Real Madrid Baloncesto

Real Madrid Baloncesto (English: Real Madrid Basketball) is a Spanish professional basketball team that was founded in 1931, as a division of the Real Madrid CF multi sports club. They play domestically in the Liga ACB, and internationally in the EuroLeague.

Real Madrid
2022–23 Real Madrid Baloncesto season
Real Madrid logo
LeaguesLiga ACB
EuroLeague
Founded8 March 1931; 91 years ago (1931-03-08)
HistoryReal Madrid CF
(1931–present)
ArenaWiZink Center
Capacity17,953
LocationMadrid, Spain
Team coloursWhite, Purple, Grey
     
Main sponsorAutohero
PresidentFlorentino Pérez
Head coachJesús Mateo
Team captainSergio Llull
OwnershipReal Madrid CF
Championships10 EuroLeague
4 Saporta Cup
1 Korać Cup
1 Eurocup
5 Intercontinental Cup
46 Spanish Championship
36 Spanish Cup
9 Spanish Supercup
Retired numbers1 (10)
Websitewww.realmadrid.com

Similarly to the Real Madrid athletic association's football club, the basketball team has been the most successful of its peers in both Spain and Europe. Real Madrid CF is the only European sports club to have become the European champions in both football and basketball in the same season.

The Real Madrid squads have won a record 36 Spanish League championships, including in 7-in-a-row and 10-in-a-row sequences. They have also won a record 28 Spanish Cup titles, a record 10 EuroLeague Championships, a record 4 Saporta Cups, and a record 5 Intercontinental Cups.

Madrid has also won 3 Triple Crowns, which constitute a treble of the national league, cup, and continental league won in a single season. Some of the club's star players over the years have included: Arvydas Sabonis, Dražen Petrović, Rudy Fernández, Sergio Rodriguez, Serge Ibaka, Dražen Dalipagić, Nikola Mirotić, Juan Antonio Corbalán, Fernando Martín, Alberto Herreros, Dejan Bodiroga, and Luka Dončić.

Real Madrid also has a developmental basketball team, called Real Madrid B, that plays in the amateur-level Spanish 4th-tier Liga EBA.

HistoryEdit

History of great success: 1950s to 1980sEdit

 
Real Madrid players during a fixture in 1965

For at least half a century, Madrid has been a standard-bearer in European basketball, accumulating a record ten continental titles, based on its dominance in the 1960s. Its early dominance in Spain has resulted in another untouchable cache of 36 national domestic league and 28 national cup trophies. And almost every time that Madrid did not play in Europe's top-tier level competition, it won a different continental trophy – four Saporta Cups, a Korać Cup, and a ULEB Cup – as a stepping-stone back to the big time.

Players like Emiliano Rodríguez, Clifford Luyk, Wayne Brabender, Walter Szczerbiak, Juan Antonio Corbalán, Dražen Petrović, Mirza Delibašić, Arvydas Sabonis, and Dejan Bodiroga have turned Real Madrid into one of the biggest basketball clubs in the world. Madrid won as many as 7 EuroLeague titles between 1964 and 1980, becoming a European basketball club legend, and even when it took the club 15 years to win it again, it found success in other European competitions, too.

Madrid downed Olimpia Milano in the 1984 Cup Winners' Cup, on free throws made by Brian Jackson, then Petrović had 62 points in the 1989 Cup Winners' Cup final, against Snaidero Caserta. Madrid added a 1988 Korać Cup title, against Cibona Zagreb.

1990–2010Edit

Real Madrid won the 1992 Saporta Cup trophy against PAOK, on a buzzer-beating jumper by Rickey Brown. It was not until Sabonis arrived in Madrid, when Real won its eighth EuroLeague title in 1995, by beating Olympiacos in the final. Madrid next won the 1997 Saporta Cup title against Verona, but no more European-wide trophies came for the club in the next decade.

