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Long jump at the Olympics

The long jump at the Summer Olympics is grouped among the four track and field jumping events held at the multi-sport event. The men's long jump has been present on the Olympic athletics programme since the first Summer Olympics in 1896. The women's long jump was introduced over fifty years later in 1948 and was the second Olympic jumping event for women after the high jump, which was added in 1928.

Long jump
at the Olympic Games
Dawn Burrell at the 2000 Olympic games in Sydney.JPEG
Dawn Burrell in the 2000 Olympic long jump competition
Overview
SportAthletics
GenderMen and women
Years heldMen: 18962016
Women: 19482016
Olympic record
Men8.90 m Bob Beamon (1968)
Women7.40 m Jackie Joyner-Kersee (1988)
Reigning champion
Men Jeff Henderson (USA)
Women Tianna Bartoletta (USA)

The Olympic records for the event are 8.90 metres (29.2 ft) for men, set by Bob Beamon in 1968, and 7.40 metres (24.3 ft) for women, set by Jackie Joyner-Kersee in 1988. Beamon's mark is the longest-standing Olympic athletics record by a margin of twelve years and remains the only time a man has set a long jump world record at the competition. The women's world record has been broken on two occasions at the Olympics, with Elżbieta Krzesińska jumping 6.35 metres (20.8 ft) in 1956 and Viorica Viscopoleanu clearing 6.82 metres (22.4 ft) in 1968.[1]

Ellery Clark and Olga Gyarmati were the first men's and women's Olympic long jump champions. Jeff Henderson and Tianna Bartoletta are the reigning Olympic champions from 2016. Carl Lewis is the event's most successful athlete as he was Olympic champion four times consecutively from 1984 to 1996. Heike Drechsler is the only woman to win two Olympic long jump titles. Ralph Boston and Jackie Joyner-Kersee are the only other two athletes to win three Olympic long jump medals in their careers. The United States is by far the most successful nation in the event, with an American topping the Olympic long jump podium on 25 occasions. Great Britain, with three gold medallists, is the next most successful.

A standing long jump variant of the event was contested from 1900 to 1912 and standing jumps specialist Ray Ewry won all but one of the gold medals in its brief history.

MedalistsEdit

MenEdit

Games Gold Silver Bronze
1896 Athens
details
Ellery Clark
  United States
Robert Garrett
  United States
James Connolly
  United States
1900 Paris
details
Alvin Kraenzlein
  United States
Myer Prinstein
  United States
Patrick Leahy
  Great Britain
1904 St. Louis
details
Myer Prinstein
  United States
Daniel Frank
  United States
Robert Stangland
  United States
1908 London
details
Frank Irons
  United States
Daniel Kelly
  United States
Calvin Bricker
  Canada
1912 Stockholm
details
Albert Gutterson
  United States
Calvin Bricker
  Canada
Georg Åberg
  Sweden
1920 Antwerp
details
William Petersson
  Sweden
Carl Johnson
  United States
Erik Abrahamsson
  Sweden
1924 Paris
details
DeHart Hubbard
  United States
Edward Gourdin
  United States
Sverre Hansen
  Norway
1928 Amsterdam
details
Ed Hamm
  United States
Silvio Cator
  Haiti
Al Bates
  United States
1932 Los Angeles
details
Ed Gordon
  United States
Lambert Redd
  United States
Chūhei Nambu
  Japan
1936 Berlin
details
Jesse Owens
  United States
Luz Long
  Germany
Naoto Tajima
  Japan
1948 London
details
Willie Steele
  United States
Bill Bruce
  Australia
Herb Douglas
  United States
1952 Helsinki
details
Jerome Biffle
  United States
Meredith Gourdine
  United States
Ödön Földessy
  Hungary
1956 Melbourne
details
Gregory Bell
  United States
John Bennett
  United States
Jorma Valkama
  Finland
1960 Rome
details
Ralph Boston
  United States
Bo Roberson
  United States
Igor Ter-Ovanesyan
  Soviet Union
1964 Tokyo
details
Lynn Davies
  Great Britain
Ralph Boston
  United States
Igor Ter-Ovanesyan
  Soviet Union
1968 Mexico City
details
Bob Beamon
  United States
Klaus Beer
  East Germany
Ralph Boston
  United States
1972 Munich
details
Randy Williams
  United States
Hans Baumgartner
  West Germany
Arnie Robinson
  United States
1976 Montreal
details
Arnie Robinson
  United States
Randy Williams
  United States
Frank Wartenberg
  East Germany
1980 Moscow
details
Lutz Dombrowski
  East Germany
Frank Paschek
  East Germany
Valeriy Pidluzhnyy
  Soviet Union
1984 Los Angeles
details
Carl Lewis
  United States
Gary Honey
  Australia
Giovanni Evangelisti
  Italy
1988 Seoul
details
Carl Lewis
  United States
Mike Powell
  United States
Larry Myricks
  United States
1992 Barcelona
details
Carl Lewis
  United States
Mike Powell
  United States
Joe Greene
  United States
1996 Atlanta
details
Carl Lewis
  United States
James Beckford
  Jamaica
Joe Greene
  United States
2000 Sydney
details
Iván Pedroso
  Cuba
Jai Taurima
  Australia
Roman Shchurenko
  Ukraine
2004 Athens
details
Dwight Phillips
  United States
John Moffitt
  United States
Joan Lino Martínez
  Spain
2008 Beijing
details
Irving Saladino
  Panama
Godfrey Khotso Mokoena
  South Africa
Ibrahim Camejo
  Cuba
2012 London
details
Greg Rutherford
  Great Britain
Mitchell Watt
  Australia
Will Claye
  United States
2016 Rio de Janeiro
details
Jeff Henderson
  United States
Luvo Manyonga
  South Africa
Greg Rutherford
  Great Britain

