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United States House of Representatives elections in Texas, 2018

The 2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Texas will be held on Tuesday, November 6, 2018. Voters will elect the 36 U.S. Representatives from the state of Texas, one from each of the state's 36 congressional districts. The elections will coincide with the elections of other offices, including a gubernatorial election, as well as other elections to the House of Representatives, elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections. The primaries were held on March 6 and the run-offs will be held on May 22.

United States House of Representatives elections in Texas, 2018
Texas
← 2016 November 6, 2018 (2018-11-06) 2020 →

All 36 Texas seats to the United States House of Representatives
 
Party Republican Democratic
Last election 25 11

In 2018, for the first time in at least 25 years, the Texas Democratic Party fielded at least one candidate in each of the state's 36 congressional districts.[1]

Contents

District 1Edit

It consists largely of three small East Texas metropolitan areasLufkin-Nacogdoches, Longview-Marshall, and Tyler.

The First District once encompassed large parts of North Texas and Central Texas, but as the population of Texas grew, the district got smaller until it only encompassed about half of Northeast Texas.

The incumbent is Republican Louie Gohmert, who has held the seat since 2005. He was reelected 73.90% of the vote in 2016. Roshin Rowjee, a physician, is running for the Republican nomination. Brent Beal, a college professor, is running for the Democratic nomination. Its Partisan Voter Index is R+25.

Republican primaryEdit

Nominee
Declared
  • Roshin Rowjee, physician[2]
  • Anthony Culler
Results
Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Louie Gohmert 64,004 88.33%
Republican Anthony Culler 6,504 8.97%
Republican Roshin Rowjee 1,955 2.70%
Total votes 72,463 100%

Democratic primaryEdit

Nominee
  • Shirley McKellar
Declared
  • Brent Beal, professor[4]
Results
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Shirley McKellar 9,181 61.05%
Democratic Brent Beal 5,858 38.95%
Total votes 15,039 100%

Libertarian District ConventionEdit

Declared
  • Jeff Callaway, Texas Outlaw Poet[5]

District 2Edit

This district is in southeastern Texas and encompasses much of northern and western Houston. The PVI is R+11.

The incumbent representative is Republican Ted Poe, who has held the seat since 2005. He was reelected in 2016 with 60.63% of the vote. In November 2017, Poe announced that he would retire at the end of his current term and not seek re-election in 2018.[6]

Republican primaryEdit

Runoff
Declared
  • Kathaleen Wall
  • Rick Walker
  • Johnny Havens
  • Justin Lurie
  • Jon Spiers
  • David Balat
  • Malcolm Whittaker
Declined
Results
Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Kevin Roberts 15,236 33.02%
Republican Dan Crenshaw 12,644 27.40%
Republican Kathaleen Wall 12,499 27.09%
Republican Rick Walker 3,315 7.18%
Republican Johnny Havens 934 2.02%
Republican Justin Lurie 425 0.92%
Republican Jon Spiers 417 0.90%
Republican David Balat 348 0.75%
Republican Malcolm Whittaker 322 0.70%
Total votes 46,140 100%
Republican primary runoff results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Kevin Roberts ' '
Republican Dan Crenshaw ' '
Total votes '' ''

Democratic primaryEdit

Nominee
  • Todd Litton, Chair of the City of Houston’s Tower Commission (2004–2010)[7]
Declared
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Todd Litton 15,113 52.84%
Democratic Darnell Jones 6,308 22.06%
Democratic Silky Malik 2,770 9.69%
Democratic H. P. Parvizian 2,259 7.90%
Democratic Ali Khorasani 2,148 7.51%
Total votes 28,598 100%

Libertarian County ConventionEdit

Declared

District 3Edit

The 3rd district is a suburban area north and northeast of Dallas. It encompasses a large portion of Collin County including McKinney, Plano, and Frisco, as well as Collin County's share of Dallas itself. The incumbent representative is Sam Johnson, a Republican who has held the seat since 1991. Johnson was reelected with 61.20% of the vote in 2016. Johnson is not standing for reelection, and several candidates have announced their candidacies to replace him. The PVI of the third district is R+13.

Republican primaryEdit

Nominee
Declared
  • Roger Barone, businessman[13]
  • Alex Donkervoet
Declined
Results
Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Van Taylor 45,475 84.66%
Republican David Niederkorn 5,052 9.41%
Republican Alex Donkervoet 3,185 5.93%
Total votes 53,712 100%

Democratic primaryEdit

Runoff
  • Lorie Burch, LGBT rights attorney[14]
  • Sam Johnson, attorney (no relation to incumbent)[15]
Declared
  • Adam Bell, businessman, Democratic nominee for the third district in 2016[16]
  • Medrick Yhap
Results
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Lorie Burch 15,468 49.61%
Democratic Sam Johnson 8,943 28.68%
Democratic Adam Bell 5,598 17.95%
Democratic Medrick Yhap 1,172 3.76%
Total votes 31,181 100%
Democratic Runoff primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Lorie Burch ' '
Democratic Sam Johnson ' '
Total votes '' ''

Libertarian District ConventionEdit

Declared
  • Christopher Claytor[17]
  • Scott Jameson[18]

ResultsEdit

Christopher Claytor was declared the nominee by defeating Scott Jameson at the Collin County Libertarian Party Convention on Saturday, March 17.

