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List of ethnic slurs by ethnicity

Broader ethnic categories

Aboriginal Australian

Abo/Abbo
(AUS) Australian Aboriginal person. Originally, this was simply an informal term for Aborigine, and was in fact used by Aboriginal people themselves until it started to be considered offensive in the 1950s. In remoter areas, Aboriginal people still often refer to themselves (quite neutrally) as Blackfellas (and whites as Whitefellas). Although Abo is still considered quite offensive by many, the pejorative boong is now more commonly used when the intent is deliberately to offend, as that word's status as an insult is unequivocal.[1]
Boong / bong / bung
(Aus) Australian aboriginal.[2] Boong, pronounced with ʊ (like the vowel in bull), is related to the Australian English slang word bung, meaning "dead", "infected", or "dysfunctional". From bung, to go bung "Originally to die, then to break down, go bankrupt, cease to function [Ab. bong dead]".[3] Highly offensive. [First used in 1847 by JD Lang, Cooksland, 430][4] The (Oxford) Australian National Dictionary gives its origin in the Wemba word for "man" or "human being".[5]
Coon
an Aboriginal person.[6]
Gin
an Aboriginal woman.[7]
Lubra
an Aboriginal woman.[8] An Aboriginal word,[5]

African

Af 
(Rhodesia) African to a white Rhodesian (Rhodie).[9]
Ape 
(U.S.) a black person.[10]
Béni-oui-oui
Mostly used during the French colonization of Algeria as a derogatory term for Algerian Muslims.[11]
Bluegum 
An offensive slur used by some United States white Southerners for an African-American perceived as being lazy and who refuses to work.[12]
Boogie 
a black person (film noire) "The boogies lowered the boom on Beaver Canal".[13]
Buck 
a black person or Native American.[14]
Burrhead / Burr-head / Burr head
(U.S.) a black person (referencing Afro-textured hair).[15]
Colored 
(U.S.) a black person. Once generally accepted as inoffensive, this word is now considered disrespectful by some. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People continues to use its full name unapologetically. This is not to be confused with the term "person of color" which is the preferred term for collectively referring to all non-white people.
Coon 
(U.S. & U.K) a black person. Possibly from Portuguese barracoos, a building constructed to hold slaves for sale. (1837).[16]
Crow 
a black person,[17] spec. a black woman.
Eggplant 
(U.S.) A black person. Notable for appearing in the 1979 film, The Jerk.[18]
Fuzzies 
(U.K.) A black person. In the 1964 film classic, Zulu, the British officer played by Michael Caine refers to the Zulus as "fuzzies".[19]
Fuzzy-Wuzzy 
(U.K.) A Hadendoa Beja fighter. fighting against the British during the Mahdist War. The term is a reference to the distinctive dirwa hairstyle used by many Beja men.[20]
Golliwogg 
(UK Commonwealth) a dark-skinned person, after Florence Kate Upton's children's book character [21]
Jigaboo, jiggabo, jijjiboo, zigabo, jig, jigg, jiggy, jigga 
(U.S. & UK) a black person (JB) with stereotypical black features. (dark skin, wide nose, etc.) Refer to mannerisms that resemble dancing.
Jim Crow 
(U.S.) a black person; also the name for the segregation laws prevalent in much of the United States until the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s.[22]
Jim Fish 
(South Africa) a black person.[23]
Jungle bunny
(US and UK) a black person.[24]
Kaffir, kaffer, kafir, kaffre 
(South Africa) a. a black person. Considered very offensive.
Macaca, same as "macaque
a person of black African descent, originally used in languages of colonial powers in Africa.[25]
Mammy 
Domestic servant of black African descent, generally good-natured, often overweight, and loud.[26]
Monkey
a person of black African descent.[25] See also Macaca (slur). It also gave rise to the racist "monkey chants" in sports.
Mosshead 
a black person.[27]
Munt 
(among whites in South Africa, Zimbabwe, and Zambia) a black person from muntu, the singular of Bantu.[28]
Nig-nog 
(UK & U.S.) a black person.[29]
Nigger / nigra / nigga / niggah / nigguh
(International) An offensive term for a black person. From the word negro, which means the color black in numerous languages. Diminutive appellations include Nigg and Nigz. Over time, the terms nigga and niggaz (plural) have come to be frequently used between some African-Americans without the negative associations of nigger. Considered very offensive and typically censored as "the n-word" even in reference to its use.
Niglet / nigglet 
a black child.
Nigra / negra / niggra / nigrah / nigruh 
(U.S.) Derogatory term for a black person [first used in the early 1900s][30]
Pickaninny 
a term – generally considered derogatory – that in English usage refers to black children, or a caricature of them which is widely considered racist.
Porch monkey 
a black person.[31]
Powder burn 
a black person.[27]
Quashie 
a black person.[27]
Sambo 
(U.S.) a derogatory term for an African American, black, or sometimes a South Asian person.[26][32]
Smoked Irishman 
(U.S.) 19th century term for black people.[27]
Sooty 
a black person [originated in the U.S. in the 1950s][33]
Spade 
A black person.[34] recorded since 1928 (OED), from the playing cards suit.
Spook 
a black person.
Tar baby
(UK; U.S.; and N.Z.) a black child.[35]
Teapot
A black person. [19th century][36][27]
Thicklips/Bootlips 
a black person.[27]

