France men's national basketball team

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The France men's national basketball team (French: Équipe de France de basketball) represents France in international basketball and is administered by the French Federation of Basketball. France is currently ranked seventh in the FIBA World Rankings.[2]

France
Fédération Française de Basket-Ball logo.svg
FIBA ranking5 Increase 2 (9 August 2021)[1]
Joined FIBA1933
FIBA zoneFIBA Europe
National federationFFBB
CoachVincent Collet
Nickname(s)Les Bleus (The Blues)
Olympic Games
Appearances10
MedalsSilver Silver: (1948, 2000, 2020)
FIBA World Cup
Appearances8
MedalsBronze Bronze: (2014, 2019)
EuroBasket
Appearances39
MedalsGold Gold: (2013)
Silver Silver: (1949, 2011)
Bronze Bronze: (1937, 1951, 1953, 1959, 2005, 2015)
Kit body basketballwhiteborder.png
First jersey
Kit shorts redsides.png
Team colours
First
Kit body basketballblankborder.png
Second jersey
Kit shorts redsides.png
Team colours
Second
First international
 Italy 23–17 France 
(Milan, Italy; 4 April 1926)
Biggest win
 France 100–6 Austria 
(Prague, Czechoslovakia; 28 April 1947)
Biggest defeat
 United States 120–62 France 
(Los Angeles, California, US; 3 August 1984)

France has been a regular at the EuroBasket, qualifying for 38 appearances all-time. Their best finish came in 2013, winning the gold medal. They have also come away with two silver medals (1949, 2011) and six bronze medals (1937, 1951, 1953, 1959, 2005, 2015). France has also won two bronze medals at the FIBA World Cup in 2014 and 2019. Furthermore, at the Summer Olympics, France has won three silver medals (1948, 2000, 2020).

HistoryEdit

 
France national team in 1919

Rise and decline (1919–1979)Edit

Throughout its history, France's national basketball team has experienced many ups and downs. The time periods where the national team earned medals have been quite streaky.

In Europe, team France started out as a fierce competitor. The team won 5 medals at the EuroBasket between 1937 and 1959.
1937: Bronze Medal, 3–2 overall, second in preliminary group, lost semi-final, won bronze medal match
1947: Silver Medal, 5–1 overall, round robin tournament, no playoffs
1949: Bronze Medal; 6–3 overall, second in preliminary group at 3–1, won semi-final group in three-way tie-breaker with 2–1 record, lost semi-final, won bronze medal match
1953: Bronze Medal, 6–4 overall, second in preliminary group at 2–1, second position of four-way tiebreaker for 2nd place in final round with 4–3 record.
1959: Bronze Medal, 7–3 overall, second in preliminary group at 3–1, first in semi-final round at 3–0, third in final round with 1–2 record.

Their period of glory at the world stage began in the late 1940s / early 1950s. At the 1948 Olympics in London, the France team led by Robert Busnel won an Olympic silver medal, the first Olympic medal in their history. France finished second only to the United States.

In the wake of this Olympic medal, France, led by captain André Vacheresse won three consecutive medals. Including silver at the EuroBasket 1949, and bronze at the EuroBasket 1951 and EuroBasket 1953.

The following years were less glorious. France's basketball team seemingly declined gradually to disappear almost completely from the two major world competitions during the 1960s and 1970s.

Generation of hope (1980–1989)Edit

After the disappointing 60s and 70s, the 1980s were marked by a generation of hope, counting in its ranks French basketball icons such as Richard Dacoury, Stéphane Ostrowski, and Hervé Dubuisson. During this decade, France returned to the Olympics in 1984, and the World Cup in 1986.[3][4]

Success and struggle (1990–2000)Edit

During the 1990s France had their moments to shine, despite some internal struggles and many injuries to key players. At the European championship, the team did not win a medal despite some good performances. The years 1999 and 2000, however, marked a turnaround for French basketball. The team built around Antoine Rigaudeau, Tariq Abdul-Wahad, Laurent Sciarra, Jim Bilba, and Laurent Foirest finished in the top 4 at the EuroBasket 1999, which France hosted. Their first loss was in the semifinals followed by their second loss in the bronze medal match to Yugoslavia 74–62, despite some internal problems that disrupted the group of players. In 2000, team France qualified for the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney, full of ambition, which developed the means for major achievement. At the end of their stint in Australia, the selection of coach Jean-Pierre de Vincenzi helped lead the team to the silver medal, France's first top 3 performance at a major basketball event in 46 years and their first Olympic medal in 52 years.[5]

Tony Parker joins the team (2001)Edit

After the 2000 Olympics, French phenom Tony Parker was selected by the San Antonio Spurs in the 2001 NBA draft. However, at the EuroBasket 2001, without Antoine Rigaudeau, who surprisingly decided to retire from the national team, the 19-year-old Parker alone was not enough as France failed to repeat their outstanding performance attained at the 2000 Olympic Games. France lost in the quarter-finals to Germany 77–81 and finished in 6th place overall.[6] During this time, most of France's players cleared their spots for a new generation of players, which were available in abundance as the France Junior national team had won the 2000 junior championship.[7]

Setback despite abundance of talent (2003)Edit

At the EuroBasket 2003, France competed with an immensely talented squad, which included NBA players Tony Parker, Jérôme Moïso and Tariq Abdul-Wahad. As well as future pro Boris Diaw, and European standouts Laurent Foirest, Cyril Julian and Florent Piétrus. But despite competing with one of the most promising rosters ever, France lost in the semi-finals against Lithuania, then went on to lose a close battle in the bronze medal match to Italy 67–69.[8]

Restructuring and improved performance (2005)Edit

Hoping not to repeat the disappointing performance of 2003, France's squad once again saw considerable changes heading into EuroBasket 2005. Reconstruction of the national team roster was built based on team chemistry instead of big names; Amongst others, Jérôme Moïso and Tariq Abdul-Wahad disappeared from the roster with the newly formed team being built around the three NBA players Tony Parker, Boris Diaw, and Mickaël Piétrus as well as the returning national team veteran Antoine Rigaudeau. The new coach Claude Bergeaud, surprisingly also selected Frédéric Weis, an underachieving player once drafted in the 1999 NBA draft, who did not participate in the team's preparation. After a sobering preliminary round, France displayed stunning performances in the knockout stage. First, France eliminated Serbia and Montenegro on their home court, then the team defeated the 2003 European champion Lithuania. Heading into their semi-finals match against Greece, where both sides battled each other throughout with tough defense, France collapsed in the final minute after leading by seven points with 45 seconds remaining in regulation. The devastating loss relegated the national team to the bronze medal match once again. However, unlike 2003 France recovered to win the bronze medal by blowing out Spain 98–68.[9]

Continued title aspirations (2006–2010)Edit

At the 2006 FIBA World Cup France competed without Tony Parker, who suffered a twisted finger two days before the competition. Because of this, the San Antonio Spurs, who just signed Parker to a 51 million Euros contract did not allow him to participate. After a preliminary round marked by three wins and two losses, including a shocking defeat at the hands of Lebanon, France beat Angola in the Round of 16 match 68–62 before losing in the quarter-finals against Greece 56–73. Furthermore, two victories in classification matches finally granted the French fifth place.[10]