IndependentsEdit

Declared

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Humane Party does not have ballot access. Appears on ballot as "Independent."[20]

District 4Edit

The 4th district serves an area of Northeast Texas, that includes some counties along the Red River northeast of the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex. The incumbent is Republican John Ratcliffe, who has served since 2015. He was reelected in 2016 with 87.99%, facing no Democratic opponent. The PVI of the district is R+28, making it one of the most conservative districts in the nation.

Republican primaryEdit

Nominee
Declared
  • John Cooper
Results
Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Ratcliffe 63,105 85.50%
Republican John Cooper 10,699 14.50%
Total votes 73,804 100%

Democratic PrimaryEdit

Nominee
  • Cathrine Krantz
Declared
  • Lander Bethel
Results
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Cathrine Krantz 8,995 68.64%
Democratic Lander Bethel 4,109 31.36%
Total votes 13,104 100%

Libertarian District ConventionEdit

Declared

District 5Edit

The 5th district serves an area that includes the southeast portion of Dallas County including Mesquite plus a number of smaller counties south and east of Dallas including Anderson, Cherokee, Henderson and Kaufman counties. At the 2000 census, the 5th district represented 651,620 people. The current Representative from District 5 is Jeb Hensarling, who has served since 2003. He was reelected in 2016 with 80.61% of the vote, facing no Democratic opponent. The PVI of this district is R+16. Hensarling announced in October 2017 that he is going to retire from Congress, and not seek re-election to another term in 2018.[22]

Republican primaryEdit

Advanced to runoff
Eliminated in primary
  • Sam Deen
  • Danny Campbell
  • Charles Lingerfelt
  • Kenneth Sheets
  • David Williams
  • Jason Wright
Declined
Results
Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lance Gooden 17,501 29.87%
Republican Bunni Pounds 12,895 22.01%
Republican Sam Deen 10,102 17.18%
Republican Kenneth Sheets 7,011 11.96%
Republican Jason Wright 6,675 11.39%
Republican Danny Campbell 1,767 3.01%
Republican David Williams 1,603 2.73%
Republican Charles Lingerfelt 1,023 1.74%
Total votes 58,777 100%
Republican primary runoff results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lance Gooden
Republican Bunni Pounds
Total votes

Democratic primaryEdit

Nominee
  • Dan Wood, attorney[23]

Libertarian District ConventionEdit

Declared

District 6Edit

The 6th district serves an area including four counties to the south of the Dallas/Fort Worth area, plus the southeast corner of Tarrant County. As of the 2000 census, District 6 represented 651,620 people. The current Representative from District 6 is Republican Joe Barton, who has served since 1985. Barton was reelected with 58.34% of the vote in 2016. The PVI of the sixth district is R+9. In November 2017, Barton announced that he would not run for re-election in 2018.[25]

Republican primaryEdit

Advanced to Runoff
  • Jake Ellzey, retired Naval combat pilot and member of the Texas Veterans Commission[26][27]
  • Ron Wright, former Tarrant County Tax Assessor[28]
Declared
  • Ken Cope
  • Shawn Dandridge
  • Thomas Dillingham
  • Shannon Dubberly, former counterterrorism professional for the U.S. Army and Air Force[29][30]
  • Deborah Gagliardi[31]
  • Kevin Harrison
  • Mel Hassell
  • Mark Mitchell
  • Troy Ratterree
Results
Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ron Wright 20,659 45.12%
Republican Jake Ellzey 9,956 21.75%
Republican Ken Cope 3,527 7.70%
Republican Shannon Dubberly 2,880 6.29%
Republican Mark Mitchell 2,141 4.68%
Republican Troy Ratterree 1,854 4.05%
Republican Kevin Harrison 1,768 3.86%
Republican Deborah Gagliardi 1,674 3.66%
Republican Thomas Dillingham 543 1.18%
Republican Shawn Dandridge 517 1.12%
Republican Mel Hassell 266 0.58%
Total votes 45,785 100%
Runoff
Republican primary runoff results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jake Ellzey
Republican Ron Wright
Total votes

Democratic primaryEdit

Runoff
Declared
  • John Duncan, lawyer and healthcare professional[36]
  • Levii R. Shocklee, of Arlington[37]
  • Justin Snider, small businessman[38]
Results
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ruby Faye Woolridge 10,857 36.94%
Democratic Jana Lynne Sanchez 10,838 36.87%
Democratic John W. Duncan 3,978 13.53%
Democratic Justin Snider 2,014 6.85%
Democratic Levii R. Shocklee 1,702 5.79%
Total votes 29,389 100%
Runoff Results
Democratic Runoff primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ruby Faye Woolridge ' '
Democratic Jana Lynne Sanchez ' '
Total votes '' ''

Libertarian District ConventionEdit

Declared
  • Jason Allen Harber[39]

District 7Edit

The 7th district serves a small area of western Harris County. The current representative is John Culberson, who's served the district since 2001. He was reelected in 2016 with 56.17% of the vote. The PVI for the district is R+7.

