2020 in paleomammalogy

This paleomammalogy list records new fossil mammal taxa that were described during the year 2020, as well as notes other significant paleomammalogy discoveries and events which occurred during the year.

List of years in paleomammalogy
In paleontology
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
In paleobotany
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
In arthropod paleontology
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
In paleoentomology
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
In paleoichthyology
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
In paleomalacology
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
In reptile paleontology
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
In archosaur paleontology
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023

AfrotheriansEdit

ProboscideaEdit

Proboscidea researchEdit

  • A study on dietary differences among Pleistocene proboscideans in North America, and their implications for the knowledge of the causes of extinction of Cuvieronius, is published by Smith & DeSantis (2020).[1]
  • Evidence of dietary resource partitioning among three proboscidean taxa from the early Pliocene locality of Langebaanweg in South Africa (Anancus capensis, Mammuthus subplanifrons and Loxodonta cookei) is presented by Groenewald et al. (2020).[2]
  • A study on the morphology of teeth and mandible of "Serridentinus" gobiensis and Miomastodon tongxinensis, as well as on the phylogenetic affinities of these taxa, is published by Wang, Zhang & Li (2020), who reestablish Miomastodon as a genus distinct from Zygolophodon, and transfer S. gobiensis to the genus Miomastodon.[3] update headers and lead
  • A study on the phylogeography of the American mastodon, based on data from 35 complete mitochondrial genomes, is published by Karpinski et al. (2020).[4]

SireniaEdit

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Type locality Country Notes Images

Trichechus hesperamazonicus[5]

Sp. nov

Valid

Perini, Nascimento & Cozzuol

Late Pleistocene

  Brazil

A manatee.

Sirenian researchEdit

  • The hindlimbs of the quadrupedal sirenian Sobrarbesiren cardieli from the Eocene of Northeastern Spain are described in detail with suggestions on the aquatic locomotion of the species.[6]
  • Review of the Miocene sirenian fossil record from Sardinia is published by Carone & Rizzo, with referral of specimens to Metaxytherium cf. M. krahuletzi, and reaffirmation of "Metaxytherium lovisati" as nomen dubium.[7]

Other afrotheriansEdit

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Type locality Country Notes Images

Stylolophus major[8]

Sp. nov

Valid

Gheerbrant et al.

Eocene (Ypresian)

Ouled Abdoun

  Morocco

An early member of Embrithopoda. Announced in 2020; the final article version was published in 2021.

Miscellaneous afrotherian researchEdit

  • A study on the anatomy of the petrosal and inner ear of Ocepeia daouiensis is published by Gheerbrant, Schmitt & Billet (2020).[9]

EuarchontogliresEdit

PrimatesEdit

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Type locality Country Notes Images
Fanchangia[10] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Harrison et al. Early Miocene   China A member of Pliopithecoidea. Genus includes new species F. jini.

Kapi[11]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Gilbert et al.

Miocene

  India

A catarrhine of uncertain affinities; originally identified as a gibbon, but subsequently argued to be a pliopithecoid.[12] Genus includes new species K. ramnagarensis.

Nesomomys[13] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Beard et al. Eocene (Lutetian) Uzunçarşidere   Turkey A member of the family Omomyidae. Genus includes new species N. bunodens. Announced in 2020; the final version of the article naming was published in 2021.

Ucayalipithecus[14]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Seiffert et al.

Paleogene

Santa Rosa locality

  Peru

A member of the family Parapithecidae. Genus includes new species U. perdita.

General primate researchEdit

  • A study aiming to determine whether the relationship between primate brain size and brain shape is characterized by allometry, and whether any such relationship may reflect shared macroevolutionary trends in primate brain shape, based on data from extant and four fossil primates (Homo heidelbergensis, Australopithecus africanus, Antillothrix bernensis and Archaeolemur sp.), is published by Sansalone et al. (2020).[15]
  • Marigó et al. (2020) describe navicular bones of Anchomomys frontanyensis from the Eocene fossil site of Sant Jaume de Frontanyà-3C (Barcelona, Spain), representing first known navicular bones of an Eocene euprimate from Europe, and evaluate the implications of these fossils for the knowledge of early patterns of locomotor evolution in primates.[16]
  • A study evaluating the potential impact of a large-scale mid-Cenozoic extinction and diversification event on lemurs from Madagascar, based on comparison of the terrestrial vertebrate fauna of Madagascar in the Holocene to that of early Cenozoic continental Africa and on phylogenetic modeling, is published by Godfrey et al. (2020).[17]
  • Virtual endocast of a specimen of Necrolemur antiquus is presented by Harrington, Yapuncich & Boyer (2020), who compare the endocast morphology of N. antiquus with those of other Eocene primates.[18]
  • New fossil material of Ganlea megacanina is described by Jaeger et al. (2020), who evaluate the implications of this finding for the knowledge of the phylogenetic relationships of amphipithecine primates, and interpret amphipithecines as stem anthropoids.[19]
  • A study on the anatomy of the talus of Paralouatta marianae and P. varonai, evaluating its implications for the knowledge of the locomotor behaviors of these primate (especially for the knowledge whether or not Paralouatta represents the first known semi-terrestrial platyrrhine), is published by Püschel et al. (2020).[20]
  • New specimens of Mesopithecus pentelicus, representing the easternmost occurrence of this genus to date, are described from the Miocene site of Shuitangba (Yunnan, China) by Jablonski et al. (2020), who evaluate the implications of these fossils for the knowledge of primate dispersals and paleoecology in the late Miocene.[21]
  • A study on the evolution of the vestibular apparatus in hominoids and on the utility of the study of the inner ear morphology for reconstructions of phylogenetic relationships of fossil apes, based on data from extant anthropoids and two fossil taxa (Oreopithecus and Australopithecus), is published by Urciuoli et al. (2020).[22]
  • A study on the biomechanical performance of the patella of Pierolapithecus catalaunicus is published by Pina et al. (2020).[23]
  • A study reevaluating the anatomical evidence for bipedalism in Danuvius guggenmosi is published by Williams et al. (2020).[24][25]
  • A study on the ecology of fossil hominins and co-existing primates in the Turkana Basin area (circa 4 to 2 Ma), based on data from tooth enamel stable calcium isotope values, is published by Martin et al. (2020).[26]

