2020 in reptile paleontology

This list of fossil reptiles described in 2020 is a list of new taxa of fossil reptiles that were described during the year 2020, as well as other significant discoveries and events related to reptile paleontology that occurred in 2020.

List of years in reptile paleontology
In archosaur paleontology
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023

Lizards and snakesEdit

New taxaEdit

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Type locality Country Notes Images
Boipeba[1] Gen. et sp. nov Fachini et al. Late Cretaceous Adamantina   Brazil A snake belonging to the group Scolecophidia. The type species is B. tayasuensis.
Borealoilysia[2] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Head Middle Eocene Bridger   United States
(  Wyoming)
An aniliid snake. Genus includes new species B. gunnelli. Announced in 2020; the final version of the article naming was published in 2021.
Bothriagenys flectomendax[3] Sp. nov In press Wick & Shiller Late Cretaceous (early Campanian) Aguja   United States
(  Texas)
A member of Borioteiioidea of uncertain phylogenetic placement.
Calumma benovskyi[4] Sp. nov Čerňanský et al. Early Miocene Hiwegi   Kenya A chameleon, a species of Calumma
Chalcides augei[5] Sp. nov Valid Čerňanský et al. Early middle Miocene   Russia A skink, a species of Chalcides. Announced in 2019; the final version of the article naming it was published in 2020.
Eoconstrictor[6] Gen. et comb. nov Valid Scanferla & Smith Eocene Messel   Germany A booid snake. The type species is "Palaeopython" fischeri Schaal (2004).
Epileolis[7] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Alifanov Late Paleocene   Mongolia A lizard belonging to the family Agamidae. Genus includes new species E. reshetovi.
Gavialimimus[8] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Strong et al. Late Cretaceous   Morocco A mosasaur belonging to the subfamily Plioplatecarpinae. Genus includes new species G. almaghribensis.
Gnathomortis[9] Gen. et comb. nov Valid Lively Late Cretaceous (middle Campanian)   United States
(  Colorado)
A mosasaur belonging to the family Mosasauridae; a new genus for "Prognathodon" stadtmani Kass (1999).
Hydrargysaurus[3] Gen. et sp. nov In press Wick & Shiller Late Cretaceous (early Campanian) Aguja   United States
(  Texas)
A member or a relative of the group Borioteiioidea. Genus includes new species H. gladius.
Hypostylos[3] Gen. et sp. nov In press Wick & Shiller Late Cretaceous (early Campanian) Aguja   United States
(  Texas)
A member of Scincomorpha belonging to the "paramacellodid"/cordylid grade. Genus includes new species H. lehmani.
Kopidosaurus[10] Gen. et sp. nov Scarpetta Eocene Willwood   United States
(  Wyoming)
A member of Pleurodonta of uncertain phylogenetic placement. The type species is K. perplexus.
Messelopython[11] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Zaher & Smith Eocene Messel pit   Germany A stem pythonid snake. Genus includes new species M. freyi.
Neokotus[12] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Bittencourt et al. Early Cretaceous (Valanginian) Quiricó   Brazil A lizard belonging to the family Paramacellodidae. The type species is N. sanfranciscanus.
Vipera latastei ebusitana[13] Subsp. nov Valid Torres-Roig et al. Pleistocene–Holocene   Spain A viper, a subspecies of Vipera latastei.