Madrid still found success at home, winning Spanish League titles in 2000 and 2005. It all changed in 2007, when Joan Plaza was promoted to the club's head coach position. With the help of players like Louis Bullock, Felipe Reyes, and Álex Mumbrú, Madrid added a new trophy to its roll of honours, the ULEB Cup, as it won 12 of its last 13 games and downed Lietuvos Rytas by a score of 75–87 in the 2007 ULEB Cup Final. Moreover, Madrid finished in 2nd place in the 2006–07 Spanish League regular season, and stayed strong in its play in Palacio Vistalegre during the Spanish league playoffs; they lifted the club's 30th national league trophy by besting their arch-rivals, Winterthur FC Barcelona, 3–1 in the Spanish League title series in 2007.

2011–2022: Pablo Laso eraEdit

Sergio Llull grew as a player under Laso to become one of the most valuable ACB guards[1]

In Pablo Laso's era, Real Madrid Baloncesto managed to find consistent success. Spanish top-tier level players of the time, like Sergio Rodríguez and Rudy Fernández, were acquired by the club. Also, ACB Rising Star winner Nikola Mirotić was a part of the team's mix, along with Sergio Llull and Felipe Reyes, to give Real Madrid a strong home grown core of players. This group of players gave Real Madrid Baloncesto 6 Copa del Reys (Spanish Cup) titles, 7 Spanish Super Cup titles, 6 Liga ACB (Spanish League) titles, 2 EuroLeague championships, and an FIBA Intercontinental Cup championship.

On 17 May 2015, after waiting 20 years to win another EuroLeague championship, Real Madrid won the 2015 EuroLeague championship against Olympiacos. Madrid's Andrés Nocioni was named the Final Four MVP. This title was called La Novena.[2] Following the EuroLeague title, the 2014–15 ACB season's championship was also won by Real. Because Real also won the national Spanish Cup and the national Spanish Supercup that season, the club won its first "Quadruble crown".[3]

On 27 September 2015, 34 years after their last FIBA Intercontinental Cup title, Real Madrid won their fifth FIBA Intercontinental Cup trophy, after defeating the Brazilian League club Bauru. Sergio Llull was named the MVP of the tournament. Real Madrid thus made it a record five FIBA Intercontinental Cup titles won, and with the Intercontinental Cup title.

On 20 May 2018, Real Madrid conquered again the EuroLeague, achieving their tenth title ever. The considered major leader of the team that season would be a Slovenian guard/forward named Luka Dončić, who became the designated MVP of the EuroLeague on all accounts at 19 years old.

On 5 June 2022, Pablo Laso suffered a heart attack.[4][5] Exactly one month later, Real Madrid parted ways with him citing "medical reasons exclusively" and adding that keeping him as a coach in his health condition would have been "a risk that this institution cannot assume".[6][7] Laso left Real Madrid as one of the greatest coaches in the club's history, having won 22 titles, which ties him with Lolo Sainz in the second place for most trophies won with Real Madrid, only behind Pedro Ferrándiz with 27. Laso is also the coach who has managed the most games for Madrid (860), having won 659 of them. He was succeeded at Real Madrid's helm by his assistant Jesús Mateo.[8]

Sponsorship namingEdit

  • Real Madrid Otaysa 1990–1991
  • Real Madrid Asegurator 1991–1992
  • Real Madrid Teka 1992–2001

Home arenasEdit

PlayersEdit

Current rosterEdit

Note: Flags indicate national team eligibility at FIBA-sanctioned events. Players may hold other non-FIBA nationality not displayed.