Asian

East Asian

Celestial 
(Aust.) Chinese people, used in the late 1900s, a reference to their coming from the "Celestial Empire" (i.e. China).
Charlie 
(U.S.) A term used by American troops during the Vietnam War as a shorthand for communist guerrillas: it was shortened from "Victor Charlie", the radio code designation for Viet Cong, or VC.[37]
Chinaman 
(U.S. and English) Chinese person, used in old American west when discrimination against Chinese was common.[38] Possibly coined by early Chinese Americans from a translation of "Zhong Guo Ren" which is literally "China" and "Person". In contrast to "Frenchman" or "Irishman" which are generally considered neutral, non-insulting terms, "Chinaman" is considered offensive especially in the U.S. due to the virulent anti-Asian racism of the period in which the term came into popular usage (mid-1800s) and tends to generate objections in contemporary usage. Can be comparable to referring to a black person as "a Negro", today. In 20th century Chicago politics, "Chinaman" had a specific, unintentionally insulting meaning. A junior politician or government worker's political patron was referred to as their "Chinaman" (or "chinaman" without the initial capital) regardless of their actual ethnic heritage or gender.[39] The term "chinaman", without the initial capital, is also regularly used in cricket in a non-ethnic sense to refer to a left-handed bowler who uses a wrist spin action.
Chink 
(U.S.) a derogatory term for those of East Asian descent.
Coolie
(North America) unskilled Asian laborer, usually Chinese (originally used in 19th-century for Chinese railroad laborers). Possibly from Mandarin "苦力" ku li or Hindi kuli, "day laborer."[40] Also racial epithet for Indo-Caribbean people, especially in Guyana, Trinidad and Tobago and South African Indians.[41]
Gook
a derogatory term for East Asians, particularly aimed towards Japanese and Koreans used especially for enemy soldiers.[42][43][44] Its use as an ethnic slur towards Koreans has been traced to U.S. Marines serving in the Philippines in the early 20th century.[44] The earliest recorded use is dated 1920.[45] Widely popularized by the Korean war and Vietnam War (1965–73).
Jap 
(Predominantly U.S.) Offensive. Shortened from the word "Japanese", often used pejoratively.
Nip 
Offensive word for a Japanese person. From "Nippon", first used in World War II.[46]
Oriental 
(Predominantly U.S., used elsewhere) Refers to an East Asian person (of the Orient) and/or their ethnicity; sometimes considered offensive.[47][48][49] In 2016, US President Barack Obama signed a bill to remove the term "Oriental", together with some others, as a reference to a person from federal laws.[50]
Yellow, Yellowman, or Yellowwoman
designating or pertaining to an East Asian person, in reference to those who have a yellowish skin complexion.[51]