ResearchEdit

  • New fossil material of squamates is described from the Upper Cretaceous Fruitland and Kirtland formations (New Mexico, United States) by Woolley, Smith & Sertich (2020), expanding known taxonomic and morphological diversity of lizards within the "Hunter Wash Local Fauna".[14]
  • A study on the affinities of putative gekkotan eggshells from the Late Cretaceous of Europe is published by Choi et al. (2020), who interpret the fossil material of Pseudogeckoolithus as theropod eggshells.[15]
  • Fossils of tupinambine teiids are described from the late Eocene of the Quercy Phosphorites Formation (France) by Louis & Santiago (2020), representing the first record of this family from the Paleogene of Europe.[16]
  • A dentary of a cnemidophorine teiid is described from the Miocene of the Ogallala Group (Nebraska, United States) by Scarpetta (2020), who evaluates the implications of this specimen for the knowledge of the evolutionary history of cnemidophorines in North America during the Neogene.[17]
  • The first known fossil example of an iguana nesting burrow is reported from the Pleistocene Grotto Beach Formation (The Bahamas) by Martin et al. (2020).[18]
  • A study on the anatomy of the skull of Ophisaurus acuminatus, and on the taxonomic validity of this species, is published by Klembara & Čerňanský (2020).[19]
  • Fossil material of the monitor lizards is reported for the first time from the late Miocene localities in Armenia and Georgia by Vasilyan & Bukhsianidze (2020).[20]
  • A study on the evolutionary history of mosasauroids, comparing their evolutionary rates and traits to those of plesiosaurs and aiming to determine whether the rise and diversification of mosasauroids was influenced by competition with or disappearance of some plesiosaur taxa, is published by Madzia & Cau (2020).[21]
  • Grigoriev & Grabovskiy (2020) describe new fossil material of a tylosaurine from the Upper Cretaceous (Turonian) of the Chukotka Region (Russia), representing one of the oldest and northernmost mosasaur records reported so far, and evaluate the implications of this fossil material (as well as mosasaur fossils from the Santonian of the Komi Republic and from the CampanianMaastrichtian of the Sakhalin Island) for the knowledge of the paleogeography and possible migrations of Arctic mosasaurs.[22]
  • A study on pathological features of a specimen of Prognathodon (belonging or related to the species P. sectorius) from the Maastrichtian Gulpen Formation (the Netherlands) is published by Bastiaans et al. (2020), who consider it most likely that this specimen was bitten in the snout by a large, possibly conspecific mosasaur, making it one of the few specimens with unambiguous evidence of agonistic interactions amongst mosasaurs.[23]
  • A study on the morphology of the snout of Taniwhasaurus antarcticus, indicating the presence of a complex internal neurovascular system of branched channels similar to systems present in extant aquatic vertebrates such as cetaceans and crocodiles, is published by Álvarez–Herrera, Agnolin & Novas (2020).[24]
  • Zietlow (2020) recovers growth series of Tylosaurus proriger and T. nepaeolicus, and tests the hypothesis that T. kansasensis represent juveniles of T. nepaeolicus.[25]
  • Redescription of Palaeophis oweni is published by Georgalis, Del Favero & Delfino (2020).[26]
  • Eocene snake vertebrae from Landana and Sassa-Zao (Angola), originally referred to Palaeophis aff. typhaeus, are assigned to the species Palaeophis africanus by Folie et al. (2020), who interpret these fossils as confirming the aquatic capabilities of palaeophiid snakes, and evaluate the implications of these fossils for the debate on the existence of primitive and advanced grades among palaeophiid snakes.[27]
  • New information on the anatomy of the Eocene fossil boas Messelophis variatus and Rieppelophis ermannorum, based on data from new specimens from the Messel pit (Germany), is presented by Scanferla & Smith (2020).[28]
  • Description of new fossil material of Thaumastophis missiaeni from the Eocene Cambay Shale (India) and a study on the phylogenetic relationships of this snake is published by Zaher et al. (2020), who name a new family Thaumastophiidae.[29]

IchthyosauromorphsEdit

New taxaEdit

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Type locality Country Notes Images
Acuetzpalin[30] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Barrientos Lara, Alvarado Ortega, & Fernández Late Jurassic La Casita   Mexico An ichthyosaur belonging to the family Ophthalmosauridae. The type species is A. carranzai.
Cymbospondylus duelferi[31] Sp. nov Valid Klein et al. Middle Triassic (Anisian) Favret   United States
(  Nevada)
Hauffiopteryx altera[32] Sp. nov Valid Maxwell & Cortés Early Jurassic (Toarcian) Posidonia Shale   Germany
Nannopterygius borealis[33] Sp. nov Valid Zverkov & Jacobs Early Cretaceous (Berriasian)   Norway
  Russia
Thalassodraco[34] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Jacobs & Martill Late Jurassic (Tithonian) Kimmeridge Clay   United Kingdom An ichthyosaur belonging to the family Ophthalmosauridae. The type species is T. etchesi.