At the EuroBasket 2007, France fell behind their aspirations again. After a strong preliminary round, the team was eliminated in the quarter-finals by eventual champion Russia 75–71, then was beaten in the classification matches by Croatia 86–69 and Slovenia 88–74, finishing in eighth place, missing out on the Olympic Games for the second consecutive time. In the following months, the team had to go through the ordeal of qualifications to participate in the next EuroBasket which was to be held in 2009. In 2008, former national team coach Michel Gomez returned to lead the team, a position he held between 1993 and 1995. But Gomez failed to help France qualify directly for the European Championship, and had to enter a repechage tournament. In August 2009 he was replaced by Vincent Collet, coach of ASVEL Lyon-Villeurbanne.[11]

Under Collet's direction, Les Bleus grabbed the last ticket to the EuroBasket 2009 by trashing Belgium 92–54 in the final game of the repechage. At the European Championship, France won their first six games of the first two rounds but failed in the quarter-finals against the eventual tournament champion Spain. The French ultimately finished in fifth place, a performance which would grant the team the direct qualification for the next two major competitions, the 2010 FIBA World Cup and EuroBasket 2011.[12]

Rise to the world elite (2011–present)Edit

 
Nicolas Batum gave Team France much support to win silver at the EuroBasket 2011.

After an disappointing showing from France during the 2010 FIBA World Cup, where they were knocked out in the Round of 16, the team looked toward EuroBasket 2011 with high expectations after an impressive run in 2009. France was placed into Group B, with Latvia as their first opponent. France got off to a slow start to begin the game as they trailed after the first quarter 18–25. Although the team would step it up in the second quarter, to only trail 40–41 at halftime. In the second half, France demonstrated why they were one of the favourites heading into the tournament. As they finished off the game strong and pulled out the win 89–78, behind Tony Parker's game high (31 points and 7 assists).[13] In their second match against Israel, France never faced any pressure, as they led throughout to an 68–85 victory. Standing with a record of 2–0, next up for France was a date with Dirk Nowitzki and Germany. Similar to their first match, France got off to another slow start where the team trailed after the first period. But they rallied back in the second quarter to take a 29–28 halftime lead. France exploded in the third quarter, which gave the national team an 18 point cushion heading into the fourth quarter. This deficit would prove too much to overcome for Germany, as France led by Tony Parker's 32 points on 55% shooting, and six assists moved to 3–0.[14]

Still undefeated, France had another tough test awaiting, with Italy in their way. For three quarters France struggled against the stymie defense of the Italians, where they were down 67–60 heading into the fourth quarter. With Tony Parker having an off shooting night, other team leaders such as Boris Diaw (21 points), and Nicolas Batum (20 points) gave the team the lift it needed down the stretch to prevail 84–91.[15] The win also helped France clinch a spot in the second group phase. France having already locked up a spot to advance went up against the undefeated Serbia in their final match of Group B. In a highly competitive match between these two unbeaten teams, where overtime was needed to determine the winner; France with balanced scoring from six players in double figures handed Serbia their first lost 96–97.[16]

 
France national team after winning silver medals at the EuroBasket 2011

In the second group phase France won their first two matches against Turkey, and Lithuania, before falling to Spain. The result was enough to book a place into the quarter-finals. There, France battled Greece with a chance to reach the semis on the line. The team eventually escaped with a 64–56 victory. France needing one more win to put themselves in position to play for the title, first had to get past Andrei Kirilenko and Russia. The two teams played a really close game throughout, but France did just enough to place themselves in prime position to move on.[17]

France reached the final of the EuroBasket for the first time since 1949, where they were up against Spain. Unfortunately, the team came up short, as Spain repeated as European champions. However, led by the extraordinary performances from the iconic Tony Parker, France proved they would be a threat on the international scene in the future.

The 2012 Summer Olympics came and went without much noise made from the French as the team bowed out in the quarter-finals. Heading toward the EuroBasket 2013, France was eager to flip the script and display the execution needed to make a deep tournament run. However, in their first match at the Euro finals in Group A, France was defeated by Germany 74–80. The loss quickly refocused the team for their next two matches, against Great Britain, and Israel, as they blew out both opponents fairly easily. France went on to also win their next two games in the preliminary phase against Ukraine and Belgium, to finish top of Group A to advance.

During the second group phase France suffered their second loss of the tournament, falling to Lithuania. Although the team turned around in their next match to beat Latvia 102–91, behind big games from center Alexis Ajinça (25 points and 3 blocks) and Tony Parker's (23 points).[18] With a place in the quarter-finals assured, France managed to drop their third match, this time an 77–65 defeat to Serbia.

 
France celebrates their first European title at EuroBasket 2013

In their quarter-finals match France were up against the EuroBasket 2013 host Slovenia. However, the team dispelled any notion there would be carryover from their prior match, as they prevailed 62–72. The win also setup an EuroBasket 2011 final rematch between Spain. Heading into the semi-finals, France was resolute to make amends for their 2009 and 2011 eliminations. But it was the Spaniards who began this duel with more urgency, as they outplayed the French in the first half to lead 34–20. To begin the third quarter France slowly started cutting into Spain's lead with their defensive tenacity to trail 49–43 going into the fourth quarter. Entering the final period France continued their harassing defensive pressure, which started to wear the Spaniards down. France eventually fought all the way back, to pull even with their nemesis 65–65 to send the game into overtime. In extra time France did not let this golden opportunity slip away, as they finally pulled ahead to win 72–75. Led once again by Tony Parker and his (32 points), along with the clutch performance from Antoine Diot, France were heading back to the title game.[19]

Ensuing their emotional win against Spain, France entered the final against Lithuania ready to seize the moment and create history. France, after years of coming up short in these situations finally became European champions.[20] Additionally, the stellar play from Tony Parker throughout the tournament earned himself MVP honors.[21]

Due to their rousing accomplishment at EuroBasket 2013, France qualified for the 2014 FIBA World Cup. Although without the services of Tony Parker, other players stepped up to try and fill the void. France was drawn into Group A at the finals, which many viewed as the Group of Death. Their first opponent was Brazil, which resulted in a tightly contested match the French would lose 63–65. Next up for France, was a date with Serbia. France looking to pick up their first win during the finals, battled back and forth with the Serbians until they escaped with a narrow 73–74 victory. Now at a record of 1–1, France easily put away Egypt in their third match of the group stage before they faced the tournament hosts Spain. There, the team was thoroughly outplayed by the Spanish, who handed France a heavy defeat 88–64. Although the French would rebound to close out the preliminary phase with a win against Iran 81–76.

 
France national team after winning bronze medals at the 2014 FIBA World Cup

Entering the Round of 16, waiting for France was Croatia. The French would get off to a lethargic start, as they trailed the Croatians 7–15 after the first quarter. France would ultimately reverse their fortune in the second, turning up their defense to hold Croatia to just seven points to head into halftime with a one-point lead. Entering the third quarter, France continued to frustrate Croatia on defense, to extend their advantage heading to the fourth. However, Croatia would put up a solid final period to no avail, France would hold on 69–64 to advance. In the quarter-finals, France would once again be paired against a familiar foe, Spain. Although this time around France displayed more resolve against the Spaniards, as they eliminated one of the World Cup favourites comfortably 65–52.[22]

France arrived at the semi-finals confident before their rematch with Serbia. But even after a remarkable 35-point performance from Nicolas Batum, France lost to the eventual tournament runners-up 85–90.[23] After the devastating lost in the semis, France turned around and finished up strong to win a highly competitive bronze medal match against Lithuania 93–95.[24]

France was named as one of four co-hosts for EuroBasket 2015.[25] At the Euro finals, France was aided by the return of EuroBasket 2013 MVP Tony Parker to the national team. With their floor general back in the fold, the French were tabbed as one of the early favourites to win the tournament and repeat. Being placed into Group A to begin their title defense, France was tasked with Finland as their first opponent. In front of an exuberant home crowd, France got off to a quick start to possess the lead after the first quarter. The French would continue to feed off this momentum as they extended their advantage heading into halftime up 45–37. Although in the third and fourth quarters Finland mounted a vigorous comeback, to send the match into overtime. However, France would not be denied on their home soil, as they pulled out an emotional 97–87 victory.[26] After the win, France would go on to triumph through their remaining four matches in group play to clinch a place into the Round of 16.