Republican primaryEdit

Nominee
Declared
  • Edward Ziegler, businessman[40]
Results
Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Culberson 28,944 76.10%
Republican Edward Ziegler 9,088 23.90%
Total votes 38,032 100%

Democratic primaryEdit

Runoff
  • Lizzie Pannill Fletcher, attorney[41]
  • Laura Moser, writer, organizer and Daily Action founder.[42]
Declared
  • Joshua Butler, University of Houston Director of Advancement[43]
  • James Cargas, Democratic nominee for TX-07 in 2012, 2014 and 2016[43]
  • Ivan Sanchez
  • Alex Triantaphyllis, Director of Immigration and Economic Opportunity at BakerRipley[40]
  • Jason Westin, physician[43]
Results
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Lizzie Pannill Fletcher 9,731 29.33%
Democratic Laura Moser 8,077 24.35%
Democratic Jason Westin 6,364 19.18%
Democratic Alex Triantaphyllis 5,219 15.73%
Democratic Ivan Sanchez 1,890 5.70%
Democratic Joshua Butler 1,245 3.75%
Democratic James Cargas 650 1.96%
Total votes 33,176 100%
Runoff Results
Democratic primary runoff results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Lizzie Pannill Fletcher ' '
Democratic Laura Moser ' '
Total votes '' ''

General electionEdit

PollingEdit

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
John
Culberson (R)
Democratic
opponent (D)
Other Undecided
PPP/Patriot Majority USA November 8–10, 2017 518 ± 4.0% 39% 49% 12%

District 8Edit

The 8th district includes Montgomery County and Walker County. It includes much of the northern outlying areas of metro Houston. The current Representative from District 8 is Republican Kevin Brady and has been since 1997. Brady was reelected in 2016 unopposed. The PVI for this district is R+28. A Democrat and an independent are running for this seat.

Republican primaryEdit

Nominee

Democratic primaryEdit

Nominee
  • Steven David, business consultant to the City of Houston[44]

Libertarian District ConventionEdit

Declared

Independent candidatesEdit

  • Todd Carlton, crop consultant[44]

District 9Edit

The 9th district serves the southwestern portion of the Greater Houston area in Texas. The current Representative for the district, since 2005, is Democrat Al Green. Green was reelected with 80.64% of the vote in 2016. The PVI for this district is D+28.

Democratic primaryEdit

Nominee

Libertarian District ConventionEdit

Declared

District 10Edit

The 10th district serves the northwestern portion of the Greater Houston region stretching to the Austin area of Texas. The current representative is Michael McCaul, who has served since 2005. McCaul was reelected with 57.33% of the vote in 2016. The district's PVI is R+9.

Republican primaryEdit

Nominee
Declared
  • John W. Cook
Results
Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michael McCaul 41,881 80.08%
Republican John W. Cook 10,413 19.91%
Total votes 52,294 100%

Democratic primaryEdit

Runoff
  • Mike Siegel
  • Tawana Walter-Cadien
Declared
  • Madeline K. Eden
  • Richie DeGrow
  • Matt Harris
  • Kevin Nelson
  • Tami Walker
Results
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mike Siegel 15,434 39.97%
Democratic Tawana Walter-Cadien 6,938 17.97%
Democratic Tami Walker 6,015 15.58%
Democratic Madeline K. Eden 5,514 14.28%
Democratic Matt Harris 2,825 7.32%
Democratic Kevin Nelson 1,589 4.11%
Democratic Richie DeGrow 301 0.77%
Total votes 38,616 100%
Runoff Results
Democratic Runoff primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mike Siegel ' '
Democratic Tawana Walter-Cadien ' '
Total votes '' ''

Libertarian District ConventionEdit

Declared

District 11Edit

The 11th district serves the midwestern portion of the state of Texas. The current Representative from District 11 is Mike Conaway. Major cities in the district are Lamesa, Midland, Odessa, San Angelo, Granbury, and Brownwood. The current representative is Mike Conaway, who has served since 2005. Conaway was reelected with 89.50% of the vote in 2016, without a Democratic opponent. The PVI is R+32, making this one of the most Republican districts in the country.

Republican primaryEdit

Nominee
Declared
  • Paul Myers
Results
Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mike Conaway 63,410 82.94%
Republican Paul Myers 13,047 17.06%
Total votes 76,457 100%

Democratic primaryEdit

Nominee
  • Jennie Lou Leeder, Chairperson of the Llano County Democratic Party[50]
Declared
  • Eric Pfalzgraf
Results
Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jennie Lou Leeder 7,264 82.70%
Democratic Eric Pfalzgraf 1,520 17.30%
Total votes 8,784 100%

Libertarian District ConventionEdit

Declared
  • Nicholas Landholt[51]
  • Rhett Rosenquest Smith[52]

District 12Edit

The 12th district serves the western half of Tarrant County as well as all of Parker and an eastern portion of Wise Counties in the state of Texas. The current Representative from District 12 is Republican Kay Granger, who has served since 1997. Granger was reelected with 69.40% of the vote in 2016. The district's PVI is R+18. One Democrat is running for the seat.