ResearchEdit

  • Partial trunk region of the largest hupehsuchian reported so far is described from the Early Triassic of Hubei, China by Qiao, Iijima & Liu (2020), who interpret this specimen as evidence of early establishment of high predation pressure in the sea after the Permian–Triassic extinction event and before the Middle Triassic.[35]
  • New anatomical features of the holotype specimen of Cartorhynchus lenticarpus revealed by CT scanning, including unique dentition, are reported by Huang et al. (2020), who evaluate the implications of this species for the knowledge of the evolution of tooth morphology and diet in basal ichthyosauriforms.[36]
  • A caudal vertebra of a basal ichthyosauriform similar to grippidians, representing the youngest record of basal ichthyosauriforms to date, is described from the Middle Triassic (Ladinian) of Mallorca (Spain) by Matamales-Andreu et al. (2020).[37]
  • A study on the age of the fossils of Thaisaurus chonglakmanii is published by Tongtherm et al. (2020).[38]
  • A study on the tempo and mode of the morphological evolution of ichthyosaurs is published by Moon & Stubbs (2020).[39]
  • A study on skeletal pathologies in ichthyosaur specimens from the Middle Triassic Besano Formation and the Lower Jurassic Posidonia Shale, evaluating their implications for the knowledge of changing locomotory and behavioural constraints affecting different ichthyosaur taxa through time, is published by Pardo-Pérez, Kear & Maxwell (2020).[40]
  • Two new specimens of Mixosaurus cornalianus, preserving evidence of the presence of a dorsal fin and a well-developed, triangular dorsal lobe of the caudal fin in this species, are described from the Anisian Besano Formation (Italy) by Renesto et al. (2020).[41]
  • Jiang et al. (2020) report the discovery of remains of a thalattosaur belonging to the genus Xinpusaurus in the abdominal region of a specimen of Guizhouichthyosaurus from the Middle Triassic (Ladinian) Zhuganpo Member of the Falang Formation (China), and interpret this finding as likely the oldest evidence for predation on megafauna by marine tetrapods reported so far.[42]
  • A study on the anatomy of the holotype specimen of Temnodontosaurus crassimanus is published by Swaby & Lomax (2020), who consider T. crassimanus to be a valid species.[43]
  • Description of the most complete and best-preserved skeleton of Suevoleviathan integer is published by Maisch (2020).[44]
  • Partial skeleton of an ophthalmosaurid ichthyosaur, found with an ichthyosaur tooth (probably not belonging to the same specimen) stuck on its rib, is described from the Upper Jurassic Rosso Ammonitico Veronese Formation (Italy) by Serafini et al. (2020), possibly representing the first evidence of scavenging between two ichthyosaurs reported so far.[45]
  • A study on the anatomy and phylogenetic relationships of Maiaspondylus lindoei, "Ophthalmosaurus" cantabrigiensis and "Platypterygius" ochevi is published by Zverkov & Grigoriev (2020), who transfer "O". cantabrigiensis to the genus Maiaspondylus, and consider "P. ochevi to be a junior synonym of M. cantabrigiensis.[46]
  • Description of a new specimen of Muiscasaurus catheti from the Aptian Paja Formation (Colombia), providing new information on the anatomy of this taxon, and a study on the phylogenetic relationships of M. catheti is published by Páramo-Fonseca et al. (2020).[47]

SauropterygiansEdit

New taxaEdit

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Type locality Country Notes Images
Brevicaudosaurus[48] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Shang, Wu & Li Middle Triassic (Ladinian) Falang   China A member of Nothosauroidea. The type species is B. jiyangshanensis.
Jucha[49] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Fischer et al. Early Cretaceous (Hauterivian) Klimovka   Russia An elasmosaurid plesiosaur. Genus includes new species J. squalea.
Ophthalmothule[50] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Roberts et al. Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary (latest Tithonian/early Berriasian) Agardhfjellet   Norway A cryptoclidid plesiosaur. The type species is O. cryostea.
Wunyelfia[51] Gen. et sp. nov In press Otero & Soto-Acuña Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Quiriquina   Chile An aristonectine elasmosaurid plesiosaur. Genus includes new species W. maulensis.