 
France national team after winning bronze medals at the EuroBasket 2015

Awaiting France in their next match was Turkey, a game they would cruise to victory 76–53. Their opponent in the quarter-finals was Latvia, who were looking to upset the hosts and advance to the semis. They were ultimately denied that chance 84–70, as France in front of over 22,000 spectators at Stade Pierre-Mauroy moved closer to their desired destination.[27] France, needing one more win to put themselves in position to play in the final, were again pitted against rivals Spain. In a classic duel between the two battle-tested sides, it was the Spaniards led by Pau Gasol's 40 points and 11 rebounds ending France's hope of repeating. However, with third place still on the line France defeated Serbia 81–68 to come away with the bronze medal.[28]

After going (4–0) during the 2016 Olympic Qualifying Tournament, France qualified for the 2016 Summer Olympics.[29] Although they only managed to reach the quarter-finals before ceding once again to Spain.[30] After the tournament French great Tony Parker announced his retirement from the national team, ending an illustrious run with Les Bleurs.[31]

At EuroBasket 2017, France continued their underwhelming play, as the team was knocked out in the Round of 16 to Germany 84–81. The devastating loss for France was their worst finish at the Euros since 1963.[32]

During the process to qualify for the 2019 FIBA World Cup, France went through European qualifiers in order to secure a spot. The national team would go on to finish with a (10–2) record during qualifying to clinch their place at the World Cup finals.[33][34]

 
France national team after winning bronze medals at the 2019 FIBA World Cup

At the 2019 FIBA World Cup, France entered the tournament looking to continue their strong play the team displayed during the qualifiers. France was slotted into Group G to begin their run at the World Cup finals. Their first test was against a familiar foe in Germany, a match that went down to the wire. But behind the heroics of national team star Evan Fournier's (26 points and 10 rebounds) France pulled out a tight 78–74 win.[35] In their final two preliminary group phase matches versus Jordan and Dominican Republic, France advanced to the second group phase, by trashing their opponents on route to heavy victories.

In France's next encounter, the team were up against Lithuania. France, however, prevailed in a physical clash between the two European heavyweights 78–75, to lockup a spot into the quarter-finals with one match remaining in the second group phase. There, France were pitted against Australia. Although even with another strong showing from Evan Fournier, and his (31 points and 6 rebounds) the team fell 98–100.

In the quarter-finals, France had the duty of trying to knock off the favourites of the tournament, the United States. Ultimately led by majestic games from Evan Fournier and big man Rudy Gobert, France eliminated the United States 79–89.[36] The win advanced the team into the semi-finals with a date versus Argentina. With the emotional confidence boosting win behind them, France exhibited lackluster urgency in their next match in an 80–66 defeat to the Argentines. The lost for France was their second consecutive ouster in the semis at the World Cup.[37] France would move on to claim the bronze medal, downing Australia in a rematch 67–59.[38]

Competitive recordEdit

Results and fixturesEdit

  Win   Loss

2020Edit

27 November 2020 Great Britain   56–79
0
  France Pau, France* [note 1]
0
18:00 Scoring by quarter: 5–24, 15–22, 17–16, 19–17
Pts: Hamilton 12
Rebs: Clark, Olaseni 6
Asts: Clark 4
Boxscore Pts: M'Baye 24
Rebs: Cordinier 9
Asts: Albicy 9
Arena: Palais des Sports de Pau
Referees: Oskars Lucis (LAT), Lorenzo Baldini (ITA), Kerem Baki (TUR)
29 November 2020 France   86–74
0
  Germany Pau, France* [note 1]
0
15:00 Scoring by quarter: 25–22, 17–19, 19–18, 25–15
Pts: Ouattara 24
Rebs: Bouteille, M'Baye 5
Asts: Albicy 7
Boxscore Pts: Obst 16
Rebs: Jallow 5
Asts: Akpınar 4
Arena: Palais des Sports de Pau
Referees: Oskars Lucis (LAT), Lorenzo Baldini (ITA), Gatis Saliņš (LAT)

