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Paleontology or palaeontology (from Greek: paleo, "ancient"; ontos, "being"; and logos, "knowledge") is the study of prehistoric life forms on Earth through the examination of plant and animal fossils.[1] This includes the study of body fossils, tracks (ichnites), burrows, cast-off parts, fossilised feces (coprolites), palynomorphs and chemical residues. Because humans have encountered fossils for millennia, paleontology has a long history both before and after becoming formalized as a science. This article records significant discoveries and events related to paleontology that occurred or were published in the year 2018.

List of years in paleontology (table)
In science
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021

Contents

Lizards and snakesEdit

ResearchEdit

  • Triassic reptile Megachirella wachtleri is reinterpreted as the oldest known stem-squamate by Simões et al. (2018).[2]
  • Simões et al. (2018) perform X-ray scans at the micron scale of the holotype specimen of Megachirella wachtleri.[3]
  • Fossil trackways probably made by lizards running bipedally are described from the Lower Cretaceous (Aptian-early Albian) Hasandong Formation (South Korea) by Lee et al. (2018), who name a new ichnotaxon Sauripes hadongensis.[4]
  • New fossil material of Dicothodon bajaensis, providing new information on the tooth replacement pattern in this species, is described from the Campanian of Mexico by Chavarría-Arellano, Simões & Montellano-Ballesteros (2018).[5]
  • A study on the manus of a putative stem-gekkotan from the Cretaceous amber from Myanmar is published by Fontanarrosa, Daza & Abdala (2018), who report the presence of adaptations to climbing, including adhesive structures.[6]
  • A maxilla of a gekkotan of uncertain phylogenetic placement is described from the Late Oligocene Nsungwe Formation (Tanzania) by Müller et al. (2018), representing the second record of a Paleogene gekkotan from Africa and the first one from the central part of the continent.[7]
  • A gekkotan specimen from the collection of the Alexander Koenig Research Museum, originally interpreted as a member of the genus Sphaerodactylus preserved in Dominican amber, is reinterpreted as a specimen belonging to the species Ebenavia boettgeri and as preserved in copal from Madagascar by Daza et al. (2018).[8]
  • A study on differences in the anatomy of the skeletons of the turnip-tailed gecko (Thecadactylus rapicauda) and the tropical house gecko (Hemidactylus mabouia), and on the specific identification of gekkotan subfossil remains from the Pointe Gros Rempart 6 Hole (La Désirade island), is published by Bochaton, Daza & Lenoble (2018).[9]
  • A revision of the lizard fossils from the Upper Cretaceous of Mongolia and China which were originally assigned to the genus Bainguis is published by Dong et al. (2018), who transfer some of this fossil material to the stem-scincoid genus Parmeosaurus.[10]
  • New specimen of the Late Jurassic lizard Ardeosaurus brevipes is described from the Solnhofen area (Germany) by Tałanda (2018), who interprets this species as a probable member of the crown group of Scincoidea.[11]
  • Description of putative cordylid fossils from the Miocene of Germany, originally assigned to the taxon informally known as "Bavaricordylus", and a study on their taxonomic status is published by Villa et al. (2018), who reinterpret these fossils as more likely to represent the lacertid genus Janosikia.[12]
  • Fossils of a member of the genus Timon are described from the Pleistocene of Monte Tuttavista (Sardinia, Italy) by Tschopp et al. (2018), representing the first reported fossil occurrence of this genus from Sardinia.[13]
  • A dentary of an amphisbaenian belonging or related to the species Blanus strauchi is described from the middle Miocene locality of Gebeceler (Turkey) by Georgalis et al. (2018), representing the first fossil find of a member of the Blanus strauchi species complex and the sole confirmed fossil occurrence of the genus Blanus in the eastern Mediterranean region reported so far.[14]