ResearchEdit

  • A study on the osteology and evolution of the temporal region of the skull of placodonts is published by Maisch et al. (2020).[52]
  • A study on the anatomy of the skull and braincase of Parahenodus atancensis, and on the anatomy of the reconstructed brain, inner ear and neurosensory structures of this taxon, is published by De Miguel Chaves et al. (2020).[53]
  • New fossil material of Lariosaurus sanxiaensis is described from the Lower Triassic Jialingjiang Formation (China) by Li & Liu (2020), who also study the phylogenetic relationships of this taxon, as well as the predator-prey relationship in the associated fauna and their implications for the knowledge of the biotic recovery after the Permian–Triassic extinction event.[54]
  • New fossil material of cryptoclidid plesiosaurs, including the first occurrence of Vinialesaurus in the Southern Hemisphere, is described from the Jurassic of the Atacama Desert by Otero et al. (2020).[55]
  • Redescription of the holotype specimen of Aphrosaurus furlongi and a study on the evolution and phylogenetic relationships of elasmosaurid plesiosaurs is published by O’Gorman (2020), who names a new clade Euelasmosaurida.[56]
  • The first non-aristonectine elasmosaurid skeleton from Antarctica that preserves an associated lower jaw is described by O’Gorman et al. (2020).[57]
  • An isolated cervical centrum of a brachauchenine pliosaurid is described from the Cenomanian of Russia by Zverkov & Pervushov (2020), who interpret this fossil as belonging to one of the largest known pliosaurids, and consider it to be evidence of survival gigantic pliosaurids into the Cenomanian.[58]
  • A study on the evolution of the short-necked plesiosaurs throughout the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods is published by Fischer et al. (2020).[59]

TurtlesEdit

New taxaEdit

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Type locality Country Notes Images
Akoranemys[60] Gen. et sp. nov In press Pérez-García Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian)   Madagascar A bothremydid pleurodiran. Genus includes new species A. madagasika.
Alatochelon[61] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Pérez-García, Vlachos & Murelaga Early Pliocene Cigarrón   Spain A large tortoise. Genus includes new species A. myrteum.
Allaeochelys liliae[62] Sp. nov In press Carbot-Chanona et al. Miocene (Aquitanian) Mazantic Shale   Mexico
Amabilis[63] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Hermanson et al. Late Cretaceous Bauru   Brazil A podocnemidoid pleurodiran. Genus includes new species A. uchoensis.
Aragochersis[64] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Pérez García et al. Early Cretaceous (Albian) Escucha   Spain A member of the family Helochelydridae. Genus includes new species A. lignitesta.
Axestemys erquelinnensis[65] Sp. nov Valid Pérez-García & Smith Eocene (Ypresian)   Belgium Announced in 2020; the final version of the article naming was published in 2021.
Chelonoidis alburyorum keegani[66] Subsp. nov Valid Franz, Albury & Steadman Late Holocene   Turks and Caicos Islands A tortoise.
Chelonoidis alburyorum sementis[66] Subsp. nov Valid Franz, Albury & Steadman Late Holocene   Turks and Caicos Islands A tortoise.
Chersine khosatzkyi[67] Sp. nov Valid Redkozubov et al. Early Pliocene   Moldova A tortoise. Announced in 2020; the final version of the article naming it was published in 2021.
Gallica[68] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Pérez-García Late Paleocene   France A "macrobaenid" eucryptodiran. Genus includes new species G. lapparentiana.
Itapecuruemys[69] Gen. et sp. nov In press Batista, Carvalho & de la Fuente Early Cretaceous Itapecuru   Brazil A pleurodiran turtle belonging to the group Pelomedusoides. Genus includes new species I. amazonensis.
Jainemys[70] Gen. et comb. nov Valid Joyce & Bandyopadhyay Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Lameta   India A member of the family Bothremydidae belonging to the tribe Kurmademydini; a new genus for "Carteremys" pisdurensis Jain (1977).
Lakotemys[71] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Joyce, Rollot & Murelaga Early Cretaceous (BerriasianValanginian) Lakota   United States
(  South Dakota)
A member of the family Baenidae. The type species is L. australodakotensis.
Laurasichersis[72] Gen. et sp. nov Pérez García Paleocene (Thanetian) Sables de Bracheux   France A member of the family Sichuanchelyidae. The type species is L. relicta.
Melanochelys tapani[73] Nom. nov Valid Garbin, Bandyopadhyay & Joyce Miocene/Pliocene Siwalik Hills   India A species of Melanochelys; a replacement name for Nicoria tricarinata var. sivalensis Lydekker (1889).
Mesoclemmys vanegasorum[74] Sp. nov Valid Cadena et al. Laventan La Victoria   Colombia A species of Mesoclemmys
Palaeomauremys metallicus[75] Sp. nov Valid Karl Oligocene   Germany A member of the family Geoemydidae.
Palauchelys[76] Gen. et sp. nov In press López-Conde et al. Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Olmos   Mexico A bothremydid pleurodiran. Genus includes new species P. montellanoi.
Prochelidella buitreraensis[77] Sp. nov Valid Maniel et al. Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian) Candeleros   Argentina
Ragechelus[78] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Lapparent de Broin, Chirio & Bour Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Farin-Doutchi   Niger A member of the family Podocnemididae belonging to the subfamily Erymnochelyinae. The type species is R. sahelica.
Solnhofia brachyrhyncha[79] Sp. nov Valid Anquetin & Püntener Late Jurassic (Kimmeridgian) Reuchenette   Switzerland A member of Thalassochelydia.
Testudo hellenica[80] Sp. nov Valid Garcia et al. Miocene (Vallesian)   Greece A species of Testudo.  
Titanochelon kayadibiensis[81] Sp. nov Valid Karl, Staesche & Safi Miocene (Turolian -Tortonian)   Turkey A species of Titanochelon
Waluchelys[82] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Sterli et al. Late Triassic Quebrada del Barro   Argentina A member of the family Australochelyidae. Genus includes new species W. cavitesta.
Yaminuechelys sulcipeculiaris[83] Sp. nov Valid Oriozabala, Sterli & De La Fuente Late Cretaceous (CampanianMaastrichtian) La Colonia   Argentina A member of the family Chelidae