Multiple medalistsEdit

Rank Athlete Nation Olympics Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Carl Lewis   United States (USA) 1984–1996 4 0 0 4
2 Ralph Boston   United States (USA) 1960–1968 1 1 1 3
3 Myer Prinstein   United States (USA) 1900–1904 1 1 0 2
Randy Williams   United States (USA) 1972–1976 1 1 0 2
5 Arnie Robinson   United States (USA) 1972–1976 1 0 1 2
Greg Rutherford   Great Britain (GBR) 2012–2016 1 0 1 2
7 Mike Powell   United States (USA) 1988–1992 0 2 0 2
8 Calvin Bricker   Canada (CAN) 1908–1912 0 1 1 2
9 Igor Ter-Ovanesyan   Soviet Union (URS) 1960–1964 0 0 2 2
Joe Greene   United States (USA) 1992–1996 0 0 2 2

Medalists by countryEdit

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1   United States (USA) 22 15 10 47
2   Great Britain (GBR) 2 0 2 4
3   East Germany (GDR) 1 2 1 4
4   Sweden (SWE) 1 0 2 3
5   Cuba (CUB) 1 0 1 2
6   Panama (PAN) 1 0 0 1
7   Australia (AUS) 0 4 0 4
8   South Africa (RSA) 0 2 0 2
9   Canada (CAN) 0 1 1 2
10   Germany (GER) 0 1 0 1
  Haiti (HAI) 0 1 0 1
  Jamaica (JAM) 0 1 0 1
  West Germany (FRG) 0 1 0 1
14   Soviet Union (URS) 0 0 3 3
15   Japan (JPN) 0 0 2 2
16   Finland (FIN) 0 0 1 1
  Hungary (HUN) 0 0 1 1
  Italy (ITA) 0 0 1 1
  Norway (NOR) 0 0 1 1
  Spain (ESP) 0 0 1 1
  Ukraine (UKR) 0 0 1 1

WomenEdit

Games Gold Silver Bronze
1948 London
details
Olga Gyarmati
  Hungary
Noemí Simonetto
  Argentina
Ann-Britt Leyman
  Sweden
1952 Helsinki
details
Yvette Williams
  New Zealand
Aleksandra Chudina
  Soviet Union
Shirley Cawley
  Great Britain
1956 Melbourne
details
Elżbieta Krzesińska
  Poland
Willye White
  United States
Nadezhda Khnykina-Dvalishvili
  Soviet Union
1960 Rome
details
Vera Krepkina
  Soviet Union
Elżbieta Krzesińska
  Poland
Hildrun Claus
  United Team of Germany
1964 Tokyo
details
Mary Rand
  Great Britain
Irena Kirszenstein
  Poland
Tatyana Shchelkanova
  Soviet Union
1968 Mexico City
details
Viorica Viscopoleanu
  Romania
Sheila Sherwood
  Great Britain
Tatyana Talysheva
  Soviet Union
1972 Munich
details
Heide Rosendahl
  West Germany
Diana Yorgova
  Bulgaria
Eva Šuranová
  Czechoslovakia
1976 Montreal
details
Angela Voigt
  East Germany
Kathy McMillan
  United States
Lidiya Alfeyeva
  Soviet Union
1980 Moscow
details
Tatyana Kolpakova
  Soviet Union
Brigitte Wujak
  East Germany
Tatyana Skachko
  Soviet Union
1984 Los Angeles
details
Anișoara Cușmir-Stanciu
  Romania
Valy Ionescu
  Romania
Sue Hearnshaw
  Great Britain
1988 Seoul
details
Jackie Joyner-Kersee
  United States
Heike Drechsler
  East Germany
Galina Chistyakova
  Soviet Union
1992 Barcelona
details
Heike Drechsler
  Germany
Inessa Kravets
  Unified Team
Jackie Joyner-Kersee
  United States
1996 Atlanta
details
Chioma Ajunwa
  Nigeria
Fiona May
  Italy
Jackie Joyner-Kersee
  United States
2000 Sydney
details
Heike Drechsler
  Germany
Fiona May
  Italy
Tatyana Kotova
  Russia
2004 Athens
details
Tatyana Lebedeva
  Russia
Irina Meleshina
  Russia
Tatyana Kotova
  Russia
2008 Beijing
details
Maurren Maggi
  Brazil
Tatyana Lebedeva
  Russia
Blessing Okagbare
  Nigeria
2012 London
details
Brittney Reese
  United States
Elena Sokolova
  Russia
Janay DeLoach
  United States
2016 Rio de Janeiro
details
Tianna Bartoletta
  United States
Britney Reese
  United States
Ivana Španović
  Serbia

