Keisei Tominaga

Keisei Tominaga (富永 啓生, とみなが けいせい, Tominaga Akirasei, born February 1, 2001) is a Japanese college basketball player for the Nebraska Cornhuskers of the Big Ten Conference. He previously played for Ranger College. Tominaga has been a member of the Japan men's national basketball team and the national 3x3 team.

Keisei Tominaga
富永 啓生
Keisei Tominaga (cropped).jpg
Tominaga with Nebraska in 2022
No. 30 – Nebraska Cornhuskers
PositionShooting guard
LeagueBig Ten Conference
Personal information
Born (2001-02-01) February 1, 2001 (age 22)
Moriyama, Japan
NationalityJapanese
Listed height5 ft 10 in (1.78 m)
Listed weight178 lb (81 kg)
Career information
High schoolSakuragaoka Gakuen
(Toyohashi, Aichi)
College
Career highlights and awards
  • NJCAA Division I Second-Team All-American (2021)
  • NJCAA Division I All-Tournament Team (2021)
  • NJCAA All-Region V Team (2020, 2021)
  • 2× First Team All-NTJCAC (2020, 2021)
  • NTJCAC Freshman of the Year (2020)

High school careerEdit

Tominaga attended Sakuragaoka Gakuen High School in Aichi Prefecture and played for its basketball team. As a senior, he averaged 39.8 points per game at the All-Japan Championship, an annual national high school tournament. During the third-place game, he posted a tournament-high 46 points in a 76–65 win over the Teikyo Nagaoka of Niigata Prefecture.[1][2][3]

College careerEdit

RangerEdit

FreshmanEdit

On November 1, 2019, Tominaga made his collegiate debut for the Ranger College, against the Missouri State University–West Plains, scoring 19 points in a 100–84 win.[4] On November 16, he logged a season-high 34 points in a 110–60 victory against Victoria College.[4] On November 28, Tominaga verbally committed to play for NCAA Division I program Nebraska, under former NBA coach Fred Hoiberg for the 2021 class.[5][6][7]

As a freshman, Tominaga averaged 16.8 points, 2.3 rebounds and 0.7 assists per game while shooting 54.9 percent from the field and 47.9 percent from 3-point range.[8][9][10] In his efforts, Tominaga earned the NJCAA All-Region V Team and the First Team All-Northern Texas Junior College Athletic Conference honors. He was also named conference Freshman of The Year, leading the conference in 3-point shooting and ranking sixth in both scoring and field goal percentage.[1][11]

With Tominaga playing for Ranger College, the team finished the season with a 28–3 record, helping them clinch a position in the NJCAA national tournament. However, the season ended early due to COVID-19. Ranger eventually finished second in the NJCAA national rankings.[1][12]

SophomoreEdit

On November 11, 2020, Hoiberg announced that Tominaga has signed a National Letter of Intent to transfer to the University of Nebraska next season.[1][12]

On March 3, 2021, Tominaga scored a season-high 39 points, knocking down 11 3-pointers in a 113–102 win over Grayson College.[13][14] Three days later, he had 26 points in a win against Temple College.[13][15] In his efforts, Tominaga set a school record for career 3-pointers with 139, previously held by Brayan Au with 130.[16] For his performance, Tominaga was named Northern Texas Junior College Athletic Conference Player of the Week for February 28 to March 6.[15] On April 22, Tominaga posted a game-high 25 points, sinking five 3-pointers in an 87–83 win against South Plains College, sending the Rangers to the Final Four round of the NJCAA Division I Championship.[17] Despite his team-high 26-point performance in the semifinals, the team lost to Cowley County Community College. Ranger College finished its season with a 23–5 record.[18]

Tominaga averaged 16.3 points, 2.4 rebounds and 1.6 assists per game while shooting 51.0 percent from the field and 48.7 percent from 3-point range as a sophomore,[19][20] earning him the NJCAA All-Region V Team and the First Team All-Northern Texas Junior College Athletic Conference honors for the second time in a row.[21] He was named to the NJCAA Division I All-Tournament Team and was the recipient of the Charles Sesher Sportsmanship Award.[22][23] Tominaga also earned the NJCAA Division I Second-Team All-American honors.[24][25][26]