Real Madrid roster
Players Coaches
Pos. No. Nat. Name Ht. Wt. Age
G 0   Williams-Goss, Nigel 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) 86 kg (190 lb) 28 – (1994-09-16)16 September 1994
SG 1   Causeur, Fabien 1.96 m (6 ft 5 in) 86 kg (190 lb) 35 – (1987-06-16)16 June 1987
F/C 3     Randolph, Anthony   2.11 m (6 ft 11 in) 104 kg (229 lb) 33 – (1989-07-15)15 July 1989
G/F 5   Fernández, Rudy   1.96 m (6 ft 5 in) 83 kg (183 lb) 37 – (1985-04-04)4 April 1985
G/F 6   Abalde, Alberto 2.02 m (6 ft 8 in) 95 kg (209 lb) 26 – (1995-12-15)15 December 1995
SF 8   Hanga, Ádám   2.00 m (6 ft 7 in) 96 kg (212 lb) 33 – (1989-04-12)12 April 1989
F 11   Hezonja, Mario 2.03 m (6 ft 8 in) 110 kg (243 lb) 27 – (1995-02-25)25 February 1995
PG 12   Alocén, Carlos   1.94 m (6 ft 4 in) 84 kg (185 lb) 21 – (2000-12-30)30 December 2000
PG 13   Rodríguez, Sergio 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) 83 kg (183 lb) 36 – (1986-06-12)12 June 1986
F 14   Deck, Gabriel 1.98 m (6 ft 6 in) 105 kg (231 lb) 27 – (1995-02-08)8 February 1995
C 17   Poirier, Vincent 2.13 m (7 ft 0 in) 110 kg (243 lb) 29 – (1993-10-17)17 October 1993
F/C 21   Cornelie, Petr 2.11 m (6 ft 11 in) 108 kg (238 lb) 27 – (1995-07-26)26 July 1995
C 22   Tavares, Edy 2.20 m (7 ft 3 in) 125 kg (276 lb) 30 – (1992-03-22)22 March 1992
G 23   Llull, Sergio (C) 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in) 94 kg (207 lb) 35 – (1987-11-15)15 November 1987
PF 28   Yabusele, Guerschon   2.01 m (6 ft 7 in) 123 kg (271 lb) 26 – (1995-12-17)17 December 1995
PF 30     Ndiaye, Eli 2.04 m (6 ft 8 in) 83 kg (183 lb) 18 – (2004-06-26)26 June 2004
SF 31   Musa, Džanan 2.05 m (6 ft 9 in) 101 kg (223 lb) 23 – (1999-05-08)8 May 1999
Head coach
Assistant coach(es)
  •   Paco Redondo
  •   Isidoro Calin
Athletic trainer(s)
  •   Juan Trapero

Legend
  • (C) Team captain
  •   Injured

Updated: 23 November 2022

Depth chartEdit

Pos. Starting 5 Bench 1 Bench 2 Bench 3 Inactive
C Edy Tavares Vincent Poirier
PF Petr Cornelie Eli Ndiaye Guerschon Yabusele   Anthony Randolph  
SF Gabriel Deck Mario Hezonja Ádám Hanga  
SG Džanan Musa Alberto Abalde Fabien Causeur Rudy Fernández  
PG Nigel Williams-Goss Sergio Llull Sergio Rodríguez Carlos Alocén  

Retired numbersEdit

Real Madrid retired numbers
No Nat. Player Position Tenure
10   Fernando Martín C 1981–1986, 1987–1989

Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of FamersEdit

The following former Real Madrid players are inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame:

Record holdersEdit

Top scorers Most official matches
1.     Wayne Brabender
11 215 points
1.   Felipe Reyes 1046 matches
2.   Sergio Llull
10 025 points
2.   Sergio Llull 940 matches
3.   Felipe Reyes
9 613 points
3.     Jaycee Carroll 709 matches
4.     Jaycee Carroll
7 332 points
4.   Rudy Fernández 654 matches
5.   Rafael Rullán
7 135 points
5.   Rafael Rullán 576 matches
Show complete list Show complete list

Head coachesEdit

HonoursEdit

Domestic competitionsEdit

Winners (36): 1957, 1958, 1959–60, 1960–61, 1961–62, 1962–63, 1963–64, 1964–65, 1965–66, 1967–68, 1968–69, 1969–70, 1970–71, 1971–72, 1972–73, 1973–74, 1974–75, 1975–76, 1976–77, 1978–79, 1979–80, 1981–82, 1983–84, 1984–85, 1985–86, 1992–93, 1993–94, 1999–2000, 2004–05, 2006–07, 2012–13, 2014–15, 2015–16, 2017–18, 2018–19, 2021–22
Runners-up (13):
Winners (28): 1951, 1952, 1954, 1956, 1957, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1977, 1985, 1986, 1989, 1993, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2020
Runners-up (23):
Winners (9): 1984–85, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021, 2022
Runners-up (2):

