Burdigalian


The Burdigalian is, in the geologic timescale, an age or stage in the early Miocene. It spans the time between 20.43 ± 0.05 Ma and 15.97 ± 0.05 Ma (million years ago). Preceded by the Aquitanian, the Burdigalian was the first and longest warming period of the Miocene[3] and is succeeded by the Langhian.

Burdigalian
20.44 – 15.97 Ma
Chronology
Key events in the Neogene
-24 —
-22 —
-20 —
-18 —
-16 —
-14 —
-12 —
-10 —
-8 —
-6 —
-4 —
-2 —
North American prairie expands[2]
An approximate timescale of key Neogene events.
Vertical axis: millions of years ago.
Formerly part ofTertiary Period/System
Etymology
Name formalityFormal
Usage Information
Celestial bodyEarth
Regional UsageGlobal (ICS)
Time scale(s) usedICS Time Scale
Definition
Chronological unitAge
Stratigraphic unitStage
Time span formalityFormal
Lower boundary definitionNot formally defined
Lower boundary definition candidates
Lower boundary GSSP candidate section(s)Astronomically tuned ODP-core
Upper boundary definitionNot formally defined
Upper boundary definition candidates
Upper boundary GSSP candidate section(s)

Stratigraphic definitionEdit

The name Burdigalian comes from Burdigala, the Latin name for the city of Bordeaux, France. The Burdigalian stage was introduced in scientific literature by Charles Depéret in 1892.

The base of the Burdigalian is at the first appearance of foram species Globigerinoides altiaperturus and the top of magnetic chronozone C6An. As of 2016, an official GSSP for the Burdigalian had not yet been assigned.

The top of the Burdigalian (the base of the Langhian) is defined by the first appearance of foram species Praeorbulina glomerosa and is also coeval with the top of magnetic chronozone C5Cn.1n.

PaleontologyEdit

Famous Burdigalian palaeontologic localities include the Turritellenplatte of Ermingen in Germany and the Dominican amber deposits of Hispaniola.

Possible human evolutionary ancestors such as Victoriapithecus evolved during this time interval.

ReferencesEdit

FootnotesEdit

  1. ^ Krijgsman, W.; Garcés, M.; Langereis, C. G.; Daams, R.; Van Dam, J.; Van Der Meulen, A. J.; Agustí, J.; Cabrera, L. (1996). "A new chronology for the middle to late Miocene continental record in Spain". Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 142 (3–4): 367–380. Bibcode:1996E&PSL.142..367K. doi:10.1016/0012-821X(96)00109-4.
  2. ^ Retallack, G. J. (1997). "Neogene Expansion of the North American Prairie". PALAIOS. 12 (4): 380–390. doi:10.2307/3515337. JSTOR 3515337. Retrieved 2008-02-11.
  3. ^ Edward Petuch, Ph.D. Florida Atlantic University, Department of Geosciences."Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-06-20. Retrieved 2010-05-01.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)

LiteratureEdit

  • Depéret, C.; 1892: Note sur la classification et le parallélisme du Système miocène, Bulletin de la Société Géologique de France 3(20), p. CXLV-CLVI. (in French)
  • Gradstein, F.M.; Ogg, J.G. & Smith, A.G.; 2004: A Geologic Time Scale 2004, Cambridge University Press.

External linksEdit