Canada men's national basketball team

The Canadian men's national basketball team represents Canada in international basketball competitions since 1923. They are overseen by Canada Basketball, the governing body of basketball in Canada.

Canada
FIBA ranking6 Increase 9 (September 15, 2023)[1]
Joined FIBA1936
FIBA zoneFIBA Americas
National federationCanada Basketball
CoachJordi Fernández
Nickname(s)Team Canada
The Road Warriors[2]
Olympic Games
Appearances9
Medals Silver: (1936)
FIBA World Cup
Appearances15
MedalsBronze Bronze: (2023)
FIBA AmeriCup
Appearances19
Medals Silver: (1980, 1999)
Bronze: (1984, 1988, 2001, 2015)
Pan American Games
Appearances14
Medals Silver: (2015)
Home jersey
Team colours
Home
Away jersey
Team colours
Away

In nine Olympic appearances, Canada has won one medal in basketball – a silver at the 1936 Games in Berlin. The team finished fourth in 1976 and 1984. Canada has won six medals at the FIBA AmeriCup – two silver medals in 1980 and 1999, as well as four bronze medals in 1984, 1988, 2001, and 2015. In recent decades, the team also won its first medals at the Pan American Games, a silver medal in 2015, and the FIBA World Cup, a bronze medal in 2023.

The Canadian senior national team won its only gold medal at a university-level tournament, the 1983 Summer Universiade, which the country hosted in Edmonton, Alberta.

History Edit

Early years Edit

As the country credited for bringing forth the inventor of the game, Canada's national team has often been a major competitor at the global stage.

Through the 70s and 80s, Team Canada consistently placed among the top teams in the world. The emergence of Steve Nash gave another boost to the team in the 1990s. Yet, great performances became more scarce when he retired.

2009–2016 Edit

Canada began the new cycle entering the 2009 FIBA Americas Championship. Canada advanced to the quarterfinals after posting a 2–2 record in the Preliminary round. A Uruguay loss to Argentina on the final day of group play meant that the winner of the Canada-Dominican Republic game would advance to the semifinals. Canada would go on to defeat them 76–80. In the semi-finals, Canada would lose to top-seeded Brazil 73–65. By finishing in the top four, this guaranteed the team a place in the 2010 FIBA World Championship held in Turkey. Canada unfortunately finished last (6th) of the Group D, and got ranked 22nd of the FIBA World Cup.

Critics blamed the absence of Nash, Samuel Dalembert, Jamaal Magloire and Matt Bonner for Canada's disappointing performance at the 2010 FIBA World Championship.[3] Ambitions to gather Canada's most outstanding basketball players for the 2010 squad failed as Nash retired from the national team in 2007, [4] Bonner did not get his citizenship in time,[5] Dalembert was cut from the team after issues with former head coach Rautins[3] and Magloire simply opted not to play.[5]

With a spot at the 2012 Summer Olympics up for grabs, Canada entered the 2011 FIBA Americas Championship with aspiration of making the quarterly tournament for the first time since 2000. Canada would ultimately bow out in the Second round of group play, and miss out on both a direct ticket to Beijing and the 2012 FIBA World Olympic Qualifying Tournament.

On May 9, 2012, Steve Nash was named general manager of the national team of Canada.

After a disappointing showing at the 2013 FIBA Americas Championship, Team Canada would not find success until the 2015 FIBA Americas Championship. In the tournament, Canada advanced to the semi-finals where they were defeated by Venezuela in a nail-bitting 78–79 loss. In the third-place game, they would defeat Mexico 87–86 to claim the bronze medal.

With there 3rd place showing at the FIBA Americas Championship, Canada qualified to the 2016 FIBA World Olympic Qualifying Tournament – Manila. Needing to finish first to qualify for the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Canada would advance all the way to the finals to face France. In front of a crown of 13,000, at the Mall of Asia Arena, Canada would fall 74–83 and miss out on yet another Summer Olympics.

2017–2020 Edit

After failing to qualify for the Olympics, Canada participated at the 2017 FIBA AmeriCup in South America. The team was composed mostly of non-NBA players, and ended group play with a 1–2 record. The poor performance led them to finishing in 8th place.

The Canadians made their debut at the 2018 Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast, winning a silver medal.[6]

With the approaching 2019 FIBA World Cup, Rowan Barrett hired Toronto Raptors head coach Nick Nurse to coach Team Canada through the World Cup and possibly the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo. [7][8]

The team withdrew from its FIBA AmeriCup qualifying games against Cuba on November 29, 2020, and against the U.S. Virgin Islands on November 30, 2020, on the advice of medical experts due to risks posed by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. As a consequence on January 20, 2021, the International Basketball Federation docked the team a point in the standings in addition to a 160,000 Swiss francs fine levied against Canada Basketball.[9][10]

At the 18th edition of the FIBA Basketball World Cup, Canada was drawn in Group H, with Australia, Lithuania, and Senegal. Canada finished in 21st place, their second worst showing at the men's international tournament.

Canada had one last change to qualify for the Summer Olympics in Tokyo, participating at the 2020 FIBA Men's Olympic Qualifying Tournaments – Victoria. Canada began the Preliminary round finishing with a 2–0 record, advancing to the semi-finals were they would face Czech Republic. A closely fought game, Canada would ultimately fall 101–103 in OT, missing out on the Summer Games for a 5th straight tournament.

 
The Rogers Centre in Toronto has served Team Canada as home court for most of their matches.