European competitionsEdit

Winners (10): 1963–64, 1964–65, 1966–67, 1967–68, 1973–74, 1977–78, 1979–80, 1994–95, 2014–15, 2017–18
Runners-up (9): 1961–62, 1962–63, 1968–69, 1974–75, 1975–76, 1984–85, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2021–22
Semifinalists (7): 1958, 1960–61, 1969–70, 1970–71, 1971–72, 1980–81, 1986–87
Third place (2): 1982–83, 2018–19
Fourth place (7): 1976–77, 1978–79, 1985–86, 1992–93, 1995–96, 2010–11, 2016–17
Final Four (12): 1967, 1993, 1995, 1996, 2011, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2022
Winners (4): 1983–84, 1988–89, 1991–92, 1996–97
Runners-up (2): 1981–82, 1989–90
Winners (1): 1987–88
Runners-up (1): 1990–91
Winners (1): 2006–07
Runners-up (1): 2003–04
Winners (1): 1953
Runners-up (1): 1966
Winners (3): 1984, 1988, 1989
Runners-up (1): 1986
Third place (2): 1983, 1985

Unofficial awardsEdit

Winners (3): 1964–65, 1973–74, 2014–15

Worldwide competitionsEdit

Winners (5): 1976, 1977, 1978, 1981, 2015
Runners-up (3): 1965*, 1968, 1970
Third place (2): 1966, 1975
Fourth place (3): 1969, 1974, 1980
Runners-up (1): 1988
Third place (1): 1993
Fourth place (1): 1995

* Unofficial edition

Regional competitionsEdit

Winners (20): 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1989, 1991, 1994, 1995, 1997, 2000, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013
Runners-up (8):
Winners (11): 1933, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1953, 1954, 1956, 1957
Runners-up (8):
Winners (8): 1957, 1958, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1966, 1967
Runners-up (1):