Multiple medalistsEdit

Rank Athlete Nation Olympics Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Heike Drechsler   Germany (GER)
  East Germany (GDR)
1988–2000 2 1 0 3
2 Elżbieta Krzesińska   Poland (POL) 1956–1960 1 1 0 2
Tatyana Lebedeva   Russia (RUS) 2004–2008 1 1 0 2
Brittney Reese   United States (USA) 2012–2016 1 1 0 2
5 Jackie Joyner-Kersee   United States (USA) 1988–1996 1 0 2 3
6 Fiona May   Italy (ITA) 1996–2000 0 2 0 2
7 Tatyana Kotova   Russia (RUS) 2000–2004 0 0 2 2

Medalists by countryEdit

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1   United States (USA) 3 3 3 9
2   Soviet Union (URS) 2 1 6 9
3   Romania (ROU) 2 1 0 3
4   Germany (GER)[nb] 2 0 1 3
5   Russia (RUS) 1 3 2 6
6   East Germany (GDR) 1 2 0 3
  Poland (POL) 1 2 0 3
8   Great Britain (GBR) 1 1 2 4
9   Nigeria (NGR) 1 0 1 2
10   Brazil (BRA) 1 0 0 1
  Hungary (HUN) 1 0 0 1
  New Zealand (NZL) 1 0 0 1
  West Germany (FRG) 1 0 0 1
14   Italy (ITA) 0 2 0 2
15   Argentina (ARG) 0 1 0 1
  Bulgaria (BUL) 0 1 0 1
  Unified Team (EUN) 0 1 0 1
18   Czechoslovakia (TCH) 0 0 1 1
  Serbia (SRB) 0 0 1 1
  Sweden (SWE) 0 0 1 1

Standing long jumpEdit

Standing long jump
at the Olympic Games
 
Kostas Tsiklitiras in the 1912 standing long jump competition
Overview
SportAthletics
GenderMen
Years heldMen: 19001912
Olympic record
Men3.47 m Ray Ewry (1904)

From 1900 to 1912 a variation of the event was contested at the Olympics where athletes had to long jump from a standing position. This was one of three standing jumps to have featured on the Olympic programme, alongside the standing high jump (present for the same period) and the standing triple jump (1900 and 1904 only).[2]

The standing jump competitions were dominated by Ray Ewry, who won the Olympic standing long jump titles in 1900, 1904 and 1908. His clearance of 3.47 m (11 ft 4 12 in) at the 1904 Olympics remained as the Olympic record for the event until its discontinuation in 1912. Ewry took Olympic three gold medals in standing jumps in both 1900 and 1904, then won the standing high and long jumps at the 1908 Olympics, as well as the 1906 Intercalated Games.[3] After Ewry's retirement, Kostas Tsiklitiras became the winner of the final Olympic standing long jump competition in 1912.[4]

The standing long jump—and standing jump events in general—had been a relatively common type of athletics event at the end of the 19th century, but became increasingly rare at top level national and international competitions as the 20th century progressed.[3] The Olympic event remains the only major international competition to have featured the event, except for the first three editions of the Women's World Games in the 1920s, as well as the 1919 and 1920 editions of the South American Championships in Athletics.[5][6] The standing long jump retained some popularity as a championship event in Scandinavia in the second half of the century.[7][8]

Games Gold Silver Bronze
1900 Paris
details
Ray Ewry
  United States
Irving Baxter
  United States
Emile Torcheboeuf
  France
1904 St. Louis
details
Ray Ewry
  United States
Charles King
  United States
John Biller
  United States
1908 London
details
Ray Ewry
  United States
Konstantinos Tsiklitiras
  Greece
Martin Sheridan
  United States
1912 Stockholm
details
Konstantinos Tsiklitiras
  Greece
Platt Adams
  United States
Benjamin Adams
  United States