  • Amphisbaenian vertebral material is described from the Pliocene of northern Greece by Georgalis, Villa & Delfino (2018), representing the youngest occurrence of amphisbaenians in continental Eastern Europe reported so far.[15]
  • Description of temujiniid frontals from the AptianAlbian of the Khobur vertebrate locality (Mongolia) and a study on the placement of Temujiniidae in the phylogenetic tree of Iguanomorpha is published by Alifanov (2018).[16]
  • A study aiming to predict past (late Quaternary), current, and future habitat ranges for lizards belonging to the genus Pogona is published by Rej & Joyner (2018).[17]
  • A premaxilla of a member of the genus Elgaria is described from the Miocene Split Rock Formation (Wyoming, United States) by Scarpetta (2018), representing the oldest known fossil of a member of this genus reported so far.[18]
  • Two specimens assigned to the species Saniwa ensidens, preserving an accessory foramen in the skull indicative of the presence of fourth eye, are described from the Eocene Bridger Formation (Wyoming, United States) by Smith et al. (2018).[19]
  • Fossil vertebrae of varanid lizards are described from the early Miocene Loire Basin (France) by Augé & Guével (2018).[20]
  • Redescription of the morphology of the type material of Varanus marathonensis from the late Miocene of Pikermi (Greece) and description of new fossils of this species from Spain is published by Villa et al. (2018), who consider the species V. amnhophilis to be likely junior synonym of V. marathonensis.[21]
  • A basal mosasauroid specimen including a rib and a vertebra, representing a larger individual than the holotype of Phosphorosaurus ponpetelegans and predating P. ponpetelegans by approximately 10 million years, is reported from the Upper Cretaceous (lower Campanian) of Hokkaido (Japan) by Sato et al. (2018).[22]
  • Description of a Campanian mosasaur assemblage from the Hannover region of northern Germany is published by Hornung, Reich & Frerichs (2018), who confirm the presence of the genus Clidastes in northern central Europe, as well as the early Transatlantic distribution of a basal member of the genus Prognathodon during the lower Campanian.[23]
  • Description of two skulls of subadult specimens of Tylosaurus proriger from the Niobrara Formation (Kansas, United States), and a study on the allometric changes undergone by T. proriger through life, is published by Stewart & Mallon (2018),[24] who reject the hypothesis presented by Jiménez-Huidobro, Simões & Caldwell (2016) that Tylosaurus kansasensis is a junior synonym of Tylosaurus nepaeolicus.[25]
  • The smallest-known, neonate-sized specimen of Tylosaurus is described from the Santonian portion of the Niobrara Chalk (Kansas, United States) by Konishi, Jiménez-Huidobro & Caldwell (2018).[26]
  • A study on the evolution of the skull shape in snakes and on its implications for inferring the ancestral ecology of snakes is published by Da Silva et al. (2018).[27]
  • New method of evaluating the age of fossil snake specimens at the time of death is proposed by Petermann & Gauthier (2018), who also test whether their method can be used to identify isolated fossil remains of the Eocene snake Boavus occidentalis from the Willwood Formation (Wyoming, United States) at the level of individual organisms.[28]
  • Digital endocasts of the inner ears of the madtsoiid snakes Yurlunggur and Wonambi are reconstructed by Palci et al. (2018), who also study the implications of the inner ear morphology of these taxa for inferring their ecology.[29]
  • A natural cast of the posterior brain, skull vessels and nerves, and the inner ear of Dinilysia patagonica is described by Triviño et al. (2018).[30]
  • A study on the phylogenetic relationships of the Miocene snake Pseudoepicrates stanolseni is published by Onary & Hsiou (2018), who transfer this species to the boid genus Chilabothrus.[31]
  • Description of snake fossils from the Pliocene/Pleistocene El Breal de Orocual locality and from the late Pleistocene Mene de Inciarte locality (Venezuela) is published by Onary, Rincón & Hsiou (2018).[32]
  • Inflammatory arthritis is documented for the first time in snakes, including the aquatic Cretaceous snake Lunaophis aquaticus, by Albino et al. (2018).[33]