Friendly competitionsEdit

Individual awardsEdit

ACB Most Valuable Player

ACB Finals MVP

All-ACB First Team

All-ACB Second Team

ACB Three Point Shootout Champion

ACB Slam Dunk Champion

ACB Most Spectacular Player of the Year

Season by seasonEdit

Season Tier Division Pos. W–L Copa del Rey Other cups European competitions
1931–56 Copa del Rey 4 times champion (1951, 1952, 1954, 1956), 6 times runner-up (1933, 1944, 1948, 1949, 1953, 1955)
1957 1 1ª División 1st 7–3 Champion
1958 1 1ª División 1st 16–2 Runner-up 1 Champions Cup SF 3–3
1958–59 1 1ª División 2nd 19–3 Semifinalist 1 Champions Cup R16 1–1
1959–60 1 1ª División 1st 20–2 Champion
1960–61 1 1ª División 1st 21–1 Champion 1 Champions Cup SF 5–1
1961–62 1 1ª División 1st 18–0 Champion 1 Champions Cup RU 5–4
1962–63 1 1ª División 1st 14–2 Runner-up 1 Champions Cup RU 7–4
1963–64 1 1ª División 1st 19–3 Fourth place 1 Champions Cup C 8–2
1964–65 1 1ª División 1st 13–1 Champion 1 Champions Cup C 6–2
1965–66 1 1ª División 1st 16–2 Champion 1 Champions Cup QF 5–3
1966–67 1 1ª División 2nd 18–2 Champion 1 Champions Cup C 10–2
1967–68 1 1ª División 1st 18–2 Semifinalist 1 Champions Cup C 10–3
1968–69 1 1ª División 1st 18–1–3 Runner-up 1 Champions Cup RU 10–3
1969–70 1 1ª División 1st 19–3 Champion 1 Champions Cup SF 6–6
1970–71 1 1ª División 1st 21–1 Champion 1 Champions Cup SF 7–1–4
1971–72 1 1ª División 1st 21–1 Champion 1 Champions Cup SF 8–4
1972–73 1 1ª División 1st 30–0 Champion 1 Champions Cup QF 7–3
1973–74 1 1ª División 1st 27–1–0 Champion 1 Champions Cup C 12–1
1974–75 1 1ª División 1st 20–2 Champion 1 Champions Cup RU 11–2
1975–76 1 1ª División 1st 29–3 Runner-up 1 Champions Cup RU 12–3
1976–77 1 1ª División 1st 21–1 Champion 1 Champions Cup SF 12–4
1977–78 1 1ª División 2nd 19–3 Runner-up 1 Champions Cup C 14–3
1978–79 1 1ª División 1st 19–2–1 Semifinalist 1 Champions Cup SF 12–4
1979–80 1 1ª División 1st 20–2 Quarterfinalist 1 Champions Cup C 14–3
1980–81 1 1ª División 3rd 18–2–6 Runner-up 1 Champions Cup SF 10–6
1981–82 1 1ª División 1st 25–1 Runner-up 2 Cup Winners' Cup RU 10–1
1982–83 1 1ª División 2nd 25–2 Semifinalist 1 Cup Champions Cup SF 8–6
1983–84 1 Liga ACB 1st 31–5 Third place 2 Cup Winners' Cup C 8–1
1984–85 1 Liga ACB 1st 33–3 Champion Supercopa C 1 Champions Cup RU 10–1–4
1985–86 1 Liga ACB 1st 30–4 Champion Supercopa RU 1 Champions Cup SF 9–5
1986–87 1 Liga ACB 4th 23–12 Quarterfinalist Supercopa RU 1 Champions Cup SF 7–7
Copa Príncipe QF
1987–88 1 Liga ACB 2nd 32–7 Champion Copa Príncipe RU 3 Korać Cup C 10–2
1988–89 1 Liga ACB 2nd 36–11 Champion Copa Príncipe SF 2 Cup Winners' Cup C 10–1
1989–90 1 Liga ACB 3rd 26–15 Semifinalist 2 Cup Winners' Cup RU 8–3
1990–91 1 Liga ACB 5th 26–12 Fourth place Copa Príncipe SF 3 Korać Cup RU 8–6
1991–92 1 Liga ACB 2nd 33–15 Quarterfinalist 2 European Cup C 13–1–1
1992–93 1 Liga ACB 1st 35–10 Champion 1 European League 4th 16–4
1993–94 1 Liga ACB 1st 34–6 Semifinalist 1 European League QF 9–7
1994–95 1 Liga ACB 3rd 27–19 Fourth place 1 European League C 13–5
1995–96 1 Liga ACB 5th 28–12 Third place 1 European League 4th 13–8
1996–97 1 Liga ACB 2nd 37–8 Quarterfinalist 2 EuroCup C 15–4
1997–98 1 Liga ACB 3rd 29–13 Quarterfinalist 1 EuroLeague GS 7–9
1998–99 1 Liga ACB 3rd 30–11 Semifinalist 1 EuroLeague QF 11–9
1999–00 1 Liga ACB 1st 32–15 Quarterfinalist 1 EuroLeague R16 10–8
2000–01 1 Liga ACB 2nd 33–12 Runner-up 1 Euroleague QF 10–5
2001–02 1 Liga ACB 5th 26–13 Quarterfinalist 1 Euroleague T16 12–8
2002–03 1 Liga ACB 10th 17–17 Quarterfinalist 1 Euroleague RS 6–8
2003–04 1 Liga ACB 5th 21–17 Quarterfinalist 2 ULEB Cup RU 12–5
2004–05 1 Liga ACB 1st 35–12 Runner-up Supercopa RU 1 Euroleague T16 9–11
2005–06 1 Liga ACB 6th 20–18 Semifinalist Supercopa 3rd 1 Euroleague QF 12–11
2006–07 1 Liga ACB 1st 34–13 Runner-up 2 ULEB Cup C 13–4
2007–08 1 Liga ACB 5th 29–7 Semifinalist Supercopa SF 1 Euroleague T16 14–6
2008–09 1 Liga ACB 4th 26–12 Quarterfinalist 1 Euroleague QF 12–8
2009–10 1 Liga ACB 3rd 31–11 Runner-up Supercopa RU 1 Euroleague QF 12–8
2010–11 1 Liga ACB 3rd 29–11 Runner-up Supercopa SF 1 Euroleague 4th 14–9
2011–12 1 Liga ACB 2nd 33–13 Champion Supercopa SF 1 Euroleague T16 12–4
2012–13 1 Liga ACB 1st 38–6 Quarterfinalist Supercopa C 1 Euroleague RU 21–8
2013–14 1 Liga ACB 2nd 38–6 Champion Supercopa C 1 Euroleague RU 25–6
2014–15 1 Liga ACB 1st 35–8 Champion Supercopa C 1 Euroleague C 24–6
2015–16 1 Liga ACB 1st 37–8 Champion Supercopa SF 1 Euroleague QF 12–15
2016–17 1 Liga ACB 2nd 31–11 Champion Supercopa SF 1 EuroLeague 4th 26–10
2017–18 1 Liga ACB 1st 38–5 Runner-up Supercopa SF 1 EuroLeague C 24–12
2018–19 1 Liga ACB 1st 36–7 Runner-up Supercopa C 1 EuroLeague 3rd 26–9
2019–20 1 Liga ACB 5th 21–7 Champion Supercopa C 1 EuroLeague [a] 22–6
2020–21 1 Liga ACB 2nd 38–5 Runner-up Supercopa C 1 EuroLeague QF 22–17
2021–22 1 Liga ACB 1st 33–10 Runner-up Supercopa C 1 EuroLeague RU 22–11

