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Italy national basketball team

  (Redirected from Italy men's national basketball team)

The Italian national basketball team (Italian: Nazionale di pallacanestro dell'Italia) is administered by the Federazione Italiana Pallacanestro (Italian Basketball Federation).[1] Italy has won 2 gold medals, 4 silver medals and 4 bronze medals at the FIBA EuroBasket, and 2 silver medals at the Summer Olympic Games. Italy has participated at 34 EuroBaskets, 8 World Cups, and 11 Summer Olympic Games. Italy is one of the founding members of the International Federation of Basketball (FIBA), and has one of the world's longest basketball traditions.[citation needed]

Italy Italy
Italy basketball.png
FIBA ranking 16 Increase19
Joined FIBA 1932 (co-founders)
FIBA zone FIBA Europe
National federation FIP
Coach Romeo Sacchetti
Nickname(s) Azzurri, Squadra Azzurra
Olympic Games
Appearances 12
Medals Silver medal.svg Silver: (1980, 2004)
FIBA World Cup
Appearances 8
EuroBasket
Appearances 37
Medals Gold medal europe.svg Gold: (1983, 1999)
Silver medal europe.svg Silver: (1937, 1946, 1991, 1997)
Bronze medal europe.svg Bronze: (1971, 1975, 1985, 2003)
Uniforms
Kit body italbasket15a.png
Light jersey
Kit shorts.png
Team colours
Light
Kit body italbasket15h.png
Dark jersey
Kit shorts.png
Team colours
Dark


First international
Italy Italy 23–17 France France
(Milan, Italy; 4 April 1926)
Biggest win
Italy Italy 128–49 Ireland Republic of Ireland
(Edinburgh, Scotland; 3 May 1976)
Biggest defeat
Italy Italy 62–108 Croatia Croatia
(Zaragoza, Spain; 3 July 1992)

Contents

HistoryEdit

The Early Years (1926–39)Edit

 
The Italians squad in 1939.

The first match of the Italian national basketball team was played on 4 April 1926 in Milan, and it ended with a victory over France by 23–17. Italy's first participation in the Olympic Games was at the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin, placing seventh out of twenty-one teams. At the EuroBasket 1937 Italy placed second behind Lithuania, after being beaten by just one point in the final game. The silver medal was repeated at EuroBasket 1946.

The Difficult Postwar Period (1946–69)Edit

Following the end of World War II the Azzurri went through difficult times and not only failed to qualify for two Summer Olympics and three consecutive world championships but struggled in Europe as well. This was also reflected at the technical level with the alternation of several head coaches within only a few years. Of special importance was Italy's decision not to compete at the EuroBasket 1949, to mourn for the victims of the Superga air disaster. It was the first time that the squad missed a EuroBasket.

In 1957 as Nello Paratore took the head coach position (which he held for 11 years) Italy made only slight improvements from the previous decade.

At the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome Italy showed its most impressive performance to this point where it placed fourth, only behind USA, USSR and Brazil. Curiously, the organizational expenses of the Olympics in Rome resulted in the decision not to participate in the EuroBasket 1961.

The Decade of Giancarlo Primo (1969–79)Edit

In 1969, Giancarlo Primo became Italy's coach, focusing the game strategies on defense. Under his leadership Italian national team grew stronger, claiming a place among the world's best teams. Under Primo, the Azzuri won two European bronze medals and earned two fourth places at FIBA World Championship. Further, Italy finished fourth at the 1972 Summer Olympics where it lost the match for third place to Cuba by only one point.
Among the leading players of the national team were the young Meneghin, Marzorati, Villalta and Bariviera.

The Successful Years of Gamba (1979–85)Edit

 
Italians versus Yugoslavia (1980).

In 1979 Sandro Gamba replaced Primo, leading Italy to its biggest triumphs till then: a silver at the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow, a gold at EuroBasket 1983 in Nantes, and a bronze at the EuroBasket 1985 in Stuttgart. As in the years before, Meneghin, Marzorati and Villalta were the cornerstones of the team, complemented by players such as Riva and Brunamonti. This episode in time stands out to this day as the most successful in the history of the Italian national team.