New taxaEdit

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Type locality Country Notes Images

Amananulam[34]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

McCartney et al.

Paleocene

  Mali

A snake belonging to the family Nigerophiidae. The type species is A. sanogoi.

Amaru[35]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Albino

Early Eocene

Lumbrera Formation

  Argentina

A macrostomatan snake. Genus includes new species A. scagliai.

Anguis rarus[36]

Sp. nov

Valid

Klembara & Rummel

Early Miocene

  Germany

A slow worm.

Barlochersaurus[37]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Daza et al.

Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian)

Burmese amber

  Myanmar

Probable member of Anguimorpha of uncertain phylogentic placement. The type species is B. winhtini.

Bicuspidon hogreli[38]

Sp. nov

Valid

Vullo & Rage

Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian)

Kem Kem Beds

  Morocco

A polyglyphanodontid lizard

Boa blanchardensis[39]

Sp. nov

Valid

Bochaton & Bailon

Late Pleistocene

  France
(Marie-Galante Island)

A species of Boa.

Callopistes rionegrensis[40]

Sp. nov

Valid

Quadros, Chafrat & Zaher

Early Miocene

Chichinales Formation

  Argentina

A teiid lizard, a species of Callopistes.

Euleptes klembarai[41]

Sp. nov

Valid

Čerňanský, Daza & Bauer

Miocene (Astaracian)

  Slovakia

A relative of the European leaf-toed gecko.

Primitivus[42]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Paparella et al.

Late Cretaceous (late Campanian–early Maastrichtian)

  Italy

A member of the family Dolichosauridae. The type species is P. manduriensis.

Stenoplacosaurus[43]

Gen. et comb. nov

Valid

Sullivan & Dong

Middle Eocene (Sharamurunian)

Heti Formation
Shara Murun Formation

  China

An anguid lizard belonging to the subfamily Glyptosaurinae. The type species is "Helodermoides" mongoliensis Sullivan (1979).

Tsagansaurus[44]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Alifanov

Late Paleocene

  Mongolia

A platynotan lizard belonging to the family Parasaniwidae. The type species is T. nemegetensis.

Tylosaurus saskatchewanensis[45]

Sp. nov

Valid

Jiménez-Huidobro et al.

Late Cretaceous (late Campanian)

Bearpaw Formation

  Canada
(  Saskatchewan)

A mosasaur

Xiaophis[46]

Gen. et sp. nov

Xing et al.

Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian)

Burmese amber

  Myanmar

A snake described on the basis of a fossilized embryo or neonate. The type species is X. myanmarensis.

IchthyosauromorphsEdit

SauropterygiansEdit

ResearchEdit

New taxaEdit

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Type locality Country Notes Images

Arminisaurus[83]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Sachs & Kear

Early Jurassic (Pliensbachian)

Amaltheenton Formation

  Germany

An early relative of pliosaurids. The type species is A. schuberti.

Paludidraco[84]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

De Miguel Chaves, Ortega & Pérez‐García

Late Triassic

  Spain

A relative of Simosaurus. Genus includes new species P. multidentatus.

Parahenodus[85]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

De Miguel Chaves, Ortega & Pérez‐García

Late Triassic (CarnianNorian)

  Spain

A placodont related to Henodus. Genus includes new species P. atancensis.

Pliosaurus almanzaensis [86]

Sp. nov

Valid

O’Gorman, Gasparini & Spalletti

Late Jurassic (Tithonian)

Vaca Muerta

  Argentina

Sachicasaurus[87]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Páramo-Fonseca, Benavides-Cabra & Gutiérrez

Early Cretaceous (Barremian)

Paja Formation

  Colombia

A pliosaurid belonging to the subfamily Brachaucheninae. The type species is S. vitae.