2021–present Edit

After numerous setbacks in tournament play, Canada Basketball introduced the concept of the 'Summer Core' consisting of 14 players who were willing to commit to represent Canada for three consecutive summers. This included the 2023 FIBA World Cup and participation at the 2024 Summer Olympics, where the Canadian men are making their first appearance since Nash led them to Sydney in 2000.[11]

In 2022, the Canadians participated at the 19th edition of the FIBA AmeriCup. They finished group play in second place with a 2–1 record. In the quarter-finals, Canada defeated Mexico 77–82. In the semi-finals, they were defeated by Brazil 86–76. They ended the tournament finishing in 4th place, after a narrow 84–80 loss to the United States, in the third place game. Dalano Banton, one of the standouts of the tournament, was named to the All-Tournament Team.

On June 27, 2023, Sacramento Kings assistant coach Jordi Fernández was hired to replace Nick Nurse as Team Canada's head coach.[12][13]

Leading up to the 2023 FIBA World Cup, Canada Basketball announced a five-game exhibition series where they would play matches in Germany and Spain, against some of the top nations in the world. Canada finished the exhibition tour with a 3–2 record, which included wins over Germany and Spain, both of which were higher-ranked.[14]

Canada carried their form into the group phase of the World Cup, defeating France 95–65 in the opening match.[15] Canada finished the first group phase with a 3–0 record, and a +111 point differential, following large wins over Lebanon and Latvia.[16] However, the team suffered their first loss of the tournament to Brazil in the first game of the second stage. The loss meant that their next match against world number one ranked Spain, was a game Canada had to win if they hoped to gain an automatic berth at the 2024 Olympics.[17] Shai Gilgeous-Alexander led a fourth quarter comeback from 12 points down, as Canada edged the defending World champions in an 88–85 victory. The win secured a quarter-final spot and Canada's first Olympic berth since 2000.[18] Canada then defeated Slovenia in the quarter-final by a score of 100–89, reaching the semi-finals of the World Cup for the first time.[19] After a loss to Serbia in the semi-final, Canada defeated the United States in the bronze medal game, which went to overtime and concluded 127–118. Dillon Brooks recorded a team-best 39 points in the game, which secured the first global championship medal since 1936 for the Canadian Senior Men's National Team.[20] Gilgeous-Alexander was named to the FIBA Basketball World Cup 2023 All-Star 5 with averages of 24.5 points, 6.4 rebounds, 6.4 assists, and 1.6 steals per game.[21]

Competitive record Edit

Summer Olympics Edit

Year Position Tournament Host
1936 Silver   Basketball at the 1936 Summer Olympics Berlin, Germany
1948 9 Basketball at the 1948 Summer Olympics London, England
1952 9 Basketball at the 1952 Summer Olympics Helsinki, Finland
1956 9 Basketball at the 1956 Summer Olympics Melbourne, Australia
1960 Basketball at the 1960 Summer Olympics Rome, Italy
1964 14 Basketball at the 1964 Summer Olympics Tokyo, Japan
1968 Basketball at the 1968 Summer Olympics Mexico City, Mexico
1972 Basketball at the 1972 Summer Olympics Munich, Germany
1976 4 Basketball at the 1976 Summer Olympics Montreal, Canada
1980 Originally qualified, but later withdrew Moscow, Soviet Union
1984 4 Basketball at the 1984 Summer Olympics Los Angeles, U.S.
1988 6 Basketball at the 1988 Summer Olympics Seoul, South Korea
1992 Basketball at the 1992 Summer Olympics Barcelona, Spain
1996 Basketball at the 1996 Summer Olympics Atlanta, U.S.
2000 7 Basketball at the 2000 Summer Olympics Sydney, Australia
2004 Basketball at the 2004 Summer Olympics Athens, Greece
2008 Basketball at the 2008 Summer Olympics Beijing, China
2012 Basketball at the 2012 Summer Olympics London, England
2016 Basketball at the 2016 Summer Olympics Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
2020 Basketball at the 2020 Summer Olympics Tokyo, Japan
2024 Qualified Basketball at the 2024 Summer Olympics Paris, France

FIBA World Cup Edit

Year Position Tournament Host
1950 1950 FIBA World Championship Buenos Aires, Argentina
1954 7 1954 FIBA World Championship Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
1959 12 1959 FIBA World Championship Chile
1963 11 1963 FIBA World Championship Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
1967 1967 FIBA World Championship Uruguay
1970 10 1970 FIBA World Championship Yugoslavia
1974 8 1974 FIBA World Championship Puerto Rico
1978 6 1978 FIBA World Championship Philippines
1982 6 1982 FIBA World Championship Colombia
1986 8 1986 FIBA World Championship Spain
1990 12 1990 FIBA World Championship Argentina
1994 7 1994 FIBA World Championship Toronto, Canada
1998 12 1998 FIBA World Championship Athens, Greece
2002 13 2002 FIBA World Championship Indianapolis, U.S.
2006 2006 FIBA World Championship Japan
2010 22 2010 FIBA World Championship Turkey
2014 2014 FIBA World Cup Spain
2019 21 2019 FIBA World Cup China
2023   Bronze 2023 FIBA World Cup Philippines, Japan and Indonesia
2027 To be determined 2027 FIBA World Cup Qatar