Intercalated GamesEdit

The 1906 Intercalated Games were held in Athens and at the time were officially recognised as part of the Olympic Games series, with the intention being to hold a games in Greece in two-year intervals between the internationally held Olympics. However, this plan never came to fruition and the International Olympic Committee (IOC) later decided not to recognise these games as part of the official Olympic series. Some sports historians continue to treat the results of these games as part of the Olympic canon.[9]

Continuing its presence since the first Olympics, a men's long jump event was contested at the 1906 Games. The two protagonists were Myer Prinstein (the 1904 champion) and Peter O'Connor (the world record holder). Prinstein won with his opening jump of 7.20 m (23 ft 7 14 in). O'Connor was runner-up in 7.02 m (23 ft 14 in) but protested the measuring of Prinstein's mark and the judgement of no-jump rulings against him. Hugo Friend was a comfortable third in 6.96 m (22 ft 10 in).[10]

Games Gold Silver Bronze
1906 Athens
details
  Myer Prinstein (USA)   Peter O'Connor (GBR)   Hugo Friend (USA)

The standing long jump variant was also contested at the Intercalated Games. Ray Ewry, who entered as the undefeated Olympic champion in the event, won a further gold medal with his mark of 3.30 m (10 ft 9 34 in). It was an American podium sweep with Martin Sheridan and Lawson Robertson taking second and third place.[11]

Games Gold Silver Bronze
1906 Athens
details
  Ray Ewry (USA)   Martin Sheridan (USA)   Lawson Robertson (USA)

Non-canonical Olympic eventsEdit

In addition to the main 1900 Olympic men's long jump, a handicap competition was held four days later. Pál Koppán of Hungary won with a mark of 7.895 m (1.60 m handicap) and John McLean of the United States came second with 7.72 m (85 cm handicap). Sources differ as to whether the third-place finisher William Percy Remington (who was fourth in the main Olympic event) or Thaddeus McClain (seventh in the Olympic long jump).[12][13]

Two professionals-only contests were held in 1900. Mike Sweeney of the United States won with 5.995 m. Another American, Otto Bruno Schoenfeld, was second in 5.60 m, while Frenchman Jules Bouchoux came third in 5.55 m. A handicap professional contest was also held but the results have not been located.[12][14]

The handicap event returned at the 1904 Summer Olympics and the three Olympic finalists who failed to win medals comprised the top three – all of them American. Fred Englehardt won with 6.82 m, Gilbert Van Cleve was runner-up with a mark of 6.53 m, and John Hagerman took third, recording 6.53 m. The corresponding handicaps are not known.[12]

These events are no longer considered part of the official Olympic history of the long jump or the athletics programme in general. Consequently, medals from these competitions have not been assigned to nations on the all-time medal tables.[12]

ReferencesEdit

Participation and athlete data
Olympic record progressions
Specific
  1. ^ 12th IAAF World Championships In Athletics: IAAF Statistics Handbook Berlin 2009 (pgs. 546, 556, 646). IAAF (2009). Retrieved on 2014-05-03.
  2. ^ Athletics Men's Standing Long Jump Medalists. Sports Reference. Retrieved on 2014-05-07.
  3. ^ a b Ray Ewry. Sports Reference. Retrieved on 2014-05-07.
  4. ^ Athletics at the 1912 Stockholm Summer Games: Men's Standing Long Jump. Sports Reference. Retrieved on 2014-05-07.
  5. ^ South American Championships (Men). GBR Athletics. Retrieved on 2014-05-07.
  6. ^ FSFI Women's World Games. GBR Athletics. Retrieved on 2014-05-07.
  7. ^ Norwegian Indoor Championships. GBR Athletics. Retrieved on 2014-05-07.
  8. ^ Swedish Indoor Championships. GBR Athletics. Retrieved on 2014-05-07.
  9. ^ 1906 Athina Summer Games. Sports Reference. Retrieved on 2014-01-26.
  10. ^ Athletics at the 1906 Athina Summer Games: Men's Long Jump. Sports Reference. Retrieved on 2014-05-03.
  11. ^ Athletics at the 1906 Athina Summer Games: Men's Standing Long Jump. Sports Reference. Retrieved on 2014-05-07.
  12. ^ a b c d Handicap Olympic Athletics Events[1]. GBR Athletics. Retrieved on 2014-04-18.
  13. ^ Athletics at the 1900 Paris Summer Games: Men's Long Jump, Handicap. Sports Reference. Retrieved on 2014-05-05.
  14. ^ Athletics at the 1900 Paris Summer Games: Men's Long Jump, Professionals. Sports Reference. Retrieved on 2014-05-05.

External linksEdit