Paleoanthropological researchEdit

  • A study on the impact caused by hard plant tissues in contact with tooth enamel is published by van Casteren et al. (2020), who evaluate the implications of their findings for the knowledge of the diet of early hominins.[27]
  • A study on the mandible morphology, chewing biomechanics and probable diet of early hominins is published by Marcé-Nogué et al. (2020).[28]
  • A study on metacarpal trabecular and cortical bone in early hominins, and on its implications for the knowledge of diversity in hominin hand use (especially in Australopithecus sediba), is published by Dunmore et al. (2020).[29]
  • A study on the phalangeal curvature of a chimpanzee who was raised during the 1930s to live much like a human, having very few opportunities to engage in arboreal activities, is published by Wallace, Burgess & Patel (2020), who attempt to determine the extent to which phalangeal curvature is shaped by arboreal locomotion during life relative to genetic factors, and evaluate the implications of their findings for the interpretations of phalangeal curvature among fossil hominins.[30]
  • A study on the evolution of human brain size, shape, and asymmetry, based on data from apes and from species belonging to the genus Homo, is published by Melchionna et al. (2020), who report evidence indicating a significant shift in the rate of brain shape evolution in the clade including modern humans, Neanderthals and Homo heidelbergensis.[31]
  • Two hominin skulls, representing the earliest definitive occurrence of Paranthropus robustus and the earliest occurrence of a cranium with clear affinities to Homo erectus reported so far, are described from Drimolen (South Africa) by Herries et al. (2020), who interpret their findings as evidence that Homo, Paranthropus and Australopithecus were contemporaneous at ~2 million years ago.[32]
  • A study on the locomotion of two hominins from the Sterkfontein Caves in South Africa (Australopithecus africanus and a geologically younger hominin of uncertain phylogenetic placement, either Paranthropus robustus or a member of the genus Homo), testing for evidence of committed terrestrial bipedalism and for significant bouts of climbing, is published by Georgiou et al. (2020).[33][34][35]
  • A study on changes of the diet of the hominins from the Shungura and Usno Formations (Ethiopia) through time, as indicated by carbon isotope data, is published by Wynn et al. (2020).[36]
  • A study on the maturational pattern of Paranthropus robustus, based on data from fossils from the Kromdraai B cave site (South Africa), is published by Cazenave et al. (2020), who report evidence indicating that P. robustus had a maturational pattern that more closely approached the extant ape rather than the human condition.[37]
  • A study on the histology of a third permanent molar of a specimen of Paranthropus robustus from the Swartkrans site (South Africa), evaluating its implications for the knowledge of the timing of teeth maturation in this hominin, is published by Dean et al. (2020).[38]
  • An approximately 2-million-year-old skull of a male Paranthropus robustus is described from the Drimolen Main Quarry by Martin et al. (2020), who argue that the morphology of this specimen refutes existing hypotheses of sexual dimorphism in this hominin, and instead documents microevolutionary changes within this species.[39]
  • Detailed comparative description of the DNH 7 skull from Drimolen is published by Rak et al. (2020).[40]
  • Richmond et al. (2020) report the first associated hand and upper limb skeleton of Paranthropus boisei from the Ileret site (Kenya).[41]
  • A study aiming to determine the length of the Achilles tendon in Australopithecus is published by McNutt & DeSilva (2020).[42]
  • A study on the anatomy of the atlas of the Australopithecus specimen Stw 573 ("Little Foot") and an additional Australopithecus specimen StW 679 from the Sterkfontein Member 4 (South Africa, evaluating their implications for the knowledge of kinematics of head-neck movements and blood supply contributing to brain metabolism in Australopithecus is published by Beaudet et al. (2020).[43]
  • A study on brain organization and growth in Australopithecus afarensis is published by Gunz et al. (2020).[44]
  • A 1.4-million-y-old large bone fragment shaped into handaxe-like form is described from the Konso Formation (Ethiopia) by Sano et al. (2020), expanding the documented technological repertoire of African Early Pleistocene Homo.[45][46][47]
  • An assemblage of immature remains of Homo naledi, including the first partial skeleton of a juvenile member of this species, is reported from the Dinaledi Chamber of the Rising Star Cave (South Africa) by Bolter et al. (2020).[48]
  • Bolter & Cameron (2020) utilize the methods used to study human growth and development for the reconstruction of ontogeny of Homo naledi.[49]
  • A study on the morphology of the mandibular premolars of Homo naledi, and on its implications for the knowledge of possible evolutionary links between H. naledi and hominins from Sterkfontein and Swartkrans, is published by Davies et al. (2020).[50]
  • A study on the timing of the first appearance of Homo erectus at the Sangiran site (Indonesia) is published by Matsu'ura et al. (2020).[51]
  • Semaw et al. (2020) report the discovery of crania of Homo erectus and both Acheulean and Oldowan artifacts at the Busidima North and Dana Aoule North sites (Gona, Afar, Ethiopia), and interpret these findings as evidence of behavioral diversity and flexibility of H. erectus.[52]
  • Reconstruction of the thorax of the juvenile H. erectus skeleton KNM-WT 15000 from Nariokotome (Kenya) is presented by Bastir et al. (2020), who evaluate the implications of the anatomy of this individual for the knowledge of the evolution of the modern human body shape.[53]
  • A study on the anatomy of the Dali Man is published by Wu (2020).[54]
  • Welker et al. (2020) present tooth enamel proteomes of Homo antecessor from Atapuerca (Spain) and Homo erectus from Dmanisi (Georgia), and evaluate the implications of their findings for the knowledge of the phylogenetic placement of H. antecessor.[55]
  • A study on tooth enamel development in hominins from the paleontological sites of the Atapuerca complex, aiming to determine whether the Atapuerca hominins shared a suite or pattern of dental developmental characteristics with Homo sapiens, is published by Modesto-Mata et al. (2020).[56]
  • A study on the morphology of hominin bones from the Sima de los Huesos site (Atapuerca, Spain) is published by Bartsiokas & Arsuaga (2020), who interpret their findings as likely evidence of hibernation in the Atapuerca hominins.[57]
  • A study on the age of the Kabwe 1 skull from Broken Hill (Zambia), and on its implications for the knowledge of human evolution, is published by Grün et al. (2020).[58]
  • Evidence of interbreeding between common ancestors of Neanderthals and Denisovans with a different hominin population that separated from other humans about 2 million years ago is presented by Rogers, Harris & Achenbach (2020).[59]
  • Petr et al. (2020) sequence Y chromosomes from Neanderthals and Denisovans, and evaluate the implications of their findings for the knowledge of the evolutionary history of Neanderthals and Denisovans.[60]
  • Zhang et al. (2020) report the discovery of Denisovan mitochondrial DNA from sediments of the Baishiya Karst Cave deposited ~100 thousand, ~60 thousand and possibly as recently as ~45 thousand years ago, and interpret their findings as evidence of long-term occupation of this cave by Denisovans.[61]
  • A study on the early life of Neanderthals, based on data from three Neanderthal individuals from northeastern Italy, is published by Nava et al. (2020), who interpret their findings as indicating that the modern human nursing strategy was present among these Neanderthals.[62]
  • A study on the exploitation of bivalves by Neanderthals from the Moscerini cave site (Italy) is published by Villa et al. (2020), who report evidence indicating that Neanderthals collected aquatic resources by skin diving.[63]
  • Zilhão et al. (2020) present evidence from the Figueira Brava site on the Atlantic coast of Portugal indicating that Middle Paleolithic Neanderthals from this site exploited marine resources at a scale on par with the modern human–associated Middle Stone Age of southern Africa.[64]
  • A study on an assemblage of Neanderthal remains and Middle Paleolithic artifacts from the Chagyrskaya Cave (Russia) is published by Kolobova et al. (2020), who compare this assemblage with other Altai sites, and interpret their findings as evidence of at least two Neanderthal incursions into southern Siberia.[65]
  • A high-quality genome of a Neanderthal from the Chagyrskaya Cave is sequenced by Mafessoni et al. (2020), who interpret the data from the genes expressed in the striatum of the brain as indicating that the striatum may have evolved unique functions in Neanderthals.[66]
  • Evidence of use of fibre technology by Neanderthals is reported from the Abri du Maras site (France) by Hardy et al. (2020), who evaluate the implications of this finding for the knowledge of cognitive abilities of Neanderthals.[67]
  • García-Martínez et al. (2020) reconstruct the ribcages of perinatal and infant Neanderthal individuals, and report evidence indicating that most of the skeletal differences between the Neanderthal and modern human thorax were already largely established at birth.[68]
  • Two new reconstructions of the Kebara 2 pelvis are presented by Adegboyega et al. (2020), who evaluate the implications of this specimen for the knowledge of the Neanderthal pelvic morphology.[69]
  • Evidence of stable climatic and environmental conditions in Apulia (Italy) during the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition, when Neanderthals and modern humans coexisted, is presented by Columbu et al. (2020), who interpret their findings as indicating that climate did not play a key role in the disappearance of Neanderthals in this area.[70]
  • A study on the biological affinities of the Olduvai Hominid 1 is published by Willman et al. (2020), who also report evidence from tooth wear indicating that this individual wore three facial piercings.[71]
  • A study on environmental dynamics associated with the replacement of the Acheulean by early Middle Stone Age, aiming to determine how shifts in landscape-scale ecological resources might have influenced hominin adaptation during this interval on the basis of data from the Olorgesailie basin, is published by Potts et al. (2020).[72]
  • A study on an assemblage more than 400 Late Pleistocene human footprints from Engare Sero (Tanzania), and on their implications for the knowledge of the body sizes, locomotor behaviors and composition of the group of humans who generated these tracks, is published by Hatala et al. (2020), who interpret these tracks as likely evidence of cooperative and sexually divided foraging behaviors in Late Pleistocene humans.[73]
  • Wadley et al. (2020) report the discovery of grass bedding likely used to create comfortable areas for sleeping and working by people who lived in Border Cave (South Africa) at least 200,000 years ago.[74]
  • A study on the evolution of early symbolic behavior in Homo sapiens, based on data from the engraved ochre and ostrich eggshell fragments from the South African Blombos Cave and Diepkloof Rock Shelter dating up to about 100,000 years ago, is published by Tylén et al. (2020).[75]
  • Hublin et al. (2020) report the discovery and study the age of human remains found in association with Initial Upper Paleolithic artefacts from the Bacho Kiro cave (Bulgaria), and argue that this assemblage represents the earliest arrival of Upper Paleolithic Homo sapiens in Europe reported so far;[76] a study on the 14C chronology of this site is published by Fewlass et al. (2020).[77]
  • Newborns from a double grave from the Gravettian site Krems-Wachtberg (Austria) are identified as the earliest known case of monozygotic twins by Teschler-Nicola et al. (2020).[78]
  • A study on the genome of a ~34,000-year-old hominin skull cap discovered in the Salkhit Valley in northeastern Mongolia is published by Massilani et al. (2020), who present evidence indicating that this individual was a woman from a modern human population carrying genomic segments of Denisovan ancestry derived from the same Denisovan admixture event that contributed to present-day mainland Asians.[79]
  • Evidence indicating that the Paleolithic colonization of the Ryukyu Islands was a result of active and continued exploration, backed up by technological advancement, is presented by Kaifu et al. (2020).[80]
  • A study aiming to determine the varying reliance of early human colonisers of Wallacea on tropical forest and terrestrial versus marine resources, as indicated by stable carbon and oxygen isotope data from human and faunal tooth enamel from six Late Pleistocene/Holocene archaeological sequences on Timor and Alor Island, is published by Roberts et al. (2020).[81]
  • Bordes et al. (2020) identify bone micro-residues on two cobbles from the Cerutti Mastodon site (California, United States), and interpret this finding as evidence supporting human agency on bone and stone artefacts from this site.[82]
  • Evidence from fecal biomarkers indicating that pre-Clovis coprolites from the Paisley Caves complex (Oregon, United States) are human is presented by Shillito et al. (2020).[83]
  • A study on the timing of the peopling of the Americas, based on chronometric data from 42 North American and Beringian archaeological sites, is published by Becerra-Valdivia & Higham (2020).[84]
  • Evidence of human presence in the Americas during the Last Glacial Maximum is reported from the Chiquihuite Cave (Zacatecas, Mexico) by Ardelean et al. (2020), who interpret their findings as pushing back dates for human dispersal to the region possibly as early as 33,000–31,000 years ago.[85]
  • A study on the age and duration of the Clovis complex is published by Waters, Stafford & Carlson (2020).[86]
  • Two Early Holocene hunter-gatherer burials, including a burial of a young adult woman associated with a hunting toolkit of stone projectile points and animal processing tools, are reported from the Wilamaya Patjxa site (Peru) by Haas et al. (2020), who also review other Late Pleistocene and Early Holocene burials throughout the Americas, and interpret their findings as consistent with nongendered labor practices in which early hunter-gatherer women were big-game hunters.[87]