2021Edit

20 February 2021 Montenegro   71–73
0
  France Podgorica, Montenegro* [note 1]
0
20:45 Scoring by quarter: 17–13, 20–18, 16–19, 18–23
Pts: Popović 17
Rebs: Simonović 7
Asts: Ivanović 4
Boxscore Pts: Heurtel 16
Rebs: Chassang, M'Baye 7
Asts: Albicy, Heurtel 4
Arena: Bemax Arena
Referees: Antonio Conde (ESP), Fernando Calatrava (ESP), Martin Horozov (BUL)
22 February 2021 France   73–94
0
  Great Britain Podgorica, Montenegro* [note 1]
0
17:00 Scoring by quarter: 16–26, 19–26, 20–21, 18–21
Pts: Lessort 15
Rebs: Cordinier, Lessort 6
Asts: Heurtel 8
Boxscore Pts: Soko 27
Rebs: Hesson, Soko 7
Asts: Nelson 6
Arena: Bemax Arena
Referees: Fernando Calatrava (ESP), Tanel Suslov (EST), Can Mavisu (TUR)
8 July 2021
Friendly
Spain   86–77   France Málaga, Spain
19:30 CEST (UTC+2) Scoring by quarter: 21–24, 23–14, 21–20, 21–19
Pts: Rubio 16
Rebs: M. Gasol 6
Asts: M. Gasol 5
Boxscore Pts: Fournier 20
Rebs: Poirier 6
Asts: de Colo 7
Arena: Palacio Martín Carpena
10 July 2021
Friendly
France   79–87   Spain Paris, France
20:30 CEST (UTC+2) Scoring by quarter: 20–23, 16–22, 21–14, 22–28
Pts: Fournier 15
Rebs: Yabusele 10
Asts: de Colo 4
Boxscore Pts: Rubio 23
Rebs: W. Hernangómez 5
Asts: López-Arostegui, Rodríguez 4
Arena: Accor Arena
18 July 2021
Friendly
Japan   81–75   France Saitama, Japan
13:30 (UTC+9) Scoring by quarter: 18–14, 28–16, 15–28, 20–17
Pts: Hachimura 19
Rebs: Watanabe 9
Asts: Tanaka 4
Boxscore Pts: Fournier 16
Rebs: Gobert 8
Asts: Batum 5
Arena: Saiden Chemical Arena
25 July 2021 France   83–76
0
  United States Saitama, Japan
0
21:00 (UTC+9) Scoring by quarter: 15–22, 22–23, 25–11, 21–20
Pts: Fournier 28
Rebs: Gobert 9
Asts: Batum, de Colo 5
Boxscore Pts: Holiday 18
Rebs: Adebayo 10
Asts: Green, Holiday 4
Arena: Saitama Super Arena
Referees: Guilherme Locatelli (BRA), Michael Weiland (CAN), Manuel Mazzoni (ITA)
28 July 2021 Czech Republic   77–97
0
  France Saitama, Japan
0
21:00 (UTC+9) Scoring by quarter: 28–22, 12–29, 16–26, 21–20
Pts: Veselý 19
Rebs: Balvín 8
Asts: Satoranský 9
Boxscore Pts: Fournier 21
Rebs: Gobert 10
Asts: de Colo 8
Arena: Saitama Super Arena
Referees: Juan Fernández (ARG), Manuel Mazzoni (ITA), Leandro Lezcano (ARG)
31 July 2021 Iran   62–79
0
  France Saitama, Japan
0
10:00 (UTC+9) Scoring by quarter: 17–22, 10–24, 20–16, 15–17
Pts: Haddadi 18
Rebs: Haddadi 12
Asts: Haddadi 5
Boxscore Pts: Heurtel 16
Rebs: four players 5
Asts: de Colo 5
Arena: Saitama Super Arena
Referees: Guilherme Locatelli (BRA), Leandro Lezcano (ARG), Rabah Noujaim (LBN)
3 August 2021 Italy   75–84
0
  France Saitama, Japan
0
17:20 (UTC+9) Scoring by quarter: 25–20, 17–23, 12–21, 21–20
Pts: Fontecchio 23
Rebs: Gallinari 10
Asts: Pajola 6
Boxscore Pts: Gobert 22
Rebs: Batum 14
Asts: de Colo 7
Arena: Saitama Super Arena
Referees: Roberto Vázquez (PUR), Juan Fernández (ARG), Steven Anderson (USA)
5 August 2021 France   90–89
0
  Slovenia Saitama, Japan
0
20:00 (UTC+9) Scoring by quarter: 27–29, 15–15, 29–21, 19–24
Pts: de Colo 25
Rebs: Gobert 16
Asts: de Colo 5
Boxscore Pts: Tobey 23
Rebs: Dončić 10
Asts: Dončić 18
Arena: Saitama Super Arena
Referees: Guilherme Locatelli (BRA), Juan Fernández (ARG), Mārtiņš Kozlovskis (LAT)
7 August 2021 France   82–87
0
  United States Saitama, Japan
0
11:30 (UTC+9) Scoring by quarter: 18–22, 21–22, 24–27, 19–16
Pts: Fournier, Gobert 16
Rebs: Gobert 8
Asts: de Colo 7
Boxscore Pts: Durant 29
Rebs: Tatum 7
Asts: Green 5
Arena: Saitama Super Arena
Referees: Guilherme Locatelli (BRA), Ademir Zurapović (BIH), Michael Weiland (CAN)
26 November 2021 (2021-11-26) France   vs.   Montenegro
Boxscore
Note:
29 November 2021 (2021-11-29) Hungary   vs.   France
Boxscore
Note:

2022Edit

24 February 2022 (2022-02-24) France   vs.   Portugal
Boxscore
Note:
27 February 2022 (2022-02-27) Portugal   vs.   France
Boxscore
Note:
1 July 2022 (2022-07-01) Montenegro   vs.   France
Boxscore
Note:
4 July 2022 (2022-07-04) France   vs.   Hungary
Boxscore
Note:

TeamEdit

2020 Olympic rosterEdit

The roster was announced on 21 May 2021.[40]

France men's national basketball team roster
Players Coaches
Pos. No. Name Age – Date of birth Height Club Ctr.
PG 1 Frank Ntilikina 22 – (1998-07-28)28 July 1998 1.98 m (6 ft 6 in) New York Knicks  
G 3 Timothé Luwawu-Cabarrot 26 – (1995-05-09)9 May 1995 1.98 m (6 ft 6 in) Brooklyn Nets  
PG 4 Thomas Heurtel 32 – (1989-04-10)10 April 1989 1.88 m (6 ft 2 in) ASVEL Basket  
SF 5 Nicolas Batum 32 – (1988-12-14)14 December 1988 2.03 m (6 ft 8 in) Los Angeles Clippers  
PF 7 Guerschon Yabusele 25 – (1995-12-17)17 December 1995 2.03 m (6 ft 8 in) ASVEL Basket  
SG 10 Evan Fournier 28 – (1992-10-29)29 October 1992 1.99 m (6 ft 6 in) Boston Celtics  
SG 12 Nando de Colo 34 – (1987-06-23)23 June 1987 1.96 m (6 ft 5 in) Fenerbahçe  
C 17 Vincent Poirier 27 – (1993-10-17)17 October 1993 2.13 m (7 ft 0 in) Real Madrid  
PG 21 Andrew Albicy 31 – (1990-03-21)21 March 1990 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in) CB Gran Canaria  
C 27 Rudy Gobert 29 – (1992-06-26)26 June 1992 2.15 m (7 ft 1 in) Utah Jazz  
C 28 Petr Cornelie 25 – (1995-07-26)26 July 1995 2.11 m (6 ft 11 in) Pau-Lacq-Orthez  
C 93 Moustapha Fall 29 – (1992-02-23)23 February 1992 2.18 m (7 ft 2 in) ASVEL Basket  
Head coach
Assistant coach(es)
Legend
  • (C) Team captain
  • Club – describes last
    club before the competition
  • Age – describes age
    on 25 July 2021

Depth chartEdit

Pos. Starting 5 Bench 1 Bench 2
C Rudy Gobert Moustapha Fall
PF Guerschon Yabusele Vincent Poirier Petr Cornelie
SF Nicolas Batum Timothé Luwawu-Cabarrot
SG Evan Fournier Frank Ntilikina
PG Nando De Colo Thomas Heurtel Andrew Albicy

Head coach historyEdit

Past rostersEdit

1935 EuroBasket: finished 5th among 10 teams

3 Pierre Boël, 4 Robert Cohu, 5 Jacques Flouret, 6 Raoul Gouga, 7 Henri Hell, 8 Charles Hemmerlin, 9 Étienne Rolland, 10 Francis Rudler (Coach: Marius Orial)


1936 Olympic Games: finished 19th among 21 teams

1 Pierre Boël, 2 Pierre Caque, 3 Georges Carrier, 4 Robert Cohu, 5 Jean Couturier, 6 Jacques Flouret, 7 Edmond Leclerc, 8 Étienne Onimus, 9 Fernand Prudhomme, 10 Étienne Rolland, 11 Lucien Thèze (Coach: Marius Orial)


1937 EuroBasket: finished 3rd   among 8 teams

3 Pierre Boël, 4 Robert Cohu, 5 Jacques Flouret, 6 Henri Hell, 7 Edmond Leclerc, 8 Henri Lesmayoux, 9 Fernand Prudhomme, 10 Étienne Rolland, 11 Eugene Ronner, 12 Marcel Verot (Coach: Henri Kretzschmar)


1939 EuroBasket: finished 4th among 8 teams

3 Vladimir Fabrikant, 4 Henri Lesmayoux, 5 Fernand Prudhomme, 6 Jean Jeammes, 7 Étienne Rolland, 8 Émile Frézot, 9 Alexandre Katlama, 10 Robert Cohu, 11 Maurice Mertz, 12 Abel Gravier, 13 Robert Busnel, 14 André Ambroise, 15 Gabriel Gonnet, 16 Gaston Falleur (Coach: Paul Geist)