NebraskaEdit

Second sophomore seasonEdit

Tominaga transferred to the University of Nebraska on a full scholarship to play for the Cornhuskers.[27] Due to COVID-19, the NCAA ruled that the 2020–21 season would not count against the eligibility of any student-athlete in any of the organization's winter sports, including basketball,[28] giving Tominaga three years of eligibility instead of two. He made his debut for Nebraska on November 9, 2021 against Western Illinois, finishing with three points, one rebound and three steals across 18 minutes of play in a 75–74 loss.[29] On November 27, Tominaga posted a season-high 23 points on 8-of-11 shooting from the field and 5-of-6 from three, along with two assists and two steals in an 83–70 win over South Dakota.[30][31][32]

National team careerEdit

 
Tominaga with the national team in 2018

Junior national teamEdit

Tominaga made his international debut when he was selected to be a part of the Japanese squad that competed at the 2018 FIBA Under-16 Asian Championship, where he led the team in efficiency (13.3) and points (17.5) per game.[33] His tournament highlights included a game-high 27-point outing, knocking down seven 3-pointers and scoring 19 points in five minutes in a 109–57 victory against India.[34] Tominaga finished the tournament as the fourth-leading scorer.[35]

Later that year, Tominaga suited up for Japan at the 2018 FIBA Under-18 Asian Championship, leading the team in efficiency (14.6) and points (19.3) per game once more.[36] In a game against Bahrain, Japan was down 70–58 with five minutes left to play, Tominaga then logged 11 points in two minutes, cutting the lead to three points. He finished the game with 33 points, helping Japan secure the win.[37] Tominaga was the tournament’s fifth best scorer.[38]

Senior national teamEdit

Tominaga earned his first senior national team call up after being named to the 12-man roster that represented Japan for the third window of the 2023 FIBA Basketball World Cup Asian Qualifiers held in Australia.[39][40][41][42] In his debut match against the tournament's host team, Tominaga scored a game-high 18 points, knocking down five 3-pointers coming off the bench.[43][44][45] He led the team in scoring with 17.5 points per game, drilling down five 3-pointers.[46][47]

Following his impressive debut,[46] Tominaga played for the national team at the 2022 FIBA Asia Cup. In the quarterfinals, Japan's first appearance since 2015, Tominaga logged a game-high 33 points, knocking down eight 3-pointers in a 99–85 loss against Australia.[48][49] Tominaga finished the tournament ranking second in points (15.2) and third in efficiency (12.0) per game for the team.[50]

3x3 national teamEdit

Tominaga represented Japan at the Asia-Europe Conference of the 2019 FIBA 3x3 Under-23 Nations League, where the team ranked last among six contenders.[51]

Two years later, Tominaga starred for Japan at the 2020 Summer Olympics, where he became the youngest player to represent Japan in 3x3 basketball. He led the team in scoring with 6.9 points per game. Tominaga ranked near the top of a number of key categories in the tournament, including fourth in scoring, second in one-point shooting and seventh in two-point shooting.[a][52][53][54]

Player profileEdit

Tominaga is known for his shooting ability beyond the arc and jump shot similar to famous NBA player Stephen Curry, which earned him the nickname the "Japanese Steph Curry".[2][12][55]

Career statisticsEdit

Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

CollegeEdit

NCAA Division IEdit

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2021–22 Nebraska 30 11 16.5 .373 .330 .842 1.5 .6 .8 0.0 5.7
2022–23 Nebraska 6 0 18.8 .500 .400 1.000 1.5 .5 .0 0.2 9.7
Career 36 11 16.9 .399 .343 .889 1.5 .6 .6 .1 6.3

JUCOEdit

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2019–20 Ranger 31 28 2.0 .549 .479 .855 2.3 .7 1.1 .3 16.8
2020–21 Ranger 27 24 6.8 .510 .487 .883 2.4 1.6 1.0 .1 16.3
Career 58 52 4.4 .530 .483 .869 2.4 1.1 1.1 .2 16.6