International recordEdit

Seasons Achievement Notes
EuroLeague
1957–58 Semi-finals eliminated by Rīgas ASK, received a forfeit (2–0) in both games
1960–61 Semi-finals eliminated by Rīgas ASK, 78–75 (W) in Paris and 45–66 (L) in Prague
1961–62 Final lost to Dinamo Tbilisi 83–90 in the final (Geneva)
1962–63 Final lost to CSKA Moscow, 86–69 (W) in Madrid and 74–91 (L) in Moscow in the double finals
1963–64 Champions defeated Spartak ZJŠ Brno, 99–110 (L) in Brno and 84–64 (W) in Madrid in the double finals
1964–65 Champions defeated CSKA Moscow, 81–88 (L) in Moscow and 76–62 (W) in Madrid in the double finals
1965–66 Quarter-final group stage 4th place in a group with Slavia Prague, Simmenthal Milano and Bell Mechelen
1966–67 Champions defeated AŠK Olimpija 88–86 in the semi-final, defeated Simmenthal Milano 91–83 in the final of the Final Four in Madrid
1967–68 Champions defeated Spartak ZJŠ Brno 98–95 in the final (Lyon)
1968–69 Final lost to CSKA Moscow 99–103 in the final (Barcelona)
1969–70 Semi-finals eliminated by Ignis Varèse, 86–90 (L) in Madrid and 73–108 (L) in Varese
1970–71 Semi-finals eliminated by Ignis Varèse, 59–82 (L) in Varese and 74–66 (W) in Madrid
1971–72 Semi-finals eliminated by Jugoplastika, 89–81 (W) in Madrid and 69–80 (L) in Split
1972–73 Quarter-finals 3rd place in a group with Simmenthal Milano, Crvena Zvezda and Maccabi Tel Aviv
1973–74 Champions defeated Ignis Varèse 84–82 in the final (Nantes)
1974–75 Final lost to Ignis Varèse 66–79 in the final (Antwerp)
1975–76 Final lost to Mobilgirgi Varese 74–81 in the final (Geneva)
1976–77 Semi-final group stage 4th place in a group with Mobilgirgi Varese, Maccabi Tel Aviv, CSKA Moscow, Maes Pils Mechelen and Zbrojovka Brno
1977–78 Champions defeated Mobilgirgi Varese 75–67 in the final (Munich)
1978–79 Semi-final group stage 4th place in a group with Emerson Varèse, Bosna, Maccabi Tel Aviv, Joventut Freixenet and Olympiacos
1979–80 Champions defeated Maccabi Tel Aviv 89–85 in the final (West Berlin)
1980–81 Semi-final group stage 5th place in a group with Sinudyne Bologna, Maccabi Tel Aviv, Nashua Den Bosch, Bosna and CSKA Moscow
1982–83 Semi-final group stage 3rd place in a group with Ford Cantù, Billy Milano, CSKA Moscow, Maccabi Tel Aviv and Cibona
1984–85 Final lost to Cibona 78–87 in the final (Athens)
1985–86 Semi-final group stage 4th place in a group with Cibona, Žalgiris, Simac Milano, Maccabi Tel Aviv and Limoges
1986–87 Semi-final group stage 6th place in a group with Tracer Milano, Maccabi Tel Aviv, Orthez, Zadar and Žalgiris
1992–93 Final Four 4th place in Athens, lost to Limoges 52–62 in the semi-final, lost to PAOK 70–76 in the 3rd place game
1993–94 Quarter-finals eliminated 2–0 by 7up Joventut, 69–88 (L) in Barcelona and 67–71 (L) in Madrid
1994–95 Champions defeated Limoges 62–49 in the semi-final, defeated Olympiacos 73–61 in the final of the Final Four in Zaragoza
1995–96 Final Four 4th place in Paris, lost to FC Barcelona 66–76 in the semi-final, lost to CSKA Moscow 73–74 in the 3rd place game
