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Fredericton (electoral district)

  (Redirected from York—Sunbury)

Fredericton (formerly Fredericton—York—Sunbury) is a federal electoral district in New Brunswick, Canada, that has been represented in the House of Commons of Canada since 1988. Its population in 2001 was 82,782. Its predecessor riding, York—Sunbury, was represented in the House of Commons from 1917 to 1988.

Fredericton
New Brunswick electoral district
Fredericton, riding.png
Fredericton in relation to other New Brunswick federal electoral districts
Coordinates:45°57′18″N 66°27′47″W / 45.955°N 66.463°W / 45.955; -66.463Coordinates: 45°57′18″N 66°27′47″W / 45.955°N 66.463°W / 45.955; -66.463
Federal electoral district
LegislatureHouse of Commons
MP
 
 
 
Matt DeCourcey
Liberal
District created1914
First contested1917
Last contested2015
District webpageprofile, map
Demographics
Population (2011)[1]81,759
Electors (2015)59,284
Area (km²)[1]1,678
Pop. density (per km²)48.7
Census divisionsSunbury, Queens, York
Census subdivisionsFredericton, Oromocto, Lincoln, Burton, New Maryland, St. Mary's 24, Minto

The district includes the city of Fredericton, and the towns of Oromocto, Chipman, and Minto and vicinity.

The neighbouring ridings are Miramichi, Beauséjour, Fundy Royal, New Brunswick Southwest, and Tobique—Mactaquac.

Contents

Political geographyEdit

In the 2008 election, the Conservatives gained this seat from the Liberals. The Conservatives were strongest in the rural parts of this riding, outside of Fredericton proper. Within the city, the Liberals still held their own with the NDP capturing a handful of polls, one which includes the University of New Brunswick, and a couple along Parkside Drive.

YearPop.±%
200182,782—    
200685,886+3.7%
201193,181+8.5%

HistoryEdit

"York—Sunbury" riding was created in 1914 from parts of Sunbury—Queen's and York ridings. Previously, York County was its own riding and Sunbury County was joined with Queens County.

The riding was named after York and Sunbury counties of which it was composed.

In 1987, York—Sunbury was abolished. Some rural areas in the southern parts of the riding were transferred to Carleton—Charlotte riding, and a largely uninhabited area, moved to Miramichi. The remainder was incorporated into "Fredericton" riding. It was renamed "Fredericton—York—Sunbury" shortly after the 1988 election.

This riding was abolished in 1996 when more rural areas were moved into other districts (particularly Tobique—Mactaquac and New Brunswick Southwest, and a new riding named "Fredericton" was created. The Minto and Chipman areas were added to the riding in 2003. As per the 2012 federal electoral redistribution, this riding will lose territory to Miramichi—Grand Lake, New Brunswick Southwest and Tobique—Mactaquac, and gain a small territory from New Brunswick Southwest.

Members of ParliamentEdit

This riding has elected the following Members of Parliament:

Parliament Years Member Party
York—Sunbury
Riding created from Sunbury—Queen's and York
13th  1917–1921     Harry Fulton McLeod Government (Unionist)
 1921–1921     Richard Hanson Conservative
14th  1921–1925
15th  1925–1926
16th  1926–1930
17th  1930–1935
18th  1935–1940     William George Clark Liberal
19th  1940–1945     Richard Hanson National Government
20th  1945–1947     Hedley Francis Gregory Bridges Liberal
 1947–1949 Milton Fowler Gregg
21st  1949–1953
22nd  1953–1957
23rd  1957–1958     John Chester MacRae Progressive Conservative
24th  1958–1962
25th  1962–1963
26th  1963–1965
27th  1965–1968
28th  1968–1972
29th  1972–1974 Robert Howie
30th  1974–1979
31st  1979–1980
32nd  1980–1984
33rd  1984–1988
Fredericton
34th  1988–1993     Bud Bird Progressive Conservative
Fredericton—York—Sunbury
35th  1993–1997     Andy Scott Liberal
Fredericton
36th  1997–2000     Andy Scott Liberal
37th  2000–2004
38th  2004–2006
39th  2006–2008
40th  2008–2011     Keith Ashfield Conservative
41st  2011–2015
42nd  2015–present     Matt DeCourcey Liberal

Election resultsEdit

Fredericton, 2013 Representation OrderEdit

The riding lost territory to Miramichi—Grand Lake, New Brunswick Southwest and Tobique—Mactaquac, and gained a small amount of territory from New Brunswick Southwest for the 42nd Canadian federal election (2015.)