FIBA AmeriCup Edit

Year Position Tournament Host
1980   Silver 1980 Tournament of the Americas San Juan, Puerto Rico
1984   Bronze 1984 Tournament of the Americas São Paulo, Brazil
1988   Bronze 1988 Tournament of the Americas Montevideo, Uruguay
1989 5 1989 Tournament of the Americas Mexico City, Mexico
1992 5 1992 Tournament of the Americas Portland, U.S.
1993 7 1993 Tournament of the Americas San Juan, Puerto Rico
1995 4 1995 Tournament of the Americas Neuquén, Argentina
1997 5 1997 Tournament of the Americas Montevideo, Uruguay
1999   Silver 1999 Tournament of the Americas San Juan, Puerto Rico
2001   Bronze 2001 Tournament of the Americas Neuquén, Argentina
2003 4 2003 Tournament of the Americas San Juan, Puerto Rico
2005 9 2005 FIBA Americas Championship Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
2007 5 2007 FIBA Americas Championship Las Vegas, U.S.
2009 4 2009 FIBA Americas Championship San Juan, Puerto Rico
2011 6 2011 FIBA Americas Championship Mar del Plata, Argentina
2013 6 2013 FIBA Americas Championship Caracas, Venezuela
2015   Bronze 2015 FIBA Americas Championship Mexico City, Mexico
2017 8 2017 FIBA AmeriCup Argentina/Colombia/Uruguay
2022 4 2022 FIBA AmeriCup Recife, Brazil

Pan American Games Edit

Year Position Tournament Host
1951 Basketball at the 1951 Pan American Games Buenos Aires, Argentina
1955 Basketball at the 1955 Pan American Games Mexico City, Mexico
1959 5 Basketball at the 1959 Pan American Games Chicago, U.S.
1963 6 Basketball at the 1963 Pan American Games São Paulo, Brazil
1967 9 Basketball at the 1967 Pan American Games Winnipeg, Canada
1971 8 Basketball at the 1971 Pan American Games Cali, Colombia
1975 6 Basketball at the 1975 Pan American Games Mexico City, Mexico
1979 5 Basketball at the 1979 Pan American Games San Juan, Puerto Rico
1983 4 Basketball at the 1983 Pan American Games Caracas, Venezuela
1987 5 Basketball at the 1987 Pan American Games Indianapolis, U.S.
1991 9 Basketball at the 1991 Pan American Games Havana, Cuba
1995 Basketball at the 1995 Pan American Games Mar del Plata, Argentina
1999 5 Basketball at the 1999 Pan American Games Winnipeg, Canada
2003 7 Basketball at the 2003 Pan American Games Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
2007 7 Basketball at the 2007 Pan American Games Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
2011 6 Basketball at the 2011 Pan American Games Guadalajara, Mexico
2015   Silver Basketball at the 2015 Pan American Games Toronto, Canada
2019 Basketball at the 2019 Pan American Games Lima, Peru
2023 Withdrew Basketball at the 2023 Pan American Games Santiago, Chile

Commonwealth Games Edit

FIBA Diamond Ball Edit

  • 2000 – 4th place

Marchand Continental Championship Cup Edit

  • 2007 – 3rd place
  • 2009 – 3rd place
  • 2011 – 4th place
  • 2013 – 5th place
  • 2015 – Champions  