Personal lifeEdit

Tominaga was born on February 1, 2001 in Moriyama, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan[2][56] to parents with basketball experience. His father, Hiroyuki, was a 6-foot-11 center, who played professional basketball for Mitsubishi Electric from 1996 to 2006 and was a member of the Japanese national team that competed during the 1998 FIBA World Championship.[1][2][3][55] Tominaga’s mother, Hitomi, was an industrial league player also for the women's team of Mitsubishi Electric.[3][55][57][58] Tominaga has one younger sister, Chihiro.[59]

FootnotesEdit

  1. ^ In 3x3 basketball, successful shots taken from outside of what is the three-point line in full-court basketball are worth 2 points. All other successful shots, whether field goals or free throws, are worth 1 point.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e "Huskers Sign Keisei Tominaga". University of Nebraska. Retrieved 2021-06-10.
  2. ^ a b c d "Japan's new NBA hopeful Tominaga Keisei in the footsteps of Rui Hachimura". Olympics. Retrieved 2021-06-10.
  3. ^ a b c Nagatsuka, Kaz (2019-01-12). "Scoring sensation Keisei Tominaga emerges as new high school star". The Japan Times. Retrieved 2021-06-10.
  4. ^ a b "2019-20 Ranger College Men's Basketball - Keisei Tominaga Game Log". Ranger College. Retrieved 2021-06-10.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  5. ^ Padilla, Jacob (2019-11-29). "Huskers Land First 2021 Commit in Japanese Guard Keisei Tominaga - Nebraska | Hail Varsity". Hail Varsity. Retrieved 2021-06-11.
  6. ^ Odeven, Ed (2019-11-30). "Ranger College freshman sharpshooter Keisei Tominaga commits to Nebraska". The Japan Times. Retrieved 2021-06-11.
  7. ^ "Nebraska Huskers basketball: NU lands commitment from top JUCO guard Keisei Tominaga". nebraska.n.rivals.com. Retrieved 2021-06-11.
  8. ^ "2019-20 Ranger College Men's Basketball - Keisei Tominaga Player Profile". Ranger College. Retrieved 2021-06-10.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  9. ^ "2019-20 NJCAA Region 5 Men's Basketball - Keisei Tominaga Player Profile". NJCAA Region 5. Retrieved 2021-06-10.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  10. ^ Nagatsuka, Kaz (2020-06-25). "Confidence and ambition power Keisei Tominaga toward promising U.S. future". The Japan Times. Retrieved 2021-06-10.
  11. ^ "2019-20 NTJCAC Men's Basketball All-Conference Team" (PDF). NJCAA Region 5. Retrieved 2021-06-12.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  12. ^ a b c Nagatsuka, Kaz (2020-11-18). "Nebraska coaches confident Keisei Tominaga can make big impact". The Japan Times. Retrieved 2021-06-10.
  13. ^ a b "2020-21 Ranger College Men's Basketball - Keisei Tominaga Game Log". Ranger College. Retrieved 2021-06-10.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  14. ^ Odeven, Ed (2021-03-06). "[JAPAN SPORTS NOTEBOOK] Kengo Suzuki Sets National Record in Final Running of Lake Biwa Mainichi Marathon | JAPAN Forward". japan-forward.com. Retrieved 2021-06-10. Ranger College sophomore standout Keisei Tominaga sank a jaw-dropping 11 3-pointers in a 39-point outburst against Grayson College on March 3. Sparked by Tominaga's great shooting effort, the hosts won 113-102 in Ranger, Texas.
  15. ^ a b "Region V Men's Basketball Players of the Week (Feb. 28 - March 6)". NJCAA Region 5. 2021-03-08. Retrieved 2021-06-11.
  16. ^ "Tominaga rewrites RC's record book with 3s". Ranger College. 2021-03-10. Retrieved 2021-06-10.
  17. ^ "Rangers advance to Final Four". Ranger College. 2021-04-23. Retrieved 2021-06-11.
  18. ^ "Tigers end RC's title hopes in semis". Ranger College. 2021-04-26. Retrieved 2021-06-11.