ResearchEdit

  • A study on the evolution of turtle skull architecture, aiming to assess the functional significance of changes in their skull architecture during feeding on the basis of data from extant and fossil taxa, is published by Ferreira et al. (2020).[84]
  • A study on the relation between ecology and shell shape in extant turtles, and its implications for the knowledge of the ecology of fossil turtles, is published by Dziomber, Joyce & Foth (2020).[85]
  • A study on the early evolution of turtles during the Triassic period is published by de la Fuente, Sterli & Krapovickas (2020).[86]
  • A study on non‐marine turtle distribution and diversity from the Late Triassic to the Paleogene is published by Cleary et al. (2020).[87]
  • Szczygielski (2020) revises the first described Triassic turtle Chelytherium obscurum, and considers it to be synonymous with Proterochersis robusta.[88]
  • Description of new fossil material of Indochelys spatulata from the Jurassic Kota Formation (India), and a study on the anatomy and phylogenetic relationships of this taxon, is published by Joyce & Bandyopadhyay (2020).[89]
  • The first three-dimensional reconstruction of the skull of Kallokibotion bajazidi is presented by Martín-Jiménez, Codrea & Pérez-García (2020).[90]
  • Fossil material of an indeterminate member of Pelomedusoides is described from the Valanginian Rosablanca Formation (Colombia) by Cadena (2020), who interprets this finding as additional evidence supporting the occurrence of Pelomedusoides during the Valanginian in northern South America.[91]
  • New specimens of Araripemys barretoi, providing new information on the morphological variation within this species, are described from the Crato Formation and Romualdo Formation (Brazil) by Limaverde et al. (2020).[92]
  • A study on the histology of the shell of Cearachelys placidoi is published by Sena et al. (2020).[93]
  • New fossil material of Cordichelys is described from the Eocene Birket Qarun Formation and Qasr el Sagha Formation (Egypt) by Cherney et al. (2020), who evaluate the implications of these fossils for the knowledge of the morphological variation within the genus Cordichelys, its ecology and the relationship between Cordichelys and Stereogenys.[94]
  • Cadena et al. (2020) describe new fossil material of Stupendemys geographicus from the Miocene of Venezuela and Colombia, providing new information on the anatomy and paleobiology of this species.[95]
  • Peltochelys duchastelii is reinterpreted as a member of Paracryptodira by Joyce & Rollot (2020).[96]
  • Description of the anatomy of the skull of Pleurosternon bullockii is published by Evers, Rollot & Joyce (2020).[97]
  • Redescription of the anatomy of the skull and mandible of Sandownia harrisi is published by Evers & Joyce (2020).[98]
  • New information on the anatomy and stratigraphic and geographic distribution of Anosteira pulchra is presented by Adrian et al. (2020).[99]
  • A revision of the extinct geoemydid Echmatemys from North America, based mainly on data from a slab containing several turtle shells collected from the Bridgerian of Levett Creek (Wyoming, United States), is published by Vlachos (2020).[100]
  • A study on the phylogenetic relationships of a putative testudinoid Cardichelyon rogerwoodi is published by Joyce & Claude (2020), who consider it more likely that this taxon is a member of Kinosternoidea.[101]
  • Fossil remains of dermochelyid turtles representing the first confidently identified multispecies assemblage of dermochelyids are described from the Oligocene Chandler Bridge and Ashley formations (South Carolina, United States) by Fallon & Boessenecker (2020).[102]