RodentsEdit

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Type locality Country Notes Images
Anomalomys grytsivensis[88] Sp. nov In press Nesin & Kovalchuk Miocene   Ukraine A member of the family Anomalomyidae
Argaleogaulus[89] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Korth & Kron Arikareean Troublesome   United States
(  Colorado)
A member of the family Mylagaulidae. Genus includes new species A. primoticus.
Arvicola nahalensis[90] Sp. nov Valid Maul, Rabinovich & Biton Late Pleistocene   Israel A species of Arvicola. Announced in 2020; the final version of the article naming it was published in 2021.
Balantiomys coloradensis[89] Sp. nov Valid Korth & Kron Troublesome   United States
(  Colorado)
A member of the family Heteromyidae.
Bibimys massoiai[91] Sp. nov Valid Das Neves et al. Late Quaternary   Brazil A species of Bibimys.
Borikenomys[92] Gen. et sp. nov Marivaux et al. late Early Oligocene San Sebastián   United States
(  Puerto Rico)
A member of the superfamily Chinchilloidea, possibly belonging to the family Dinomyidae. The type species is B. praecursor.
Ceratogaulus cornutasagma[93] Sp. nov Valid Calede & Samuels   United States
(  Nebraska)
"Cricetodon" venczeli[94] Sp. nov Valid Hír, Codrea & Prieto Miocene   Romania A large hamster. Announced in 2019; the final version of the article naming it was published in 2020.
Ctenomys viarapaensis[95] Sp. nov In press De Santi et al. Holocene   Argentina A tuco-tuco
Cupidinimus robinsoni[89] Sp. nov Valid Korth & Kron Troublesome   United States
(  Colorado)
A member of the family Heteromyidae.
Entoptychus rensbergeri[89] Sp. nov Valid Korth & Kron Troublesome   United States
(  Colorado)
A gopher.
Episiphneus dalianensis[96] Sp. nov Valid Qin et al. Late Pliocene   China A zokor. Announced in 2020; the final version of the article naming it was published in 2021.
Golunda aouraghei[97] Sp. nov Valid Piñero et al. Pliocene-Pleistocene boundary   Morocco A relative of the Indian bush rat
Gregorymys mixtecorum[98] Sp. nov Valid Ortiz-Caballero, Jiménez-Hidalgo & Bravo-Cuevas Oligocene (Arikareean)   Mexico A gopher.
Gregorymys montanus[89] Sp. nov Valid Korth & Kron Troublesome   United States
(  Colorado)
A gopher.
Gregorymys tavenneri[99] Sp. nov Valid Calede & Rasmussen Arikareean Renova   United States
(  Montana)
A gopher.
Harrymys cyanothos[89] Sp. nov Valid Korth & Kron Troublesome   United States
(  Colorado)
A member of the family Heteromyidae.
Harrymys taussigi[89] Sp. nov Valid Korth & Kron Troublesome   United States
(  Colorado)
A member of the family Heteromyidae.
Honeymys[100] Gen. et comb. nov Valid Martin et al. Miocene (Clarendonian)   United States
(  Nebraska
  Nevada
  Oklahoma)
A member of the family Cricetidae, possibly belonging to the subfamily Sigmodontinae; a new genus for "Copemys" mariae Baskin & Korth (1996). Genus also includes "Copemys" esmeraldensis Clark, Dawson & Wood (1964).[101]
Huerzelerimys asiaticus[102] Sp. nov Valid Wang, Qiu & Li Late Miocene Liushu   China A member of the family Muridae belonging to the subfamily Murinae
Hystrix brevirostra[103] Sp. nov Valid Wang & Qiu Late Miocene and early Pliocene Hewangjia
Liushu
  China A species of Hystrix.
Luantus sompallwei[104] Sp. nov In press Solórzano et al. Miocene Cura-Mallín   Chile A member of Caviomorpha.
Namaphiomys[105] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Pickford Eocene   Namibia A member of Phiomorpha of uncertain phylogenetic placement. The type species is N. scopulus.
Oregonomys perilaccos[89] Sp. nov Valid Korth & Kron Troublesome   United States
(  Colorado)
A member of the family Heteromyidae.
Paraethomys baeticus[106] Sp. nov Valid Piñero & Verzi Pliocene (Ruscinian) Baza   Spain A member of the family Muridae belonging to the subfamily Murinae.
Pareumys flynni[107] Sp. nov Valid Korth Eocene (Bridgerian and Uintan) Washakie   United States
(  Wyoming)
A member of the family Cylindrodontidae.
Pareumys muffleri[108] Sp. nov Valid Lofgren et al. Eocene   United States
(  Montana)
Pauromys turnbulli[107] Sp. nov Valid Korth Eocene (Uintan) Washakie   United States
(  Wyoming)
A member of the family Sciuravidae.
Perasciuravus[109] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Korth Eocene (Bridgerian) Washakie   United States
(  Wyoming)
A member of the family Sciuravidae. Genus includes new species P. mcintoshi.
Petaurista tetyukhensis[110] Sp. nov Valid Tiunov & Gimranov Late Pleistocene   Russia A species of Petaurista. Announced in 2019; the final version of the article naming it was published in 2020.
Pleurolicus compressus[89] Sp. nov Valid Korth & Kron Troublesome   United States
(  Colorado)
A gopher.
Pleurolicus gwinni[99] Sp. nov Valid Calede & Rasmussen Arikareean Renova   United States
(  Montana)
A gopher.
Pleurolicus mensae[89] Sp. nov Valid Korth & Kron Troublesome   United States
(  Colorado)
A gopher.
Pleurolicus nelsoni[99] Sp. nov Valid Calede & Rasmussen Arikareean Renova   United States
(  Montana)
A gopher.
Pleurolicus rensbergeri[99] Sp. nov Valid Calede & Rasmussen Arikareean Renova   United States
(  Montana)
A gopher.
Protospermophilus parvus[89] Sp. nov Valid Korth & Kron Troublesome   United States
(  Colorado)
A member of the family Sciuridae.
Pseudocylindrodon yihesubuensis[111] Sp. nov Valid Li Late Eocene Erlian Basin   China A member of the family Cylindrodontidae.
Rupestromys[105] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Pickford Eocene   Namibia A member of Phiomorpha of uncertain phylogenetic placement. The type species is R. brevirostris.
Schizodontomys bareia[89] Sp. nov Valid Korth & Kron Troublesome   United States
(  Colorado)
A member of the family Heteromyidae.
Spermophilinus kumkolensis[112] Sp. nov Valid Li et al. Middle Miocene Shimagou   China A member of the family Sciuridae belonging to the subfamily Sciurinae. Announced in 2019; the final version of the article naming it was published in 2020.
Thisbemys intermedius[113] Sp. nov Valid Korth Bridgerian Washakie   United States
(  Wyoming)
A member of the family Ischyromyidae.
Thryonomys kamulai[114] Sp. nov Valid Tanabe et al. Late Miocene Nakali   Kenya A cane rat.
Uromys aplini[115] Sp. nov Valid Cramb, Hocknull & Price Middle Pleistocene   Australia A species of Uromys.

Rodentian researchEdit

  • Description of new fossil material of Cephalomys arcidens from the Deseadan locality of Cabeza Blanca (Argentina), and a study on the species belonging to the genus Cephalomys and on the phylogenetic relationships of cephalomyids, is published by Busker, Dozo & Soto (2020).[116]
  • A study on brain anatomy and size in Neoepiblema acreensis is published by Ferreira et al. (2020).[117]
  • A study on the anatomy of the auditory region of the skull of Prospaniomys priscus is published by Arnaudo, Arnal & Ekdale (2020).[118]
  • A study on the locomotor agility of fossil ischyromyid, sciurid and aplodontid rodents, as inferred from the anatomy of the semicircular canals in their inner ear, is published by Bhagat, Bertrand & Silcox (2020).[119]
  • A study on a specimen of Ischyromys douglassi from the White River Formation of West Canyon Creek (Wyoming, United States), representing the oldest and most complete articulated skeleton yet known of Ischyromys, is published by Rankin, Emry & Asher (2020), who report that this specimen exhibits anatomical sciuromorphy, and evaluate its implications for the knowledge of jaw musculature evolution in rodents.[120]
  • A study on the locomotor behavior of Paramys delicatus is published by Prufrock, Ruff & Rose (2020), who also attempt to determine the body mass of P. delicatus and other early North American paramyines.[121]
  • A study on the morphology of the skull of the endemic dormouse Leithia melitensis from the Pleistocene of Sicily is published by Hennekam et al. (2020), who present a composite digital model of the skull of this rodent.[122]
  • A study on the evolution of island gigantism in fossil dormice from Sicily and the Balearic Islands is published by Hennekam et al. (2020).[123]
  • A study on the diet of Pliocene beavers belonging to the genus Dipoides from the High Arctic Beaver Pond fossil locality (Ellesmere Island, Canada), aiming to determine whether early woodcutting behaviour of beavers was driven by nutritional needs, is published by Plint et al. (2020).[124]
  • Partial mitochondrial genome of the extinct beaver Castoroides is reported by Xenikoudakis et al. (2020), who evaluate the implications of this finding for the knowledge of the origin of aquatic behavior of beavers.[125]
  • A study on the anatomy of the skeleton of Copemys loxodon is published by Ronez, Martin & Pardiñas (2020).[126]
  • A study on the anatomy and phylogenetic relationships of Megaoryzomys curioi is published by Ronez et al. (2020).[127]
  • A study aiming to determine whether insularity might have affected bone metabolism in Late Quaternary murine rodents from Timor is published by Miszkiewicz et al. (2020).[128]

XenarthransEdit

CingulataEdit

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Type locality Country Notes Images

Chlamydophractus[129][130]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Barasoain et al.

Late Miocene

Arroyo Chasicó Formation

  Argentina

A fairy armadillo.
The type species is C. dimartinoi.

Glyptodon jatunkhirkhi[131]

Sp. nov

Valid

Cuadrelli et al.

Quaternary

  Bolivia

Panochthus florensis[132]

Sp. nov

In press

Brambilla, Lopez & Parent

Late Pleistocene

  Argentina

A glyptodont.

Prozaedyus scillatoyanei[133]

Sp. nov

Valid

Barasoain et al.

Miocene (Chasicoan)

Loma de Las Tapias Formation

  Argentina

An armadillo belonging to the subfamily Euphractinae.

Cingulatan researchEdit

PilosaEdit

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Type locality Country Notes Images

Magdalenabradys[135]

Gen. et comb. et sp. nov

Valid

Rincón & McDonald

Miocene (Laventan to Huayquerian)

Urumaco Formation
Villavieja Formation

  Colombia
  Venezuela

A Mylodontidae sloth.
The type species is "Pseudoprepotherium" confusum Hirschfeld (1985)
genus also includes new species M. kolossiaia.