1946 EuroBasket: finished 4th among 10 teams

3 André Buffière, 4 Jean Duperray, 5 Robert Busnel, 6 Jacques Perrier, 7 Andre Tartary, 8 Justy Specker, 9 Lucien Rebuffic, 10 Paul Chaumont, 11 Henri Lesmayoux, 12 Émile Frézot, 13 Étienne Rolland, 14 René Chocat, 15 André Goeuriot, 16 Maurice Girardot (Coach: Paul Geist)


1947 EuroBasket: finished 5th among 14 teams

3 André Goeuriot, 4 Jean Duperray, 5 Robert Busnel, 6 Émile Frézot, 7 Pierre Thiolon, 8 Jacques Perrier, 9 René Chocat, 10 Fernand Guillou, 11 Jacques Favory, 12 Marcel Béziers, 13 Aimé Gravas, 14 Maurice Girardot, 15 Henri Lesmayoux, 16 Jacques Faucherre (Coach: Michael Rutzgis)


1948 Olympic Games: finished 2nd   among 23 teams

3 André Buffière, 4 René Dérency, 5 Pierre Thiolon, 6 Jacques Perrier, 7 René Chocat, 8 Raymond Offner, 9 André Even, 10 Maurice Desaymonnet, 11 Fernand Guillou, 12 Michel Bonnevie, 13 Maurice Girardot, 14 Lucien Rebuffic, 15 Yvan Quénin, 16 André Barrais (Coach: Robert Busnel)


1949 EuroBasket: finished 2nd   among 7 teams

3 André Buffière, 4 Jean Perniceni, 5 Jacques Freimuller, 6 Jean Swidzinski, 7 René Chocat, 8 Jean-Pierre Salignon, 9 Marc Quiblier, 10 Robert Busnel, 11 Jacques Dessemme, 12 André Vacheresse, 13 Louis Devoti, 14 Maurice Desaymonnet, 15 Jacques Favory, 16 Fernand Guillou (Coach: Robert Busnel)


1950 FIBA World Cup: finished 6th among 10 teams

3 Jacques Perrier, 4 Jean Swidzinski, 5 Jean Perniceni, 6 Fernand Guillou, 7 Robert Marsolat, 8 Jean-Pierre Salignon, 9 Maurice Marcelot, 10 Maurice Desaymonnet, 11 Jacques Dessemme, 12 André Vacheresse, 13 Jacques Chalifour, 15 Robert Monclar (Coach: Robert Busnel)


1951 EuroBasket: finished 3rd   among 17 teams

3 André Vacheresse, 4 Pierre Thiolon, 5 Marc Quiblier, 6 Louis Devoti, 7 Jacques Freimuller, 8 Jean-Pierre Salignon, 9 Justy Specker, 10 René Chocat, 11 Jacques Dessemme, 12 André Buffière, 13 Robert Guillin, 14 Marc Peirone, 15 Robert Monclar, 16 Jean Perniceni (Coach: Robert Busnel)


1952 Olympic Games: finished 8th among 23 teams

3 Roger Haudegand, 4 Bernard Planque, 5 Robert Monclar, 6 René Chocat, 7 Jean Perniceni, 8 Louis Devoti, 9 Robert Guillin, 10 Robert Crost, 11 Jacques Dessemme, 12 André Buffière, 13 André Vacheresse, 14 André Chavet, 15 Jean-Pierre Salignon, 16 Jean-Paul Beugnot (Coach: Robert Busnel)


1953 EuroBasket: finished 3rd   among 17 teams

3 Jacques Freimuller, 4 Bernard Planque, 5 Robert Monclar, 6 Claude Gallay, 7 Jean Perniceni, 8 Roger Haudegand, 9 Robert Guillin, 10 René Chocat, 11 Jacques Dessemme, 12 André Buffière, 13 André Vacheresse, 14 Henri Rey, 15 Marc Quiblier, 16 Justy Specker (Coach: Robert Busnel)


1954 FIBA World Cup: finished 4th among 12 teams

3 Roger Haudegand, 4 Robert Zagury, 5 Robert Monclar, 6 Jacques Freimuller, 7 Jean Perniceni, 8 Henri Rey, 9 Roger Antoine, 10 Henri Grange, 11 Jacques Dessemme, 12 André Buffière, 13 Louis Bertorelle, 14 Jean-Paul Beugnot, 15 André Schlupp, 16 Yves Gominon (Coach: Robert Busnel)


1955 EuroBasket: finished 9th among 18 teams

3 Gérard Pontais, 4 Bernard Planque, 5 Robert Monclar, 6 Jacques Freimuller, 7 Jean Perniceni, 8 Henri Rey, 9 Jacques Owen, 10 Henri Grange, 11 Maurice Marcelot, 12 André Buffière, 13 André Vacheresse, 14 Jean-Paul Beugnot, 15 Louis Bertorelle, 16 Robert Giraud (Coach: Robert Busnel)


1956 Olympic Games: finished 4th among 15 teams

3 Roger Haudegand, 4 Christian Baltzer, 5 Robert Monclar, 6 Roger Veyron, 7 Gérard Sturla, 8 Henri Rey, 9 Roger Antoine, 10 Henri Grange, 11 Yves Gominon, 12 Maurice Buffière, 13 André Schlupp, 14 Jean-Paul Beugnot (Coach: Robert Busnel)


1957 EuroBasket: finished 8th among 16 teams

3 Louis Bertorelle, 4 Christian Baltzer, 5 Robert Monclar, 6 Maurice Buffière, 7 Gérard Sturla, 8 Roger Guillaume, 9 Roger Antoine, 10 Henri Grange, 11 Bernard Mayeur, 12 Roger Veyron, 13 Claude Desseaux, 14 Jean-Claude Lefebvre (Coach: André Buffière)


1959 EuroBasket: finished 3rd   among 17 teams

3 Max Dorigo, 4 André Chavet, 5 Robert Monclar, 6 Christian Baltzer, 7 Lucien Sedat, 8 Henri Villecourt, 9 Jérôme Christ, 10 Henri Grange, 11 Bernard Mayeur, 12 Michel Rat, 13 Philippe Baillet, 14 Jean-Claude Lefebvre (Coach: André Buffière)


1960 Olympic Games: finished 10th among 16 teams

3 Henri Villecourt, 4 Max Dorigo, 5 Robert Monclar, 6 Jérôme Christ, 7 Jean Degros, 8 Christian Baltzer, 9 Roger Antoine, 10 Henri Grange, 11 Bernard Mayeur, 12 Jean-Paul Beugnot, 13 Philippe Baillet, 14 Louis Bertorelle (Coach: André Buffière)


1961 EuroBasket: finished 4th among 19 teams

4 Lucien Sedat, 5 Jean-Pierre Goisbault, 6 Jérôme Christ, 7 Michel Housse, 9 Michel Le Ray, 10 Henri Grange, 11 Bernard Mayeur, 12 Jean-Paul Beugnot, 13 Christian Baltzer, 14 André Souvré, 15 Jean-Claude Vergne, 16 Michel Rat (Coach: André Buffière)