Summer Universiade Edit

Results and fixtures Edit

  Win   Loss   Fixture

2023 Edit

February 23, 2023 Argentina   83–72   Canada Mar del Plata, Argentina
21:40 CET (UTC+1) Scoring by quarter: 17–18, 23–13, 21–19, 22–22
Pts: Brussino, Campazzo 13
Rebs: Delía 7
Asts: Campazzo 11
Boxscore Pts: T. Scrubb 18
Rebs: Young 9
Asts: P. Scrubb 5
Arena: Polideportivo Islas Malvinas
Attendance: 0
Referees: Roberto Vázquez (PUR), Johnny Batista (PUR), Alan dos Santos (BRA)
February 26, 2023 Venezuela   57–74   Canada Caracas, Venezuela
20:10 CET (UTC+1) Scoring by quarter: 17–22, 13–15, 8–16, 19–21
Pts: Colmenares 13
Rebs: Carrera 11
Asts: Cubillán 4
Boxscore Pts: P. Scrubb, Young 14
Rebs: T. Scrubb 5
Asts: Bell-Haynes 7
Arena: Poliedro de Caracas
Attendance: 12,609
Referees: Krishna Domínguez (MEX), Andrés García (URU), Alan dos Santos (BRA)
August 9, 2023
Friendly
Germany   86–81   Canada Berlin, Germany
19:30 CEST (UTC+2) Scoring by quarter: 27–14, 23–20, 16–24, 20–23
Pts: F. Wagner 18 Boxscore Pts: Dort 14 Arena: Mercedes-Benz Arena
August 12, 2023
DBB Supercup 2023
Canada   107–76   New Zealand Hamburg, Germany
15:45 CEST (UTC+2) Scoring by quarter: 28–24, 39–14, 18–24, 22–14
Pts: Gilgeous-Alexander 26
Rebs: Alexander-Walker 8
Asts: Bell-Haynes 4
Boxscore Pts: Delany 13
Rebs: Brown 7
Asts: Cameron 4
Arena: Edel-optics.de Arena
Attendance: 3,400
August 13, 2023
DBB Supercup 2023
Germany   112–1130(OT)   Canada Hamburg, Germany
18:30 CEST (UTC+2) Scoring by quarter: 26–20, 23–25, 38–33, 14–23Overtime: 11–12
Pts: Schröder 26
Rebs: M. Wagner 7
Asts: Schröder 8
Boxscore Pts: Barrett 31
Rebs: Gilgeous-Alexander 8
Asts: Gilgeous-Alexander 6
Arena: Edel-optics.de Arena
Attendance: 3,400
August 17, 2023
Friendly
Spain   80–850(OT)   Canada Granada, Spain
21:30 CEST (UTC+2) Scoring by quarter: 21–27, 44–40, 56–55, 73–73, Overtime: 7–12
Pts: J. Hernangómez 12
Rebs: Garuba 8
Asts: R. Fernández 6
Boxscore Pts: Gilgeous-Alexander 22
Rebs: Powell 12
Asts: Olynyk 6
Arena: Palacio Municipal de Deportes
August 18, 2023
Friendly
Canada   88–94   Dominican Republic Granada, Spain
21:30 CEST (UTC+2) Scoring by quarter: 26–27, 21–21, 19–18, 22–28
Pts: Dort 12
Rebs: Dort 5
Asts: Scrubb 3
Boxscore Pts: Towns 20
Rebs: Delgado 12
Asts: Feliz 6
Arena: Palacio Municipal de Deportes
August 25, 2023 Canada   95–65   France Jakarta, Indonesia
20:30 (UTC+7) Scoring by quarter: 14–18, 29–22, 25–8, 27–17
Pts: Gilgeous-Alexander 27
Rebs: Gilgeous-Alexander 13
Asts: Gilgeous-Alexander 6
Boxscore Pts: Fournier 21
Rebs: Gobert 9
Asts: Okobo 4
Arena: Indonesia Arena
Attendance: 12,091
Referees: Roberto Vázquez (PUR), Johnny Batista (PUR), Gvidas Gedvilas (LTU)
August 27, 2023 Lebanon   73–128   Canada Jakarta, Indonesia
16:45 (UTC+7) Scoring by quarter: 13–29, 17–37, 18–34, 25–28
Pts: Spellman 16
Rebs: three players 3
Asts: Arakji 5
Boxscore Pts: Barrett 17
Rebs: Olynyk 8
Asts: Bell-Haynes 8
Arena: Indonesia Arena
Attendance: 10,180
Referees: Roberto Vázquez (PUR), Jenna Reneau (USA), Daigo Urushima (JPN)
August 29, 2023 Canada   101–75   Latvia Jakarta, Indonesia
20:30 (UTC+7) Scoring by quarter: 13–29, 30–19, 24–15, 34–18
Pts: Gilgeous-Alexander 27
Rebs: Ejim 7
Asts: Gilgeous-Alexander 6
Boxscore Pts: Gražulis 16
Rebs: Kurucs 10
Asts: Šķēle 6
Arena: Indonesia Arena
Attendance: 11,186
Referees: Juan Fernández (ARG), Jenna Reneau (USA), Johnny Batista (PUR)
September 1, 2023 Canada   65–69   Brazil Jakarta, Indonesia
20:30 (UTC+7) Scoring by quarter: 13–16, 24–11, 15–18, 13–24
Pts: Gilgeous-Alexander 23
Rebs: Olynyk 7
Asts: Alexander-Walker 3
Boxscore Pts: Caboclo 19
Rebs: Caboclo 13
Asts: Dos Santos 10
Arena: Indonesia Arena
Attendance: 8,934
Referees: Julio Anaya (PAN), Jenna Reneau (USA), Johnny Batista (PUR)
September 3, 2023 Spain   85–88   Canada Jakarta, Indonesia
20:30 (UTC+7) Scoring by quarter: 21–21, 27–17, 25–23, 12–27
Pts: W. Hernangómez 25
Rebs: W. Hernangómez 6
Asts: Fernández, Núñez 7
Boxscore Pts: Gilgeous-Alexander 30
Rebs: three players 5
Asts: Gilgeous-Alexander 7
Arena: Indonesia Arena
Attendance: 12,493
Referees: Julio Anaya (PAN), Juan Fernández (ARG), Jenna Reneau (USA)
September 6, 2023 Canada   100–89   Slovenia Pasay, Philippines
20:40 (UTC+7) Scoring by quarter: 26–24, 24–26, 30–21, 20–18
Pts: Gilgeous-Alexander 31
Rebs: Gilgeous-Alexander 10
Asts: Gilgeous-Alexander, Olynyk 4
Boxscore Pts: Dončić 26
Rebs: Tobey 6
Asts: Dončić 5
Arena: Mall of Asia Arena
Attendance: 11,710
Referees: Roberto Vázquez (PUR), Manuel Mazzoni (ITA), Gatis Saliņš (LAT)
September 8, 2023 Serbia   95–86   Canada Pasay, Philippines
16:45 (UTC+8) Scoring by quarter: 23–15, 29–24, 23–24, 20–23
Pts: Bogdanović 23
Rebs: Milutinov 10
Asts: Jovic 5
Boxscore Pts: Barrett 23
Rebs: Barrett 3
Asts: Gilgeous-Alexander 9
Arena: Mall of Asia Arena
Attendance: 8,630
Referees: Yohan Rosso (FRA), Julio Anaya (PAN), Manuel Mazzoni (ITA)
September 10, 2023 United States   118–1270(OT)   Canada Pasay, Philippines
16:30 (UTC+8) Scoring by quarter: 25-34, 31-24, 26-33, 29-20, Overtime: 7-16
Pts: Edwards 24
Rebs: Bridges 9
Asts: Haliburton 7
Boxscore Pts: Brooks 39
Rebs: Barrett, Powell 7
Asts: Gilgeous-Alexander 12
Arena: Mall of Asia Arena
Attendance: 10,666
Referees: Yohan Rosso (FRA), Julio Anaya (PAN), Takaki Kato (JPN)

Team Edit

Current roster Edit

Roster for the 2023 FIBA Basketball World Cup.[22]