Sibotherium[136]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Rincón, Valerio & Laurito

Miocene (Hemphillian)

Curré Formation

  Costa Rica

A Megatheriidae sloth.
The type species is S. ka.

Xibalbaonyx exinferis[137]

Sp. nov

In press

Stinnesbeck et al.

Pleistocene

  Mexico

A Megalonychidae sloth.

Pilosan researchEdit

  • A study on the anatomy of the skull of Pronothrotherium typicum, and on the validity of the species assigned to the genus Pronothrotherium, is published by Gaudin et al. (2020).[138]
  • Barbosa et al. (2020) describe a femur of a specimen of Nothrotherium maquinense from the Lapa dos Peixes I cave (Brazil) affected by parosteal osteosarcoma, representing the first case of cancer in a Quaternary non-human mammal reported so far.[139]
  • A study on an assemblage of at least 22 specimens of Eremotherium laurillardi from the Pleistocene locality Tanque Loma (Ecuador) is published by Lindsey et al. (2020), who interpret this assemblage as likely resulting from a mass mortality event, and evaluate its implications for the knowledge of the ecology of ground sloths.[140]
  • Previously unreported postcranial material of the holotype specimen of Xibalbaonyx oviceps, providing information on the locomotion capabilities of this species, is described by Stinnesbeck et al. (2020).[141]
  • A study on the external and internal anatomy of the skull of Catonyx tarijensis is published by Boscaini et al. (2020).[142]
  • A study on the anatomy of the skeleton of the manus of Scelidotherium, and on the phylogenetic relationships of this genus, is published by Nieto et al. (2020).[143]
  • A study on a late Pleistocene assemblage of several individuals of Lestodon armatus from Playa del Barco site (Argentina), aiming to determine the origin of this assemblage and its implications for the knowledge of the biology of L. armatus, is published by Tomassini et al. (2020).[144]
  • A study on the anatomy and phylogenetic relationships of Glossotherium wegneri is published by De Iuliis et al. (2020), who argue against the recognition of Oreomylodon as a distinct genus.[145]
  • A study testing the inhibitory cascade model on the evolution of the dentition of sloths is published by Varela et al. (2020).[146]

Other xenarthansEdit

Miscellaneous xenarthan researchEdit

ChiropteraEdit

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Type locality Country Notes Images

Cuvierimops penalveri[148]

Sp. nov

Valid

Crespo et al.

Early Miocene

  Spain

A free-tailed bat.

Macroderma handae[149]

Sp. nov

Valid

Aplin & Armstrong in Armstrong, Aplin & Motokawa

Pliocene or early Pleistocene

  Australia

Mops kerio[150]

Sp. nov

Valid

Gunnell & Manthi

Pliocene

Kanapoi site

  Kenya

Announced in 2018; the final article version was published in 2020.

Mops turkwellensis[150]

Sp. nov

Valid

Gunnell & Manthi

Pliocene

Kanapoi site

  Kenya

Announced in 2018; the final article version was published in 2020.

Rousettus pattersoni[150]

Sp. nov

Valid

Gunnell & Manthi

Pliocene

Kanapoi site

  Kenya

Announced in 2018; the final article version was published in 2020.

Saccolaimus kenyensis[150]

Sp. nov

Valid

Gunnell & Manthi

Pliocene

Kanapoi site

  Kenya

Announced in 2018; the final article version was published in 2020.

Turkanycteris[150]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Gunnell & Manthi

Pliocene

Kanapoi site

  Kenya

A very large fruit bat, larger than all extant fruit bats other than select Pteropus and Hypsignathus.
The type species is T. harrisi.
Announced in 2018; final article version published in 2020.

Chiropteran researchEdit

  • Part of the humerus of a large-bodied vampire bat (similar in body size to Desmodus draculae) is described from the late Pliocene or early Pleistocene asphalt-bearing deposit of El Breal de Orocual (Venezuela) by Czaplewski & Rincón (2020), representing one of the oldest vampire bats in the fossil record reported so far.[151]

NotoungulatesEdit

  • Studies on the anatomy of the skull of Paedotherium and Tremacyllus, and on its implications for the knowledge of the paleobiology of these notoungulates, are published by Ercoli et al. (2020).[152][153]
Name Novelty Status Authors Age Type locality Country Notes Images
Archaeogaia[154] Gen. et sp. nov In press Zimicz et al. Paleocene Mealla   Argentina An early notoungulate. Genus includes new species A. macachaae.
Juchuysillu[155] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Croft & Anaya Miocene Nazareno   Bolivia A member of the family Interatheriidae. Genus includes new species J. arenalesensis.
Teratopithecus[156] Gen. et sp. nov Valid López et al. Early Eocene ?Laguna del Hunco   Argentina A member of the family Archaeopithecidae. Genus includes new species T. elpidophoros.

Odd-toed ungulatesEdit

  • A study comparing changes of body mass of ungulates belonging to the genera Lophiodon and Propalaeotherium from the middle Eocene site of Geiseltal (Germany) is published by Ring et al. (2020).[157]
  • A study on the diet of lophialetid tapiroids from the Eocene of the Erlian Basin (China), as indicated by tooth wear, is published online by Gong et al. (2020).[158]
  • A study on the sexual dimorphism and body size of Plesiaceratherium gracile is published by Lu et al. (2020), who also present a reconstruction of the body of P. gracile.[159]
  • Iurino et al. (2020) describe the braincase with a natural brain endocast of a 12–18 months old rhinocerotine rhinoceros from the Middle Pleistocene site of Melpignano (Italy).[160]
  • A study on the demographic history of the woolly rhinoceros leading up to its extinction, based on data from one complete nuclear genome and 14 mitogenomes, is published by Lord et al. (2020).[161]
  • A study aiming to determine the diet of the woolly rhinoceros and Stephanorhinus kirchbergensis is published by Stefaniak et al. (2020).[162]
  • Revision of the fossil material of hipparionines from the Miocene locality of Tizi N'Tadderht (Morocco) is published by Cirilli et al. (2020).[163]
  • Catalano et al. (2020) reconstruct a near complete mitogenome of a specimen of Equus hydruntinus from San Teodoro Cave (Sicily, Italy), and evaluate the implications of their findings for the knowledge of the phylogenetic relationships of this taxon.[164]
  • A study on the geographical origin and mobility behavior of Rancholabrean horses from the La Cinta-Portalitos and La Piedad-Santa Ana sites (Mexico), as indicated by radiogenic strontium and stable oxygen isotope data from tooth enamel, is published by Marín-Leyva et al. (2020).[165]
  • A study on near-complete mitochondrial genomes retrieved from specimens of Equus dalianensis and Przewalski's horse from Late Pleistocene strata in northeastern China, evaluating their implications for the knowledge of the phylogenetic relationships of these horses, is published by Yuan et al. (2020).[166]
Name Novelty Status Authors Age Type locality Country Notes Images
Amynodontopsis jiyuanensis[167] Sp. nov Valid Wang et al. Middle Eocene Niezhuang   China A member of the family Amynodontidae
"Dihoplus" bethlehemsis[168] Sp. nov Valid Pandolfi, Rivals & Rabinovich Pliocene Israel-Palestine water divide A rhinoceros

Ephyrachyus woodi[169]

Sp. nov

Valid

Bai et al.

Early–middle Eocene

Arshanto

  China

Possibly a member of the family Hyracodontidae.

Gobioceras[169]

Gen. et sp. nov

Junior homonym

Bai et al.

Early Eocene

Arshanto

  China

A relative of Forstercooperia. The type species is G. wangi. The generic name is preoccupied by Gobioceras Bogoslovskaya (1988).

Hyrachyus? tumidus[169]

Sp. nov

Valid

Bai et al.

Early Eocene

Arshanto

  China

A member of the family Hyrachyidae.

Iriritherium[170]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Pickford

Early Miocene

  Uganda

A chalicothere belonging to the subfamily Chalicotheriinae. The type species is I. pyroclasticum.

Mesaceratherium tschani[171] Sp. nov Valid Tissier, Antoine & Becker Late Oligocene   Switzerland A rhinoceros.
Rhodopagus guoi[172] Sp. nov Valid Paepen et al. Eocene (Arshantan) Arshanto   China Announced in 2020; the final version of the article naming was published in 2021.

Triplopus? youjingensis[169]

Sp. nov

Valid

Bai et al.

Early Eocene

Arshanto

  China

A member of Rhinocerotoidea of uncertain phylogenetic placement.

Winamia[170]

Nom. nov

Valid

Pickford

Early Miocene

  Kenya

A chalicothere belonging to the subfamily Chalicotheriinae; a replacement name for Butleria de Bonis et al. (1995).

Yimengia chaganense[169]

Sp. nov

Valid

Bai et al.

Early Eocene

Arshanto

  China

A member of Rhinocerotoidea of uncertain phylogenetic placement.

Yimengia magna[169]

Sp. nov

Valid

Bai et al.

Early Eocene

Nomogen

  China

A member of Rhinocerotoidea of uncertain phylogenetic placement.