  19. ^ "2020-21 Ranger College Men's Basketbal - Keisei Tominaga Player Profile". Ranger College. Retrieved 2021-06-10.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  20. ^ "2020-21 NJCAA Region 5 Men's Basketball - Keisei Tominaga Player Profile". NJCAA Region 5. Retrieved 2021-06-10.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  21. ^ "2020-21 NTJCAC Men's Basketball All-Conference Team" (PDF). NJCAA Region 5. Retrieved 2021-06-11.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  22. ^ "Pair of Ranger players named to NJCAA All-Tournament team". NJCAA Region 5. 2021-04-29. Retrieved 2021-06-11.
  23. ^ "Tominaga, Saterfield named to all-tournament team". Ranger College. 2021-04-27. Retrieved 2021-06-10.
  24. ^ Knight, Kevin (2021-06-27). "Nebrasketball: JuCo signee Keisei Tominaga Named NJCAA Second-Team All-American". Corn Nation. Retrieved 2021-06-28.
  25. ^ "2020-21 NJCAA Division I Men's Basketball All-America Teams". NJCAA. Retrieved 2021-06-28.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  26. ^ "A Look Back at NJCAA Alum in 2020 Tokyo Olympics". NJCAA. 2021-08-10. Retrieved 2021-09-25. Tominaga was an NJCAA DI men's basketball Second-Team All-American, where he averaged 16.3 ppg.
  27. ^ Nagatsuka, Kaz (2020-12-05). "Keisei Tominaga looking forward to taking next step with Nebraska". The Japan Times. Retrieved 2021-06-10.
  28. ^ "DI Council extends eligibility for winter sport student-athletes" (Press release). NCAA. October 14, 2020. Retrieved April 19, 2021.
  29. ^ "Western Ill. (1-0,0-0 Summit League) -vs- Nebraska (0-1,0-0 Big Ten) (PDF)". University of Nebraska. Retrieved 2021-11-30.
  30. ^ "Tominaga Shoots Huskers Past South Dakota". University of Nebraska. Retrieved 2021-11-30.
  31. ^ "Tominaga, McGowens lead Nebraska past South Dakota 83-70". Associated Press. 2021-11-27. Retrieved 2021-12-01.
  32. ^ "Tominaga stirs the drink for Huskers in fourth straight win". 247Sports.com. Retrieved 2021-12-01.
  33. ^ "Japan at the FIBA U16 Asian Championship 2018". FIBA. Retrieved 2021-06-10.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  34. ^ "Tominaga and Tanaka star as Japan scuttle India". FIBA. Retrieved 2021-06-10.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  35. ^ "Players statistics of the FIBA U16 Asian Championship 2018". FIBA. Retrieved 2021-06-10.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  36. ^ "Japan at the FIBA U18 Asian Championship 2018". FIBA. Retrieved 2021-06-10.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
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  41. ^ "Hoiberg offers thoughts on team chemistry, key injury updates". Husker247. Retrieved 2022-07-02. Keisei Tominaga just found out a few days ago he made his national team, so he'll play for Japan in some games in Australia this next month.
  42. ^ "Tominaga named to Japan National Team". KNOP-TV. Retrieved 2022-07-02.
  43. ^ "Basketball: Japan no match for Australia in World Cup qualifier". Kyodo News+. Retrieved 2022-07-02. University of Nebraska Omaha guard Keisei Tominaga was Japan's lone spark, scoring a game-high 18 points off the bench, including 5-from-11 from behind the arc at Melbourne's John Cain Arena.
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  54. ^ "Husker hoops recruit Tominaga nearly leads Japan to semifinals of 3x3 at Olympics". News Channel Nebraska. Retrieved 2021-09-25.
  55. ^ a b c Watkins, Jimmy. "Keisei Tominaga — 'the Japanese Steph Curry' — brings his jump shot to Nebraska". Omaha World-Herald. Retrieved 2021-12-04.
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  57. ^ "バスケ - 昨年の高校得点王・富永啓生がアメリカ留学へ 八村塁のNBA入りに未来重ねて | 4years. #大学スポーツ". 4years.asahi.com (in Japanese). Retrieved 2021-07-24.
  58. ^ "3x3 Basketball TOMINAGA Keisei - Tokyo 2020 Olympics". Olympics. Retrieved 2021-07-24.
  59. ^ "Keisei Tominaga - Men's Basketball Roster". University of Nebraska. Retrieved 2022-01-01.

External linksEdit