Canada men's national basketball team – 2023 FIBA Basketball World Cup roster
Players Coaches
Pos. No. Name Age – Date of birth Height Club Ctr.
G 0 Luguentz Dort 24 – (1999-04-19)April 19, 1999 1.94 m (6 ft 4 in) Oklahoma City Thunder  
SG 1 Nickeil Alexander-Walker 24 – (1998-09-02)September 2, 1998 1.96 m (6 ft 5 in) Minnesota Timberwolves  
G 2 Shai Gilgeous-Alexander 25 – (1998-07-12)July 12, 1998 1.98 m (6 ft 6 in) Oklahoma City Thunder  
F 3 Melvin Ejim 32 – (1991-03-04)March 4, 1991 2.01 m (6 ft 7 in) Unicaja  
PF 7 Dwight Powell 32 – (1991-07-20)July 20, 1991 2.12 m (6 ft 11 in) Dallas Mavericks  
SF 9 RJ Barrett 23 – (2000-06-14)June 14, 2000 1.95 m (6 ft 5 in) New York Knicks  
F 11 Kyle Alexander 26 – (1996-10-21)October 21, 1996 2.07 m (6 ft 9 in) Hapoel Tel Aviv  
F 13 Kelly Olynyk (C) 32 – (1991-04-19)April 19, 1991 2.11 m (6 ft 11 in) Utah Jazz  
C 15 Zach Edey 21 – (2002-05-14)May 14, 2002 2.24 m (7 ft 4 in) Purdue Boilermakers  
G 23 Philip Scrubb 30 – (1992-11-27)November 27, 1992 1.94 m (6 ft 4 in) Bahçeşehir  
SF 24 Dillon Brooks 27 – (1996-01-22)January 22, 1996 1.98 m (6 ft 6 in) Houston Rockets  
PG 25 Trae Bell-Haynes 27 – (1995-09-05)September 5, 1995 1.88 m (6 ft 2 in) Basket Zaragoza  
Head coach
Assistant coach(es)
Legend
  • (C) Team captain
  • Club – describes last
    club before the tournament
  • Age – describes age
    on August 25, 2023

Head coaches Edit

Past rosters Edit

Scroll down to see more.

1936 Summer Olympics: finished 2nd of 21 teams

Gordon Aitchison, Ian Allison, Arthur Chapman, Charles Chapman, Edward Dawson, Irving Meretsky, Douglas Peden, James Stewart, Malcolm Wiseman were awarded silver medals for having played in at least one match during the tournament. Reserves John Dawson, Alphonse Freer, Donald Grey, Stanley Nantais, Robert Osborne, Thomas Pendlebury, and coach Gordon Fuller were not awarded medals.

1948 Summer Olympics: finished 9th of 23 teams

Ole Bakken, Bill Bell, David Bloomfield, Dave Campbell, Harry Kermode, Bennie Lands, Pat McGeer, Reid Mitchell, Mort Morein, Nev Munro, Bob Scarr, Cy Strulovitch, Sol Tolchinsky, Murray Waxman. (Coach: Bob Osborne)

1952 Summer Olympics: finished 9th of 23 teams

Ralph Campbell, William Coulthard, James Curren, Charles Dalton, William Pataky, Glenn Pettinger, Robert Phibbs, Bernard Pickel, Carl Ridd, Robert Simpson, Harry Wade, George Wearring, Roy Williams. (Player/Coach: Paul Thomas)

1954 FIBA World Championship: finished 7th of 12 teams

Roy Burkett, Ken Callis, George Delkers, Doug Gresham, Herb Olafson, Wally Parobec, Carl Ridd, Andy Spack, Mike Spack, Ralph Watts. (Coach: Jim Bulloch)

1956 Summer Olympics: finished 9th of 15 teams

Ronald Bissett, Doug Brinham, Mel Brown, Bob Burtwell, Edward Lucht, Don Macintosh, John McLeod, Coulter Osborne, Bernard Pickel, Ron Stuart, George Stulac, Ed Wild. (Coach: Lance Hudson)

1959 FIBA World Championship: finished 12th of 13 teams

Doug Brinham, Al Brown, Bob Burtwell, Ed Lucht, Ed Malecki, John McLeod, Peter Mullins, Lance Stephens, Logan Tait, Brian Upson, Ed Wild. (Coach: Fred Collen)

1963 FIBA World Championship: finished 11th of 13 teams

Harry Blacker, Neil Dirom, Gordon Fester, Ken Galanchuk, Bob Inglis, Ken Larsen, Jack Lilja, Bill McDonald, Lance Stephens, Logan Tait, Dave Way, Al West. (Coach: Bob Hamilton)

1964 Summer Olympics: finished 14th of 16 teams

Walter Birtles, John Dacyshyn, Rolly Goldring, Keith Hartley, Barry Howson, Fred Ingaldson, James Maguire, John McKibbon, Warren Reynolds, Ruby Richman, George Stulac, Joe Stulac. (Coach: Ruby Richman)

1970 FIBA World Championship: finished 10th of 13 teams

John Barton, Alex Braiden, John Cassidy, Rod Cox, Bruce Dempster, Barry Howson, Terry MacKay, Bob Molinski, Dave Murphy, Bill Robinson, Derek Sankey, Ron Thorsen. (Coach: Paul Mullins)

1972 Pre-Olympic Basketball Tournament: finished 6th of 12 teams

John Cassidy, Tom Kieswetter, Terry McKay, Jamie Russell, Derek Sankey, Gary Smith, Ron Thorsen, Phil Tollestrup, Tim Tollestrup, Bob Town, Ted Stoesz, Ross Wedlake. (Coach: Jack Donohue)