South Asian

American-Born Confused Desi, or ABCD
(Asian Indians in U.S.): used for American-born South Asians including Indian/ Pakistani/ Bangladeshi (mainly Indians as Indians are the largest number of "South Asians") who are confused about their cultural identity. This is often used humorously without any derogatory meaning.
Brownie 
a brown-skinned person of South Asian descent.[52]
Chee-chee 
a Eurasian half-caste, probably from Hindi chi-chi fie!, literally, dirt.[53]
Chinki 
used in India for those from Northeast India.
Curry Muncher 
used in Australia, Africa, New Zealand, and North America, it is a person of Asian Indian origin.[54]
Hajji, Hadji, Haji 
Used to refer to Iraqis, Arabs, Afghans, or Middle Eastern and South Asian people in general. Derived from the honorific Al-Hajji, the title given to a Muslim who has completed the Hajj (pilgrimage to Mecca)
Malaun 
Term for Hindus used in Bangladesh.
Paki 
people of Pakistan descent.

Southeast Asian

Dink
Someone of Southeast Asian origin, particularly aimed towards a Vietnamese person. Also used as a disparaging term for a North Vietnamese soldier or guerrilla in the Vietnam War. Origin: 1965–70, Americanism[55]
Flip
(U.S.) An ethnic slur applied to Filipinos.[56]
Huan-a 
Hokkien word for foreigner, used to refer to non-Chinese Southeast Asians and Taiwanese aborigines, considered offensive by most non-Chinese speakers.[57][58]
Jakun 
used as an insult for an unsophisticated person in Malaysia; derived from the name of an indigenous Orang Asli group and considered by some as derogatory and racist.[59]

Middle Easterner

Brownie 
Someone of Hispanic, Indian, and Arab, rarely used as someone of Native American or Pacific Island descent.[52]
Camel jockey
an Arab.
Sand nigger 
person who dwells in deserts of Saudi Arabia or African continent.
Towelhead / Raghead
A Muslim, Arab, Sikh, or member of any group that traditionally wears headdress such as a turban, keffiyeh or headscarf.

Inuit/Alaska Native

Eskimo 
an indigenous person from the Arctic.
Eskimo Pie 
an Inuk person.[60]

Latin American/Hispanic

Cholo 
term used by Chilean officers to refer to Peruvians during the War of the Pacific (1879–1883).[61]
Spic, spick, spik, spig, or spigotty 
A person of Hispanic descent. First recorded use in 1915. Theories include from "no spik English" (and spiggoty from the Chicano no speak-o t'e English), but common belief is that it is an abbreviation of "Hispanic". Also used for someone who speaks the Spanish language. In the early 20th century, "spic", "spig", and "spigotty" was also used as a slur against Italian people and Portuguese people.[62]
Brownie 
Someone of Hispanic, Indian, and Arab, rarely used as someone of Native American or Pacific Island descent.[52]
Wetback 
A Latino person. Originally applied specifically to Mexican migrant workers who had crossed the Rio Grande border river illegally to find work in the United States, its meaning has since broadened.
Greaseball
(U.S.) Can refer to a person of Italian or Hispanic descent.[63] More generally, it can also refer to anyone of Mediterranean or Latin American descent.[64]
Beaner 
Term for Mexican, but can be used for Hispanics in general because of the idea that all Hispanics are the same.
Greaser
(U.S.) Can refer to a person of Italian or Hispanic descent. Can also refer to members of the 1950-1960s subculture which Italian Americans, and, to a lesser extent, Hispanics were stereotyped to be a part of.
Sudaca
(Spain) a person from Latin America or 'Sudamérica' [65]
Tacohead
a Mexican person. This phrase is uttered by Willem Dafoe's character (Charlie) in the film Born on the Fourth of July.[66]
Tonk
An illegal migrant from Mexico.[67]