The National Crisis of 1983: Bianchini and leg-a (1985–92)Edit

Following these outstanding accomplishments was another period of crisis, first under Coach Valerio Bianchini (replaced in 1985), and then another six years of modest success where the biggest accomplishment was silver at the EuroBasket 1991 in Rome, which was called to end Ettore Messina, who took over in 1992. In the same year Enrico Vinci stepped down as President of the Italian Basketball Federation after 16 years. The place was taken over by Giovanni Petrucci.

The Messina-Tanjevic Era (1992–2001)Edit

Ettore Messina became Italy's coach in 1992, winning a silver medal at EuroBasket 1997 in Barcelona. This medal was the main accomplishment of coach Messina, who served the team for five years and failed to qualify for the Olympic Games and the World Championship. A great disappointment was suffered at the 1998 FIBA World Championship in Athens when a team with Fučka, Myers and Meneghin was believed to aspire to the podium but only finished sixth.
Bogdan Tanjević replaced Messina, leading Italy to the triumph at EuroBasket 1999, the first gold medal in 16 years. The second gold medal at a European Basketball Championship arrived after beating Spain in the final game. After a ninth place at EuroBasket 2001, held in Turkey, Carlo Recalcati was called to replace Tanjević. Recalcati could count on Italy's top talents Gregor Fučka and Carlton Myers, as well as valuable contributors such as Basile, Abbio and Chiacig.

The Recalcati Era (2001–09)Edit

 
Marco Belinelli is a prominent member of Team Italy

At EuroBasket 2003, Italy showed a strong performances and defeated Germany and Greece but was later kicked out by Spain in the semifinals. The victory against France in the bronze medal game guaranteed the team's qualification at the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens. Italy won a silver medal in that event and was stopped only in the final game by Argentina. Most important, this silver seemed to be worth much more than that of the 1980 Olympics in Moscow where several top teams, including the United States and Canada were absent for a boycott.
Since then, the Azzurri experienced years of only skimpy satisfaction: after the Summer Olympics in Greece, the team collected three ninth places, two at the EuroBasket and one at the 2006 World Cup. Subsequently, the team failed to qualify for the 2008 Beijing Olympics, for the 2009 EuroBasket and the World Championship the following year.
Despite the increasing internationalization of the NBA (especially towards European players) and a steady presence of Italian players, (including the historic first overall pick Andrea Bargnani of the 2006 NBA Draft) the national team performed poorly in these years. The reasons for this phenomenon are simple: low contribution of NBA athletes, ageing guards (Massimo Bulleri and Gianluca Basile, who were the highlights of Athens already in their thirties) and the lack of young talent. The reason for the seeming lack of talent were caused by the difficulty that Italian talents had in the national championships Serie A. There, they faced strong competition especially from American and European players. It comes as no coincidence that the team that absolutely dominated in the last years, Montepaschi Siena rarely had Italians in the starting lineup.
During these years, the Serie A went through some changes at the top executives level. Fausto Maifredi (in office since 1999) left and the Federation's first commissioner Dino Meneghin changed the rules by mandating for the commissioner to be the league's president as well.
Meanwhile, Italy failed to qualify for EuroBasket 2009 for the first time since 1961. Curiously, 2009 is the first year where the Azzurri failed to qualify for sports-related reasons. Both absences (1949 and 1961) were due non-sporting reasons. Following the disappointment CT Recalcati left and was replaced by Simone Pianigiani. Pianigiani currently coaches both the national team and Mens Sana Basket, which for years dominated the Serie A.

Coach Pianigiani (2009-2015)Edit

 
Team Italy in 2011

The team of coach Pianigiani was able to participate in the EuroBasket 2011 due to an FIBA decision regarding the enlargement of the tournament.

Later, Coach Pianigiani was able to secure Italy a spot at the EuroBasket 2015.

Ettore Messina, the return (2015-2017)Edit

From November 5, 2015, Ettore Messina returned to be head coach of the Italian team simultaneously with his with his appointment as assistant-coach of the NBA club San Antonio Spurs.[2]

In July 9, 2016, Italy was defeated by Croatia in the Finals of the FIBA World Olympic Qualifying Tournament in Turin, failing the qualification for the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.[3]

In 2017, Coach Messina and his players were able to lock up third place in Group B of the FIBA EuroBasket 2017 and set up a Round of 16 date with Finland.[4] They reached the Quarterfinals, but Serbia booked a Semi-Finals clash with Russia after a 83-67 victory over a cold-shooting Italy.[5]