Even-toed ungulatesEdit

  • A systematic revision of the even-toed ungulate fauna from Aumelas and Saint-Martin-de-Londres localities (France), and a study on the implications of these ungulates for the knowledge of the phylogenetic relationships and evolutionary history of early endemic even-toed ungulates from Europe, is published by Busker, Dozo & Soto (2020).[173]
  • New sample of isolated fossil auditory ossicles of cainotheriids is reported from the Paleogene karstic infillings of Dams (France) by Assemat et al. (2020), who provide the first description of a reconstructed ossicular chain of Caenomeryx filholi.[174]
  • A study on the Old World fossil record of the family Camelidae, aiming to determine the timing of the divergence between the Bactrian camel and the dromedary, is published by Geraads et al. (2020).[175]
  • A study on the phylogenetic relationships of fossil South and North American camelids is published by Lynch, Sánchez-Villagra & Balcarcel (2020), who also describe a partial skeleton of a member of Lamini from the Ensenadan locality of San Nicolas (Buenos Aires Province, Argentina).[176]
  • A study on the systematic relationships of extant and fossil members of the family Cervidae is published by Heckeberg (2020).[177]
  • A study on the evolution of the cycle of growth, death and regeneration of antlers in cervids, based on data from fossil and extant taxa, is published by Rössner, Costeur & Scheyer (2020).[178]
  • A study on the brain endocast of Antifer ensenadensis is published by Fontoura et al. (2020).[179]
  • A study on the diet of Cervus astylodon, as indicated by data from tooth microwear, is published by Kubo & Fujita (2020).[180]
  • Postcranial remains and first almost complete skulls of members of the genus Samotherium are described from the Middle Maragheh sequence (northwest Iran) by Parizad et al. (2020), who also discuss the validity of the genus Alcicephalus.[181]
  • Description of new fossil bovid material from Xishuigou (Gansu, China) and a revision of the type material of "Eotragus" halamagaiensis from the Halamagai Formation (Xinjiang, China) is published by Li et al. (2020), who transfer "E." halamagaiensis to the genus Turcocerus.[182]
  • New fossil material of Miotragocerus monacensis, including the most complete skull of a member of this species reported so far, is described from the late Miocene hominid locality Hammerschmiede (southern Germany) by Hartung, Lechner & Böhme (2020).[183]
  • A record of the European water buffalo dating to the time of the Bølling–Allerød warming is reported from the Moscow Region of Russia by Vislobokova et al. (2020), who evaluate the implications of this finding for the knowledge of the dispersal and final extinction of this species.[184]
  • A study on the anatomy of molars of extant and fossil suids, and on its implications for reconstructions of diets of fossil suids from the Plio-Pleistocene Turkana Basin (Kenya), is published by Rannikko et al. (2020).[185]
  • A study on the anatomy of the deciduous teeth of members of Cetartiodactyla, and on its implications for the knowledge of the phylogenetic relationships within Hippopotamoidea, is published by Rodrigues et al. (2020), who interpret their findings as supporting the emergence of the family Hippopotamidae within bothriodontine anthracotheres from the Paleogene of Africa.[186]
  • A study comparing the distribution of ecomorphologies in the artiodactyl communities of North American Neogene savannas and modern-day African savannas is published by Morales-García, Säilä & Janis (2020).[187]
Name Novelty Status Authors Age Type locality Country Notes Images
Bubalus murrensis extremus[188] Subsp. nov Valid Vislobokova, Tarasenko & Lopatin Late Pleistocene   Russia
(  Moscow Oblast)
A subspecies of the European water buffalo.
Cervus canadensis combrayicus[189] Subsp. nov Valid Croitor Late Pleistocene   France A subspecies of the elk. Announced in 2019; the final version of the article naming it was published in 2020.
Geniokeryx[190] Gen. et comb. nov Valid Ducrocq Late Eocene Krabi Basin   Thailand A member of the family Anthracotheriidae; a new genus for "Anthracokeryx" thailandicus Ducrocq (1999).
Heliosus[191] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Burger & Jolley Eocene (Bridgerian) Washakie   United States
(  Wyoming)
A member of the family Helohyidae. The type species is H. apophis.
Metkatius babbiangalensis[192] Sp. nov Valid Waqas & Rana Eocene Subathu   India A member of the family Raoellidae
Nyanzachoerus nakaliensis[193] Sp. nov Valid Tsubamoto et al. Late Miocene Nakali   Kenya A member of the family Suidae belonging to the subfamily Tetraconodontinae
Palembertina[194] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Weppe et al. Eocene Quercy Phosphorites   France A member of the family Cainotheriidae. The type species is P. deplasi.
Paukkaungmeryx[195] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Ducrocq et al. Middle Eocene Pondaung   Myanmar A relative of Archaeomeryx. Genus includes new species P. minutus.

Praemuntiacus[196]

Gen. et comb. nov

Valid

Croitor, Zakharov & Mararescul

Pliocene

  China
  Italy
  Moldova

A small muntjac-like deer. The type species is "Eostyloceros" pidoplitschkoi Korotkevich (1964); genus also includes P. triangularis (Zdansky, 1925).

Prolistriodon[197] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Pickford et al. Early Miocene Soma   Turkey A member of the family Suidae belonging to the subfamily Listriodontinae. The type species is P. smyrnensis.
Qurliqnoria chorakensis[198] Sp. nov Valid Kostopoulos et al. Late Miocene   Turkey A stem-caprine bovid. Announced in 2019; the final version of the article naming it was published in 2020.
Stenomeryx[195] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Ducrocq et al. Middle Eocene Pondaung   Myanmar Probably an early chevrotain. Genus includes new species S. bahinensis.

CetaceansEdit

  • A study on the evolution of asymmetry in the skulls of living and extinct cetaceans is published by Coombs et al. (2020).[199]
  • A study comparing the morphology of the carpus of Ambulocetus natans, other archaeocetes and Eocene terrestrial even-toed ungulates, and evaluating its implications for the knowledge of the evolution of the forelimbs of early cetaceans, is published by Gavazzi et al. (2020).[200]
  • A study on the distributional patterns of the aetiocetids is published by Cisneros & Velez-Juarbe (2020).[201]
  • A vertebra of a small member of Neoceti, representing one of the earliest known members of this group, is described from the Eocene Submeseta Formation (Seymour Island, Antarctica) by Davydenko, Mörs & Gol'din (2020), who evaluate the implications of this finding for the knowledge of the early evolution of Neoceti.[202]
Name Novelty Status Authors Age Type locality Country Notes Images
Ankylorhiza[203] Gen. et comb. nov Boessenecker et al. Oligocene Ashley
Chandler Bridge
  United States
(  South Carolina)
A large dolphin. Genus includes "Squalodon" tiedemani.
Antwerpibalaena[204] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Lavigerie et al. Pliocene   Belgium A stem-balaenid. Genus includes new species A. liberatlas.
Archaebalaenoptera liesselensis[205] Sp. nov Valid Bisconti et al. Miocene (Tortonian) Breda   Netherlands A rorqual
Archaeobalaena[206] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Tanaka, Furusawa & Kimura Pliocene (Zanclean) Chippubetsu   Japan A member of the family Balaenidae. The type species is A. dosanko.
Atlanticetus[207] Gen. et comb. et sp. nov Valid Bisconti et al. Miocene Calvert
Pietra da Cantoni
  Italy
  United States
An early baleen whale. The type species is "Aglaocetus" patulus Kellogg (1968); genus also includes new species A. lavei.
Cozzuoliphyseter[208] Gen. et comb. nov Valid Paolucci et al. Miocene Gran Bajo del Gualicho   Argentina A member of the family Physeteridae; a new genus for "Aulophyseter" rionegrensis.
Dolgopolis[209] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Viglino et al. Miocene (Burdigalian) Gaiman   Argentina A toothless platanistoid dolphin. Genus includes new species D. kinchikafiforo. Announced in 2020; the final version of the article naming it was published in 2021.
Ensidelphis[210] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Bianucci et al. Miocene (Burdigalian) Chilcatay   Peru A member of Platanistoidea. The type species is E. riveroi.
Furcacetus[210] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Bianucci et al. Miocene (Burdigalian) Chilcatay   Peru A member of the family Squalodelphinidae. The type species is F. flexirostrum.
Marzanoptera[211] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Bisconti et al. Pliocene   Italy A rorqual. Genus includes new species M. tersillae.
Norisdelphis[212] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Kimura & Hasegawa Miocene (Tortonian) Haraichi   Japan An oceanic dolphin. Genus includes new species N. annakaensis.
Perditicetus[213] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Nelson & Uhen Oligocene–Miocene (ChattianAquitanian) Nye   United States
(  Oregon)
A member of Platanistoidea. Genus includes new species P. yaconensis.
Platyscaphokogia[214] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Collareta et al. Miocene (Messinian) Pisco   Peru A member of the family Kogiidae belonging to the subfamily Scaphokogiinae. The type species is P. landinii.
Protororqualus wilfriedneesi[215] Sp. nov Valid Bisconti & Bosselaers Pliocene (Zanclean Kattendijk Sands
Yorktown
  Belgium
  Netherlands
  United States
(  North Carolina)
Rhaphicetus[216] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Lambert et al. Miocene (Burdigalian) Chilcatay   Peru A member of Physeteroidea. Genus includes new species R. valenciae.
Samaydelphis[217] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Lambert et al. Miocene (Tortonian) Pisco   Peru A member of the family Pontoporiidae. Genus includes new species S. chacaltanae.
Scaphokogia totajpe[218] Sp. nov Valid Benites-Palomino et al. Late Miocene Pisco   Peru A member of the family Kogiidae.