Republican primaryEdit

Nominee

Democratic primaryEdit

Nominee
  • Vanessa Adia, schoolteacher, activist[53]
Withdrew

Libertarian District ConventionEdit

Declared

District 13Edit

The 13th district includes most of the Texas Panhandle, parts of Texoma and northeastern parts of North Texas. It winds across the Panhandle into the South Plains, then runs east across the Red River Valley. Covering over 40,000 square miles (100,000 km2), it is the second-largest district geographically in Texas and larger in area than thirteen entire states. The principal cities in the district are Amarillo and Wichita Falls. The incumbent representative is Mac Thornberry, serving since 1995. He was reelected with 89.97% of the vote, without facing a Democratic candidate. The thirteenth's district PVI is R+33, making it the most Republican district in the country.

Republican primaryEdit

Nominee

Democratic primaryEdit

Nominee
  • Greg Sagan, Navy veteran[56]

Libertarian District ConventionEdit

Declared

District 14Edit

The 14th district covers the area south and southwest of the Greater Houston region, including Galveston, in the state of Texas. The district now stretches from Freeport to Beaumont. Republican Randy Weber is the incumbent, serving since 2013. He was reelected with 61.86% of the vote in 2016. The district's PVI is R+12. The sole Democratic candidate to declare their candidacy, Adrienne Bell, has been endorsed by Brand New Congress.

Republican primaryEdit

Nominee

Randy Weber, incumbent representative

Declared
  • Keith Casey
  • Bill "Sarge" Sargent
Results
Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Randy Weber 33,509 75.23%
Republican Bill "Sarge" Sargent 8,742 19.62%
Republican Keith Casey 2,291 5.14%
Total votes 44,542 100

Democratic primaryEdit

Nominee
  • Adrienne Bell, education administrator[58]
Declared
  • Levy Q. Barnes, Jr.
Results
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Adrienne Bell 19,458 79.80%
Democratic Levy Q. Barnes, Jr. 4,923 20.19%
Total votes 24,381 100%

Libertarian District ConventionEdit

Declared
  • Don E. Conley III[59]

District 15Edit

The 15th district serves a thin section of the far south of the state of Texas, from McAllen to the northeastern suburbs of San Antonio. The district's current Representative is Democrat Vicente González, elected in 2016. González was elected with 57.31% of the vote. The district's PVI is D+7.

RepublicanEdit

Nominee
  • Tim Westley

DemocraticEdit

Nominee

Libertarian District ConventionEdit

Declared

District 16Edit

The 16th district serves El Paso and the surrounding area in the state of Texas. The current Representative from District 16 is Democrat Beto O'Rourke, serving since 2013. O'Rourke was reelected with 85.73% of the vote in 2016, without facing a Republican candidate. O'Rourke is retiring from his seat to challenge Senator Ted Cruz in the state's 2018 Senate election. The district's PVI is D+17.

Republican primaryEdit

Nominee
  • Rick Seeberger
Declared
  • Alia Garcia-Ureste
Results
Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rick Seeberger 7,273 69.33%
Republican Alia Garcia-Ureste 3,216 30.66%
Total votes 10,489 100%

Democratic primaryEdit

Nominee
Declared
  • John Carillo, public radio executive[63]
  • Norma Chavez
  • Dori Fenebock, former El Paso Independent School Board President[64]
  • Enrique Garcia, immigration attorney[65]
  • Jerome Tilghman
Not on ballot
  • Nicole LeClaire, schoolteacher[66]
Results
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Veronica Escobar 30,630 61.42%
Democratic Dori Fenenbock 10,992 22.04%
Democratic Norma Chavez 3,325 6.66%
Democratic Enrique Garcia 2,661 5.33%
Democratic Jerome Tilghman 1,489 2.98%
Democratic John Carrillo 771 1.54%
Total votes 49,868 100%

Libertarian County ConventionEdit

Declared
  • Mackenzie Grubbs[67]

District 17Edit

The 17th district serves a strip of central Texas stretching from Waco to Bryan-College Station, including former President George W. Bush's McLennan County ranch.[68][69] The district is currently represented by Republican Bill Flores, who has served since 2011. Flores was reelected with 60.81% of the vote in 2016. The district's PVI is R+12. Three Democrats are currently running for the seat.

Republican primaryEdit

Nominee

Bill Flores, incumbent representative

Democratic primaryEdit

Nominee
  • Rick Kennedy, software programmer[70]
Declared
  • Dale Mantey, epidemiologist[71]
  • Scott Sturm, paramedic[72]
Results
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Rick Kennedy 14,343 63.34%
Democratic Dale Mantey 8,300 36.65%
Total votes 22,643 100%

Libertarian District ConventionEdit

Declared
  • Nicholas Becker[73]
  • Peter Churchman[74]

District 18Edit

The 18th district serves much of inner city Houston and the surrounding area. It has been the Downtown Houston district since 1973. The current Representative from District 18 is Democratic Sheila Jackson Lee, serving since 1995. Jackson Lee won re-election in 2016 with 73.50%. The district's PVI D+27.

RepublicanEdit

Nominee
  • Ava Reynero Pate[75]

DemocraticEdit

Nominee
Declared
  • Richard Johnson
Results
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Sheila Jackson Lee 34,514 86.03%
Democratic Richard Johnson 5,604 13.96%
Total votes 40,118 100%

Libertarian County ConventionEdit

Declared

District 19Edit

The 19th district serves the upper midwestern portion of the state of Texas The district includes portions of the State from Lubbock to Abilene. The current Representative from the 19th District is Republican Jodey Arrington, serving since 2017. Arrington was elected 86.65% of the vote in 2016, without a Democratic opponent. The district's PVI is R+27. Two Democrats are running for the seat.