1963 FIBA World Cup: finished 5th among 13 teams

4 Max Dorigo, 5 Jean-Daniel Vinson, 6 Alain Gilles, 7 Jean Degros, 8 Christian Baltzer, 9 Michel Le Ray, 10 Henri Grange, 11 Bernard Mayeur, 12 Jean-Baptiste Ré, 13 Michel Rat, 14 Raphaël Ruiz, 15 Jean-Claude Lefebvre (Coach: André Buffière)


1963 EuroBasket: finished 13th among 16 teams

4 Michel Rat, 5 Claude Marc, 6 Jean-Claude Bonato, 7 Jean Degros, 8 Christian Baltzer, 9 Jacques Caballé, 10 Jean-Pierre Goisbault, 11 Alain Gilles, 12 Jean-Baptiste Ré, 13 Michel Audureau, 14 Philippe Baillet, 15 Jean-Claude Lefebvre (Coach: André Buffière)


1965 EuroBasket: finished 9th among 16 teams

4 Gérard Capron, 5 Laurent Dorigo, 6 Alain Gilles, 7 Jean Degros, 8 Hubert Papin, 9 Michel Le Ray, 10 Ferruccio Biasucci, 11 Daniel Ledent, 12 Jean-Marie Jouaret, 13 Maurice Boulois, 14 Jean-Claude Bonato, 15 Alain Schol (Coach: Joë Jaunay)


1967 EuroBasket: finished 11th among 16 teams

4 Francis Schneider, 5 Charles Tassin, 6 Alain Gilles, 7 Jean Degros, 8 Alain Schol, 9 Michel Le Ray, 10 Jean-Claude Bonato, 11 Jean-Pierre Staelens, 12 Michel Longueville, 13 Gérard Lespinasse, 14 Claude Peter, 15 Alain Durand (Coach: Joë Jaunay)


1971 EuroBasket: finished 10th among 12 teams

4 Daniel Ledent, 5 Charles Tassin, 6 Alain Gilles, 7 Carlo Wilm, 8 Claude Gasnal, 9 Bernard Magnin, 10 Jean-Claude Bonato, 11 Jean-Pierre Staelens, 12 Michel Longueville, 13 Gérard Lespinasse, 14 Jacques Cachemire, 15 Alain Durand (Coach: Joë Jaunay)


1973 EuroBasket: finished 10th among 12 teams

4 Pierre Galle, 5 Daniel Ledent, 6 Jean-Michel Sénégal, 7 Charles Tassin, 8 Yves-Marie Vérove, 9 Jean-Louis Vacher, 10 Jean-Claude Bonato, 11 Firmin Onissah, 12 Claude Gasnal, 13 Jacques Cachemire, 14 Jacky Lamothe, 15 Patrick Demars (Coach: Joë Jaunay)


1977 EuroBasket: finished 11th among 12 teams

4 Barry White, 5 Jean-Louis Vacher, 6 Alain Gilles, 7 Alain Larrouquis, 8 Alain Durand, 9 Didier Dobbels, 10 Mathieu Bisséni, 11 Hervé Dubuisson, 12 Jacky Lamothe, 13 Jacques Cachemire, 14 Éric Beugnot, 15 Roger Duquesnoy (Coach: Pierre Dao)


1979 EuroBasket: finished 8th among 12 teams

4 Victor Boistol, 5 Jean-Michel Sénégal, 6 Saint-Ange Vebobe, 7 Jacques Monclar, 8 Bill Cain, 9 George Brosterhous, 10 Mathieu Bisséni, 11 Hervé Dubuisson, 12 Jacky Lamothe, 13 Jacques Cachemire, 14 Éric Beugnot, 15 Apollo Faye (Coach: Pierre Dao)


1981 EuroBasket: finished 8th among 12 teams

4 Patrick Cham, 5 Jean-Michel Sénégal, 6 Frédéric Hufnagel, 7 Jacques Monclar, 8 Philippe Szanyiel, 9 Didier Dobbels, 10 Richard Dacoury, 11 Hervé Dubuisson, 12 Jacky Lamothe, 13 Jacques Cachemire, 14 Éric Beugnot, 15 Jean-Luc Deganis (Coach: Pierre Dao)


1983 EuroBasket: finished 5th among 12 teams

4 Alain Larrouquis, 5 Jean-Michel Sénégal, 6 Richard Dacoury, 7 Jacques Monclar, 8 Philippe Szanyiel, 9 George Brosterhous, 10 Apollo Faye, 11 Hervé Dubuisson, 12 Daniel Haquet, 13 Jacques Cachemire, 14 Éric Beugnot, 15 Georges Vestris (Coach: Pierre Dao)


1984 Olympic Games: finished 11th among 12 teams

4 Grégor Beugnot, 5 Jean-Michel Sénégal, 6 Richard Dacoury, 7 Jacques Monclar, 8 Philippe Szanyiel, 9 Stéphane Ostrowski, 10 Jean-Luc Deganis, 11 Hervé Dubuisson, 12 Patrick Cham, 13 Bangaly Kaba, 14 Éric Beugnot, 15 Georges Vestris (Coach: Jean Luent)


1985 EuroBasket: finished 6th among 12 teams

4 Frédéric Hufnagel, 5 Franck Cazalon, 6 Patrick Cham, 7 Jacques Monclar, 8 Philippe Szanyiel, 9 Stéphane Ostrowski, 10 Christophe Grégoire, 11 Hervé Dubuisson, 12 Daniel Haquet, 13 Christian Garnier, 14 Jean-Louis Hersin, 15 Valéry Demory (Coach: Jean Luent)


1986 FIBA World Cup: finished 13th among 24 teams

4 Frédéric Hufnagel, 5 Valéry Demory, 6 Patrick Cham, 7 Jacques Monclar, 8 Richard Dacoury, 9 Stéphane Ostrowski, 10 Christian Garnier, 11 Hervé Dubuisson, 12 Daniel Haquet, 13 Jean-Luc Deganis, 14 Éric Beugnot, 15 Georges Vestris (Coach: Jean Galle)


1987 EuroBasket: finished 9th among 12 teams

4 Frédéric Hufnagel, 5 Valéry Demory, 6 Patrick Cham, 7 Richard Dacoury, 8 Frédéric Monetti, 9 Stéphane Ostrowski, 10 Pierre Bressant, 11 Hervé Dubuisson, 12 Jean-Louis Hersin, 13 Jean-Luc Deganis, 14 Éric Beugnot, 15 Georges Vestris (Coach: Jean Galle)


1989 EuroBasket: finished 6th among 8 teams

4 Frédéric Forte, 5 Jim Bilba, 6 Grégor Beugnot, 7 Richard Dacoury, 8 Stéphane Lauvergne, 9 Stéphane Ostrowski, 10 Éric Occansey, 11 Hervé Dubuisson, 12 Patrick Cham, 13 Skeeter Jackson, 14 Franck Butter, 15 Georges Vestris (Coach: Francis Jordane)


1991 EuroBasket: finished 4th among 8 teams

4 Frédéric Forte, 5 Valéry Demory, 6 Antoine Rigaudeau, 7 Richard Dacoury, 8 Philippe Szanyiel, 9 Stéphane Ostrowski, 10 Hugues Occansey, 11 Didier Gadou, 12 Félix Courtinard, 13 Georges Adams, 14 Jim Deines, 15 Jim Bilba (Coach: Francis Jordane)