1974 FIBA World Championship: finished 8th of 14 teams

Alex Devlin, Lars Hansen, Ken McKenzie, Michael Moser, Romel Raffin, George Rautins, Martin Riley, Jamie Russell, Bob Sharpe, Robert Stewart, Phil Tollestrup. (Coach: Jack Donohue)

1976 Summer Olympics: finished 4th of 12 teams

John Cassidy, Alex Devlin, Cameron Hall, Lars Hansen, Romel Raffin, Martin Riley, Bill Robinson, Jamie Russell, Derek Sankey, Bob Sharpe, Phil Tollestrup, Bob Town. (Coach: Jack Donohue)

1978 FIBA World Championship: finished 6th of 14 teams

Steve Atkin, Tom Bishop, John Cassidy, Tom Kappos, Howard Kelsey, Ross Quakenbush, Leo Rautins, Martin Riley, Jamie Russell, Peter Ryan, Jay Triano, Jim Zoet. (Coach: Jack Donohue)

1980 Tournament of the Americas: finished 2nd of 7 teams

Tom Bishop, Reni Dolcetti, Varouj Gurunlian, Howard Kelsey, Perry Mirkovich, Ross Quackenbush, Romel Raffin, Leo Rautins, Martin Riley, Doc Ryan, Jay Triano, Jim Zoet. (Coach: Jack Donohue)

1982 FIBA World Championship: finished 6th of 12 teams

Ron Crevier, Stewart Granger, Gerald Kazanowski, Howard Kelsey, Ken Larson, Dan Meagher, Eli Pasquale, Leo Rautins, Tony Simms, Jay Triano, Bill Wennington, Greg Wiltjer. (Coach: Jack Donohue)

1983 Summer Universiade: finished 1st of 16 teams

Kelly Dukeshire, John Hatch, Gord Herbert, Gerald Kazanowski, Howard Kelsey, Dan Meagher, Eli Pasquale, Tony Simms, Karl Tilleman, Jay Triano, Bill Wennington, Greg Wiltjer. (Coach: Jack Donohue)

1984 Tournament of the Americas: finished 3rd of 9 teams

John Hatch, Gord Herbert, Gerald Kazanowski, Howard Kelsey, Dan Meagher, Eli Pasquale, Romel Raffin, Tony Simms, Karl Tilleman, Jay Triano, Bill Wennington, Greg Wiltjer. (Coach: Jack Donohue)

1984 Summer Olympics: finished 4th of 12 teams

John Hatch, Gord Herbert, Gerald Kazanowski, Howard Kelsey, Dan Meagher, Eli Pasquale, Romel Raffin, Tony Simms, Karl Tilleman, Jay Triano, Bill Wennington, Greg Wiltjer. (Coach: Jack Donohue)

1986 FIBA World Championship: finished 8th of 24 teams

Gerry Besselink, John Hatch, Gord Herbert, Gerald Kazanowski, Howard Kelsey, Barry Mungar, Dan Meagher, Eli Pasquale, Tony Simms, Jay Triano, David Turcotte, Greg Wiltjer. (Coach: Jack Donohue)

1988 Tournament of the Americas: finished 3rd of 7 teams

Barry Bekkedam, Norm Clarke, John Hatch, Alan Kristmanson, Barry Mungar, Eli Pasquale, Romel Raffin, Karl Tilleman, Jay Triano, David Turcotte, Wayne Yearwood, Dwight Walton. (Coach: Jack Donohue)

1988 Summer Olympics: finished 6th of 12 teams

Norm Clarke, John Hatch, Gerald Kazanowski, Alan Kristmanson, Barry Mungar, Eli Pasquale, Romel Raffin, Karl Tilleman, Jay Triano, David Turcotte, Wayne Yearwood, Dwight Walton. (Coach: Jack Donohue)

1989 Tournament of the Americas: finished 5th of 10 teams

Cord Clemons, Stewart Granger, John Karpis, Gerald Kazanowski, Alan Kristmanson, Spencer McKay, Phil Ohl, Eli Pasquale, Rob Samuels, Tony Simms, Leo Rautins, David Turcotte. (Coach: Ken Shields)

1990 FIBA World Championship: finished 11th of 16 teams

Rick Fox, Stewart Granger, J.D. Jackson, Gerald Kazanowski, Martin Keane, Dan Meagher, Phil Ohl, Eli Pasquale, Tony Simms, Andrew Steinfeld, Dwight Walton, Jim Zoet. (Coach: Ken Shields)

1992 Tournament of the Americas: finished 5th of 10 teams

J.D. Jackson, Martin Keane, Gerald Kazanowski, Al Kristmanson, Ronn McMahon, Phil Ohl, Leo Rautins, Mike Smrek, Jay Triano, David Turcotte, Bill Wennington, Trevor Williams, Greg Wiltjer. (Coach: Ken Shields)

1993 Tournament of the Americas: finished 7th of 10 teams

Rowan Barrett, Jeff Foreman, Kory Hallas, Cordell Llewellyn, Ronn McMahon, Steve Nash, William Njoku, David Turcotte, Sean Van Koughnett, Joey Vickery, Dwight Walton, Rob Wilson (Coach: Ken Shields)

1994 FIBA World Championship: finished 7th of 16 teams

Rick Fox, Kory Hallas, J.D. Jackson, Martin Keane, Spencer McKay, Ronn McMahon, Steve Nash, William Njoku, Mike Smrek, Joey Vickery, Dwight Walton, Greg Wiltjer. (Coach: Ken Shields)