2019 Canadian federal election
The 2019 general election will be held on October 21.
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Green Jenica Atwin
Liberal Matt DeCourcey
Conservative Andrea Johnson
Libertarian Brandon Kirby
People's Jason Paull
Total valid votes/Expense limit 100.0  
Total rejected ballots
Turnout
Eligible voters
2015 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Liberal Matt DeCourcey 23,016 49.26 +25.24 $98,991.33
Conservative Keith Ashfield 13,280 28.42 -18.55 $79,507.14
Green Mary Lou Babineau 5,804 12.42 +8.27 $159,022.44
New Democratic Sharon Scott-Levesque 4,622 9.89 -14.41
Total valid votes/Expense limit 46,722 100.00   $195,873.36
Total rejected ballots 188 0.40
Turnout 46,910 77.43
Eligible voters 60,587
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +21.90
Source: Elections Canada[2][3][4]
2011 federal election redistributed results[5]
Party Vote %
  Conservative 18,213 46.97
  New Democratic 9,423 24.30
  Liberal 9,314 24.02
  Green 1,609 4.15
  Others 213 0.55

Fredericton, 2003 Representation OrderEdit

2011 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Conservative Keith Ashfield 21,573 48.38 +5.85 $80,569.94
New Democratic Jesse Travis 10,626 23.83 +8.47 $8,535.27
Liberal Randy McKeen 10,336 23.18 -8.35 $53,834.28
Green Louise Comeau 1,790 4.01 -6.15 $8,177.72
Independent Adam Scott Ness 266 0.60 $101.69
Total valid votes/Expense limit 44,591 100.0     $83,547.51
Total rejected, unmarked and declined ballots 207 0.46 -0.11
Turnout 44,798 64.24 +2.11
Eligible voters 69,732
Conservative hold Swing -1.31
Sources:[6][7]
2008 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Conservative Keith Ashfield 17,962 42.53 +7.87 $73,954.11
Liberal David Innes 13,319 31.53 -10.27 $64,776.23
New Democratic Jesse Travis 6,490 15.36 -5.89 $6,944.89
Green Mary Lou Babineau 4,293 10.16 +8.28 $8,526.99
Canadian Action Ben Kelly 168 0.39 none listed
Total valid votes/Expense limit 42,232 100.0     $80,195
Total rejected, unmarked and declined ballots 242 0.57 +0.13
Turnout 42,474 62.13 -5.86
Eligible voters 68,368
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +9.07
2006 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Liberal Andy Scott 19,649 41.80 -4.95 $63,544.32
Conservative Pat Lynch 16,292 34.66 +1.18 $57,563.68
New Democratic John Carty 9,988 21.25 +3.89 $33,143.96
Green Philip Duchastel 884 1.88 -0.47 none listed
Independent David Raymond Amos 198 0.42 none listed
Total valid votes/Expense limit 47,011 100.0     $75,043
Total rejected, unmarked and declined ballots 207 0.44
Turnout 47,218 67.99
Eligible voters 69,453
Liberal hold Swing -3.06
2004 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Liberal Andy Scott 19,819 46.75 +8.97 $60,726.40
Conservative Kent Fox 14,193 33.48 -21.22 $61,658.27
New Democratic John Carty 7,360 17.36 +10.41 $21,188.88
Green Daron Letts 997 2.35 $1,194.22
Total valid votes/Expense limit 42,396 100.0     $73,437
Total rejected, unmarked and declined ballots 264 0.62
Turnout 42,633 61.82
Eligible voters 68,968
Liberal notional hold Swing +15.10
Changes from 2000 are based on redistributed results. Conservative Party change is based on the combination of Canadian Alliance and Progressive Conservative Party totals.
2000 federal election redistributed results
Party Vote %
  Liberal 15,151 37.78
  Progressive Conservative 12,185 30.38
  Alliance 9,753 24.32
  New Democratic 2,787 6.95
  Others 228 0.57

Fredericton, 1996 Representation OrderEdit

2000 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Andy Scott 14,175 38.60 +4.48
Progressive Conservative Raj Venugopal 10,919 29.73 -0.44
Alliance Allan Neill 8,814 24.00 +2.24
New Democratic Michael Dunn 2,584 7.04 -6.02
Natural Law William Parker 233 0.63 -0.26
Total valid votes 36,725 100.00
Rejected ballots 213 0.58
Turnout 36,938 62.8

Change for the Canadian Alliance is based on the 1997 results of its predecessors, the Reform Party.