Republican primaryEdit

Nominee

Democratic primaryEdit

Nominee
  • Miguel Lavario, college professor[77]
Withdrew

District 20Edit

The 20th district serves the western half of San Antonio and Bexar County in Texas. The district is heavily Latino/Hispanic (predominantly of Mexican descent), as is the surrounding area. The incumbent representative is a Democrat Joaquín Castro, serving since 2013. He was reelected in 2016 with 79.74% of the vote without a Republican opponent.

Democratic primaryEdit

Nominee

Libertarian County ConventionEdit

Declared
  • Chuck Pena[80]
  • Jeffrey Blunt[81]
  • Michael "Commander" Idrogo[82]

District 21Edit

The 21st district serves the area north of San Antonio and a significant portion of Austin. The current Representative is Republican Lamar Smith, serving since 1987. Smith was reelected with 57.01% of the vote in 2016. The district's PVI is R+10.

In November 2017, Smith announced that he would retire at the end of his current term, and not seek re-election in 2018.[83] Currently, four Democrats are running for the open seat.

Republican primaryEdit

Runoff
  • Matt McCall
  • Chip Roy, former Chief of Staff to Senator Ted Cruz[84]
Declared
  • Ivan A. Andarza
  • Eric Burkhart
  • Francisco "Quico" Canseco, former U.S. Representative
  • Mauro Garza
  • Foster Hagen
  • Jason Isaac, State Representative[85]
  • Ryan Krause
  • Susan Narvaiz
  • William Negley
  • Al M. Poteet
  • Autry J. Pruitt
  • Jenifer Sarver
  • Robert Stovall
  • Samuel Temple
  • Peggy Wardlaw
  • Anthony J. White
Declined
Results
Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Chip Roy 19,319 27.05%
Republican Matt McCall 12,088 16.93%
Republican William Negley 11,088 15.53%
Republican Jason Isaac 7,165 10.03%
Republican Jenifer Sarver 4,001 5.60%
Republican Robert Stovall 3,396 4.75%
Republican Susan Narvaiz 2,710 3.79%
Republican Francisco "Quico" Canseco 2,484 3.47%
Republican Ryan Krause 2,289 3.20%
Republican Al M. Poteet 1,292 1.80%
Republican Peggy Wardlaw 1,281 1.79%
Republican Samuel Temple 1,017 1.42%
Republican Anthony J. White 949 1.32%
Republican Eric Burkhart 719 1.00%
Republican Mauro Garza 657 0.92%
Republican Autry J. Pruitt 454 0.63%
Republican Foster Hagen 392 0.54%
Republican Ivan A. Andarza 95 0.13%
Total votes 71,396 100%
Runoff
Republican primary runoff results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Matt McCall
Republican Chip Roy
Total votes

Democratic primaryEdit

Runoff
  • Joseph Kopser, Army veteran[87]
  • Mary Wilson, pastor[88]
Declared
  • Derrick Crowe, activist[89]
  • Elliott McFadden, executive director of Austin B-Cycle[88]
Results
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mary Street Wilson 15,669 30.92%
Democratic Joseph Kopser 14,684 28.98%
Democratic Derrick Crowe 11,686 23.06%
Democratic Elliott McFadden 8,625 17.02%
Total votes 50,664 100%
Runoff Results
Democratic Runoff primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joseph Kopser ' '
Democratic Mary Street Wilson ' '
Total votes '' ''

Libertarian District ConventionEdit

Declared

District 22Edit

The 22nd district covers a largely suburban south-central portion of the Greater Houston metropolitan area. The district includes the majority of Fort Bend County, including most of the cities of Sugar Land, Missouri City, Rosenberg, Needville and the county seat of Richmond as well as the county's share of the largely unincorporated Greater Katy area west of Houston. In addition, the district also contains portions of northern Brazoria County including Pearland and Alvin as well as a small portion of southeast Harris County centered on Friendswood. The district is currently represented by Republican Pete Olson, serving since 2009. Olson was reelected with 59.52% of the vote in 2016. The district's PVI is R+10.

Republican primaryEdit

Nominee
Declared
  • Danny Nguyen
  • James Green
  • Eric Zmrhal
Results
Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Pete Olson 35,782 78.38%
Republican Danny Nguyen 6,170 13.51%
Republican James Green 2,521 5.52%
Republican Eric Zmrhal 1,174 2.57%
Total votes 45,647 100%

Democratic primaryEdit

Runoff
  • Sri Preston Kulkarni
  • Letitia Plummer, small business owner[93]
Declared
  • Steve Brown
  • Mark Gibson
  • Margarita Ruiz Johnson
Results
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Sri Preston Kulkarni 9,466 31.81%
Democratic Letitia Plummer 7,230 24.29%
Democratic Steve Brown 6,246 20.99%
Democratic Margarita Ruiz Johnson 3,767 12.66%
Democratic Mark Gibson 3,046 10.23%
Total votes 29,755 100%
Runoff Results
Democratic Runoff primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Sri Preston Kulkarni ' '
Democratic Letitia Plummer ' '
Total votes '' ''

Libertarian District ConventionEdit

Declared
  • John B. McElligott[94]

District 23Edit

The 23rd district stretches across the southwestern portion of Texas. It is a prominently Hispanic-majority district and its current Representative is Republican Will Hurd, serving since 2015. Hurd was narrowly reelected in 2016, with 48.7% of the vote. The district's PVI is R+1.