1995 Tournament of the Americas: finished 4th of 10 teams

Bobby Allen, Phil Dixon, Kory Hallas, Sherman Hamilton, Martin Keane, Michael Meeks, Steve Nash, William Njoku, Joey Vickery, Dwight Walton, Greg Wiltjer, Wayne Yearwood. (Coach: Steve Konchalski)

1997 Tournament of the Americas: finished 5th of 10 teams

Rowan Barrett, Pascal Fleury, Sherman Hamilton, Martin Keane, Michael Meeks, Steve Nash, William Njoku, Eli Pasquale, Peter Van Elswyk, Joey Vickery, Rob Wilson, Wayne Yearwood. (Coach: Steve Konchalski)

1998 FIBA World Championship: finished 12th of 16 teams

Rowan Barrett, David Daniels, Greg Francis, Peter Guarasci, Kory Hallas, Sherman Hamilton, Martin Keane, Todd MacCulloch, Michael Meeks, Greg Newton, William Njoku, Joey Vickery. (Coach: Steve Konchalski)

1999 Tournament of the Americas: finished 2nd of 10 teams

Richard Elias Anderson, Rowan Barrett, Peter Guarasci, Sherman Hamilton, Andrew Mavis, Todd MacCulloch, Jordie McTavish, Michael Meeks, Steve Nash (Tournament MVP), Greg Newton, Shawn Swords, Keith Vassell (Coach: Jay Triano)

2000 Summer Olympics: finished 7th of 12 teams

Rowan Barrett, David Daniels, Greg Francis, Peter Guarasci, Sherman Hamilton, Eric Hinrichsen, Todd MacCulloch, Andrew Mavis, Michael Meeks, Steve Nash, Greg Newton, Shawn Swords. (Coach: Jay Triano)

2001 Tournament of the Americas: finished 3rd of 10 teams

David Daniels, Peter Guarasci, Sherman Hamilton, Kevin Jobity, Prosper Karangwa, Andrew Kwiatkowski, Todd MacCulloch, Michael Meeks, Steve Nash, Jerome Robinson, Shawn Swords, Dean Walker. (Coach: Jay Triano)

2002 FIBA World Championship: finished 13th of 16 teams

Richard Elias Anderson, Rowan Barrett, Titus Channer, Sherman Hamilton, Kevin Jobity, Prosper Karangwa, Michael Meeks, Greg Meldrum, Steve Ross, Shawn Swords, Dave Thomas, Novell Thomas. (Coach: Jay Triano)

2003 Tournament of the Americas: finished 4th of 10 teams

Rowan Barrett, Denham Brown, Greg Francis, Peter Guarasci, Prosper Karangwa, Mike King, Andrew Kwiatkowski, Steve Nash (Tournament MVP), Greg Newton, Novell Thomas, Jesse Young. (Coach: Jay Triano)

2005 FIBA Americas Championship: finished 9th of 10 teams

Jermaine Anderson, Richard Elias Anderson, Denham Brown, Jermaine Bucknor, Nathan Doornekamp, Carl English, James Gillingham, Kevin Jobity, Levon Kendall, Vidal Massiah, Juan Mendez, Randall Nohr. (Coach: Leo Rautins)

2007 FIBA Americas Championship: finished 5th of 10 teams

Jermaine Anderson, Ryan Bell, Denham Brown, Samuel Dalembert, Carl English, Olu Famutimi, Levon Kendall, Vladimir Kuljanin, Juan Mendez, Andy Rautins, David Thomas, Jesse Young. (Coach: Leo Rautins)

2008 FIBA World Olympic Qualifying Tournament for Men: finished 5th of 8 teams

Jermaine Anderson, Joel Anthony, Rowan Barrett, Ransford Brempong, Samuel Dalembert, Aaron Doornekamp, Carl English, Olu Famutimi, Levon Kendall, Tyler Kepkay, Andy Rautins, David Thomas. (Coach: Leo Rautins)

2009 FIBA Americas Championship: finished 4th of 10 teams

Jermaine Anderson, Joel Anthony, Ryan Bell, Jermaine Bucknor, Aaron Doornekamp, Carl English, Olu Famutimi, Levon Kendall, Tyler Kepkay, Kyle Landry, Andy Rautins, Jesse Young. (Coach: Leo Rautins)

2010 FIBA World Championship: finished 22nd of 24 teams

Jermaine Anderson, Joel Anthony, Ryan Bell, Denham Brown, Jermaine Bucknor, Aaron Doornekamp, Olu Famutimi, Levon Kendall, Kelly Olynyk, Andy Rautins, Robert Sacre, Jevohn Shepherd. (Coach: Leo Rautins)

2011 FIBA Americas Championship: finished 6th of 10 teams

Jermaine Anderson, Joel Anthony, Denham Brown, Aaron Doornekamp, Carl English, Jeff Ferguson, Cory Joseph, Levon Kendall, Kelly Olynyk, Andy Rautins, Jevohn Shepherd, Jesse Young. (Coach: Leo Rautins)

2013 FIBA Americas Championship: finished 6th of 10 teams

Jermaine Anderson, Joel Anthony, Junior Cadougan, Aaron Doornekamp, Brady Heslip, Cory Joseph, Devoe Joseph, Levon Kendall, Andrew Nicholson, Andy Rautins, Jevohn Shepherd, Tristan Thompson. (Coach: Jay Triano)

2015 Pan American Games: finished 2nd of 8 teams

Anthony Bennett, Sim Bhullar, Dillon Brooks, Junior Cadougan, Aaron Doornekamp, Melvin Ejim, Carl English, Brady Heslip, Daniel Mullings, Jamal Murray, Andrew Nicholson, Kyle Wiltjer. (Coach: Jay Triano)