In June 15, 2017, Messina announced he will leave the bench of Italy’s National Team after Eurobasket 2017.[6]

Romeo Sacchetti (2017-present)Edit

In August 1, 2017, Italy names Romeo Sacchetti head coach of National Team after Eurobasket 2017. Sacchetti, who is also coach of Vanoli Cremona, will start his new job during the 2019 FIBA Basketball World Cup qualification.[7]

Competitive recordEdit

TeamEdit

Current rosterEdit

The following is the squad in the EuroBasket 2017.[8]

Italy men's national basketball team – EuroBasket 2017 roster
Players Coaches
Pos. # Name Age – Date of birth Ht. Club Ctr.
PG 0 Hackett, Daniel 29 – (1987-12-19)19 December 1987 1.97 m (6 ft 6 in) Olympiacos  
SG 3 Belinelli, Marco 31 – (1986-03-25)25 March 1986 1.96 m (6 ft 5 in) Charlotte Hornets  
SG 4 Aradori, Pietro 28 – (1988-12-09)9 December 1988 1.96 m (6 ft 5 in) Grissin Bon Reggio Emilia  
PG 5 Filloy, Ariel 30 – (1987-03-11)11 March 1987 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in) Reyer Venezia  
C 6 Biligha, Paul 27 – (1990-05-31)31 May 1990 2.00 m (6 ft 7 in) Vanoli Cremona  
PF 9 Melli, Nicolò 26 – (1991-01-26)26 January 1991 2.05 m (6 ft 9 in) Brose Bamberg  
C 12 Cusin, Marco 32 – (1985-02-28)28 February 1985 2.11 m (6 ft 11 in) Sidigas Avellino  
PG 20 Cinciarini, Andrea 31 – (1986-06-21)21 June 1986 1.93 m (6 ft 4 in) Olimpia Milano  
SF 23 Abass, Awudu 24 – (1993-01-27)27 January 1993 2.00 m (6 ft 7 in) Olimpia Milano  
PF 24 Baldi Rossi, Filippo 25 – (1991-10-26)26 October 1991 2.07 m (6 ft 9 in) Dolomiti Energia Trento  
C 32 Burns, Christian 31 – (1985-09-04)4 September 1985 2.03 m (6 ft 8 in) Germani Basket Brescia  
SF 70 Datome, Luigi (C) 29 – (1987-11-27)27 November 1987 2.03 m (6 ft 8 in) Fenerbahçe  
Head coach
Assistant coach(es)
Legend
  • (C) Team captain
  • Club – describes last
    club before the tournament
  • Age – describes age
    on 31 August 2017

Depth ChartEdit

Pos. Starting 5 Bench 1 Bench 2
C Marco Cusin Paul Biligha Christian Burns
PF Nicolò Melli Filippo Baldi Rossi
SF Luigi Datome Awudu Abass
SG Marco Belinelli Pietro Aradori
PG Daniel Hackett Ariel Filloy Andrea Cinciarini

CoachesEdit

Individual recordsEdit

Players with the most caps (games played)Edit

  • Players in bold, are players that are still active.
Rank Player Caps
1. Pierluigi Marzorati 278
2. Dino Meneghin 271
3. Roberto Brunamonti 256
4. Giacomo Galanda 215
5. Walter Magnifico 214
6. Antonello Riva 213
7. Gianluca Basile 209
8. Renzo Bariviera 208
9. Renato Villalta 206
10. Renzo Vecchiato 202

Players with the most points scoredEdit

  • Players in bold, are players that are still active.
Rank Player Points scored
1. Antonello Riva 3,785
2. Dino Meneghin 2,847
3. Renato Villalta 2,277
4. Pierluigi Marzorati 2,209
5. Renzo Bariviera 2,151
6. Walter Magnifico 2,026
7. Gregor Fučka 1,889
8. Massimo Masini 1,852
9. Carlton Myers 1,825
10. Marco Belinelli 1,795

Highest individual scoring gamesEdit

Past rostersEdit

1935 EuroBasket: finished 7th among 10 teams

Livio Franceschini, Egidio Premiani, Sergio Paganella, Bruno Caracoi, Emilio Giassetti, Giancarlo Marinelli, Gino Basso, Ezio Varisco