Republican primaryEdit

Nominee
Declared
  • Alma Arredondo-Lynch
Results
Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Will Hurd 24,866 80.23%
Republican Alma Arredondo-Lynch 6,126 19.76%
Total votes 30,992 100%

Democratic primaryEdit

Runoff
Declared
Results
Results
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gina Ortiz Jones 18,382 41.47%
Democratic Rick Trevino 7,748 17.48%
Democratic Judy Canales 7,532 16.99%
Democratic Jay Hulings 6,640 14.98%
Democratic Angela "Angie" Villescaz 4,018 9.06%
Total votes 44,320 100%
Results
Democratic primary runoff results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gina Ortiz Jones ' '
Democratic Rick Treviño ' '
Total votes '' ''

Libertarian District ConventionEdit

Declared

PollingEdit

General electionEdit

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Will
Hurd (R)
Democratic
candidate
Other Undecided
PPP/Patriot Majority USA February 12–13, 2018 659 ± 3.8% 44% 43% 13%

District 24Edit

The 24th district serves a suburban area in between Fort Worth and Dallas in the state of Texas. The district centers along the Dallas-Tarrant county line, and includes the southeastern corner of Denton County as well. The incumbent representative is Republican Kenny Marchant, serving since 2005. Marchant won reelection in 2016 with 56.18% of the vote. The PVI is R+9.

Republican primaryEdit

Nominee
Declared
  • Johnathan Kyle Davidson
Results
Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Kenny Marchant 30,310 74.40%
Republican Johnathan Kyle Davidson 10,425 25.59%
Total votes 40,735 100%

Democratic primaryEdit

Nominee
  • Jan McDowell, accountant[99]
Declared
  • Edward "Todd" Allen
  • John Biggan
  • Josh Imhoff
Results
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jan McDowell 14,551 52.45%
Democratic John Biggan 5,970 21.52%
Democratic Edward "Todd" Allen 5,556 20.02%
Democratic Josh Imhoff 1,663 5.99%
Total votes 27,740 100%

Libertarian District ConventionEdit

Declared

District 25Edit

The 25th district stretches from Fort Worth to Austin. The current Representative from District 25 is Republican Roger Williams, serving since 2013. Williams was reelected with 58.35% of the vote in 2016. The district has a PVI of R+11.

Republican primaryEdit

Nominee

Democratic primaryEdit

Runoff
Declared
  • West Hansen[103]
  • Chetan Panda[103]
  • Kathi Thomas,[103] the Democratic nominee in 2016
Results
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Chris Perri 13,896 32.76%
Democratic Julie Oliver 11,220 26.45%
Democratic Kathi Thomas 8,976 21.16%
Democratic West Hansen 4,479 10.56%
Democratic Chetan Panda 3,835 9.04%
Total votes 42,406 100%
Runoff Results
Democratic Runoff primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Chris Perri ' '
Democratic Julie Oliver ' '
Total votes '' ''

Libertarian District ConventionEdit

Declared

District 26Edit

The 26th district serves an area in the northern portion of the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex centering on Denton County. The current Representative is Republican Michael C. Burgess, serving since 2003. Burgess was reelected in 2016 with 66.36% of the vote. The district's PVI is R+18.

Burgess is running for reelection. He is being challenged in the Republican primary by Veronica Birkenstock. Four Democrats and a Libertarian are also running.

Republican primaryEdit

Nominee
Declared
  • Veronica Birkenstock, small business owner[106]
Results
Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michael C. Burgess 42,290 76.92%
Republican Veronica Birkenstock 12,684 23.07%
Total votes 54,974 100%

Democratic primaryEdit

Nominee
  • Linsey Fagan, activist[107]
Declared
  • Will Fisher, attorney[107]
Not on ballot
  • Michael Callaway, former Republican[106]
  • John Wannamaker, deacon[108]
Results
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Linsey Fagan 13,817 52.69%
Democratic Will Fisher 12,402 47.30%
Total votes 26,219 100%

Libertarian District ConventionEdit

Declared

Mark Boler, Libertarian nominee in TX-26 in 2012, 2014 and 2016[109]

District 27Edit

The 27th district serves the coastal bend of Texas' Gulf Coast consisting of Corpus Christi and Victoria up to Bastrop County near Austin and Wharton County near Houston. The most recent representative is Republican Blake Farenthold, who served from 2011 until April 2018. Farenthold was reelected with 61.69% of the vote in 2016, and the district's PVI is R+13. Farenthold is retiring from Congress and not running for re-election in 2018.[110][111] Farenthold resigned on April 6, 2018.[112]

Republican primaryEdit

Runoff
  • Bech Bruun
  • Michael Cloud, former Victoria County Republican Party chairman[113]
Declared
  • Eddie Gassman
  • John Grunwald
  • Jerry Hall
  • Christopher K. Mapp
Results
Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bech Bruun 15,845 36.09%
Republican Michael Cloud 14,866 33.86%
Republican Christopher K. Mapp 5,302 12.07%
Republican Jerry Hall 3,616 8.23%
Republican John Grunwald 3,038 6.92%
Republican Eddie Gassman 1,226 2.79%
Total votes 43,893 100%
Runoff
Republican primary runoff results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bech Bruun
Republican Michael Cloud
Total votes