European

Barang 
(Cambodia) any white person.[68]
Bule 
(Indonesia) White people; literally, "albino", but used in the same way that "colored" might be used to refer to a black person to mean any white person.[69]
Charlie 
Mildly derogatory term used by African Americans, mainly in the 1960s and 1970s, to refer to a white person (from James Baldwin's play, Blues For Mister Charlie).[70]
Coonass or coon-ass 
(U.S.) a Cajun; may be derived from the French conasse.
Cracker 
(U.S.) Derogatory term for whites, particularly from the American South.[71]
Farang
(Thailand) any white person.
Gammon 
A derogatory term for white people, especially older white men - based on the appearance of their faces.
Gringo 
(The Americas) Non-Hispanic U.S. national. Hence Gringolandia, the United States; not always a pejorative term, unless used with intent to offend.[72]
Gubba 
(AUS) Aboriginal (Koori) term for white people[73] – derived from Governor / Gubbanah
Gweilo, gwailo, or kwai lo (鬼佬) 
(Hong Kong and South China) A White man. Gwei means "ghost". The color white is associated with ghosts in China. A lo is a regular guy (i.e. a fellow, a chap, or a bloke). Once a mark of xenophobia, the word was promoted by Maoists as insulting but is now in general, informal use.[74]
Honky (U.S.) 
Offensive term for a white person.
Haole (Hawaii) 
Usually not offensive, can be derogatory if intended to offend. Used by modern-day Native Hawaiians to refer to anyone of European descent whether native born or not. Use has spread to many other islands of the Pacific and is known in modern pop culture.[75]
Hunky, Bohunk
(U.S.) A central Central European laborer. It originated in the coal regions of Pennsylvania and West Virginia, where Poles and other immigrants from Central Europe (Hungarians (Magyar), Rusyns, Slovaks) came to perform hard manual labor on the mines.[76]
Mangia cake / cake (Canada)
A derogatory term used by Italian Canadians for those of Anglo-Saxon descent (from Italian, literally 'cake eater'). One suggestion is that this term originated from the perception of Italian immigrants that Canadian bread is sweet as cake in comparison to the rustic bread eaten by Italians.[77]
Medigan / Amedigan (U.S.)
Similar to "mangia cake". A term used by Italian Americans to refer to Americans of White Anglo Saxon Protestant descent, Americans with no discernible ethnicity, or non-Italian Americans in general. Comes from Southern Italian pronunciation of the Italian word "americano".[78][self-published source][79][80][81][82][83]
Ofay 
(U.S.) a white person, unknown etymology.[84]
Arkie
A person from the State of Arkansas, used during the great depression for farmers from Arkansas looking for work else where.
Okie
A person from the State of Oklahoma, used during the great depression for farmers from Oklahoma looking for work else where.
Peckerwood 
(U.S.) a white person (southerner). This word was coined in the 19th century by Southern black people to refer to poor white people.[85]
Whitey (U.S.) 
Offensive term for a white person.

Mediterranean/Southern European

Chocko
(Aus) a person of Mediterranean, Southern European, or Middle Eastern descent.[86][87]
Dago
In the U.S., refers specifically to Italians. In UK and Commonwealth, may refer to Italians, Spaniards, Portuguese, and potentially Greek peoples, possibly derived from the Spanish name "Diego".[88]
Greaseball, Greaser
In the U.S. especially, "greaseball" generally refers to a person of Italian descent, while "greaser", though it may be used as a shortening of "greaseball" to refer to Italians, has been more often applied to Hispanic Americans or Mexican Americans. However, "greaseball" and, to a lesser extent, "greaser", can also refer to any person of Mediterranean/Southern European descent or Hispanic descent, including Greeks, Spaniards, and the Portuguese, as well as Latin Americans.[89][64]
Kanake
(Ger) Used in 1960s Germany to refer to Southern European and Mediterranean immigrants, increasingly used exclusively for Turkish people.
Métèque
(Fr) Mediterranean or Middle Eastern immigrant, especially Italians.[90]
Wog
(Aus) Australian slur for the first wave of Southern European immigrants and their descendants that contrasted with the dominant Anglo-Saxon/Anglo-Celtic colonial stock. Used mostly for Mediterraneans and Southern Europeans, including the Spanish, Italians, Greeks, Macedonians, Lebanese, Arabs, Croatians and Serbians.