CarnivoransEdit

  • A study on changes in hindlimb functional diversity in North American carnivoran communities (especially in felids) over the last 19 million years is published by Polly (2020).[219]
  • Description of the tarsal bones of the bear dogs from the Paleogene of Europe, and a study on the evolution of posture and locomotion of European bear dogs, is published by Fournier et al. (2020).[220]
  • New fossil material of Megamphicyon giganteus, providing new information on the locomotor adaptations of this species and allowing an estimation of its body mass, is described from the middle Miocene (MN6) site of Carpetana (Spain) by Siliceo et al. (2020).[221]
  • A study aiming to determine the impact of large body size and adaptation to hypercarnivory on extinction risk throughout the evolutionary history of North American canids is published by Balisi & Van Valkenburgh (2020).[222]
  • A study on the anatomy of the holotype specimen of Vulpes alopecoides and on the diversity of the Plio-Pleistocene members of the genus Vulpes from Europe is published by Bartolini Lucenti & Madurell-Malapeira (2020), who consider the species Vulpes praeglacialis and V. praecorsac to be junior synonyms of V. alopecoides.[223]
  • A study on the anatomy and likely diet of "Canis" ferox is published online by Bartolini Lucenti & Rook (2020), who transfer this species to the genus Eucyon.[224]
  • Tong et al. (2020) document dental injuries (likely caused by processing hard food, such as bones) and infections and a healed tibia fracture in specimens of Canis chihliensis from the Early Pleistocene Nihewan Basin (China), and interpret these findings as possible evidence of social hunting and family care in this canid.[225]
  • A study comparing the anatomy of hyoid bones of dire wolves and coyotes from La Brea Tar Pits with those of extant canids, and evaluating the implications of reported anatomical differences for the knowledge of likely vocalizations of fossil canids, is published by Flores et al. (2020).[226]
  • The study of the extensive record of Canis from Dmanisi showed the combination so primitive and derived species that contrast with the previous interpretation of these specimens to Canis etruscus and support the description of the new species Canis borjgali, very close to Canis mosbachensis and probably to modern wolves, coyotes and affine dogs (Bartolini Lucenti et al. 2020 [227])
  • Partial fragment of the mandible of a dire wolf is described from the Late Pleistocene of northeastern China by Lu et al. (2020), representing the first record of this species from Eurasia reported so far.[228]
  • Ramos-Madrigal et al. (2020) sequence the genomes of four Pleistocene wolves from Northeast Siberia, including specimens with divergent skull morphologies.[229]
  • A study on a 57,000-years-old wolf pup mummy discovered in thawing permafrost in the Klondike goldfields (Yukon, Canada), aiming to determine her appearance, evolutionary relationships, life history and ecology, is published by Meachen et al. (2020).[230]
  • A study on fossil canid remains from the Pleistocene of the Paglicci Cave and the Romanelli Cave (southern Italy) is published by Boschin et al. (2020), who interpret their findings as attesting the presence of dogs in Italy at least 14,000 calibrated years before present.[231]
  • A study on the genomes of modern Greenland sled dogs, an ~9500-year-old Siberian dog associated with archaeological evidence for sled technology, and an ~33,000-year-old Siberian wolf is published by Sinding et al. (2020), who interpret their findings as indicating that sled dogs represent an ancient lineage going back at least 9500 years and that wolves bred with the ancestors of sled dogs and precontact American dogs.[232]
  • A study on aiming to reconstruct dog population history, based on data from 27 ancient (up to 10.9 thousand years old) dog genomes from Europe, the Near East and Siberia, is published by Bergström et al. (2020).[233]
  • New specimen of Agnotherium antiquum, providing new information on the anatomy of this species, is described from the Miocene locality of Eppelsheim (Germany) by Morlo et al. (2020), who interpret this species as a powerful, strictly carnivorous ambush hunter.[234]
  • A metacarpal bone of a short-faced bear is described from Daisy Cave (San Miguel Island, California Channel Islands) by Mychajliw et al. (2020), who attempt to the determine the most likely explanation of the occurrence of this specimen on San Miguel Island.[235]
  • A study on anatomical specializations in cave bears for longer hibernation periods, and on their impact on feeding biomechanics in cave bears, is published by Pérez-Ramos et al. (2020).[236]
  • A study on the diet of cave bears from cave sites in Romania, as indicated by nitrogen isotope values of individual amino acids from fossil collagen, is published by Naito et al. (2020).[237]
  • A study on the relationship between the shape of tooth crown surfaces and feeding behaviour in living bears, evaluating its implications for the knowledge of likely diet and possible extinction causes of cave bears, is published by Pérez-Ramos et al. (2020).[238]
  • Description of new fossils and a review of the fossil material of large mustelids Sivaonyx hendeyi and Plesiogulo aff. monspessulanus from the Pliocene of the Langebaanweg fossil site (South Africa) is published by Valenciano & Govender (2020).[239]
  • Description of new fossil material of Mellivora benfieldi from the Langebaanweg site and a revision of the taxonomic status of Mio–Pliocene African mellivorines is published by Valenciano & Govender (2020), who name a new tribe Eomellivorini.[240]
  • A study on the phylogenetic relationships of extant and fossil pinnipeds is published by Paterson et al. (2020).[241]
  • New fossil material of pinnipeds, including fossils referrable to Phocidae and a humerus referrable specifically to Monachinae, is described from the Upper Miocene–Lower Pliocene Beaumaris Local Fauna (Victoria, Australia) by Rule, Adams & Fitzgerald (2020), who evaluate the implications of these fossils for the knowledge of the origins of the southern true seals from the Southern Ocean.[242]
  • Rule, Hocking & Fitzgerald (2020) describe a tooth of a monachine seal from the Pliocene Whalers Bluff Formation (Victoria, Australia), and evaluate its implications for the knowledge of the timing of pinniped faunal turnovers in the Southern Hemisphere.[243]
  • Fossil teeth of a hyaenid Adcrocuta eximia and a saber-toothed cat belonging or related to the genus Paramachaerodus are described from the Miocene Chu Formation (Kyrgyzstan) by Miller et al. (2020), who evaluate the implications of these fossils for the knowledge of endemism in the fossil fauna in Kyrgyzstan.[244]
  • A study on the evolutionary history of the genus Crocuta, based on paleogenomic data from Late Pleistocene cave hyenas from across Eurasia and on population-level genomic data from sub-Saharan spotted hyenas, is published by Westbury et al. (2020).[245]
  • Description of a skull of Machairodus giganteus from the late Miocene locality Hadjidimovo (Bulgaria), and a study on the evolution of the genus Machairodus, is published by Geraads & Spassov (2020).[246]
  • A study on the evolutionary history of Homotherium, as indicated by genomic analyses, is published by Barnett et al. (2020).[247]
  • An almost complete skull of Smilodon populator, likely belonging to one of the largest known specimens of the genus with an estimated body mass over 400 kg, is described from the Lujanian Dolores Formation (Uruguay) by Manzuetti et al. (2020).[248]
  • Fossil material of Panthera gombaszoegensis georgica, representing the first record of the Eurasian jaguar in southern Asia, is described from the middle Early Pleistocene Haro River quarry (Pakistan) by Jiangzuo & Liu (2020), who present a new dispersal scenario of the jaguar in Eurasia, and compare the morphology of the teeth of the Eurasian jaguar and the living jaguar.[249]
  • A study on the evolutionary history of the cave lion, based on data from mitochondrial genomes of cave lions from across their entire prehistoric range, is published by Stanton et al. (2020).[250]
  • A study on the evolutionary history of lions, based on whole-genome resequencing data from a set of modern, historic, and Pleistocene lions, is published by de Manuel et al. (2020).[251]
Name Novelty Status Authors Age Type locality Country Notes Images
Agriotherium hendeyi[252] Sp. nov Valid Jiangzuo & Flynn Late Hemphillian Quiburis   United States
(  Arizona)
Announced in 2019; the final version of the article naming it was published in 2020.

Aurorarctos[253]

Gen. et sp. nov

Jiangzuo & Flynn

Late Barstovian

  United States
(  Nebraska)

A bear belonging to the subfamily Ursinae. The type species is A. tirawa.

Canis borjgali[227] Sp. nov. Valid Bartolini Lucenti et al. Early Pleistocene Dmanisi   Georgia An ancestor of wolf-like canids
Circamustela peignei[254] Sp. nov Valid Valenciano et al. Miocene (Vallesian) Cerro de los Batallones fossil site   Spain A member of the family Mustelidae belonging to the subfamily Guloninae.
Cryptailurus tinaynakti[255] Sp. nov Valid Barrett et al. Hemingfordian Mascall   United States
(  Oregon)
A hypercarnivorous feliform
Cynelos stenos[256] Sp. nov Valid Hunt & Yatkola Early Miocene Runningwater   United States
(  Nebraska)
A bear dog
Cynodictis peignei[257] Sp. nov Valid Le Verger, Solé & Ladevèze Late Eocene to early Oligocene Quercy Phosphorites   France A bear dog
Eodesmus[258] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Tate-Jones et al. Miocene (Burdigalian) Astoria   United States
(  Oregon)
An early member of the family Desmatophocidae. Genus includes new species E. condoni.
Eomonachus[259] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Rule et al. Pliocene Tangahoe   New Zealand A monk seal. Genus includes new species E. belegaerensis.
Ferrucyon[260] Gen. et comb. nov Valid Ruiz-Ramoni et al. Pliocene   Mexico A vulpine canid; a new genus for "Cerdocyon" avius.
Jinomrefu[261] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Friscia et al. PaleogeneNeogene boundary   Kenya A member of the family Barbourofelidae. Genus includes new species J. lakwanza.
Leptoplesictis peignei[262] Sp. nov Valid Grohé et al. Miocene Mae Moh Basin   Thailand A mongoose
Lycophocyon tabrumi[108] Sp. nov Valid Lofgren et al. Eocene   United States
(  Montana)
A caniformian carnivoran.
Martes crassidens[263] Sp. nov Valid Jiangzuo et al. Early Pleistocene   China A marten. Announced in 2020; the final version of the article naming it was published in 2021.
Oriensmilus[264] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Wang, White & Guan Middle Miocene Tongxin   China A barbourofeline. Genus includes new species O. liupanensis.
Osodobenus[265] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Biewer, Velez-Juarbe & Parham Miocene (Messinian) Capistrano   United States
(  California)
A member of the family Odobenidae. The type species is O. eodon.
Panthera balamoides[266] Sp. nov Valid Stinnesbeck et al. Pleistocene   Mexico A species of Panthera. Announced in 2018; the final version of the article naming it was published in 2020.
Pontolis barroni[265] Sp. nov Valid Biewer, Velez-Juarbe & Parham Miocene (probably Tortonian) Monterey   United States
(  California)
A member of the family Odobenidae.
Pontolis kohnoi[265] Sp. nov Valid Biewer, Velez-Juarbe & Parham Miocene (Messinian) Capistrano   United States
(  California)
A member of the family Odobenidae.
Sarcodectes[267][268] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Rule et al. Pliocene (Zanclean) Yorktown   United States
(  North Carolina)
An earless seal belonging to the subfamily Monachinae. The type species is S. magnus.
Siamictis[262] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Grohé et al. Miocene Mae Moh Basin   Thailand A member of the family Viverridae belonging to the subfamily Paradoxurinae. The type species is S. carbonensis.
Siamogale bounosa[262] Sp. nov Valid Grohé et al. Miocene Mae Moh Basin   Thailand An otter
Skopelogale[269] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Baskin Miocene (Barstovian)   United States
(  Nebraska)
A member of the family Mustelidae of uncertain phylogenetic placement. The type species is S. melitodes.
Storchictis[270] Gen. et comb. nov Valid De Bonis Possibly middle or late Eocene Quercy phosphorites   France A bear dog. The type species is "Cynodon" miacinus Teilhard de Chardin (1915).
Tungurictis peignei[271] Sp. nov Valid Wang et al. Middle Miocene Suosuoquan   China A hyena
Vishnuonyx maemohensis[262] Sp. nov Valid Grohé et al. Miocene Mae Moh Basin   Thailand An otter