TurtlesEdit

ResearchEdit

  • A study on the changes in diversity of South American turtles from the Late Triassic to the present, and on major extinction events of South American turtles, is published by Vlachos et al. (2018).[88]
  • A study on the Early and Middle Triassic turtle tracks and their implications for the origin of turtles is published by Lichtig et al. (2018).[89]
  • Fossil turtle footprints are described from the Triassic (Carnian) localities in eastern Spain by Reolid et al. (2018), who interpret the findings as indicating a freshwater semi-aquatic habit for some early turtles during the early Late Triassic.[90]
  • A revision of Late Cretaceous turtle fossils from the El Gallo Formation (Baja California, Mexico) is published by López-Conde et al. (2018).[91]
  • A clutch of 15 turtle eggs, found in close association with a partial skeleton of the dinosaur Mosaiceratops azumai, is described from the Upper Cretaceous Xiaguan Formation (China) by Jackson et al. (2018), who report that the size of these eggs exceeds that of all previously reported fossil turtle eggs.[92]
  • A study on the anatomy of the brain, inner ear, nasal cavity and skull nerves of Proganochelys quenstedti, and on its implications for inferring the sensory capabilities and ecology of the species and for the evolution of turtle brains is published by Lautenschlager, Ferreira & Werneburg (2018).[93]
  • A study on the external variability and abnormalities observed in the carapace and plastron of Proterochersis robusta and Proterochersis porebensis is published by Szczygielski, Słowiak & Dróżdż (2018).[94]
  • A study on the anatomy and phylogenetic relationships of Kallokibotion bajazidi based on well-preserved new fossil material is published by Pérez-García & Codrea (2018).[95]
  • A study on the paleoecology of Meiolania platyceps is published by Lichtig & Lucas (2018).[96]
  • A study on the phylogenetic relationships of extant and fossil pleurodirans is published by Ferreira et al. (2018).[97]
  • New fossil material of the bothremydid Algorachelus peregrinus, providing new information on the anatomy and intraspecific variability of the species, is described from the Upper Cretaceous (Cenomanian) of the Arenas de Utrillas Formation (Spain) by Pérez-García (2018), who also transfers the species "Podocnemis" parva Haas (1978) and "Paiutemys" tibert Joyce, Lyson & Kirkland (2016) to the genus Algorachelus.[98]
  • A revision of bothremydid fossils in the lower Eocene British record, assigned to the species "Platemys" bowerbankii Owen (1842), "Emys" laevis Bell in Owen & Bell (1849), "Emys" delabechii Bell in Owen & Bell (1849), and "Emys" conybearii Owen (1858), is published by Pérez-García (2018), who interprets all this fossil material as representing a single species Palemys bowerbankii.[99]
  • A restudy of the type material of the Late Cretaceous pan-chelid Linderochelys rinconensis and a description of new fossils of the species is published by Jannello et al. (2018).[100]
  • Redescription of the Eocene chelid Hydromedusa casamayorensis based on twenty‐seven new specimens recovered from lower levels of the Sarmiento Formation (Argentina) and a study on the phylogenetic relationships of this species is published by Maniel et al. (2018).[101]
  • Description of the morphology of the skull of the Eocene carettochelyid Anosteira pulchra is published by Joyce, Volpato & Rollot (2018).[102]
  • A study on the phylogenetic relationships of the putative emydine Piramys auffenbergi is published by Ferreira, Bandyopadhyay & Joyce (2018), who reinterpret this species as a member of the family Podocnemididae.[103]
  • A study on the skull innervation and circulation of Eubaena cephalica, based on data from a new specimen, is published by Rollot, Lyson & Joyce (2018).[104]
  • Fragmentary trionychid specimen is described from the Upper Cretaceous (Turonian to Maastrichtian) Nanaimo Group (Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada) by Vavrek & Brinkman (2018), representing the first trionychid reported from Cretaceous deposits along the Pacific Coast of North America.[105]
  • Taxonomic review of fossil testudinoids from South America is published by de la Fuente, Zacarías & Vlachos (2018).[106]
  • A study on the phylogenetic relationships and body size evolution of extant and extinct tortoises is published by Vlachos & Rabi (2018).[107]
  • A study on the holotype specimen of a purported tortoise from the Oligocene or early Miocene of Costa Rica, "Testudo" costarricensis, is published by Lichtig, Lucas & Alvarado (2018), who reinterpret this specimen as a fossil of Oligopherus laticunea collected from the Eocene-Oligocene White River Group of the western United States.[108]
  • Description of new specimens of the tortoise Manouria oyamai from the Pleistocene of the Okinawa Island (Japan) and a study on the phylogenetic relationships of this species is published by Takahashi, Hirayama & Otsuka (2018).[109]
  • A study on the sources of variation in the morphology of the carapaces of extant and fossil common box turtles (Terrapene carolina) is published by Vitek (2018).[110]
  • A tail vertebra of the common snapping turtle is described from the late Pleistocene of New Jersey by Brownstein (2018), representing the northernmost occurrence of this species in eastern North America during the Pleistocene.[111]
  • Redescription of the holotype of Rhinochelys amaberti from the Cretaceous (Albian) of France and a study on the phylogenetic relationships of this species is published by Scavezzoni & Fischer (2018).[112]
  • A study on the anatomy of the skull of the holotype specimen of Desmatochelys lowii is published by Raselli (2018).[113]
  • Description of newly identified fossil material of Prionochelys from the collections at McWane Science Center and the Alabama Museum of Natural History, collected from multiple sites from the Upper Cretaceous Mooreville Chalk and Eutaw Formation (Alabama, United States), and a study on the taxonomy and phylogenetic relationships of Prionochelys is published by Gentry (2018).[114]
  • A nearly complete skull and mandible of a subadult specimen of Euclastes wielandi is described from the Danian Hornerstown Formation (New Jersey, United States) by Ullmann, Boles & Knell (2018).[115]
  • An isolated costal bone of a sea turtle is described from the Oligocene Dos Bocas Formation (Ecuador) by Cadena, Abella & Gregori (2018), representing the first record of Oligocene Pancheloniidae in South America.[116]
  • Remains of leatherback sea turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) recovered from Mid to Late Holocene sites at Ra’s al-Hamra and Ra’s al-Hadd (coastal Oman) are described by Frazier et al. (2018).[117]

