Year 1276 (MCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1276 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar1276
MCCLXXVI
Ab urbe condita2029
Armenian calendar725
ԹՎ ՉԻԵ
Assyrian calendar6026
Balinese saka calendar1197–1198
Bengali calendar683
Berber calendar2226
English Regnal yearEdw. 1 – 5 Edw. 1
Buddhist calendar1820
Burmese calendar638
Byzantine calendar6784–6785
Chinese calendar乙亥年 (Wood Pig)
3972 or 3912
    — to —
丙子年 (Fire Rat)
3973 or 3913
Coptic calendar992–993
Discordian calendar2442
Ethiopian calendar1268–1269
Hebrew calendar5036–5037
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1332–1333
 - Shaka Samvat1197–1198
 - Kali Yuga4376–4377
Holocene calendar11276
Igbo calendar276–277
Iranian calendar654–655
Islamic calendar674–675
Japanese calendarKenji 2
(建治2年)
Javanese calendar1186–1187
Julian calendar1276
MCCLXXVI
Korean calendar3609
Minguo calendar636 before ROC
民前636年
Nanakshahi calendar−192
Thai solar calendar1818–1819
Tibetan calendar阴木猪年
(female Wood-Pig)
1402 or 1021 or 249
    — to —
阳火鼠年
(male Fire-Rat)
1403 or 1022 or 250
Pope John XXI (c. 1215–1277)

EventsEdit

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit

EnglandEdit

  • Spring – King Edward I (Longshanks) orders the people of Bayonne in Gascony (as part of the only English possessions in France) to provide Castile with warships "to resist the Saracens by sea", but he excuses himself from personal participation against the Marinid invasion in Spain because of his wars in Wales and his plan to lead a Crusade to the Holy Land.[3]

AfricaEdit

AsiaEdit

The AmericasEdit

By topicEdit

Cities and TownsEdit

CultureEdit

EconomyEdit

  • Henry of Ghent (or Henricus) becomes the last major theologian to openly consider annuities as a usurious contract. The end of the debate allows for the expansion of the budding practice of renten emission, to become a staple of public finance in northwestern Europe.[9]

ReligionEdit

BirthsEdit

DeathsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Joseph F. O'Callaghan (2011). The Gibraltar Crusade: Castile and the battle for the Strait, p. 69. ISBN 978-0-8122-2302-6.
  2. ^ Hywel Williams (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History, p. 148. ISBN 0-304-35730-8.
  3. ^ Joseph F. O'Callaghan (2011). The Gibraltar Crusade: Castile and the battle for the Strait, p. 71. ISBN 978-0-8122-2302-6.
  4. ^ Seignobos, Robin (2012). The other Ethiopia: Nubia and the Crusade (12th and 14th century), pp. 307–311. ISSN 0066-2127.
  5. ^ Wasserman, James (2001). The Templars and the Assassins: The Militia of heaven, p. 115. ISBN 978-1-59477-873-5.
  6. ^ Virani, Shafique N.; Assistant Professor Departments of Historical Studies and the Study of Religion Shafique N. (2007). The Ismailis in the Middle Ages: A History of Survival, a Search for Salvation, p. 32. Oxford University Press, USA. ISBN 978-0-19-531173-0.
  7. ^ O'Connor, Letitia Burns (1992). The Grand Canyon, pp. 16–19, 30–32. Los Angeles: Perpetua Press. ISBN 0-88363-969-6.
  8. ^ "Library & Archives - History". Oxford: Merton College. Archived from the original on May 13, 2012. Retrieved May 8, 2012.
  9. ^ Munro, John H. (2003). "The Medieval Origins of the Financial Revolution". The International History Review. 15 (3): 506–562.
  10. ^ "Blessed Gregory X | pope | Britannica". www.britannica.com. Retrieved May 10, 2022.