1997 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Andy Scott 12,252 34.12 -12.54
Progressive Conservative Cleveland Allaby 10,835 30.17 +0.95
Reform Mark McCready 7,815 21.76 +4.74
New Democratic Patricia Hughes 4,689 13.06 +8.06
Natural Law Jeanne Geldart 321 0.89 +0.07
Total valid votes 35,912 100.00

Change from 1993 is not based on redistributed results.

Fredericton—York—Sunbury, 1989–1996Edit

1993 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Andy Scott 21,868 46.66 +6.94
Progressive Conservative Bud Bird 13,696 29.22 -13.76
Reform Jack Lamey 7,977 17.02 Ø
New Democratic Pauline MacKenzie 2,343 5.00 -5.32
Natural Law Neil Dickie 382 0.82 Ø
Canada Party Steven Gillrie 373 0.80 Ø
Independent Doreen Fraser 226 0.48 -5.30
Total valid votes 46 865 100.00

Doreen Fraser was nominated as a Confederation of Regions candidate, but was listed as an Independent because that party did not run enough candidates to be officially recognized.

Fredericton, 1987–1989Edit

1988 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative Bud Bird 20,494 42.98 -15.87
Liberal Brad Woodside 18,939 39.72 +16.66
New Democratic Allan Sharp 4,922 10.32 -6.89
Confederation of Regions Greg Hargrove 2,755 5.78 Ø
Rhinoceros Chris Fullerton 316 0.66 Ø
Independent Harry Marshall 253 0.53 -0.35
Total valid votes 47,679 100.00

York—Sunbury, 1917–1987Edit

1984 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative Robert Howie 25,190 58.85 +11.15
Liberal Loretta Washburn 9,873 23.06 -13.90
New Democratic Allan Sharp 7,366 17.21 +2.66
Independent Harry Marshall 377 0.88 +0.34
Total valid votes 42,806 100.00
1980 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative Robert Howie 18,246 47.70 -7.35
Liberal Dan Hurley 14,138 36.96 +7.02
New Democratic Phillip Booker 5,567 14.55 +0.19
Independent Harry Marshall 205 0.54 -0.11
Libertarian Jay Nauss 95 0.25 Ø
Total valid votes 38,251 100.00
1979 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative Robert Howie 21,722 55.05 +4.78
Liberal Pete Mockler 11,815 29.94 -10.32
New Democratic Phillip Booker 5,665 14.36 +4.90
Independent Harry Marshall 258 0.65 Ø
Total valid votes 39,460 100.00
1974 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative Robert Howie 17,673 50.27 -2.70
Liberal John McNair 14,153 40.26 +2.97
New Democratic Kevin White 3,327 9.46 -0.27
Total valid votes 35,153 100.00
1972 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative Robert Howie 20,362 52.97 -2.42
Liberal Ray Dixon 14,335 37.29 -4.05
New Democratic Beverley Wallace 3,741 9.73 +6.46
Total valid votes 38,438 100.00
1968 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative John Chester MacRae 17,394 55.39 +6.87
Liberal Paul Burden 12,983 41.34 -4.40
New Democratic Patrick Callaghan 1,028 3.27 -2.47
Total valid votes 31,405 100.00
1965 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative John Chester MacRae 15,813 48.52 +0.04
Liberal Paul Burden 14,909 45.74 +0.78
New Democratic Patrick Callaghan 1,872 5.74 +2.67
Total valid votes 32,594 100.00
1963 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative John Chester MacRae 15,827 48.48 -0.11
Liberal David Dickson 14,678 44.96 +2.09
Social Credit George Nickerson 1,142 3.50 -1.32
New Democratic Lovell Clark 1,001 3.07 -0.65
Total valid votes 32,648 100.00
1962 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative John Chester MacRae 15,255 48.59 -4.83
Liberal David Dickson 13,461 42.87 -1.45
Social Credit George Nickerson 1,513 4.82 Ø
New Democratic John Simonds 1,167 3.72 +1.46
Total valid votes 31,396 100.00

Changes for the New Democratic Party are based on the 1958 results of its predecessor, the Cooperative Commonwealth Federation.