ArchosauriformesEdit

ArchosaursEdit

Other archosauriformsEdit

New taxaEdit

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Type locality Country Notes Images
Polymorphodon[103] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Sues et al. Middle Triassic (Ladinian) Erfurt   Germany A non-archosaurian member of Archosauriformes. Genus includes new species P. adorfi.
Rugarhynchos[104] Gen. et comb. nov Valid Wynd et al. Late Triassic Chinle   United States
(  New Mexico)
A member of the family Doswelliidae; a new genus for "Doswellia" sixmilensis Heckert, Lucas & Spielmann (2012).

ResearchEdit

  • New Early Triassic archosauriform track assemblage is described from the Gardetta Plateau (Western Alps, Italy) by Petti et al. (2020), who interpret this finding as evidence of the presence of archosauriforms at low latitudes soon after the Permian–Triassic extinction event, and name a new ichnotaxon Isochirotherium gardettensis.[105]
  • Postcranial material of an erythrosuchid from the Rassypnaya locality (Olenekian; Orenburg Oblast, Russia), previously referred to Vjushkovia triplicostata, is referred to the species Garjainia prima by Maidment et al. (2020), who evalue the implications of this fossil material for the knowledge of the phylogenetic relationships, body mass and locomotor musculature of erythrosuchids.[106]
  • Redescription of the anatomy of the holotype specimen of Chanaresuchus bonapartei and a study on the phylogenetic relationships of this species is published by Trotteyn & Ezcurra (2020).[107]
  • Redescription of the anatomy of the skull and mandible of Euparkeria capensis is published Sookias et al. (2020).[108]
  • A study on the joint mobility of the hindlimb of Euparkeria capensis, and on its implications for the knowledge of the evolution of the locomotor capabilities of archosaurs, is published by Demuth, Rayfield & Hutchinson (2020).[109]
  • Phytosaur remains are described from the Upper Triassic Upper Karoo Group (Zimbabwe) by Barrett et al. (2020), representing the first record of members of this group from sub-Saharan Africa.[110]
  • An assemblage of at least 21 phytosaur specimens dominated by juveniles and subadults is described from the Upper Triassic Tiki Formation (India) by Datta, Mukherjee & Ray (2020), who interpret this finding as likely evidence of parental care in phytosaurs, and study the taphonomy of the assemblage.[111]
  • A study on the evolution of the skull shape in phytosaurs is published by Datta, Sharma & Ray (2020).[112]
  • A study comparing teeth microwear textures in Machaeroprosopus pristinus, Mystriosuchus planirostris, Nicrosaurus kapffi, N. meyeri and "Smilosuchus" lithodendrorum, aiming to determine whether microwear texture differences reflect dietary differences between phytosaur species, is published by Bestwick et al. (2020).[113]

Other reptilesEdit

New taxaEdit

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Type locality Country Notes Images
Carbonodraco Gen. et sp. nov Valid Mann et al. Carboniferous (Moscovian) Allegheny   United States A member of the family Acleistorhinidae. The type species is C. lundi. Announced in 2019;[114] the correction including the required ZooBank accession number was published in 2020.[115]
Elessaurus[116] Gen. et sp. nov Valid De-Oliveira et al. Early Triassic Sanga do Cabral   Brazil An archosauromorph reptile of uncertain phylogenetic placement, possibly a relative of tanystropheids. The type species is E. gondwanoccidens.