1936 Olympic Games: finished 7th among 21 teams

Livio Franceschini, Emilio Giassetti, Enrico Castelli, Galeazzo Dondi, Giancarlo Marinelli, Sergio Paganella, Egidio Premiani, Gino Basso, Ambrogio Bessi, Adolfo Mazzini, Mario Novelli, Michele Pelliccia, Remo Piana

1937 EuroBasket: finished 2nd among 8 teams

Livio Franceschini, Ambrogio Bessi, Galeazzo Dondi, Emilio Giassetti, Giancarlo Marinelli, Camillo Marinone, Sergio Paganella, Mino Pasquini, Michele Pelliccia, Ezio Varisco

1939 EuroBasket: finished 6th among 8 teams

Mino Pasquini, Giancarlo Marinelli, Mario Novelli, Michele Pelliccia, Gelsomino Girotti, Ambrogio Bessi, Giuseppe Bernini, Aldo Tambone, Bruno Renner, Giovanbattista Pellegrini

1946 EuroBasket: finished 2nd among 10 teams

Cesare Rubini, Giuseppe Stefanini, Sergio Stefanini, Albino Bocciai, Mario Cattarini, Marcello de Nardus, Armando Fagarazzi, Giancarlo Marinelli, Valentino Pellarini, Tullio Pitacco, Venzo Vannini

1947 EuroBasket: finished 9th among 14 teams

Cesare Rubini, Giancarlo Primo, Mario Cattarini, Armando Fagarazzi, Carlo Cerioni, Marcello de Nardus, Sergio Ferriani, Enrico Garbosi, Guido Garlato, Massimo Lucentini, Giovanni Miliani, Valentino Pellarini, Severino Radici, Vittorio Tracuzzi

1948 Olympic Games: finished 17th among 23 teams

Giancarlo Primo, Sergio Stefanini, Gianfranco Bersani, Vittorio Tracuzzi, Romeo Romanutti, Carlo Cerioni, Giancarlo Marinelli, Renzo Ranuzzi, Luigi Rapini, Federico Marietti, Valentino Pellarini, Giovanni Nesti, Sergio Ferriani, Ezio Mantelli (Coach: Elliott van Zandt)

1951 EuroBasket: finished 5th among 17 teams

Cesare Rubini, Giancarlo Primo, Sergio Stefanini, Gianfranco Bersani, Vittorio Tracuzzi, Dino Zucchi, Romeo Romanutti, Giorgio Bongiovanni, Federico Marietti, Enrico Pagani, Carlo Cerioni, Mario de Carolis, Giuseppe Sforza, Enzo Ferretti (Coach: Elliott van Zandt)

1952 Olympic Games: finished 17th among 23 teams

Sergio Stefanini, Dino Zucchi, Giorgio Bongiovanni, Federico Marietti, Enrico Pagani, Carlo Cerioni, Achille Canna, Giordano Damiani, Fabio Presca, Renzo Ranuzzi, Luigi Rapini, Sergio Ferriani, Sergio Marelli

1953 EuroBasket: finished 7th among 17 teams

Cesare Rubini, Antonio Zorzi, Carlo Cerioni, Giorgio Bongiovanni, Stelio Posar, Alberto Margheritini, Alessandro Riminucci, Achille Canna, Antonio Calebotta, Nicola Porcelli, Giuseppe Lomazzi, Romano Forastieri, Mario Alesini, Rino di Cera (Coach: Vittorio Tracuzzi)

1955 EuroBasket: finished 6th among 18 teams

Alessandro Gamba, Elvio Bizzaro, Alessandro Riminucci, Adelino Cappelletti, Adelino Costanzo, Giordano Damiani, Germano Gambini, Silvio Lucev, Sergio Macoratti, Alberto Margheritini, Vinicio Nesti, Stelio Posar, Gianfranco Sardagna (Coach: Jim McGregor)

1957 EuroBasket: finished 10th among 16 teams

Paolo Conti, Antonio Costanzo, Alessandro Gamba, Gianni Zagatti, Marcello Motto, Cesare Volpato, Stelio Posar, Rolando Rocchi, Vittorio Pomilio, Sergio Macoratti, Mario Alesini, Giancarlo Sarti (Coach: Carmine "Nello" Paratore)

1959 EuroBasket: finished 10th among 17 teams

Gabriele Vianello, Gianfranco Pieri, Paolo Conti, Cesare Volpato, Silvio Lucev, Enrico de Carli, Mario Alesini, Achille Canna, Antonio Calebotta, Giovanni Gavagnin, Gianfranco Lombardi, Claudio Velluti (Coach: Carmine "Nello" Paratore)