1993 EuroBasket: finished 7th among 16 teams

4 Frédéric Forte, 5 Olivier Allinéi, 6 Christophe Soulé, 7 Stéphane Risacher, 8 Yann Bonato, 9 Stéphane Ostrowski, 10 Bruno Coqueran, 11 Antoine Rigaudeau, 12 Félix Courtinard, 13 Georges Adams, 14 Thierry Gadou, 15 Jim Bilba (Coach: Francis Jordane)


1995 EuroBasket: finished 8th among 14 teams

4 Frédéric Forte, 5 Moustapha Sonko, 6 Antoine Rigaudeau, 7 Bruno Hamm, 8 Yann Bonato, 9 Stéphane Ostrowski, 10 Hugues Occansey, 11 Thierry Gadou, 12 Didier Gadou, 13 Franck Butter, 14 Jim Bilba, 15 Frédéric Domon (Coach: Michel Gomez)


1997 EuroBasket: finished 10th among 16 teams

4 Laurent Pluvy, 5 Jérôme Moïso, 6 Fabien Dubos, 7 Laurent Foirest, 8 Yann Bonato, 9 Frédéric Fauthoux, 10 Stéphane Risacher, 11 Thierry Gadou, 12 Cyril Julian, 13 Georges Adams, 14 Laurent Sciarra, 15 Rémi Rippert (Coach: Jean-Pierre de Vincenzi)


1999 EuroBasket: finished 4th among 16 teams

4 Moustapha Sonko, 5 Alain Digbeu, 6 Antoine Rigaudeau, 7 Laurent Foirest, 8 Laurent Sciarra, 9 Tariq Abdul-Wahad, 10 Stéphane Risacher, 11 Thierry Gadou, 12 Cyril Julian, 13 Frédéric Weis, 14 Jim Bilba, 15 Ronnie Smith (Coach: Jean-Pierre de Vincenzi)


2000 Olympic Games: finished 2nd   among 12 teams

4 Moustapha Sonko, 5 Laurent Sciarra, 6 Antoine Rigaudeau, 7 Laurent Foirest, 8 Yann Bonato, 9 Makan Dioumassi, 10 Stéphane Risacher, 11 Thierry Gadou, 12 Cyril Julian, 13 Crawford Palmer, 14 Jim Bilba, 15 Frédéric Weis (Coach: Jean-Pierre de Vincenzi)


2001 EuroBasket: finished 6th among 16 teams

4 Éric Micoud, 5 Laurent Sciarra, 6 Tony Parker, 7 Laurent Foirest, 8 Alain Digbeu, 9 Makan Dioumassi, 10 Stéphane Risacher, 11 Vassil Evtimov, 12 Cyril Julian, 13 Crawford Palmer, 14 Jim Bilba, 15 Frédéric Weis (Coach: Alain Weisz)


2003 EuroBasket: finished 4th among 16 teams

4 Moustapha Sonko, 5 Tariq Abdul-Wahad, 6 Jérôme Moïso, 7 Laurent Foirest, 8 Alain Digbeu, 9 Tony Parker, 10 Makan Dioumassi, 11 Florent Piétrus, 12 Cyril Julian, 13 Boris Diaw, 14 Thierry Rupert, 15 Ronny Turiaf (Coach: Alain Weisz)


2005 EuroBasket: finished 3rd   among 16 teams

4 Frédéric Fauthoux, 5 Mickaël Gelabale, 6 Antoine Rigaudeau, 7 Cyril Julian, 8 Mickaël Piétrus, 9 Tony Parker, 10 Mamoutou Diarra, 11 Florent Piétrus, 12 Jérôme Schmitt, 13 Boris Diaw, 14 Frédéric Weis, 15 Sacha Giffa (Coach: Claude Bergeaud)


2006 FIBA World Cup: finished 5th among 24 teams

4 Joseph Gomis, 5 Mickaël Gelabale, 6 Aymeric Jeanneau, 7 Laurent Foirest, 8 Mickaël Piétrus, 9 Mamoutou Diarra, 10 Yannick Bokolo, 11 Florent Piétrus, 12 Johan Petro, 13 Boris Diaw, 14 Ronny Turiaf, 15 Frédéric Weis (Coach: Claude Bergeaud)


2007 EuroBasket: finished 8th among 16 teams

4 Joseph Gomis, 5 Pape Badiane, 6 Sacha Giffa, 7 Yohann Sangaré, 8 Yakhouba Diawara, 9 Tony Parker, 10 Cédric Ferchaud, 11 Florent Piétrus, 12 Tariq Kirksay, 13 Boris Diaw, 14 Ronny Turiaf, 15 Frédéric Weis (Coach: Claude Bergeaud)


2009 EuroBasket: finished 5th among 16 teams

4 Antoine Diot, 5 Nicolas Batum, 6 Aymeric Jeanneau, 7 Alain Koffi, 8 Ian Mahinmi, 9 Tony Parker, 10 Yannick Bokolo, 11 Florent Piétrus, 12 Nando de Colo, 13 Boris Diaw, 14 Ronny Turiaf, 15 Ali Traoré (Coach: Vincent Collet)


2010 FIBA World Cup: finished 13th among 24 teams

4 Andrew Albicy, 5 Nicolas Batum, 6 Fabien Causeur, 7 Alain Koffi, 8 Ian Mahinmi, 9 Edwin Jackson, 10 Yannick Bokolo, 11 Florent Piétrus, 12 Nando de Colo, 13 Boris Diaw, 14 Mickaël Gelabale, 15 Ali Traoré (Coach: Vincent Collet)


2011 EuroBasket: finished 2nd   among 24 teams

4 Joakim Noah, 5 Nicolas Batum, 6 Kevin Séraphin, 7 Andrew Albicy, 8 Charles Lombahe-Kahudi, 9 Tony Parker, 10 Ali Traoré, 11 Florent Piétrus, 12 Nando de Colo, 13 Boris Diaw (C), 14 Steed Tchicamboud, 15 Mickaël Gelabale (Coach: Vincent Collet)


2012 Olympic Games: finished 6th among 12 teams

4 Kevin Seraphin, 5 Nicolas Batum, 6 Fabien Causeur, 7 Yakhouba Diawara, 8 Ali Traore, 9 Tony Parker, 10 Yannick Bokolo, 11 Florent Piétrus, 12 Nando de Colo, 13 Boris Diaw, 14 Ronny Turiaf, 15 Mickaël Gelabale (Coach: Vincent Collet)


2013 EuroBasket: finished 1st   among 24 teams

4 Joffrey Lauvergne, 5 Nicolas Batum, 6 Antoine Diot, 7 Johan Petro, 8 Charles Lombahe-Kahudi, 9 Tony Parker (MVP), 10 Thomas Heurtel, 11 Florent Piétrus, 12 Nando de Colo, 13 Boris Diaw, 14 Alexis Ajinça, 15 Mickaël Gelabale (Coach: Vincent Collet)


2014 FIBA World Cup: finished 3rd   among 24 teams

4 Thomas Heurtel, 5 Nicolas Batum, 6 Antoine Diot, 7 Joffrey Lauvergne, 8 Charles Lombahe-Kahudi, 9 Edwin Jackson, 10 Evan Fournier, 11 Florent Piétrus, 12 Rudy Gobert, 13 Boris Diaw, 14 Kim Tillie, 15 Mickaël Gelabale (Coach: Vincent Collet)