1958 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative John Chester MacRae 15,813 53.42 +3.96
Liberal David Dickson 13,118 44.32 -3.89
Co-operative Commonwealth Lawrence Bright 669 2.26 -0.07
Total valid votes 29,600 100.00
1957 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative John Chester MacRae 13,356 49.46 +6.71
Liberal Milton Fowler Gregg 13,018 48.21 -4.49
Co-operative Commonwealth Lawrence Bright 628 2.33 -2.21
Total valid votes 27,002 100.00
1953 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Milton Fowler Gregg 12,888 52.70 +3.90
Progressive Conservative Ewart Clair Atkinson 10,455 42.75 -1.91
Co-operative Commonwealth Charles Watson 1,111 4.54 -1.99
Total valid votes 24,454 100.00
1949 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Milton Fowler Gregg 12,158 48.80 -2.47
Progressive Conservative Ewart Clair Atkinson 11,127 44.66 +10.65
Co-operative Commonwealth Murray Young 1,628 6.53 -8.19
Total valid votes 24,913 100.00
By-election on 1947

On the death of Francis Bridges

Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Milton Fowler Gregg 12,237 51.27 +3.05
Progressive Conservative Ernest William Sansom 8,119 34.01 -10.31
Co-operative Commonwealth Murray Young 3,514 14.72 +7.27
Total valid votes 23,870 100.00
1945 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Hedley Francis Gregory Bridges 10,828 48.22 -0.68
Progressive Conservative Ernest William Sansom 9,953 44.32 -6.78
Co-operative Commonwealth Murray Young 1,674 7.45 Ø
Total valid votes 22,455 100.00
1940 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
National Government Richard Hanson 10,352 51.10 +5.53
Liberal Peter J. Hughes 9,908 48.90 +2.05
Total valid votes 20,260 100.00
1935 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal William George Clark 9,296 46.85 +15.92
Conservative Richard Hanson 9,042 45.57 -23.50
Reconstruction Errol MacDonald 1,506 7.59 Ø
Total valid votes 19,844 100.00
1930 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Richard Hanson 10,166 69.07 +3.61
Liberal Fraser Winslow 4,552 30.93 -3.61
Total valid votes 14,718 100.00
1926 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Richard Hanson 8,451 65.46 -7.46
Liberal Peter J. Hughes 4,459 34.54 +7.46
Total valid votes 12,910 100.00
1925 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Richard Hanson 8,636 72.92 +19.97
Liberal Charles Robert Hawkins 3,207 27.08 -19.97
Total valid votes 11,843 100.00
1921 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Richard Hanson 7,777 52.95 -0.62
Liberal William James Osborne 6,911 47.05 +0.62
Total valid votes 14,688 100.00
By-election on 1921
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Richard Hanson 7,107 53.57 -15.65
Liberal Ernest W. Stairs 6,160 46.43 +15.65
Total valid votes 13,267 100.00
1917 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes %
Government (Unionist) Harry Fulton McLeod 6,957 69.22
Liberal Nelson Brown 3,093 30.78
Total valid votes 10,050 100.00

Student Vote resultsEdit

2011 electionEdit

In 2011, a Student Vote was conducted at participating Canadian schools to parallel the 2011 Canadian federal election results. The vote was designed to educate students and simulate the electoral process for persons who have not yet reached the legal majority. Schools with a large student body that reside in another electoral district had the option to vote for candidates outside of the electoral district then where they were physically located.[8]

2011 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes %
New Democratic Jesse Travis 1,067 30.02
Conservative Keith Ashfield 1,035 29.12
Green Louise Comeau 648 18.23
Liberal Randy McKeen 631 17.75
Independent Adam Scott Ness 173 4.87
Total valid votes 3,554 100.00

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • "(Code 13003) Census Profile". 2011 census. Statistics Canada. 2012. Retrieved 2011-03-03.
  • Campaign expense data from Elections Canada
Riding history from the Library of Parliament

NotesEdit