1960 Olympic Games: finished 4th among 16 teams

Sandro Riminucci, Gabriele Vianello, Gianfranco Pieri, Paolo Vittori, Giovanni Gavagnin, Alessandro Gamba, Augusto Giomo, Gianfranco Lombardi, Mario Alesini, Achille Canna, Antonio Calebotta, Gianfranco Sardagna (Coach: Carmine "Nello" Paratore)

1963 EuroBasket: finished 12th among 16 teams

Massimo Masini, Paolo Vittori, Sauro Bufalini, Valerio Vatteroni, Antonio Frigerio, Santo Rossi, Massimo Cosmelli, Ettore Zuccheri, Giusto Pellanera, Claudio Velluti, Stefano Albanese, Alfredo Barlucchi (Coach: Carmine "Nello" Paratore)

1963 World Championship: finished 7th among 13 teams

Massimo Masini, Sandro Riminucci, Paolo Vittori, Giambattista Cescutti, Gabriele Vianello, Gianfranco Lombardi, Giovanni Gavagnin, Guido Carlo Gatti, Vittorio dal Pozzo, Franco Bertini, Augusto Giomo, Giusto Pellanera (Coach: Carmine "Nello" Paratore)

1964 Olympic Games: finished 5th among 16 teams

Massimo Masini, Sauro Bufalini, Ottorino Flaborea, Gabriele Vianello, Paolo Vittori, Gianfranco Pieri, Gianfranco Lombardi, Giovanni Gavagnin, Franco Bertini, Gianfranco Sardagna, Augusto Giomo, Giusto Pellanera (Coach: Carmine "Nello" Paratore)

1965 EuroBasket: finished 4th among 16 teams

Massimo Masini, Gabriele Vianello, Ottorino Flaborea, Giambattista Cescutti, Sauro Bufalini, Gianfranco Lombardi, Franco Bertini, Guido Carlo Gatti, Massimo Cosmelli, Sandro Spinetti, Giusto Pellanera (Coach: Carmine "Nello" Paratore)

1967 EuroBasket: finished 7th among 16 teams

Carlo Recalcati, Massimo Masini, Gabriele Vianello, Ottorino Flaborea, Sauro Bufalini, Giulio Iellini, Livio Paschini, Massimo Cosmelli, Gianfranco Fantin, Gianluigi Jessi, Alberto Merlati, Fernando Fattori (Coach: Carmine "Nello" Paratore)

1967 World Championship: finished 9th among 13 teams

Sauro Bufalini, Carlo Recalcati, Massimo Villetti, Gianfranco Lombardi, Massimo Cosmelli, Gianfranco Fantin, Enrico Bovone, Giusto Pellanera, Alberto Merlati, Fernando Fattori, Gianluigi Jessi, Giuseppe Rundo (Coach: Carmine "Nello" Paratore)

1968 Olympic Games: finished 8th among 16 teams

Massimo Masini, Paolo Vittori, Gabriele Vianello, Carlo Recalcati, Ottorino Flaborea, Sauro Bufalini, Massimo Cosmelli, Gianluigi Jessi, Gianfranco Lombardi, Enrico Bovone, Giusto Pellanera, Guido Carlo Gatti (Coach: Carmine "Nello" Paratore)

1969 EuroBasket: finished 6th among 12 teams

Dino Meneghin, Massimo Masini, Carlo Recalcati, Renzo Bariviera, Ivan Bisson, Aldo Ossola, Marino Zanatta, Giuseppe Brumatti, Enrico Bovone, Massimo Cosmelli, Gianluigi Jessi, Paolo Bergonzoni (Coach: Giancarlo Primo)

1970 World Championship: finished 4th among 13 teams

Dino Meneghin, Massimo Masini, Renzo Bariviera, Marino Zanatta, Carlo Recalcati, Ivan Bisson, Ottorino Flaborea, Massimo Cosmelli, Edoardo Rusconi, Augusto Giomo, Eligio de Rossi, Antonio Errico (Coach: Giancarlo Primo)