1998–99 Quarter-finals eliminated 2–0 by Teamsystem Bologna, 63–90 (L) in Bologna and 65–76 (L) in Madrid
2000–01 Quarter-finals eliminated 2–1 by Paf Wennington Bologna, 68–74 (L) in Bologna, 88–57 (W) in Madrid and 70–88 (L) in Bologna
2005–06 Quarter-finals eliminated 2–1 by FC Barcelona, 58–72 (L) in Barcelona, 84–78 (W) in Madrid and 70–76 (L) in Barcelona
2008–09 Quarter-finals eliminated 3–1 by Olympiacos, 79–88 (L) & 73–79 (L) in Piraeus, 71–63 (W) & 75–78 (L) in Madrid
2009–10 Quarter-finals eliminated 3–1 by FC Barcelona, 61–68 (L) & 70–63 (W) in Barcelona, 73–84 (L) & 78–84 (L) in Madrid
2010–11 Final Four 4th place in Barcelona, lost to Maccabi Tel Aviv 63–82 in the semi-final, lost to Montepaschi Siena 62–80 in the 3rd place game
2012–13 Final defeated FC Barcelona 74–67 in the semi-final, lost to Olympiacos 88–100 in the final of the Final Four in London
2013–14 Final defeated FC Barcelona 100–62 in the semi-final, lost to Maccabi Tel Aviv 86–98 in the final of the Final Four in Milan
2014–15 Champions defeated Fenerbahçe 96–87 in the semi-final, defeated Olympiacos 78–59 in the final of the Final Four in Madrid
2015–16 Quarter-finals eliminated 3–0 by Fenerbahçe, 69–75 (L) & 78–110 (L) in Istanbul, 63–75 (L) in Madrid
2016–17 Final Four 4th place in Istanbul, lost to Fenerbahçe 75–84 in the semi-final, lost to CSKA Moscow 70–94 in the 3rd place game
2017–18 Champions defeated CSKA Moscow 92–83 in the semi-final, defeated Fenerbahçe 85–80 in the final of the Final Four in Belgrade
2018–19 Final Four 3rd place in Vitoria-Gasteiz, lost to CSKA Moscow 90–95 in the semi-final, defeated Fenerbahçe 94–75 in the 3rd place game
2019–20 Regular season The tournament was suspended and then cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic; Madrid was 2nd in the standings at the time of suspension
2020–21 Quarter-finals eliminated 3–2 by Anadolu Efes, 63–90 (L) & 68–91 (L) in Istanbul, 80–76 (W) & 82–76 (W) in Madrid, 83–88 (L) in Istanbul
2021–22 Final defeated FC Barcelona 86–83 in the semi-final, lost to Anadolu Efes 57–58 in the final of the Final Four in Belgrade
Saporta Cup
1981–82 Final lost to Cibona 96–95 in the final (Brussels)
1983–84 Champions defeated Simac Milano 82–81 in the final of European Cup Winners' Cup in Ostend
1988–89 Champions defeated Snaidero Caserta 117–113 in the final of European Cup Winners' Cup in Athens
1989–90 Final lost to Knorr Bologna 74–79 in the final (Florence)
1991–92 Champions defeated PAOK 65–63 in the final of European Cup in Nantes
1996–97 Champions defeated Mash Verona 78–64 in the final of EuroCup in Nicosia
Korać Cup
1987–88 Champions defeated Cibona, 102–89 (W) in Madrid, 93–94 (L) in Zagreb in the double finals of Korać Cup
1990–91 Final lost to Clear Cantù, 71–73 (L) in Madrid, 93–95 (L) in Cucciago in the double finals of Korać Cup
Eurocup
2003–04 Final lost to Hapoel Migdal 72–83 in the final (Charleroi)
2006–07 Champions defeated Lietuvos Rytas 87–75 in the final of Eurocup in Charleroi

Notable playersEdit

Players who are currently on the team are in boldface. Players who are still active, but in other team, are in italics.