Democratic primaryEdit

Runoff
  • Raul (Roy) Barrera
  • Eric Holguin, former congressional staffer[114]
Declared
  • Vanessa Edwards Foster
  • Ronnie McDonald
Results
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Raul (Roy) Barrera 8,733 41.21%
Democratic Eric Holguin 4,939 23.31%
Democratic Vanessa Edwards Foster 4,041 19.07%
Democratic Ronnie McDonald 3,474 16.39%
Total votes 21,187 100%
Runoff Results
Democratic Runoff primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Raul (Roy) Barrera ' '
Democratic Eric Holguin ' '
Total votes '' ''

Libertarian District ConventionEdit

Declared

District 28Edit

The 28th district serves a strip in the deep south Texas starting south of San Antonio and ending at the U.S.-Mexico border. The current Representative from District 28 is Democrat Henry Cuellar, who has served since 2005. Cuellar was reelected in 2016 with 66.19% of the vote. The district's PVI is D+9.

Democratic primaryEdit

Nominee

Libertarian District ConventionEdit

Declared

District 29Edit

The 29th district serves the eastern portion of the Greater Houston area in the state of Texas. The current Representative from District 29 is Democrat Gene Green, who has served since 1993. Green was reelected with 72.47% of the vote in 2016. The district's PVI is D+19.

In November 2017, Green announced that would not run for re-election in 2018.[117] After Green's announcement, Democrats Sylvia Garcia, member of the Texas Senate for the 6th district, Armando Walle, member of the Texas House of Representatives for the 140th district, teacher Hector Morales and Republicans Adrian Garcia, the former Sheriff of Harris County, and businessman Robert Schafranek all announced their candidacy for the seat.[118]

Republican primaryEdit

Runoff
Declared
  • Jaimy Z. Blanco
  • Robert Schafranek, businessman[118]
Results
Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Phillip Aronoff 2,402 38.61%
Republican Carmen Maria Montiel 1,467 23.58%
Republican Jaimy Z. Blanco 1,309 21.04%
Republican Robert Schafranek 1,042 16.75%
Total votes 6,220 100%
Runoff
Republican primary runoff results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Phillip Aronoff
Republican Carmen Maria Montiel
Total votes

Democratic primaryEdit

Nominee
Declared
Declined
Results
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Sylvia Garcia 11,659 63.21%
Democratic Tahir Javed 3,817 20.69%
Democratic Roel Garcia 1,217 6.59%
Democratic Hector Morales 562 3.04%
Democratic Augustine H. Reyes 524 2.84%
Democratic Dominique Michelle Garcia 472 2.55%
Democratic Pedro Valencia 192 1.04%
Total votes 18,443 100%


Libertarian County ConventionEdit

Declared

District 30Edit

The 30th district serves much of the city of Dallas and other parts of Dallas County (primarily black- and Hispanic-majority areas). The current Representative from District 30 is Democrat Eddie Bernice Johnson, who has represented the district since its creation in 1993. She was reelected in 2016 with 77.92% of the vote. The district's PVI is D+29. Johnson is running for reelection.

Democratic primaryEdit

Nominee
Declared
  • Eric Williams
  • Barbara Mallory Caraway
Results
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Eddie Bernice Johnson 32,415 63.57%
Democratic Barbara Mallory Caraway 11,641 22.83%
Democratic Eric Williams 6,931 13.59%
Total votes 50,987 100%

Libertarian County ConventionEdit

Declared

District 31Edit

The 31st district serves a strip of central Texas from north Austin up to Temple. The district includes the portion of Austin located in Williamson County and most of the fast-growing northern suburbs of Austin, as well as a portion of the area surrounding Fort Hood. Republican John Carter has served since 2003, this district's creation. He was reelected with 58.35% of the vote in 2016. The district's PVI is R+10. Carter is running for reelection. He is being challenged in the Republican primary by Mike Sweeney. Three Democrats, including Air Force veteran and writer MJ Hegar, are also running.

Republican primaryEdit

Nominee
Declared
  • Mike Sweeney, member of the Board of the Chisholm Trail Special Utility District, candidate for the Republican nomination in TX-31 in 2016[125]
Results
Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Carter 34,513 65.49%
Republican Mike Sweeney 18,184 34.50%
Total votes 52,697 100%

Democratic primaryEdit

Runoff
Declared
  • Mike Clark, geospatial engineer, Democratic nominee for TX-31 in 2016[127]
  • Kent Lester, Army veteran and former schoolteacher[127]
Results
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic MJ Hegar 13,848 44.90%
Democratic Christine Eady Mann 10,340 33.52%
Democratic Mike Clark 3,465 11.23%
Democratic Kent Lester 3,188 10.33%
Total votes 30,841 100%
Runoff Results
Democratic Runoff primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic MJ Hegar ' '
Democratic Christine Eady Mann ' '
Total votes '' ''

Libertarian District ConventionEdit

Declared

District 32Edit

The 32nd district serves a suburban area of northeastern Dallas, Texas. It is represented by Republican Pete Sessions, serving since 1997. He was reelected with 71.07% of the vote in 2016 without a Democratic opponent. The district's PVI is R+5, due to 2016 Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's performance in the district. Sessions is running for reelection. Six Democrats are also running, including civil rights attorney and former NFL player Colin Allred, longtime Democratic operative Ed Meier, and former Department of Agriculture official Lilian Salerno.