1971 EuroBasket: finished 3rd among 12 teams

Dino Meneghin, Pierluigi Marzorati, Massimo Masini, Ivan Bisson, Renzo Bariviera, Carlo Recalcati, Ottorino Flaborea, Marino Zanatta, Giulio Iellini, Giorgio Giomo, Luigi Serafini, Massimo Cosmelli (Coach: Giancarlo Primo)

1972 Olympic Games: finished 4th among 16 teams

Dino Meneghin, Pierluigi Marzorati, Massimo Masini, Ivan Bisson, Ottorino Flaborea, Renzo Bariviera, Marino Zanatta, Giuseppe Brumatti, Giorgio Giomo, Mauro Cerioni, Luigi Serafini, Giulio Iellini (Coach: Giancarlo Primo)

1973 EuroBasket: finished 5th among 12 teams

Dino Meneghin, Pierluigi Marzorati, Fabrizio della Fiori, Renzo Bariviera, Marino Zanatta, Ivan Bisson, Giuseppe Brumatti, Giulio Iellini, Luigi Serafini, Gianni Bertolotti, Mauro Cerioni, Vittorio Ferracini (Coach: Giancarlo Primo)

1974 World Championship: did not participate

1975 EuroBasket: finished 3rd among 12 teams

Dino Meneghin, Pierluigi Marzorati, Carlo Recalcati, Fabrizio della Fiori, Renato Villalta, Ivan Bisson, Renzo Bariviera, Marino Zanatta, Gianni Bertolotti, Giulio Iellini, Lorenzo Carraro, Vittorio Ferracini (Coach: Giancarlo Primo)

1976 Olympic Games: finished 5th among 12 teams

Dino Meneghin, Pierluigi Marzorati, Carlo Recalcati, Fabrizio della Fiori, Marino Zanatta, Ivan Bisson, Renzo Bariviera, Giuseppe Brumatti, Gianni Bertolotti, Giulio Iellini, Luigi Serafini, Luciano Vendemini (Coach: Giancarlo Primo)

1977 EuroBasket: finished 4th among 12 teams

Dino Meneghin, Pierluigi Marzorati, Marco Bonamico, Renzo Bariviera, Fabrizio della Fiori, Lorenzo Carraro, Carlo Caglieris, Gianni Bertolotti, Luigi Serafini, Giulio Iellini, Renzo Vecchiato, Vittorio Ferracini (Coach: Giancarlo Primo)

1978 World Championship: finished 4th among 14 teams

Dino Meneghin, Pierluigi Marzorati, Renato Villalta, Marco Bonamico, Fabrizio della Fiori, Renzo Bariviera, Carlo Caglieris, Gianni Bertolotti, Giulio Iellini, Lorenzo Carraro, Vittorio Ferracini, Renzo Vecchiato (Coach: Giancarlo Primo)

1979 EuroBasket: finished 5th among 12 teams

Dino Meneghin, Roberto Brunamonti, Marco Bonamico, Renato Villalta, Gianni Bertolotti, Carlo Caglieris, Domenico Zampolini, Lorenzo Carraro, Luigi Serafini, Renzo Vecchiato, Enrico Gilardi, Vittorio Ferracini (Coach: Giancarlo Primo)

1980 Olympic Games: finished 2nd among 12 teams

Dino Meneghin, Pierluigi Marzorati, Roberto Brunamonti, Marco Bonamico, Mike Sylvester, Renato Villalta, Romeo Sacchetti, Enrico Gilardi, Pietro Generali, Fabrizio della Fiori, Renzo Vecchiato, Marco Solfrini (Coach: Sandro Gamba)

1981 EuroBasket: finished 5th among 12 teams

Dino Meneghin, Pierluigi Marzorati, Roberto Brunamonti, Mike Sylvester, Renato Villalta, Ario Costa, Enrico Gilardi, Domenico Zampolini, Pietro Generali, Renzo Vecchiato, Franco Boselli, Vittorio Ferracini (Coach: Sandro Gamba)

1983 EuroBasket: finished 1st among 12 teams

Dino Meneghin, Pierluigi Marzorati, Antonello Riva, Roberto Brunamonti, Renato Villalta, Marco Bonamico, Enrico Gilardi, Romeo Sacchetti, Ario Costa, Alberto Tonut, Renzo Vecchiato, Carlo Caglieris (Coach: Sandro Gamba)