Other eutheriansEdit

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Type locality Country Notes Images
Africtis[272] Gen. et sp. nov In press Mattingly et al. Early Oligocene   Libya An early member of Carnivoraformes. Genus includes new species A. sirtensis.
Alilepus spassovi[273] Sp. nov Valid Sen Early Pliocene Chepino Basin   Bulgaria A member of the family Leporidae.
Atelerix steensmai[274] Sp. nov Valid Van Dam, Mein & Alcalá Late Miocene Teruel Basin   Spain A hedgehog, a species of Atelerix.
Bisonalveus gracilis[275] Sp. nov Valid Fox & Scott Paleocene (Tiffanian) Paskapoo   Canada
(  Alberta)
A member of the family Pentacodontidae.
Chiromyoides kesiwah[276] Sp. nov Valid Beard et al. Tiffanian   United States
(  Wyoming)
A member of the family Plesiadapidae.
Desmana marci[277] Sp. nov Valid Minwer-Barakat et al. Early Pliocene   Spain A relative of the Russian desman.
Ereberix[278] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Lopatin Early Miocene Loo   Mongolia A member of the family Erinaceidae. Genus includes new species E. erebericulus.
Lantanotherium anthrace[279] Sp. nov Valid Cailleux et al. Miocene Mae Moh   Thailand A gymnure.
Leonhardtina meridianum[280] Sp. nov Valid Solé, Marandat & Lihoreau Eocene   France A member of the family Hyaenodontidae.
Matthodon peignei[280] Sp. nov Valid Solé, Marandat & Lihoreau Eocene   France A member of the family Hyaenodontidae.
Mesolicaphrium[281] Gen. et comb. nov Valid McGrath, Anaya & Croft Miocene (Laventan) Honda Group (La Venta)   Colombia A member of Litopterna belonging to the family Proterotheriidae, a new genus for "Prolicaphrium" sanalfonensis.
Oxyaenoides aumelasiensis[280] Sp. nov Valid Solé, Marandat & Lihoreau Eocene   France A member of the family Hyaenodontidae.
Plioblarinella[282] Gen. et comb. nov Valid Koenigswald & Reumer Pliocene   Austria A shrew belonging to the tribe Blarinellini; a new genus for "Petenyia" dubia
Proscalops brevidens[283] Sp. nov Valid Korth Oligocene (Whitneyan)   United States
(  South Dakota)
A soricomorph.
Pseudobrachytherium[284] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Corona et al. Miocene (Huayquerian) Camacho   Uruguay A member of Litopterna belonging to the family Proterotheriidae. Genus includes new species P. breve.
Pseudotrimylus metaxy[283] Sp. nov Valid Korth Oligocene (Whitneyan)   United States
(  South Dakota)
A shrew belonging to the subfamily Heterosoricinae. Originally described as a species of Pseudotrimylus, but subsequently transferred to the genus Noritrimylus.[285]
Rodcania[286] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Gelfo, García-López & Bergqvist Paleocene Río Loro   Argentina A member of Xenungulata. Genus includes new species R. kakan.
Saltaodus[287] Gen. et sp. nov Valid Gelfo et al. Eocene Lumbrera   Argentina A native South American ungulate belonging to the family Didolodontidae. Genus includes new species S. sirolli. Announced in 2019; the final version of the article naming it was published in 2020.
Suncus honeyi[288] Sp. nov Valid Flynn et al. Late Miocene Dhok Pathan
Nagri
  Pakistan A shrew, a species of Suncus
Tonomochota[289] Gen. et 3 sp. nov Valid Tiunov & Gusev Late Pleistocene   Russia A pika. Genus includes new species T. khasanensis, T. sikhotana and T. major. Announced in 2020; the final version of the article naming it was published in 2021.
Wyonycteris kingi[290] Sp. nov Valid Hooker Paleogene Woolwich   United Kingdom A member of the family Nyctitheriidae. Announced in 2018; the final version of the article naming it was published in 2020.

Miscellaneous eutherian researchEdit

General eutherian researchEdit

  • A review of the origins, evolution and paleoecology of major clades of extinct native South American ungulates is published by Croft, Gelfo & López (2020).[303]
  • A study on the evolution of feeding strategies in marine mammals throughout their evolutionary history is published by Berta & Lanzetti (2020).[304]
  • A study on zinc isotope ratios in tooth enamel of Late Pleistocene mammals from the Tam Hay Marklot cave (Laos) is published by Bourgon et al. (2020), who evaluate potential utility of zinc isotopes as dietary tracers in paleontology and archeology.[305]
  • A study on the dietary patterns of nine herbivore families from the Shungura Formation (Ethiopia) throughout the late Pliocene and early Pleistocene, as indicated by carbon isotope data from fossil teeth, is published by Negash et al. (2020).[306]
  • Hominin and non-hominin mammal footprints and fossils dating to the last interglacial are reported from the Alathar lacustrine deposit in the western Nefud Desert (Saudi Arabia) by Stewart et al. (2020), who interpret this finding as likely to be the earliest evidence of Homo sapiens in the Arabian Peninsula reported so far.[307]
  • A study on ancient DNA recovered from fragmented bovid and rhinoceros specimens from the Neolithic site of Shannashuzha is published by Chen et al. (2020), who interpret their findings as indicating that the gaur and a rhinoceros closely related to the extant Sumatran rhinoceros lived as far north as the margin of the northeastern Tibetan Plateau during the late Neolithic.[308]

MetatheriansEdit

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Type locality Country Notes Images

Amphidolops intermedius[309]

Sp. nov

Valid

Chornogubsky

Eocene

Huancache Formation
Laguna del Hunco Formation

  Argentina

A member of Polydolopimorphia belonging to the family Polydolopidae.

Amphidolops minimus[309]

Sp. nov

Valid

Chornogubsky

Eocene

Tufolitas Laguna del Hunco

  Argentina

A member of Polydolopimorphia belonging to the family Polydolopidae.

Apeirodon[310]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Babot et al.

Eocene (Priabonian)

Geste Formation

  Argentina

A small bunodont metatherian, possibly an early divergent member of Polydolopimorphia.
Type species A. sorianoi.
Announced in 2019; final published article in 2020.

Aquiladelphis analetris[311]

Sp. nov

Valid

Cohen, Davis & Cifelli

Late Cretaceous

Judith River Formation

  United States
(  Montana)

An Aquiladelphidae Pediomyoidea.

Australogale[312]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Engelman, Anaya & Croft

Laventan (Serravallian)

Honda Group

  Bolivia

A member of Sparassodonta.
Type species A. leptognathus.
Announced in 2018; final published article in 2020.

Copedelphys superstes[313]

Sp. nov

Valid

Korth et al.

Whitneyan

Brule Formation

  United States
(  North Dakota)

A member of the family Herpetotheriidae.

Eomakhaira[314]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Engelman et al.

Early Oligocene

Abanico Formation

  Chile

A Thylacosmilinae Sparassodonta.
Type species is E. molossus.

Glasbius piceanus[311]

Sp. nov

Valid

Cohen, Davis & Cifelli

Late Cretaceous (Edmontonian)

Williams Fork Formation

  United States
(  Colorado)

Hypodolops[309]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Chornogubsky

Eocene

Huancache
Tufolitas Laguna del Hunco

  Argentina

A Polydolopidae Polydolopimorphia.
Type species is H. sapoensis.

Lekaneleo[315]

Gen. et comb. nov

Valid

Gillespie, Archer & Hand

OligoceneMiocene

Riversleigh

  Australia

A marsupial lion;
A new genus for "Priscileo" roskellyae Gillespie (1997)

Mukupirna[316]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Beck et al.

Late Oligocene

Namba Formation

  Australia

A member of Vombatoidea.
Type species is M. nambensis.

Pujatodon[317]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Goin et al.

Eocene (Ypresian)

La Meseta Formation

Antarctica
(Seymour Island)

A probable Polydolopimorphia.
Type species P. ektopos.
Announced in 2018; final article version published in 2020.

Scalaria[311]

Gen. et 2 sp. nov

Junior homonym

Cohen, Davis & Cifelli

Late Cretaceous (Turonian)

Straight Cliffs Formation

  United States
(  Utah)

An aquiladelphid Pediomyoidea.
Genus includes new species S. martini and S. aquilana.
"Scalaria" is preoccupied by Scalaria Lamarck (1801). The replacement name Scalaridelphys was coined in 2021.[318]

Metatherian researchEdit

  • Two isolated teeth of stagodontid metatherians are described from the Cenomanian of France by Vullo et al. (2020), representing the first reported occurrence of stagodontids in Europe.[319]
  • A study on the anatomy of the skull of Andinodelphys cochabambensis, and on the phylogenetic relationships of this species, is published by de Muizon & Ladevèze (2020).[320]
  • A study comparing the anatomy of the skull and teeth of Thylacosmilus atrox and placental saber-toothed carnivores is published by Janis et al. (2020), who question the interpretation of T. atrox as having a similar type of predatory behavior to placental saber-tooths, and consider it unlikely that T. atrox used its canines to dispatch its prey.[321]
  • A study on the anatomy of the petrosal and inner ear of Peratherium elegans and Amphiperatherium elegans, and on its implications for the knowledge of the phylogenetic relationships of herpetotheriids and peradectids, is published online by Ladevèze, Selva & de Muizon (2020).[322]
  • A study on the anatomy of the teeth of Groeberia, and on the phylogenetic affinities of this genus, is published by Zimicz & Goin (2020).[323]
  • A study on the relationship between variation in skull and mandibular shape of extant and extinct macropodiforms and ecological factors such as diet, locomotion and body mass, and on the implications of this relationship for the knowledge of the feeding ecology of the fossil macropodiforms from the Riversleigh World Heritage Area, is published online by Butler et al. (2020).[324]
  • A study on the morphology of the humeri of fossil kangaroos belonging to the subfamily Sthenurinae and of Protemnodon, evaluating its implications for the knowledge of the mode of locomotion in these marsupials, is published online by Janis et al. (2020).[325]
  • The hypothesis that marsupial forelimbs are restricted by long-term developmental constraints resulting from their reproductive strategy, is challenged in a paper to be published by Martin-Serra and Benson (2020).[326]

AllotheriaEdit

EuharamiyidaEdit

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Type locality Country Notes Images

Cryoharamiya[327]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Averianov et al.