New taxaEdit

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Type locality Country Notes Images

Allaeochelys rouzilhacensis[118]

Sp. nov

Valid

Godinot et al.

Eocene

  France

A member of the family Carettochelyidae.

Basilemys morrinensis[119]

Sp. nov

Valid

Mallon & Brinkman

Late Cretaceous (early Maastrichtian)

Horseshoe Canyon Formation

  Canada
(  Alberta)

A member of Cryptodira belonging to the family Nanhsiungchelyidae.

Chelonoidis dominicensis[120]

Sp. nov

Valid

Albury et al.

Probably Late Quaternary

  Dominican Republic

A species of Chelonoidis.

Eochelone voltregana[121]

Sp. nov

Valid

Lapparent de Broin et al.

Eocene (Priabonian)

  Spain

A member of the family Cheloniidae.

Eotaphrosphys[122]

Gen. et comb. nov

Valid

Pérez-García

Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian)

  France

A member of Bothremydidae; a new genus for "Tretosternum" ambiguum Gaudry (1890).

Eulalichelys[118]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

De Lapparent de Broin in Godinot et al.

Eocene

  France

A member of the family Carettochelyidae. Genus includes new species E. labarrerei.

Gilmoremys gettyspherensis[123]

Sp. nov

Valid

Joyce, Lyson & Sertich

Late Cretaceous (late Campanian)

Fruitland Formation

  United States
(  New Mexico)

Jeholochelys[124]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Shao et al.

Early Cretaceous (Aptian)

Jiufotang Formation

  China

A member of the family Sinemydidae. The type species is J. lingyuanensis.

Mauremys aristotelica[125]

Sp. nov

Valid

Vlachos et al.

Late Miocene to Pliocene

  Greece

A species of Mauremys.

Motelomama[122]

Gen. et comb. nov

Valid

Pérez-García

Eocene (Ypresian)

  Peru

A member of Bothremydidae; a new genus for "Podocnemis" olssoni Schmidt (1931).

Owadowia[126]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Szczygielski, Tyborowski & Błażejowski

Late Jurassic (Tithonian)

Kcynia Formation

  Poland

A member of Pancryptodira. The type species is O. borsukbialynickae.

Peritresius martini[127]

Sp. nov

Valid

Gentry et al.

Late Cretaceous (late Campanian)

Lower Ripley Formation

  United States
(  Alabama)

A member of Pancheloniidae.

Sinemys chabuensis[128]

Sp. nov

Valid

Ji & Chen

Early Cretaceous

Jingchuan Formation

  China

Trachemys haugrudi[129]

Sp. nov

Valid

Jasinski

Late Hemphillian

Gray Fossil Site

  United States
(  Tennessee)

A species of Trachemys.

Yuraramirim[130]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Ferreira et al.

Late Cretaceous

Adamantina Formation

  Brazil

A member of Pleurodira related to Peiropemys. Genus includes new species Y. montealtensis.

ArchosauriformesEdit

General researchEdit

ArchosaursEdit

Other reptilesEdit

ResearchEdit

New taxaEdit

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Type locality Country Notes Images

Clevosaurus cambrica[155]

Sp. nov

Valid

Keeble, Whiteside & Benton

Late Triassic

  United Kingdom

A small rhynchocephalian known from Rhaetian fissure fill deposits.

Colobops[156]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Pritchard et al.

Late Triassic (Norian)

Newark Supergroup

  United States
(  Connecticut)

A reptile of uncertain phylogenetic placement, possibly a rhynchosaur. The type species is C. noviportensis.

Elginia wuyongae[157]

Sp. nov

Valid

Liu & Bever

Late Permian

Naobaogou Formation

  China

A pareiasaurid parareptile

Eorhynchochelys[158]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Li et al.