Indigenous people of the Americas

Brownie 
A brown-skinned person, or someone of Asian, or Aboriginal Australian, or Japanese descent.[52]
Chug
(Canada) refers to an individual of aboriginal descent.[91] See Chugach for the native people.
Injun 
a corrupted version of the word "Indian".
Prairie Nigger 
refers to Native Americans in the Great Plains.[92]
Redskin 
a Native American person, now generally defined as an offensive term
(Red) Indian 
only considered offensive by few, termed by Columbus due to the fact he thought he arrived in India, and met their natives and their reddish skin tone.[citation needed]
Squaw
(US and CAN) a female Native American.[93] Derived from lower East Coast Algonquian (Massachuset: ussqua),[94] which originally meant "young woman", but which took on strong negative connotations in the late 20th century.
Timber Nigger 
a Native American person, term used by whites in the U.S.[95]
Wagon burner 
a Native American person. A reference to when Native American tribes would attack wagon trains during the wars in the eastern American frontier.[96]
Yanacona
a term used by modern Mapuche as an insult for Mapuches considered to be subservient to non-indigenous Chileans, "sellout".[97] Use of the word "yanacona" to describe people have led legal action in Chile.[97]

Pacific Islander

Boonga / boong / bunga / boonie
(New Zealand) a Pacific Islander [alteration of boong].[98]
Brownie 
Someone of Hispanic, Indian, and Arab, rarely used as someone of Native American or Pacific Island descent.[52]
Hori
(New Zealand), an offensive term for a Māori (from the formerly common Maorified version of the English name George).[99]
Kanaka
originally referred to indentured laborers from the Pacific Islands, especially Melanesians and Polynesians.

Individual ethnicities

Americans

Merkin
Internet slang for inhabitant of the United States of America.[100]
Yankee and Yank
First applied by the Dutch colonists of New Amsterdam to Connecticuters and other residents of New England, possibly from Dutch Janke ("Johnny") or from Jan Kees ("John Cheese").[101] Uncontracted, "Yankee" remains in use in the American South in reference to Northerners; contracted, "Yank" is employed internationally by speakers of British English in informal reference to all Americans (first recorded 1778[101]).
Seppo and Septic
From Cockney rhyming slang, using the unrhymed word of "septic tank" in reference to "Yank" above.

White Americans

Buckra, Bakra
from Sub-Saharan African languages, used in the U.S. and the West Indies.[102]
Bumpkin, Country Bumpkin, and Hillbilly Bumpkin
derogatory term for poor rural white people, mainly those who share a rural or southern lifestyle.
Cracker 
Derogatory term for whites, particularly from the American South.[71]
Good ol' boy
Southerners, especially white, powerful people and their networks.
Hick
Derogatory term for poor white people.
Hillbilly
Usually refers to rural people or Southerners. It originated as a term for farmers living in The Appalachian Mountains.
Honky also spelled "honkey" or "honkie"
(U.S., NZ) a white person. Derived from an African American pronunciation of "hunky", the disparaging term for a Hungarian laborer. The first record of its use as an insulting term for a white person dates from the 1950s.[103] In New Zealand honky is used by Māori to refer to New Zealanders of European descent.[104]
Peckerwood
In the 1940s, the abbreviated version "wood" entered California prison slang, originally meaning an Okie mainly from the San Joaquin Valley. This has caused the symbol of the woodpecker to be used by white power skinheads and other pro-white groups. It is used as a slur against southerners today.
Redneck
Usually an insult to rural people or Southerners.
Trailer Trash
Derogatory term for a mainly white population stereotyped to live in trailer parks.
White Trash
Originally an insult for poor white Southerners.
Whitey
a term for a Caucasian.[105]

Argentines

Curepí
A common term used by people from Paraguay for people from Argentina, it means "pig's skin".[106][107]
Argie
Mildly derogative British term, popularised in the British press during the Falklands conflict.

Britons

Limey
A predominantly North American slang nickname for Britons, especially those from England.
Pom, Pommy
In Australia, South Africa and New Zealand usually denotes an English person.