1984 Olympic Games: finished 5th among 12 teams

Walter Magnifico, Dino Meneghin, Antonello Riva, Roberto Brunamonti, Pierluigi Marzorati, Roberto Premier, Marco Bonamico, Romeo Sacchetti, Renato Villalta, Enrico Gilardi, Renzo Vecchiato, Carlo Caglieris (Coach: Sandro Gamba)

1985 EuroBasket: finished 3rd among 12 teams

Walter Magnifico, Roberto Brunamonti, Pierluigi Marzorati, Roberto Premier, Augusto Binelli, Romeo Sacchetti, Ario Costa, Renato Villalta, Enrico Gilardi, Giuseppe Bosa, Renzo Vecchiato, Giampiero Savio (Coach: Sandro Gamba)

1986 World Championship: finished 6th among 24 teams

Antonello Riva, Walter Magnifico, Roberto Brunamonti, Pierluigi Marzorati, Roberto Premier, Ario Costa, Renato Villalta, Augusto Binelli, Romeo Sacchetti, Sandro dell'Agnello, Enrico Gilardi, Fulvio Polesello (Coach: Valerio Bianchini)

1987 EuroBasket: finished 5th among 12 teams

Antonello Riva, Ferdinando Gentile, Walter Magnifico, Roberto Brunamonti, Riccardo Morandotti, Renato Villalta, Ario Costa, Massimo Iacopini, Piero Montecchi, Alberto Tonut, Angelo Gilardi, Flavio Carera (Coach: Valerio Bianchini)

1989 EuroBasket: finished 4th among 8 teams

Mike D'Antoni, Antonello Riva, Walter Magnifico, Roberto Brunamonti, Riccardo Morandotti, Augusto Binelli, Ario Costa, Andrea Gracis, Sandro dell'Agnello, Massimo Iacopini, Flavio Carera, Giuseppe Bosa (Coach: Sandro Gamba)

1990 World Championship: finished 9th among 16 teams

Antonello Riva, Roberto Brunamonti, Riccardo Pittis, Davide Pessina, Alberto Vianini, Sandro dell'Agnello, Francesco Vescovi, Andrea Niccolai, Alberto Rossini, Davide Cantarello, Giuseppe Bosa, Gustavo Tolotti (Coach: Sandro Gamba)

1991 EuroBasket: finished 2nd among 8 teams

Antonello Riva, Walter Magnifico, Ferdinando Gentile, Stefano Rusconi, Roberto Brunamonti, Riccardo Pittis, Roberto Premier, Andrea Gracis, Ario Costa, Davide Pessina, Sandro Dell'Agnello, Alessandro Fantozzi (Coach: Sandro Gamba)

1993 EuroBasket: finished 9th among 16 teams

Carlton Myers, Ferdinando Gentile, Riccardo Pittis, Stefano Rusconi, Claudio Coldebella, Alessandro Frosini, Massimo Iacopini, Alberto Tonut, Paolo Moretti, Flavio Carera, Giuseppe Bosa, Alberto Rossini (Coach: Ettore Messina)

1995 EuroBasket: finished 5th among 14 teams

Gregor Fučka, Ferdinando Gentile, Walter Magnifico, Riccardo Pittis, Vincenzo Esposito, Stefano Rusconi, Claudio Coldebella, Alessandro Frosini, Alessandro Abbio, Paolo Conti, Flavio Carera, Federico Pieri (Coach: Ettore Messina)

1997 EuroBasket: finished 2nd among 16 teams

Gregor Fučka, Carlton Myers, Riccardo Pittis, Denis Marconato, Giacomo Galanda, Claudio Coldebella, Dan Gay, Alessandro Frosini, Alessandro Abbio, Davide Bonora, Paolo Moretti, Flavio Carera (Coach: Ettore Messina)

1998 World Championship: finished 6th among 16 teams

Gregor Fučka, Carlton Myers, Andrea Meneghin, Roberto Chiacig, Giacomo Galanda, Gianmarco Pozzecco, Alessandro Abbio, Alessandro Frosini, Gianluca Basile, Davide Bonora, Alessandro de Pol, Marcelo Damiao (Coach: Bogdan Tanjević)

1999 EuroBasket: finished 1st among 16 teams

Gregor Fučka, Carlton Myers, Andrea Meneghin, Roberto Chiacig, Denis Marconato, Alessandro Abbio, Alessandro de Pol, Gianluca Basile, Giacomo Galanda, Davide Bonora, Marcelo Damiao, Michele Mian (Coach: Bogdan Tanjević)