2015 FIBA Americas Championship: finished 3rd of 10 teams

Anthony Bennett, Aaron Doornekamp, Melvin Ejim, Brady Heslip, Cory Joseph, Andrew Nicholson, Kelly Olynyk, Dwight Powell, Robert Sacre, Philip Scrubb, Nik Stauskas, Andrew Wiggins. (Coach: Jay Triano)

2016 FIBA World Olympic Qualifying Tournament – Manila: finished 2nd of 6 teams

Joel Anthony, Anthony Bennett, Khem Birch, Melvin Ejim, Tyler Ennis, Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, Brady Heslip, Cory Joseph, Levon Kendall, Philip Scrubb, Thomas Scrubb, Tristan Thompson. (Coach: Jay Triano)

2017 FIBA AmeriCup: finished 8th of 12 teams

Richard Amardi, Jermaine Anderson, Joel Anthony, Murphy Burnatowski, Junior Cadougan, Ammanuel Diressa, Grandy Glaze, Olivier Hanlan, Brady Heslip, Andrew Nicholson, Dyshawn Pierre, Xavier Rathan-Mayes. (Coach: Roy Rana)

2019 FIBA Basketball World Cup: finished 21st of 32 teams

Khem Birch, Melvin Ejim, Brady Heslip, Cory Joseph, Kaza Kajami-Keane, Owen Klassen, Conor Morgan, Andrew Nembhard, Kevin Pangos, Phil Scrubb, Thomas Scrubb, Kyle Wiltjer. (Coach: Nick Nurse)

2020 FIBA Men's Olympic Qualifying Tournaments – Victoria: finished 3rd of 6 teams

Nickeil Alexander-Walker, RJ Barrett, Trae Bell-Haynes, Anthony Bennett, Aaron Doornekamp, Luguentz Dort, Cory Joseph, Trey Lyles, Mychal Mulder, Andrew Nicholson, Dwight Powell, Andrew Wiggins. (Coach: Nick Nurse)

See also Edit

References Edit

  1. ^ "FIBA Ranking Presented by Nike". FIBA. September 15, 2023. Retrieved September 15, 2023.
  2. ^ Buffery, Steve (July 19, 2011). "Calling Steve Nash, Canada needs you!". Toronto Sun. Retrieved August 30, 2011.
  3. ^ a b Basu, Arpon (September 12, 2010). "Kings' Dalembert unloads on Canadian basketball program". National Post. Archived from the original on January 29, 2013. Retrieved September 22, 2010.
  4. ^ Arthur, Bruce (December 4, 2007), "Nash era at an end for Canada", National Post, archived from the original on December 7, 2007, retrieved February 9, 2022
  5. ^ a b Alter, David (June 24, 2010). "Canada limping to World Championships". The Globe and Mail. Toronto.
  6. ^ "Canada settles for men's basketball silver at Commonwealth Games". Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
  7. ^ "Raptors' Nick Nurse confirms he'll coach Canada at 2019 FIBA World Cup". Sportsnet. June 16, 2019. Retrieved June 18, 2019.
  8. ^ "Raptors coach Nick Nurse to lead Canada's men's team at FIBA World Cup". Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. June 24, 2019. Retrieved February 9, 2022.
  9. ^ "'Out of the blue': Canada Basketball blindsided by FIBA sanctions, $227K fine | CBC Sports".
  10. ^ "Canada Basketball to appeal FIBA sanctions; fined for missing games during pandemic". Sportsnet.ca.
  11. ^ "Fourteen athletes committed to represent Canada as Senior Men's National Team summer core revealed". basketball.ca. Retrieved August 16, 2023.
  12. ^ "Sacramento Kings' Jordi Fernandez to replace Nick Nurse as Canada's head coach". Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. June 27, 2023. Retrieved June 28, 2023.
  13. ^ "Who is Jordi Fernandez? Canada national team picks Kings coach to replace Nick Nurse". Sportsnet. June 27, 2019. Retrieved June 28, 2023.
  14. ^ MacKenzie, Holly (August 21, 2023). "After wrapping up exhibition play, Canada is officially World Cup ready". Canada Basketball. Retrieved September 6, 2023.
  15. ^ "Gilgeous-Alexander, Canada stun France in dominant fashion". Canada Basketball. August 25, 2023. Retrieved September 6, 2023.
  16. ^ MacKenzie, Holly (August 31, 2023). "Canada clashes with Brazil in opening game of second round at FIBA World Cup". Canada Basketball. Retrieved September 6, 2023.
  17. ^ MacKenzie, Holly (September 2, 2023). "Quarter-final on the line as Canada squares off with Spain in Jakarta". Canada Basketball. Retrieved September 6, 2023.
  18. ^ "Down go the champs: Canada knock out Spain in thriller". Canada Basketball. September 3, 2023. Retrieved September 6, 2023.
  19. ^ Grange, Michael (September 6, 2023). "Gilgeous-Alexander raising Canada's ceiling one signature moment at a time". Sportsnet. Retrieved September 6, 2023.
  20. ^ "Canada holds off U.S. to win bronze at men's Basketball World Cup in OT". CBC Sports. September 10, 2023. Retrieved September 10, 2023.
  21. ^ https://www.fiba.basketball/basketballworldcup/2023/news/dennis-schroder-named-fiba-basketball-world-cup-2023-tissot-mvp
  22. ^ "Senior Men's National Team roster finalized for FIBA Men's Basketball World Cup 2023". basketball.ca. August 24, 2023. Retrieved August 24, 2023.
  23. ^ "Team roster: Canada" (PDF). FIBA. August 25, 2023.

External links Edit