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Texas's 32nd congressional district

Texas's 32nd district of the United States House of Representatives serves a suburban area of northeastern Dallas County, Texas. The district was created after the 2000 census when Texas went from 30 seats to 32 seats. It was then modified in 2011 after the 2010 United States Census. The current representative is Democrat Colin Allred.

Texas's 32nd congressional district
Texas US Congressional District 32 (since 2013).tif
Texas's 32nd congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Representative
  Colin Allred
DDallas
Distribution
  • 99.85[1]% urban
  • 0.15% rural
Population (2016)753,715[2]
Median income$70,640[3]
Ethnicity
Cook PVIR+5[4]

Among other communities, the district includes part of the North Dallas neighborhood of Preston Hollow, which has been the home of George W. Bush since the end of his Presidency. While it previously contained much of the Western Dallas County area, including Irving, since the redistricting in 2011–2012,[5] the district now covers mostly the Northern and Eastern Dallas County areas, and a small portion of Collin County.

In 2018, civil rights attorney and former NFL player Colin Allred won a heavily contested primary for the Democratic Nomination, and defeated Republican Pete Sessions in the November 6 elections.[6]

Election results from presidential racesEdit

Year Office Result
2004 President Bush 60 - 40%
2008 President McCain 55 - 44%
2012 President Romney 57 - 41.5%
2016 President Clinton 48.5 - 46.6%

List of members representing the districtEdit

Member Party Years Cong
ess
Electoral history Counties represented
District created January 3, 2003
 
Pete Sessions
Republican January 3, 2003 –
January 3, 2019
108th
109th
110th
111th
112th
113th
114th
115th
Redistricted from the 5th district and re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Lost re-election.
Northeastern Dallas, Southeastern Collin
 
Colin Allred
Democratic January 3, 2019 –
present
116th Elected in 2018.

Living former Members of the HouseEdit

As of March 2019, there is one living former member.

Representative Term of office Date of birth (and age)
Pete Sessions 2003–2019 (1955-03-22) March 22, 1955 (age 64)


Recent electionsEdit

2004 electionEdit

In the 2004 election, Martin Frost, the Democratic representative from Texas's 24th congressional district, who had been redistricted out of his district in Fort Worth, Arlington, and parts of Dallas, decided to run against Sessions rather than challenge Kenny Marchant or Joe Barton. Sessions benefited from President George W. Bush's endorsement to win in this Republican-leaning district.

US House election, 2004: Texas District 32
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Pete Sessions 109,859 54.3 -14.8
Democratic Martin Frost 89,030 44.0 +13.7
Libertarian Michael Needleman 3,347 1.7 +0.6
Majority 20,829 10.3
Turnout 202,236
Republican hold Swing -14.2

2006 electionEdit

In 2006, Dallas lawyer (and cousin of Arkansas Senator Mark Pryor) Will Pryor unsuccessfully challenged Sessions, and lost by a large margin.

US House election, 2006: Texas District 32
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Pete Sessions 71,461 56.4 +2.1
Democratic Will Pryor 52,269 41.3 -2.7
Libertarian John B. Hawley 2,922 2.3 +0.6
Majority 19,192 15.1 +4.8
Turnout 126,562 -75,584
Republican hold Swing +2.4

2008 electionEdit

In 2008, Sessions successfully faced a challenge by Democrat Eric Roberson and was reelected to another term.[7]

US House election, 2008: Texas District 32
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Pete Sessions 116,165 57.2 +0.8
Democratic Eric Roberson 82,375 40.6 -0.7
Libertarian Alex Bischoff 4,410 2.2 -0.1
Majority 33,790 16.6 +1.5
Turnout 202,950 +76,298
Republican hold Swing +0.8

2010 electionEdit

In 2010, Sessions successfully faced a challenge by Democrat Grier Raggio and Libertarian John Jay Myers. Sessions was reelected to another term.[8]

US House election, 2010: Texas District 32
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Pete Sessions 79,433 62.6 +5.4
Democratic Grier Raggio 44,258 34.9 -5.7
Libertarian John Jay Myers 3,178 2.5 +0.3

2012 electionEdit

In 2012, Sessions successfully faced a challenge by Democrat Katherine Savers McGovern and Libertarian Seth Hollist. Sessions was reelected to his 9th term.[9]

US House election, 2012: Texas District 32
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Pete Sessions 146,129 58.29 -4.31
Democratic Katherine Savers McGovern 98,867 39.44 +4.54
Libertarian Seth Hollist 5,664 2.25 -0.25

2014 electionEdit

In 2014, Sessions successfully faced a challenge by Democrat Frank Perez and Libertarian Ed Rankin. Sessions was reelected to his 10th term.

US House election, 2014: Texas District 32
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Pete Sessions 96,420 61.8 +3.51
Democratic Frank Perez 55,281 35.4 -4.04
Libertarian Ed Rankin 4,271 2.7 +0.45
Majority 41,139 26.4 -12.96
Turnout 155,972 -94,688

2016 electionEdit

In 2016, Sessions won an election contested only by third party candidates, as the Democrats did not nominate a challenger. Sessions was reelected to his 11th term.

United States House of Representatives elections, 2016: Texas District 32
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Pete Sessions 162,868 71.07
Libertarian Ed Rankin 43,490 18.98
Green Gary Stuard 22,813 9.95
Total votes 229,171 100

2018 electionEdit

In 2018, Sessions was defeated by attorney and former professional football player Colin Allred.

United States House of Representatives elections, 2018: Texas District 32
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Colin Allred 144,067 52.27
Republican Pete Sessions 126,101 45.75
Libertarian Melina Baker 5,452 1.98
Total votes 275,620 [10] 100

Historical district boundariesEdit

 
2007–2013

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ https://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/data/cd_state.html
  2. ^ https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=48&cd=32
  3. ^ https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=48&cd=32
  4. ^ "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  5. ^ Ross Ramsey (March 5, 2012). "In Redistricting, Race is the Limit to GOP Majority". The Texas Tribune. Retrieved August 8, 2012.
  6. ^ https://www.dallasnews.com/news/2018-elections/2018/11/06/former-nfl-player-colin-allred-beats-powerful-incumbent-pete-sessions-congress
  7. ^ US News and World Report (November 10, 2008). "2008 US Congressional Race Results". USA Today. Retrieved May 6, 2009.
  8. ^ The New York Times (November 10, 2009). "Election 2010". The New York Times. Retrieved August 8, 2012.
  9. ^ Texas Office of the Secretary of State (November 9, 2012). "2012 General Election Results". Office of the Secretary of State. Retrieved Nov 29, 2012.
  10. ^ https://elections.sos.state.tx.us/elchist331_state.htm

Coordinates: 32°55′13″N 96°39′13″W / 32.92028°N 96.65361°W / 32.92028; -96.65361