2000 Olympic Games: finished 5th among 12 teams

Gregor Fučka, Carlton Myers, Andrea Meneghin, Denis Marconato, Roberto Chiacig, Giacomo Galanda, Gianluca Basile, Alessandro Abbio, German Scarone, Marcelo Damiao, Agostino li Vecchi, Michele Mian (Coach: Bogdan Tanjević)

2001 EuroBasket: finished 9th among 16 teams

Gregor Fučka, Andrea Meneghin, Roberto Chiacig, Denis Marconato, Gianluca Basile, Giacomo Galanda, Nikola Radulović, Alessandro de Pol, Andrea Pecile, Alex Righetti, Michele Mian, Andrea Camata (Coach: Bogdan Tanjević)

2003 EuroBasket: finished 3rd among 16 teams

Gianluca Basile, Roberto Chiacig, Giacomo Galanda, Denis Marconato, Massimo Bulleri, Nikola Radulović, Alessandro de Pol, Matteo Soragna, Michele Mian, Alex Righetti, Alessandro Cittadini, Davide Lamma (Coach: Carlo Recalcati)

2004 Olympic Games: finished 2nd among 12 teams

Gianluca Basile, Massimo Bulleri, Roberto Chiacig, Denis Marconato, Giacomo Galanda, Nikola Radulović, Gianmarco Pozzecco, Matteo Soragna, Michele Mian, Alex Righetti, Rodolfo Rombaldoni, Luca Garri (Coach: Carlo Recalcati)

2005 EuroBasket: finished 10th among 16 teams

Gianluca Basile, Denis Marconato, Gianmarco Pozzecco, Giacomo Galanda, Massimo Bulleri, Roberto Chiacig, Stefano Mancinelli, Dante Calabria, Matteo Soragna, Alex Righetti, Marco Mordente, Angelo Gigli (Coach: Carlo Recalcati)

2006 World Championship: finished 9th among 24 teams

Gianluca Basile, Denis Marconato, Marco Belinelli, Stefano Mancinelli, Matteo Soragna, Richard Mason Rocca, Andrea Pecile, Marco Mordente, Andrea Michelori, Fabio di Bella, Luca Garri, Angelo Gigli (Coach: Carlo Recalcati)

2007 EuroBasket: finished 9th among 16 teams

Andrea Bargnani, Marco Belinelli, Gianluca Basile, Massimo Bulleri, Stefano Mancinelli, Denis Marconato, Matteo Soragna, Marco Mordente, Angelo Gigli, Fabio di Bella, Andrea Crosariol, Luigi Datome (Coach: Carlo Recalcati)

2011 EuroBasket: finished 20th among 24 teams

Antonio Maestranzi, Marco Carraretto, Stefano Mancinelli, Andrea Bargnani, Danilo Gallinari, Marco Mordente, Andrea Cinciarini, Marco Belinelli, Marco Cusin, Luigi Datome, Andrea Renzi, Daniel Hackett (Coach: Simone Pianigiani)

2013 EuroBasket: finished 8th among 24 teams

Andrea Bargnani, Danilo Gallinari, Andrea Cinciarini, Marco Belinelli, Marco Cusin, Luigi Datome, Daniel Hackett, Pietro Aradori, Amedeo Della Valle, Achille Polonara, Alessandro Gentile, Nicolò Melli (Coach: Simone Pianigiani)

2015 EuroBasket: finished 6th among 24 teams

Andrea Bargnani, Danilo Gallinari, Andrea Cinciarini, Marco Belinelli, Marco Cusin, Luigi Datome, Daniel Hackett, Pietro Aradori, Amedeo Della Valle, Achille Polonara, Alessandro Gentile, Nicolò Melli (Coach: Simone Pianigiani)

2017 EuroBasket: finished 7th among 24 teams

Andrea Cinciarini, Marco Belinelli, Marco Cusin, Luigi Datome, Daniel Hackett, Pietro Aradori, Nicolò Melli, Ariel Filloy, Paul Biligha, Awudu Abass, Filippo Baldi Rossi, Christian Burns (Coach: Ettore Messina)

KitEdit

ManufacturerEdit

2017–present: Spalding [9]

Edit

2015–present: Barilla [10]

See alsoEdit

References and notesEdit

External linksEdit