free lunches for needy children in 1931.[5]

In 1934, the Texas Relief Cannery was in operation. The Drought Relief Program bought cattle and sheep from area ranchers.[5][12] A gas well is redrilled in 1941, and produced about seven million cubic feet of gas.[5] In 1946, aA small oilfield was discovered northeast of Fort McKavett, but was abandoned the following year.[5] By the 1960s, oil and gas production had an average annual yield more than 270,000 barrels (43,000 m3).[5] In the 1980s, of the county's 40 oilfields, about 20 were still active, producing 132,000 to 185,000 barrels (29,400 m3) annually.[5]

GeographyEdit

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 902 square miles (2,340 km2), of which 902 square miles (2,340 km2) are land and 0.2 square miles (0.52 km2) (0.03%) is covered by water.[13]

Major highwaysEdit

Adjacent countiesEdit

DemographicsEdit

Census Pop.
1870667
18801,23985.8%
18901,215−1.9%
19002,01165.5%
19102,70734.6%
19203,16216.8%
19304,44740.6%
19404,5211.7%
19504,175−7.7%
19602,964−29.0%
19702,646−10.7%
19802,346−11.3%
19902,252−4.0%
20002,3604.8%
20102,242−5.0%
Est. 20162,123[14]−5.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[15]
1850–2010[16] 2010–2014[1]

As of the census[17] of 2000, 2,360 people, 990 households, and 665 families resided in the county. The population density was 3 people per square mile (1/km²). The 1,607 housing units averaged 2 per square mile (1/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 87.54% White, 0.51% African American, 0.64% Native American, 0.34% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 9.79% from other races, and 1.14% from two or more races. About 31.69% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Of the 990 households, 28.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.00% were married couples living together, 8.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.80% were not families. Around 30.40% of all households was made up of individuals and 17.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.34 and the average family size was 2.91.

In the county, the population was distributed as 24.20% under the age of 18, 5.30% from 18 to 24, 21.90% from 25 to 44, 26.60% from 45 to 64, and 21.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44 years. For every 100 females, there were 99.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.10 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $24,762, and for a family was $30,872. Males had a median income of $21,953 versus $20,000 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,987. About 20.00% of families and 25.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 39.90% of those under age 18 and 19.10% of those age 65 or over.

CommunitiesEdit

Census-designated placeEdit

Unincorporated communitiesEdit

Ghost townsEdit

PoliticsEdit

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results[18]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 78.9% 682 17.8% 154 3.2% 28
2012 78.3% 665 20.1% 171 1.5% 13
2008 69.9% 712 29.0% 295 1.1% 11
2004 69.0% 761 30.0% 331 1.0% 11
2000 64.9% 642 33.7% 334 1.4% 14
1996 42.5% 443 47.0% 490 10.6% 110
1992 27.7% 354 43.3% 553 29.0% 370
1988 47.1% 552 52.4% 614 0.4% 5
1984 64.4% 725 35.0% 394 0.5% 6
1980 52.2% 548 46.6% 489 1.2% 13
1976 44.1% 441 54.3% 543 1.6% 16
1972 69.9% 644 29.6% 273 0.4% 4
1968 50.6% 491 37.3% 362 12.2% 118
1964 40.3% 397 59.7% 588
1960 55.3% 608 44.7% 491
1956 65.9% 614 34.1% 318
1952 67.9% 843 32.1% 399
1948 28.4% 283 66.6% 663 5.0% 50
1944 8.6% 96 69.2% 776 22.3% 250
1940 17.6% 246 82.4% 1,153 0.1% 1
1936 13.5% 115 86.1% 734 0.5% 4
1932 14.3% 150 85.6% 901 0.2% 2
1928 71.6% 589 28.4% 234
1924 42.7% 247 52.6% 304 4.7% 27
1920 47.7% 203 46.2% 197 6.1% 26
1916 12.8% 44 77.8% 267 9.3% 32
1912 7.5% 15 54.5% 109 38.0% 76

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on October 18, 2011. Retrieved December 22, 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. ^ "Texas: Individual County Chronologies". Texas Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2008. Retrieved May 25, 2015.
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. U.S. Government Printing Office. p. 205.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Smyrl, Vivian Elizabeth. "Menard County, Texas". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 30 November 2010.
  6. ^ Robinson III, Charles M (2003). The Plains Wars 1757-1900. Routledge. pp. 11–13. ISBN 978-0-415-96912-3.
  7. ^ Graves, John; Wyman Meinzer (2002). Texas Rivers. University of Texas Press. p. 79. ISBN 978-0-292-70198-4.
  8. ^ "The Lost San Saba Mines". Tex Files. Retrieved 30 November 2010.
  9. ^ a b "Fort McKavett". Texas Escapes. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved 30 November 2010.
  10. ^ Parent, Laurence (1997). Official Guide to Texas State Parks. University of Texas Press. pp. 71–72. ISBN 978-0-292-76575-7.
  11. ^ "Menard, Texas". Texas Escapes. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved 30 November 2010.
  12. ^ "Texas Vernon's Texas Civil Statutes - Article 2372e. Buildings For Canneries For Unemployment Relief". Texas Vernon. Archived from the original on 12 March 2012. Retrieved 30 November 2010.
  13. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved May 4, 2015.
  14. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  15. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 4, 2015.
  16. ^ "Texas Almanac: Population History of Counties from 1850–2010" (PDF). Texas Almanac. Retrieved May 4, 2015.
  17. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14.
  18. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-07-27.

External linksEdit