Germans

Boches
Apheresis of the word alboche, which in turn is a blend of allemand (French for German) and caboche (slang for head). Used mainly during the First and Second World Wars, and directed especially at German soldiers.[108]
Chleuh
From the name of the Chleuh, a North African ethnicity — a term with racial connotations. It also denotes the absence of words beginning in Schl- in French. It was used mainly in World War II, but is also used now in a less offensive way.
Hermans, Herms
Based on the common German name Hermann, pronounced to rhyme with "German"[109]
The Hun, The Huns
Initially seen on Allied war propaganda during World War I. An allusion to the legendary savagery of Attila the Hun, referenced by Kaiser Wilhelm II in a speech given in 1900, exhorting his troops to be similarly brutal and relentless in suppressing the Boxer Rebellion in China.
Jerry, Gerry
Rhyming slang (Jerry the German), primarily used in the first and second World Wars by the British, but also other English speakers. Based on the common given nickname Jerry, short for Jeremiah, Gerald, and other similar-sounding names.
Kraut
Since World War II, Kraut has, in the English language, come to be used as a derogatory term for a German. This is probably based on sauerkraut, which is popular in various South-German cuisines but traditionally not prepared in North Germany.
Marmeladinger
The term Marmeladinger (from Southern German/Austrian "Marmelade" = jam [cook.]) has its origin in the trenches of World War I. While Austrian infantry rations included butter and lard as spread German troops had to make do with cheaper "Marmelade" as ersatz which they disdainfully called "Heldenbutter" (Hero's butter) or "Hindenburgfett".[110]
Mof
In Dutch the most common term for the German people, after the regular/official one, is "mof". It is regarded as a derogatory term, used exclusively for Germans and reflected Dutch resentment of the German occupation of the Netherlands during the Second World War.[111]
Piefke
The Austrian ethnic slur for a German is Piefke. Like its Bavarian counterpart Saupreiß (literally: sow-Prussian) the term Piefke historically characterized the people of Prussia only. It is derived from the name of Prussian military composer and band-leader Johann Gottfried Piefke.[112]

Irish

Bog-trotter or Bog Irish
Derogatory term for the Irish derived from the widespread occurrence of peat bogs in central Ireland and the attendant Irish practice of peat cutting for fuel.[113]
Mick
Derogatory term for an Irishman in the U.S. and U.K. Like Mickey, Mike, and Mikey, Mick is a common abbreviation or nickname for Michael (in English) or Mícheál (its equivalent in Irish), which are common names for Irish males (such as Mick McCarthy).[114][115]
Paddy
Derogatory term for an Irish man, derived from a nickname for Pádraig, a common Irish name for males after St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland. The term is not always intended to be derogatory - for instance, it was used by Taoiseach-in-waiting Enda Kenny in February 2011.[116]
Prod
Abbreviation for 'Protestant', especially Northern Ireland Protestants, often used alongside 'Taig', in expressions such as 'both Taigs and Prods'; like other such abbreviations everywhere, it is often used for convenience, or as a friendly nickname, or as self-description, usually without any offense being intended, and usually without any offense being taken.
Taig
derived from the Irish Gaelic forename Tadhg, often refers to Catholics in Northern Ireland. It often has implications of Republican sympathy. It is often used alongside 'Prod', in expressions such as 'both Taigs and Prods'.
Snout
Offensive term used in Northern Ireland to refer to Protestants of British descent living in Northern Ireland.[117]

Italians

Dago
(U.S.) A person of Italian descent. Possibly originally from the common Spanish first name Diego.
Eyetie
(U.S.) a person of Italian descent derived from the mispronunciation of “Italian” as “eye-talian”.[118][119]
Ginzo
(U.S.) an Italian-American.[120]
Goombah
An Italian male, especially an Italian thug or mafioso. From Italian compagno (companion).
Greaseball
(U.S.) A person of Italian or Hispanic descent.[63]
Greaser
(U.S.) A person of Italian or Hispanic descent. Also, members of the 1950s subculture which Italians were stereotyped to be a part of.
Guido
(US) An Italian-American male. Usually offensive. Derives from the Italian given name, Guido. Used mostly in the Northeastern United States as a stereotype for working-class urban Italian-Americans.[121]
Guinea
(U.S.) someone of Italian descent, most likely derived from "Guinea Negro", implying that Italians are dark or swarthy-skinned like the natives of Guinea.[122]
Polentone
(Italy) A slur often used by southern Italians to refer to northern Italians. From polenta eater.[123]
Terrone
(Italy) A slur often used by northern Italians to refer to southern Italians, especially Sicilians.
Wog
(Aus) Australian slur for the first wave of Southern European immigrants and their descendants that contrasted with the dominant Anglo-Saxon/Anglo-Celtic colonial stock. Used mostly for Mediterraneans and Southern Europeans, including the Spanish, Italians, Greeks, Macedonians, Lebanese, Arabs, Croatians and Serbians.
Wop
(U.S.) An ethnic term for anyone of Italian descent, derived from the Italian dialectism, "guappo", close to "dude, swaggerer" and other informal appellations, a greeting among male Neapolitans.[124][125] With Out Passport/Papers or Working On Pavement are popular inaccurate etymologies for the slur, supposedly derived from Italians that arrived to North America as immigrants without papers and worked in construction and blue collar work. These acronyms are dismissed as folk etymology or backronyms by etymologists.