Note: Flags indicate national team eligibility at FIBA-sanctioned events. Players may hold other non-FIBA nationality not displayed.

Criteria

To appear in this section a player must have either:

  • Set a club record or won an individual award while at the club.
  • Played at least one official international match for their national team at any time.
  • Played at least one official NBA match at any time.

Players in the NBA draftEdit

* Denotes player who has been selected for at least one All-Star Game and All-NBA Team
# Denotes player who has never appeared in an NBA regular season or playoff game
~ Denotes player who has been selected as Rookie of the Year
Position Player Year Round Pick Drafted by
PF/C   Fernando Martín 1985 2nd round 38th New Jersey Nets
C   Stanley Roberts 1991 1st round 23rd Orlando Magic
PG   Raül López 2001 1st round 24th Utah Jazz
PF/C   Maciej Lampe 2003 2nd round 30th New York Knicks
SF/PF   Mickaël Gelabale 2005 2nd round 48th Seattle SuperSonics
PF   Axel Hervelle# 2005 2nd round 52nd Denver Nuggets
PG/SG   Sergio Llull# 2009 2nd round 34th Denver Nuggets
PF   Nikola Mirotić 2011 1st round 23rd Houston Rockets
SG/SF   Luka Dončić*~ 2018 1st round 3rd Atlanta Hawks
PF   Usman Garuba 2021 1st round 23rd Houston Rockets

Historical uniformsEdit

 
 
 
 
1931
(Home)
 
 
 
 
2012–13 (Home)
 
 
 
 
2012–13 (Away)
 
 
 
 
2014–15 (Home)
 
 
 
 
2014–15 (Away)
 
 
 
 
2016–17 (Home)
 
 
 
 
2016–17 (Away)


Matches against NBA teamsEdit

23 October 1988
Boston Celtics   111–96   Real Madrid
22 October 1993
Phoenix Suns   145–115   Real Madrid
11 October 2007
Toronto Raptors   103–104   Real Madrid
8 October 2009
Utah Jazz   109–87   Real Madrid
6 October 2012
Real Madrid   93–105   Memphis Grizzlies
8 October 2012
Real Madrid   95–102   Toronto Raptors
8 October 2015
Boston Celtics   111–96   Real Madrid
3 October 2016
Oklahoma City Thunder   137–142 (OT)   Real Madrid

See alsoEdit

Notes and referencesEdit

  1. ^ "La anécdota de cómo se conocieron Pablo Laso y Sergio Llull". ABC. 15 December 2018.
  2. ^ "El Real Madrid exhibe la 'Novena'". Levante-emv.com. 18 May 2015. Retrieved 19 May 2015.
  3. ^ Quadruble crown for Real Madrid
  4. ^ "Official Announcement: Pablo Laso". Real Madrid. 5 June 2022. Retrieved 5 July 2022.
  5. ^ "Pablo Laso admitted to hospital after heart attack". Eurohoops. 5 June 2022. Retrieved 5 July 2022.
  6. ^ "Comunicado Oficial: Pablo Laso" (in Spanish). Real Madrid. 4 July 2022. Retrieved 5 July 2022.
  7. ^ "Real Madrid parts ways with Pablo Laso in heart attack aftermath". Eurohoops. 5 July 2022. Retrieved 5 July 2022.
  8. ^ "Official Announcement". Real Madrid. 5 July 2022. Retrieved 5 July 2022.
  9. ^ Antonio García (16 December 2019). "Intrahistorias y cuentos de los torneos de Navidad. Cuando España se paraba a ver el baloncesto…". gigantes.com. Retrieved 6 September 2022.
Notes
  1. ^ The season was cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
  1. ^ AAVV. Cien Años del Real Madrid. Vol. 16 Historia del Baloncesto. Madrid, As, 2001, pág. 17–20
  2. ^ AAVV. Cien Años del Real Madrid. Vol. 16 Historia del Baloncesto. Madrid, As, 2001, pág. 115

External linksEdit