Republican primaryEdit

Nominee
Declared
  • Paul Brown
Results
Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Pete Sessions 32,784 79.26%
Republican Paul Brown 8,575 20.73%
Total votes 41,359 100%

Democratic primaryEdit

Runoff
Declared
  • Ed Meier, Executive Director of BigThought, former co-Executive Director of Hillary Clinton's presidential transition team[131]
  • Ron Marshall
  • Todd Maternowski
  • Danielle Pellett, LGBT activist[132]
  • Darrell Rodriguez, former schoolteacher[133]
  • George Rodriguez, attorney[134]
  • Brett Shipp
Results
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Colin Allred 15,442 38.52%
Democratic Lillian Salerno 7,343 18.31%
Democratic Brett Shipp 6,550 16.34%
Democratic Ed Meier 5,474 13.65%
Democratic George Rodriguez 3,029 7.55%
Democratic Ron Marshall 1,301 3.24%
Democratic Todd Maternowski 945 2.35%
Total votes 40,084 100%
Runoff Results

The runoff election will take place on May 22, 2018.[135]

Democratic Runoff primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Colin Allred ' '
Democratic Lillian Salerno ' '
Total votes '' ''

Libertarian District ConventionEdit

Declared

General electionEdit

PollingEdit

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Pete
Sessions (R)
Democratic
opponent (D)
Other Undecided
PPP/Patriot Majority USA November 8–9, 2017 534 ± 4.2% 43% 48% 9%

District 33Edit

The 33rd district is composed of two counties in Texas—Dallas County and Tarrant County. In Dallas County, the district covers parts of Dallas, Irving, and Grand Prairie, and all of Cockrell Hill. In Tarrant County, the district includes parts of Arlington, Forest Hill, Fort Worth, Grand Prairie, Haltom City, Saginaw and Sansom Park, and all of Everman. It is currently represented by Democrat Marc Veasey, and has been since the district's creation in 2013. Veasey was reelected with 73.71% of the vote in 2016. The district's PVI is D+23.

Republican primaryEdit

Nominee
  • Willie Billups

Democratic primaryEdit

Nominee
Declared
  • Carlos Quintanilla
Results
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Marc Veasey 14,998 70.64%
Democratic Carlos Quintanilla 6,233 29.35%
Total votes 21,231 100%

Libertarian District ConventionEdit

Declared

District 34Edit

The 34th district is composed of the area on the Gulf Coast between Brownsville and Corpus Christi. It is currently represented by Democrat Filemon Vela Jr. and has been since the district's creation in 2013. Vela was reelected with 62.67% of the vote in 2016. The district's PVI is D+10.

Republican primaryEdit

Nominee
  • Rey Gonzalez

Democratic primaryEdit

Nominee

District 35Edit

The 35th district includes parts of the San Antonio metropolitan area, including portions of Bexar County, thin strips of Comal and Hays, and a portion of Caldwell county, as well as portions of southern and eastern Austin in Travis County.[138]

In March 2017, a panel of federal judges ruled that the 35th district was illegally drawn with discriminatory intent.[139] In August, 2017 there was another ruling that the district is unconstitutional.[140]

The district is currently represented by Democrat Lloyd Doggett, and has been since its creation in 2013. Doggett previously represented Texas's 25th congressional district before redistricting. Doggett won reelection in 2016 with 63.07% of the vote. The district's PVI is D+15 Doggett is running for reelection.


Republican primaryEdit

Nominee
  • David Smalling
Declared
  • Sherrill Kenneth (SK) Alexander
Results
Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican David Smalling 7,083 53.33%
Republican Sherrill Kenneth (SK) Alexander 6,198 46.66%
Total votes 13,281 100%

Democratic primaryEdit

Nominee

Libertarian District ConventionEdit

Declared

District 36Edit

The 36th district is located in southeast Texas and includes all of Newton, Jasper, Tyler, Polk, Orange, Hardin, Liberty, and Chambers counties, plus portions of southeastern Harris County.[143] The Johnson Space Center is within the district. It is currently represented by Republican Brian Babin, who has served since 2015. Babin was reelected in 2016 with 88.61% of the vote, without a Democratic opponent. Two Democrats have announced their candidacy, scientist/environmental consultant Jon Powell and radio and television personality Dayna Steele.

Republican primaryEdit

Nominee

Democratic primaryEdit

Nominee
Declared
  • Jon Powell, scientist[145]
Results
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dayna Steele 9,848 72.01%
Democratic Jon Powell 3,827 27.98%
Total votes 13,675 100%

Libertarian District ConventionEdit

Declared

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

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External linksEdit

Official campaign websites of first district candidates
Official campaign websites of second district candidates
Official campaign websites of third district candidates
Official campaign websites of fourth district candidates
Official campaign websites of fifth district candidates
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