2015 EuroBasket: finished 3rd   among 24 teams

4 Léo Westermann, 5 Nicolas Batum, 7 Joffrey Lauvergne, 8 Charles Lombahe-Kahudi, 9 Tony Parker, 10 Evan Fournier, 11 Florent Piétrus, 12 Nando de Colo, 13 Boris Diaw, 15 Mickaël Gelabale, 16 Rudy Gobert, 19 Mouhammadou Jaiteh (Coach: Vincent Collet)


2016 Olympic Games: finished 6th among 12 teams

4 Thomas Heurtel, 5 Nicolas Batum, 6 Antoine Diot, 7 Joffrey Lauvergne, 8 Charles Lombahe-Kahudi, 9 Tony Parker, 11 Florent Piétrus, 12 Nando de Colo, 13 Boris Diaw, 15 Mickaël Gelabale, 16 Rudy Gobert, 17 Kim Tillie (Coach: Vincent Collet)


2017 EuroBasket: finished 12th among 24 teams

1 Kevin Séraphin, 4 Thomas Heurtel, 6 Antoine Diot, 7 Joffrey Lauvergne, 10 Evan Fournier, 12 Nando de Colo, 13 Boris Diaw (C), 15 Léo Westermann, 17 Vincent Poirier, 25 Louis Labeyrie, 33 Axel Toupane, 91 Edwin Jackson (Coach: Vincent Collet)


2019 FIBA World Cup: finished 3rd   among 32 teams

1 Frank Ntilikina, 2 Amath M'Baye, 5 Nicolas Batum, 10 Evan Fournier, 12 Nando de Colo, 17 Vincent Poirier, 21 Andrew Albicy, 25 Louis Labeyrie, 26 Mathias Lessort, 27 Rudy Gobert, 33 Axel Toupane, 90 Paul Lacombe (Coach: Vincent Collet)

Notable players and statisticsEdit

Historical key figuresEdit

 
Tony Parker – MVP of the EuroBasket 2013

Highest individual scoring gamesEdit

  • Players in bold are still active.
Player Date Competition Opponent Points scored
Hervé Dubuisson 21 November 1985 1986 FIBA World Cup Qualification   Greece 51
Hervé Dubuisson 28 June 1981 Friendly   Italy 39
Hervé Dubuisson 7 June 1985 EuroBasket 1985   Poland 39
Hervé Dubuisson 21 May 1984 1984 Summer Olympics Qualification   Sweden 38
Yann Bonato 30 June 1995 EuroBasket 1995   FR Yugoslavia 38
Hervé Dubuisson 17 May 1980 1980 Summer Olympics Qualification   Czechoslovakia 37
Richard Dacoury 26 May 1989 Friendly   Germany 37
Tony Parker 20 September 2008 EuroBasket 2009 Qualification   Turkey 37
Hervé Dubuisson 9 June 1987 EuroBasket 1987   Israel 36
Tony Parker 4 September 2007 EuroBasket 2007   Italy 36

Media coverageEdit

France's matches are currently televised by Canal+.

Kit supplierEdit

ManufacturerEdit

Edit

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, all matches in the November 2020 and February 2021 windows were played behind closed doors in select host cities.[39]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "FIBA Ranking Presented by Nike". FIBA. 9 August 2021. Retrieved 9 August 2021.
  2. ^ FIBA.com – FIBA World Ranking for men
  3. ^ 1984 Olympic Games results
  4. ^ 1986 FIBA World Cup results
  5. ^ "2000 Olympic Games". Archive.fiba.com. 1 October 2000.
  6. ^ "EuroBasket 2001 results". Archive.fiba.com. 9 September 2001.
  7. ^ "2000 U18 European Championship results". Archive.fiba.com. 23 July 2000.
  8. ^ "EuroBasket 2003 results". Archive.fiba.com. 14 September 2003.
  9. ^ "EuroBasket 2005 results". Archive.fiba.com. 25 September 2005.
  10. ^ "2006 FIBA World Cup results". Archive.fiba.com. 3 September 2006.
  11. ^ "France appoints Vincent Collet as new head coach". 4 March 2009. Retrieved 4 March 2009.
  12. ^ "EuroBasket 2009 results". Archive.fiba.com. 20 September 2009.
  13. ^ "France v Latvia EuroBasket 2011 game results". Retrieved 31 August 2011.
  14. ^ "France v Germany EuroBasket 2011 game results". Retrieved 2 September 2011.
  15. ^ "Italy v France EuroBasket 2011 game results". Retrieved 4 September 2011.
  16. ^ "Serbia v France EuroBasket 2011 game results". Retrieved 5 September 2011.
  17. ^ "France join Spain in the EuroBasket 2011 final". 16 September 2011. Retrieved 16 September 2011.
  18. ^ "France v Latvia EuroBasket 2013 game results". Retrieved 13 September 2013.
  19. ^ "France get their revenge and beat Spain to reach final". Retrieved 20 September 2013.
  20. ^ "France beat Lithuania to win first-ever European crown". Retrieved 22 September 2013.
  21. ^ "Parker basks in French basketball glory, finally". Retrieved 24 September 2013.
  22. ^ "Heurtel comes good as France end Spanish dreams". Retrieved 11 September 2014.
  23. ^ "France at the 2014 FIBA World Cup". Retrieved 13 September 2014.
  24. ^ "France hold on against Lithuania to take third place". Retrieved 13 September 2014.
  25. ^ "Croatia, France, Germany and Latvia to host EuroBasket 2015". Retrieved 8 September 2014.
  26. ^ "France v Finland EuroBasket 2015 game results". Retrieved 5 September 2015.
  27. ^ "France v Latvia EuroBasket 2015 game results". Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  28. ^ "France claim bronze at EuroBasket 2015". Retrieved 20 September 2015.
  29. ^ "France at the 2016 Olympic Qualifying Tournament". Retrieved 10 July 2016.
  30. ^ "France at the 2016 men's Olympic Basketball Tournament". Retrieved 17 August 2016.
  31. ^ "Tony Parker wraps up international career". Retrieved 17 August 2016.
  32. ^ "France at the EuroBasket 2017". Retrieved 9 September 2017.
  33. ^ "France becomes fifth European team to qualify for World Cup after beating Czech Republic". Retrieved 30 November 2017.
  34. ^ "France during the 2019 FIBA World Cup European Qualifiers". Retrieved 24 February 2019.
  35. ^ "France won against Germany in another European World Cup clash". Retrieved 1 September 2019.
  36. ^ "France stun back-to-back champs USA, advance to Semi-Finals". Retrieved 11 September 2019.
  37. ^ "France at the 2019 FIBA World Cup". Retrieved 15 September 2019.
  38. ^ "France comes away with consecutive World Cup third-place finishes". Retrieved 15 September 2019.
  39. ^ "Statement regarding the November 2020 and February 2021 Qualifiers". Retrieved 18 September 2020.
  40. ^ "Gobert, Fournier to spearhead Tokyo Games campaign for experienced France". fiba.basketball. Retrieved 21 May 2021.
  41. ^ "Team Roster France" (PDF). olympics.com. Retrieved 24 July 2021.
  42. ^ "Nike's Jordan Brand nets French Basketball Federation deal". Retrieved 13 November 2017.
  43. ^ "French Basketball Federation adds Amazon, Suzuki as new partners". Retrieved 31 July 2019.

External linksEdit

VideosEdit