 

Eomurruna[117] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Hamley, Cisneros & Damiani Early Triassic Arcadia   Australia A procolophonid. Genus includes new species E. yurrgensis.
Feralisaurus[118] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Cavicchini, Zaher & Benton Middle Triassic (Anisian) Helsby Sandstone   United Kingdom A neodiapsid reptile of uncertain phylogenetic placement, possibly a member of Lepidosauromorpha. The type species is F. corami.
Gunakadeit[119] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Druckenmiller et al. Late Triassic (Norian) Hound Island   United States
(  Alaska)
A thalattosaur. The type species is G. joseeae.
Heishanosaurus[120] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Dong et al. Early Cretaceous (AptianAlbian) Shahai   China A member of Choristodera. The type species is H. pygmaeus.
Lanceirosphenodon[121] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Vivar et al. Late Triassic (Norian) Candelária   Brazil A rhynchocephalian. Genus includes new species L. ferigoloi.
Micromenodon[122] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Sues & Schoch Late Triassic (Carnian) Doswell   United States
(  Virginia)
A rhynchocephalian. Genus includes new species M. pitti.
Oculudentavis Gen. et sp. nov Disputed Xing et al. Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian) Burmese amber   Myanmar A diapsid of uncertain phylogenetic placement. Originally described as a member of Avialae[123] but subsequently argued to be a lizard.[124] Genus includes new species O. khaungraae. Its status as a validly named taxon is controversial because the scientific article it was named in was subsequently retracted.[125][126]  
Oryctorhynchus[127] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Sues, Fitch & Whatley Late Triassic (Carnian? - Norian?) Wolfville   Canada
(  Nova Scotia)
A rhynchosaur. Genus includes new species O. bairdi.  
Raibliania[128] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Dalla Vecchia Late Triassic (Carnian) Calcare del Predil   Italy A member of the family Tanystropheidae. The type species is R. calligarisi.  
Skybalonyx[129] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Jenkins et al. Late Triassic Chinle   United States
(  Arizona)
A member of the family Drepanosauridae. Genus includes new species S. skapter.
Smilodonterpeton[130] Gen. et sp. nov In press Skinner, Whiteside & Benton Late Triassic (Rhaetian)   United Kingdom A procolophonid. Genus includes new species S. ruthinensis.
Tanystropheus hydroides[131] Sp. nov Valid Spiekman et al. Late Triassic Besano Italy-Switzerland border
Trilophosaurus phasmalophos[132] Sp. nov Valid Kligman et al. Late Triassic (Norian) Chinle   United States
(  Arizona)

 

Vellbergia[133] Gen. et sp. nov Sobral, Simões & Schoch Middle Triassic (Ladinian) Erfurt   Germany A non-lepidosaurian lepidosauromorph. The type species is V. bartholomaei.
Youngetta[117] Gen. et comb. nov Valid Hamley, Cisneros & Damiani Early Triassic   China A procolophonid; a new genus for "Eumetabolodon" dongshengensis Li (1983).