Late Triassic (Carnian)

Falang Formation

  China

A stem-turtle. The type species is E. sinensis.

Fraserosphenodon[159]

Gen. et comb. nov

Valid

Herrera-Flores et al.

Late Triassic

  United Kingdom

A rhynchocephalian belonging to the group Opisthodontia; a new genus for "Clevosaurus" latidens Fraser (1993).

Fraxinisaura[160]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Schoch & Sues

Middle Triassic (Ladinian)

  Germany

A member of Lepidosauromorpha, probably a relative of Marmoretta oxoniensis. Genus includes new species F. rozynekae.

Labidosauriscus[161]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Modesto, Scott & Reisz

Early Permian

Richards Spur locality

  United States
(  Oklahoma)

A member of the family Captorhinidae. Genus includes new species L. richardi.

Mandaphon[162]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Tsuji

Triassic

Manda Formation

  Tanzania

A member of the family Procolophonidae. The type species is M. nadra.

Wachtlerosaurus[163]

Gen. et sp. nov

Perner

Middle Triassic (Ladinian)

  Italy

A small reptile of uncertain phylogenetic placement, possibly an archosaur. The type species is W. ladinicus.

ReferencesEdit

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  3. ^ Tiago R. Simões; Michael W. Caldwell; Mateusz Tałanda; Massimo Bernardi; Alessandro Palci; Oksana Vernygora; Federico Bernardini; Lucia Mancini; Randall L. Nydam (2018). "X-ray computed microtomography of Megachirella wachtleri". Scientific Data. 5: Article number 180244. doi:10.1038/sdata.2018.244. PMC 6219415. PMID 30398474.
  4. ^ Hang-Jae Lee; Yuong-Nam Lee; Anthony R. Fiorillo; Junchang Lü (2018). "Lizards ran bipedally 110 million years ago". Scientific Reports. 8: Article number 2617. doi:10.1038/s41598-018-20809-z. PMC 5814403. PMID 29449576.
  5. ^ María Luisa Chavarría-Arellano; Tiago R. Simões; Marisol Montellano-Ballesteros (2018). "New data on the Late Cretaceous lizard Dicothodon bajaensis (Squamata, Borioteiioidea) from Baja California, Mexico reveals an unusual tooth replacement pattern in squamates". Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências. 90 (3): 2781–2795. doi:10.1590/0001-3765201820170563. PMID 30043904.
  6. ^ Gabriela Fontanarrosa; Juan D. Daza; Virginia Abdala (2018). "Cretaceous fossil gecko hand reveals a strikingly modern scansorial morphology: Qualitative and biometric analysis of an amber-preserved lizard hand". Cretaceous Research. 84: 120–133. doi:10.1016/j.cretres.2017.11.003.
  7. ^ Johannes Müller; Eric Roberts; Emily Naylor; Nancy Stevens (2018). "A fossil gekkotan (Squamata) from the Late Oligocene Nsungwe Formation, Rukwa Rift Basin, Tanzania". Journal of Herpetology. 52 (2): 223–227. doi:10.1670/17-123.
  8. ^ Juan D. Daza; Jordan P. Hunziker; Aaron M. Bauer; Philipp Wagner; Wolfgang Böhme (2018). "Things are not always as they seem: High-resolution X-ray CT scanning reveals the first resin-embedded miniature gecko of the genus Ebenavia". Bonn zoological Bulletin. 67 (2): 71–77. doi:10.20363/BZB-2018.67.2.071.
  9. ^ Corentin Bochaton; Juan D. Daza; A. Lenoble (2018). "Identifying gecko species from Lesser Antillean paleontological assemblages: intraspecific osteological variation within and interspecific osteological differences between Thecadactylus rapicauda (Houttuyn, 1782) (Phyllodactylidae) and Hemidactylus mabouia (Moreau de Jonnès, 1818) (Gekkonidae)". Journal of Herpetology. 52 (3): 313–320. doi:10.1670/17-093.
  10. ^ Liping Dong; Xing Xu; Yuan Wang; Susan E. Evans (2018). "The lizard genera Bainguis and Parmeosaurus from the Upper Cretaceous of China and Mongolia". Cretaceous Research. 85: 95–108. doi:10.1016/j.cretres.2018.01.002.
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