Early Cretaceous

Batylykh Formation

  Russia
(  Sakha)

An euharamiyidan of uncertain phylogenetic placement.
Type species is C. tarda.

GondwanatheriaEdit

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Type locality Country Notes Images

Adalatherium[328][329][330][331][332][333][334][335]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Krause, Hoffmann, Wible & Rougier in Krause et al.

Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian)

Maevarano Formation

  Madagascar

A Gondwanatherian.
The type species is A. hui.

Magallanodon[336]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Goin et al.

Late Cretaceous (late Campanian to early Maastrichtian)

Chorrillo Formation[337]
Dorotea Formation

  Argentina[337]  Chile

A Gondwanatherian, possibly a Ferugliotheriidae.
The type species is M. baikashkenke.

MultituberculataEdit

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Type locality Country Notes Images

Bructerodon[338]

Gen. et sp. nov

In press

Martin et al.

Early Cretaceous (BarremianAptian)

  Germany

A pinheirodontid multituberculate. Genus includes new species B. alatus.

Cheruscodon[338]

Gen. et sp. nov

In press

Martin et al.

Early Cretaceous (Barremian–Aptian)

  Germany

An eobaatarid multituberculate.
Type species C. balvensis.

Dolichoprion[339]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Kusuhashi, Wang & Jin

Early Cretaceous

Fuxin Formation

  China

An eobaatarid multituberculate.
Type species D. lii.
Announced in 2019; the final article version was published in 2020.

Filikomys[340]

Gen. et comb. nov

In press

Weaver et al.

Late Cretaceous

Belly River Group
Judith River Formation
Kaiparowits Formation
Two Medicine Formation

  Canada
(  Alberta)
  United States
(  Montana
  Utah
  Wyoming)

A ptilodontoid multituberculate.
Type species is F. primaevus (Lambe, 1902)
Possibly also including "Mesodma" minor Eaton (2002).

Sinobaatar pani[341]

Sp. nov

Valid

Mao et al.

Early Cretaceous (Aptian)

Jiufotang Formation

  China

An eobaatarid multituberculate.

Tagaria[342]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Averianov et al.

Middle Jurassic (Bathonian)

Itat Formation

  Russia
(  Krasnoyarsk Krai)

A member of Multituberculata.
Genus includes new species T. antiqua.

Tashtykia[342]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Averianov et al.

Middle Jurassic (Bathonian)

Itat Formation

  Russia
  Krasnoyarsk Krai

A multituberculate.
The type species is T. primaeva.

Multituberculate researchEdit

Other mammalsEdit

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Type locality Country Notes Images

Amblotherium megistodon[344]

Sp. nov

Valid

Foster, Pagnac & Hunt-Foster

Late Jurassic

Morrison Formation

  United States
(  Wyoming)

A member of the family Dryolestidae.

Fuxinoconodon[345]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Kusuhashi et al.

Early Cretaceous (AptianAlbian)

Fuxin Formation

  China

A gobiconodontid eutriconodontan.
The type species is F. changi.
Announced in 2019; the final article version was published in 2020.

Kryoparvus[346]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Rich et al.

Early Cretaceous (late Barremian to early Aptian)

  Australia

A possible Ausktribosphenidae?.
Type species is K. gerriti.

Origolestes[347]

Gen. et sp. nov

Mao et al.

Early Cretaceous (Aptian)

Yixian Formation

  China

A zhangheotheriid.
Type species O. lii. Announced in 2019; the final article version was published in 2020.

Stirtodon[348]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Rich, Flannery & Vickers-Rich

Early Cretaceous (Albian)

Griman Creek Formation

  Australia

A monotreme.
The type species is S. elizabethae.

Sundrius[349]

Gen. et sp. nov

In press

Rich et al.

Early Cretaceous (Albian)

Eumeralla Formation

  Australia

A possible monotreme.
The type species is S. ziegleri.

Triconodon averianovi[350]

Sp. nov

valid

Jäger, Cifelli & Martin

Early Cretaceous (Berriasian)

Lulworth Formation

  United Kingdom

A triconodonid Eutriconodontan

Miscellaneous mammalian researchEdit

  • A study on the phylogenetic relationships of Mesozoic mammals, aiming to determine the morphological character complexes with a high potential to introduce phylogenetic error, is published by Celik & Phillips (2020).[351]
  • A study on maximum lifespans and blood flow rates of Morganucodon and Kuehneotherium, evaluating their implications for the knowledge of basal and maximum metabolic rates in these taxa, is published by Newham et al. (2020);[352] their conclusions are subsequently contested by Meiri & Levin (2022).[353][354]
  • A study on the jaw morphology, jaw movement and occlusion in Priacodon, and on its implications for the knowledge of the occlusal mode and likely diet of triconodontids in general, is published by Jäger, Cifelli & Martin (2020).[355]

General researchEdit

  • A study on the phylogenetic relationships of the haramiyidans and on the consistency between the known morphology and age of Juramaia and other mammaliaforms from the Yanliao Biota, as indicated by Bayesian tip-dated phylogenetic methods, is published by King & Beck (2020).[356]
  • A study on the community-level response of North American mammals to Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum is published by Fraser & Lyons (2020).[357]
  • A study aiming to determine resource and habitat use, niche occupation and trophic interactions of mammals living during the Great American Interchange, as indicated by carbon and oxygen stable isotope compositions of tooth enamel of fossil mammals from the late Miocene to the late Pleistocene of the Pampean region of Argentina, is published by Domingo et al. (2020).[358]
  • A study on predator richness in mammalian communities from the Miocene Santa Cruz Formation (Argentina), aiming to determine whether the mammalian predator guild from this area was impoverished prior to the Great American Interchange, is published by Rodríguez-Gómez et al. (2020).[359]
  • A study on the causes of the asymmetrical character of the Great American Biotic Interchange, with an increasing dominance of mammals of North American origin in South America during the Pleistocene, is published by Carrillo et al. (2020), who argue that the asymmetry was caused by higher extinction of mammals with South American origin, which in turn reduced the diversity of South American taxa that dispersed into North America.[360]
  • A study on environmental changes in Southeast Asia from the Early Pleistocene to the Holocene, based on stable isotope data from Southeast Asian mammals, and on their impact on the evolution of mammals (including hominins), is published by Louys & Roberts (2020).[361]
  • A study on changes of mammalian extinction rates over the past 126,000 years, aiming to determine whether, and to what extent, species extinctions during this time period can be attributed to anthropogenic or to climatic factors, is published by Andermann et al. (2020).[362]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Gregory James Smith; Larisa R. G. DeSantis (2020). "Extinction of North American Cuvieronius (Mammalia: Proboscidea: Gomphotheriidae) driven by dietary resource competition with sympatric mammoths and mastodons". Paleobiology. 46 (1): 41–57. doi:10.1017/pab.2020.7. S2CID 212725861.
  2. ^ Patricia A. Groenewald; Judith Sealy; Deano Stynder; Kathlyn M. Smith (2020). "Dietary resource partitioning among three coeval proboscidean taxa (Anancus capensis, Mammuthus subplanifrons, Loxodonta cookei) from the South African Early Pliocene locality of Langebaanweg E Quarry". Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology. 543: Article 109606. Bibcode:2020PPP...543j9606G. doi:10.1016/j.palaeo.2020.109606. S2CID 213999549.
  3. ^ Shi-Qi Wang; Xiao-Xiao Zhang; Chun-Xiao Li (2020). "Reappraisal of Serridentinus gobiensis Osborn & Granger and Miomastodon tongxinensis Chen: the validity of Miomastodon". Vertebrata PalAsiatica. 58 (2): 134–158. doi:10.19615/j.cnki.1000-3118.200310.
  4. ^ Emil Karpinski; Dirk Hackenberger; Grant Zazula; Chris Widga; Ana T. Duggan; G. Brian Golding; Melanie Kuch; Jennifer Klunk; Christopher N. Jass; Pam Groves; Patrick Druckenmiller; Blaine W. Schubert; Joaquin Arroyo-Cabrales; William F. Simpson; John W. Hoganson; Daniel C. Fisher; Simon Y. W. Ho; Ross D. E. MacPhee; Hendrik N. Poinar (2020). "American mastodon mitochondrial genomes suggest multiple dispersal events in response to Pleistocene climate oscillations". Nature Communications. 11 (1): Article number 4048. Bibcode:2020NatCo..11.4048K. doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17893-z. PMC 7463256. PMID 32873779.
  5. ^ Fernando A. Perini; Ednair Rodrigues Nascimento; Mario Alberto Cozzuol (2020). "A new species of Trichechus Linnaeus, 1758 (Sirenia, Trichechidae), from the upper Pleistocene of southwestern Amazonia, and the evolution of Amazonian manatees". Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 39 (5): e1697882. doi:10.1080/02724634.2019.1697882. S2CID 212816367.
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