ResearchEdit

  • A study on fracture planes (unossified regions in the middle of vertebral centra) in tail vertebrae of mesosaurs is published by MacDougall et al. (2020), who argue that mesosaurs were theoretically capable of tail autotomy, but probably did not utilize this ability.[134]
  • A study on patterns of tooth development and replacement in Belebey and Bolosaurus, indicating that bolosaurid teeth had thecodont implantation with deep roots, is published by Snyder et al. (2020).[135]
  • Revision of Pachypes‐like footprints from the CisuralianGuadalupian of Europe and North America is published by Marchetti et al. (2020), who date the earliest known occurrence of Pachypes to the Artinskian, interpret the footprints belonging to the ichnospecies Pachypes ollieri as produced by nycteroleter pareiasauromorphs, and argue that the earliest occurrences of pareiasauromorph footprints precede the earliest occurrence of this group in the skeletal record by at least 10 million years.[136]
  • A study on the dental wear along the tooth rows of nearly one hundred jaws of Captorhinus aguti, indicating that this reptile preferred to feed using the right side of the jaw, is published by Reisz et al. (2020).[137]
  • Redescription of Cargninia enigmatica is published by Vivar et al. (2020).[138]
  • A study on the phylogenetic relationships and evolutionary history of sphenodontian reptiles is published by Simões, Caldwell & Pierce (2020).[139]
  • A study on the feeding mechanics and ecology of Clevosaurus hudsoni and C. cambrica, as indicated by their bite force, resistance of skull bones to bending and torsion, and the distribution of stresses in the jaws during biting, is published by Chambi‐Trowell et al. (2020).[140]
  • A study on the anatomy and phylogenetic relationships of Colobops noviportensis is published by Scheyer et al. (2020), who reinterpret this taxon as a probable rhynchocephalian.[141]
  • A study on the morphology of teeth of Priosphenodon avelasi is published by LeBlanc et al. (2020).[142]
  • Partial skeleton of a small reptile, probably a juvenile specimen of Eusaurosphargis dalsassoi, is described from the Anisian Buchenstein Formation (northern Dolomites, Italy) by Renesto, Kustatscher & Gianolla (2020), who interpret this finding as possible evidence of that the lands emerged near the basins of the northern Dolomites, Besano Formation and Prosanto Formation had a similar reptilian fauna during the middle-late Anisian.[143]
  • Fossil tracks possibly produced by a monjurosuchid-like choristoderan are described from the Albian Daegu Formation (South Korea) by Lee, Kong & Jung (2020), who attempt to determine the trackmaker’s locomotory posture on land, and name a new ichnotaxon Novapes ulsanensis.[144]
  • A study on the anatomy of the skull of Champsosaurus lindoei is published by Dudgeon et al. (2020), who evaluate the morphology of a putative neomorphic bone in the skull and its possible developmental and functional origins.[145]
  • A study on the internal anatomy of the skull of Champsosaurus lindoei and C. natator, and on their probable sensory abilities, is published by Dudgeon et al. (2020).[146]
  • A study on the Triassic fossil record and evolution of non-archosaurian archosauromorph reptiles in South America is published by Ezcurra et al. (2020), who also identify the first record of the family Proterosuchidae from South America (partial braincase from the Buena Vista Formation, Uruguay).[147]
  • New fossil material of tanystropheid and azendohsaurid archosauromorphs, providing new information on the diversity of Late Triassic archosauromorph reptiles in North America, is described from the Lamy Quarry south of the town of Lamy (Garita Creek Formation; New Mexico, United States) by Hégron et al. (2020).[148]
  • Redescription of the anatomy of the skeleton of Macrocnemus fuyuanensis is published by Scheyer et al. (2020).[149]
  • Description of the morphology of the skull of Macrocnemus bassanii is published by Miedema et al. (2020).[150]
  • A study on the morphology of the skull of Tanystropheus hydroides is published by Spiekman et al. (2020).[151]
  • A study on bone histology of three archosauromorph reptiles (Lagerpeton chanarensis, Tropidosuchus romeri and Chanaresuchus bonapartei) from the Triassic Chañares Formation (Argentina), evaluating its implications for the knowledge of the paleobiology of these taxa, is published by Marsà, Agnolín & Novas (2020).[152]

Reptiles in generalEdit

  • A study on the dynamics of phenotypic and molecular evolution of reptiles during the early diversification of the major lineages of diapsid reptiles in the Permian and Triassic periods, and during the evolution of lepidosaurs from the Jurassic to the present, is published by Simões et al. (2020).[153]
  • A large, soft-shelled egg, most closely resembling eggs of extant lizards and snakes and possibly produced by a mosasaur, is described from the Upper Cretaceous Lopez de Bertodano Formation (Antarctica) by Legendre et al. (2020), who name a new ootaxon Antarcticoolithus bradyi.[154]
  • A study on the ecological diversity of Mesozoic marine tetrapods is published by Reeves et al. (2020).[155]
  • Diverse marine reptile faunas, including taxa previously known nearly exclusively from coeval strata of Europe (such as Temnodontosaurus, Stenopterygius, microcleidids, rhomaleosaurids and basal pliosaurids), are described from the Lower Jurassic Series (Pliensbachian and Toarcian stages) of Eastern Siberia (Russia) by Zverkov, Grigoriev & Danilov (2020).[156]
  • A study on the evolution of the archosauromorph ankle, aiming to test the hypothesis of fusion between the centrale and astragalus and the alternative hypothesis of a complete loss of the centrale, based on embryological and palaeontological data, is published by Blanco, Ezcurra & Bona (2020).[157]

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