Jews

  • Kike or kyke: (Chiefly US) Ashkenazi Jews. Possibly from kikel, Yiddish for "circle". Immigrant Jews who couldn't read English often signed legal documents with an "O" (similar to an "X", to which Jews objected because "X" also symbolizes a cross).[126]
  • Shylock : A slur against Jews based upon the Shakespeare character of the same name. Relates to money lending and greed.
  • Yid: a Jew, from its use as an endonym among Yiddish-speaking Jews.[127] Similarly Russian zhyd.
  • Kapo, generally used of one Jew by another.[128]

Lebanese

Lebo, Lebbo
(Chiefly Aus) Someone of Lebanese descent, usually a Lebanese Australian.[129]
Wog
(Aus) Australian slur for the first wave of Southern European immigrants and their descendants that contrasted with the dominant Anglo-Saxon/Anglo-Celtic colonial stock. Originally used mostly for Mediterraneans and Southern Europeans, including the Spanish, Italians, Greeks, and Macedonians, expanded to include Mediterranean people of the Middle East or Levantine, including the Lebanese.

Macedonians

Bulgaroskopian
(Greece) Used by Greeks when referring to the Macedonians in an attempt to deny self-identification [130][131]
Macedonist
(Bulgaria) A derogatory term used by Bulgarians to identify Macedonians [132]
Pseudomacedonian
(Greece) Used by Greeks to refer to the Macedonians in an attempt to deny self-identification [133]
Skopjan or Skopjian, Skopiana or Skopianika
(Greece) A term used by Greeks to refer to Macedonians in an attempt to deny self-identification[131][134][135][136][137][138][139][140]

Finnish

China Swede
(US) A person of Finnish descent.
Chukhna
(Russia) A person of Finnish descent.

Polish

Polack, Polak, Pollack, Pollock, Polock
(US, UK, Canada) A person of Polish descent.
Pshek
(Russia) A person of Polish descent.

Russians

Russki, Russkie 
Sometimes disparaging when used by foreigners for "Russian",[141] although in the Russian language, it is a neutral term which simply means an ethnic Russian as opposed to a citizen of the Russian Federation.
Moskal 
(Ukraine,[142] Belarus[142] and Poland[143]) originally a designation for a resident of the Grand Duchy of Moscow from the 12th-18th centuries.[142]

Scots

Jock 
(U.K.) used in the south of England,[144] occasionally used as an insult. The slur became an offensive word during the war of succession with England when all Scots were referred to as Jocks.[145]
Teuchter 
a Lowland Scots word originally used to describe a Scottish Highlander, essentially describing someone seen to be uncouth and rural.[146]

South Africans

Japies, Yarpies
Mildly derogative term for white South Africans, especially those of Afrikaans descent. From the Afrikaans term plaasjapie, meaning "farm boy",[147] and from the common Afrikaans first name Japie, a diminutive of Jacobus.

