The 1020s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1020, and ended on December 31, 1029.

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
Categories:

Events

1020

By placeEdit

1021

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
AfricaEdit
AsiaEdit

1022

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
EuropeEdit
  • Spring – Emperor Henry II divides his army into three columns and descends through Rome onto Capua. The bulk of the expeditionary force (20,000 men) led by Henry, makes its way down the Adriatic coast.
  • Pilgrim, archbishop of Cologne, marches with his army down the Tyrrhenian coast to lay siege to Capua. The citizens open the gates and surrender the city to the imperial army.[3]
  • Pilgrim besieges the city of Salerno for forty days. Prince Guaimar III offers to give hostages – Pilgrim accepts the prince's son and co-prince Guaimar IV, and lifts the siege.[4]
  • Summer – Outbreak of the plague among the German troops forces Henry II to abandon his campaign in Italy. He reimposes his suzerainty on the Lombard principalities.
  • King Olof Skötkonung dies and is succeeded by his son Anund Jakob (or James) as ruler of Sweden. He becomes the second Christian king of the Swedish realm.
AfricaEdit
AsiaEdit
  • The Chinese military has one million registered soldiers during the Song Dynasty, an increase since the turn of the 11th century (approximate date).

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1023

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1024

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
EuropeEdit
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1025

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
EuropeEdit
AfricaEdit
AsiaEdit

1026

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
AsiaEdit
  • A Zubu revolt against the Liao dynasty is suppressed, with the Zubu forced to pay an annual tribute of horses, camels and furs.

1027

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

Science, technology and medicineEdit

1028

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
EnglandEdit
EuropeEdit

1029

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

Significant peopleEdit

BirthsEdit

1020

1021

1022

1023

1024

1025

1026

1027

1028

1029

DeathsEdit

1020

1021

1022

1023

1024

1025

1026

1027

1028

1029


ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Bresc, Henri (2003). "La Sicile et l'espace libyen au Moyen Age" (PDF). Parte prima. Il regno normanno e il Mediterraneo. Retrieved 17 January 2012.
  2. ^ Hewsen, Robert H. (2001). Armenia: A Historical Atlas. The University of Chicago Press. p. 126. ISBN 0-226-33228-4.
  3. ^ Norwich, John Julius (1967). The Normans in the South. London: Longman, pp. 26–28.
  4. ^ Amatus, Dunbar & Loud (2004), p. 53. The young prince was sent to the papal court for safekeeping according to Amatus.
  5. ^ Walker, Williston (1921). A History of the Christian Church. Charles Scribner's Sons, p. 218.
  6. ^ Ortenberg. Anglo-Saxon Church and the Papacy. English Church and the Papacy, p. 49.
  7. ^ Wortley, John, ed. (2010). John Skylitzes: A Synopsis of Byzantine History, 811–1057. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 347. ISBN 978-0-521-76705-7.
  8. ^ Boissonade, B. "Les premières croisades françaises en Espagne. Normands, Gascons, Aquitains et Bourguignons (1018-1032)". Bulletin Hispanique. 36 (1): 5–28. doi:10.3406/hispa.1934.2607.
  9. ^ Meynier, Gilbert (2010). L'Algérie cœur du Maghreb classique. De l'ouverture islamo-arabe au repli (658-1518). Paris: La Découverte. p.50.
  10. ^ Jonathan Riley-Smith (2004). The New Cambridge Medieval History. Volume IV c.1024–c.1198. p. 72. ISBN 978-0-521-41411-1.
  11. ^ Lucy Margaret Smith (1920). The Early History of the Monastery of Cluny. Oxford University Press.
  12. ^ Dated 1025 by the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, which gives the victory to Sweden.
  13. ^ Wolfram, Herwig (2006). Conrad II, 990-1039: Emperor of Three Kingdoms. Pennsylvania State University Press. p. 102. ISBN 0-271-02738-X.
  14. ^ Clark, William W. (2006). Medieval Cathedrals. Westport, CT: Greenwood Publishing. p. 87. ISBN 978-0-313-32693-6.
  15. ^ Goodman, Lenn Evan (1992). Avicenna. London: Routledge. p. 31. ISBN 0-415-01929-X.