Fujiwara no Kinsue

Fujiwara no Kinsue (藤原 公季; 957–1029), also known as Kaikō, was a Japanese statesman, courtier and politician during the Heian period.[1]

Fujiwara no Kinsue
Born957
Died1029
NationalityJapanese
ParentsFujiwara no Morosuke (father)

CareerEdit

Kinsue served as a minister during the reign of Emperor Go-Ichijō.

  • 997 (Chōtoku 3, 7th month): Kinsue was promoted from the office of dainagon to nadaijin.[2]
  • 1017 (Kannin 1, 3rd month): Kinsue is made udaijin.[3]
  • 1021 (Jian 1, 7th month): Kinsue was promoted from the office of udaijin to daijō daijin.[4]
  • 1029 (Chōgen 2, 10th month): Daijō daijin Kinsue died;[1] and he was posthumously named Kai-kō. He was given the posthumous title of as Jingi-kō (仁義公).[5]

GenealogyEdit

This member of the Fujiwara clan was a son of Morosuke.[1] Kinsue's mother was Imperial Princess Kōshi, daughter of Emperor Daigo. She died in Kinsue's childhood; and he was brought up by his sister Empress Anshi, who was a consort of Emperor Murakami.

Kinsue was the youngest of his four brothers: Kaneie,[6] Kanemichi,[7] Koretada,[8] and Tamemitsu.[9]

Kinsue, also known as Kan'in Kinsue, is the progenitor of Kan'in family (閑院家) which was later divided into Sanjō family, Saionji Family, Tokudaiji family and the Tōin family.

Kinsue was married to a daughter of Imperial Prince Ariakira; and from this marriage, three children were produced:

  • Gishi (義子) (974–1053) - married to Emperor Ichijō
  • Sanenari (実成) (975–1004) - Chūnagon
  • Nyogen (如源) (977–1021) - priest (Sanmai Sōzu, 三昧僧都)

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric. (2005). "Fujiwara no Tokihira" in Japan Encyclopedia, p. 204, p. 204, at Google Books; Brinkley, Frank et al. (1915). A History of the Japanese People from the Earliest Times to the End of the Meiji Era, p. 203., p. 203, at Google Books
  2. ^ Titsingh, Isaac. (1834). Annales des empereurs du japon, p. 153, p. 153, at Google Books; see "Fousiwara-no Kin souye", pre-Hepburn romanization
  3. ^ Titsingh, p. 156., p. 156, at Google Books
  4. ^ Titsingh, p. 157., p. 157, at Google Books
  5. ^ Titsingh, p. 159., p. 159, at Google Books
  6. ^ Nussbaum, "Fujiwara no Kaneie" at p. 203, p. 203, at Google Books
  7. ^ Nussbaum, "Fujiwara no Kanemichi" at p. 203, p. 203, at Google Books
  8. ^ Nussbaum, "Fujiwara no Koretada" at p. 205, p. 205, at Google Books
  9. ^ Brinkley, p. 259., p. 259, at Google Books

ReferencesEdit

  • Brinkley, Frank and Dairoku Kikuchi. (1915). A History of the Japanese People from the Earliest Times to the End of the Meiji Era. New York: Encyclopædia Britannica. OCLC 413099
  • Hosaka, Hiroshi. (1981). 大鏡: 全現代語訳 (Ōkagami: zen gendaigoyaku). Tokyo: Kōdansha. ISBN 9784061584914; OCLC 29229916
  • Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric and Käthe Roth. (2005). Japan encyclopedia. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5; OCLC 58053128
  • Owada, Tetsuo, Masako Sugawara and Atsushi Nitō. (2003). 日本史諸家系図人名辞典 (Nihonshi shoka keizu jinmei jiten). Tokyo: Kōdansha. ISBN 9784062115780; OCLC 675318472
  • Titsingh, Isaac. (1834). Annales des empereurs du Japon (Nihon Odai Ichiran). Paris: Royal Asiatic Society, Oriental Translation Fund of Great Britain and Ireland. OCLC 5850691