Chinese

Japanese

Koreans

Filipinos

Serbs

Ukrainians

Crossed ethnicities

African-European

Mulatto 
(Origin Americas) Mulatto is a term used to refer to a person who is born from one white parent. The term is generally considered archaic by some and inadvertently derogatory, especially in the African-American community. The term is widely used in Latin America and Caribbean usually without suggesting any insult. Historically in the American South, the term mulatto was applied also at times to persons with an admixture of Native Americans, and African Americans in general. In early American history, the term mulatto was also used to refer to persons of Native American and European ancestry.
Uncle Tom 
(U.S. minorities) term for an African-American, Latino, or Asian who panders to white people; a "sellout" (from the title character of Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin.)
Oreo
Africans that practice white culture, called this because they are "black on the outside, white on the inside" according to users of the term.
Aunt Jemima / Aunt Jane / Aunt Mary / Aunt Sally / Aunt Thomasina 
(U.S. black people) a black woman who "kisses up" to whites, a "sellout", female counterpart of Uncle Tom (see also "Coconut" below).[148] Taken from the popular syrup of the same name, where "Aunt Jemima" is represented as a black woman.[149]
Afro-Saxon 
(North America) A young white male devotee of black pop culture.[150]
Ann 
A white woman to a black person, or a black woman who acts too much like a white one. While Miss Ann, also just plain Ann, is a derisive reference to the white woman, by extension it is applied to any black woman who puts on airs and tries to act like Miss Ann.[151][152]
Wigger, Wegro 
is a slang term for a white person who allophilically emulates mannerisms, slangs and fashions stereotypically associated with urban African Americans; especially in relation to hip hop culture.
Rhineland Bastard 
was a derogatory term used in the Weimar Republic and Nazi Germany to refer to Afro-German children of mixed German and African parentage, who were fathered by Africans serving as French colonial troops occupying the Rhineland after World War I.

Native American-African

Mulatto 
(Origin Americas) Mulatto is a term used to refer to a person who is born from one white parent. The term is generally considered archaic by some and inadvertently derogatory, especially in the African-American community. The term is widely used in Latin America and Caribbean usually without suggesting any insult. Historically in the American South, the term mulatto was applied also at times to persons with an admixture of Native Americans, and African Americans in general. In early American history, the term mulatto was also used to refer to persons of Native American and European ancestry.
Zambo 
are racial terms used in the Spanish and Portuguese Empires and occasionally today to identify individuals in the Americas who are of mixed African and Amerindian ancestry (the analogous English term, considered a slur, is sambo).
Lobos 
In Mexico, black Native Americans are known as lobos (literally meaning wolves), they formed a sizeable minority in the past.

Native American-European

Mulatto 
(Origin Americas) Mulatto is a term used to refer to a person who is born from one white parent. The term is generally considered archaic by some and inadvertently derogatory, especially in the African-American community. The term is widely used in Latin America and Caribbean usually without suggesting any insult. Historically in the American South, the term mulatto was applied also at times to persons with an admixture of Native Americans, and African Americans in general. In early American history, the term mulatto was also used to refer to persons of Native American and European ancestry.
Apple
(North America) a Native American who is "red on the outside, white on the inside". Used primarily by other Native Americans to indicate someone who has lost touch with their cultural identity. First used in the 1970s.[153]

South Asian-European

American-Born Confused Desi, or ABCD
(Asian Indians in U.S.): used for American-born South Asians including Indian/ Pakistani/ Bangladeshi (mainly Indians as Indians are the largest number of "South Asians") who are confused about their cultural identity. This is often used humorously without any derogatory meaning.

East Asian-European

Banana
(North America; UK; Malaysia) an East Asian person living in a Western country (e.g., an East Asian American) who is yellow on the outside, white on the inside. Used primarily by East Asians to indicate someone who has lost touch with the cultural identity of his or her parents.[154]

Pacific Islander/Latin American/South Asian/African-European

Coconut
(U.S.) a person of Hispanic descent who is accused of acting 'white'.[155]
(UK) a brown person of South Asian descent who has assimilated into Western culture.[156][157][158]
(New Zealand/Australia) a Pacific Islander. Named after the coconut, the nut from the coconut palm; in Australian Aboriginal culture used in the American sense, as one who adapts to, or is adopted by White society; it derives from the fact that a coconut is brown on the outside and white on the inside.[159]

See also

Literature

  • Geoffrey Hughes, An Encyclopedia of Swearing: The Social History of Oaths, Profanity, Foul Language, And Ethnic Slurs in the English-speaking World, (M.E. Sharpe: 2006)
  • The New Oxford American Dictionary, second edition. Ed. Erin McKean. (Oxford University Press: 2005).
  • The Concise Oxford English Dictionary. Ed. Catherine Soanes and Angus Stevenson. (Oxford University Press: 2004)
  • Grand dictionnaire (Larousse: 1993)
  • John A. Simpson, Oxford English Dictionary Additions Series ISBN 0-19-861299-0

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