43rd Canadian Parliament

The 43rd Canadian Parliament was in session from December 5, 2019, to August 15, 2021, with the membership of its Lower House, the House of Commons of Canada, having been determined by the results of the 2019 federal election held on October 21, 2019.

43rd Parliament of Canada
Minority parliament
December 5, 2019 – August 15, 2021
Coat of arms of Canada rendition.svg
Parliament leaders
Prime
Minister

(cabinet)
Rt. Hon. Justin Trudeau
(29th Canadian Ministry)
4 November 2015 – present
Leader of the
Opposition
Hon. Andrew Scheer
27 May 2017 – 24 August 2020
Hon. Erin O'Toole
24 August 2020 – present
Party caucuses
GovernmentLiberal Party
OppositionConservative Party
RecognizedBloc Québécois
New Democratic Party
Independent Senators Group*
Canadian Senators Group*
Progressive Senate Group*
UnrecognizedGreen Party
* Only in the Senate.
House of Commons
House of Commons of Canada Current.svg
Seating arrangements of the House of Commons
Speaker of the
Commons
Hon. Anthony Rota
5 December 2019 – present
Government
House Leader
Hon. Pablo Rodríguez
20 November 2019 – present
Opposition
House Leader
Hon. Candice Bergen
15 September 2016 – 2 September 2020
Gérard Deltell
2 September 2020 – present
Members338 MP seats
List of members
Senate
Senate of Canada - Seating Plan (43rd Parliament).svg
Seating arrangements of the Senate
Speaker of the
Senate
Hon. George Furey
3 December 2015 – present
Government
Senate Rep.
Hon. Marc Gold
24 January 2020 – present
Opposition
Senate Leader
Hon. Don Plett
5 November 2019 – present
Senators105 senator seats
List of senators
Sessions
1st Session
5 December 2019 – 18 August 2020
2nd Session
23 September 2020 – 15 August 2021
<42nd 44th>

TimelineEdit

2019Edit

2020Edit

2021Edit

First sessionEdit

The first session of the 43rd Parliament opened on December 5, 2019, with the speech from the throne delivered by Governor General Julie Payette. Although several bills were introduced, the agenda was overtaken by the COVID-19 pandemic. Before Parliament implemented a five-week closure on March 13, 2020, the Canada–United States–Mexico Agreement Implementation Act was given all three Senate readings and royal assent in one day, the only non-appropriation bill adopted before the closure.[33][34]

However, Parliament reconvened for one day, on March 24, 2020, to introduce and adopt the COVID-19 Emergency Response Act (Bill C-13) with unanimous consent. Among other provisions, the bill doubled the GST/HST credit for the 2019 tax year, added $300 to the May 2020 Canada Child Benefit, paused (for 6 months) repayments of Canada Student Loans, immediately transferred $500 million to the provinces, amended the Patent Act to allow government to use a patented invention without the permission until September 30 to respond to a public health emergency, and enacted the Canada Emergency Response Benefit Act and the Public Health Events of National Concern Payments Act.[35] They again reconvened for one day, on April 11, for the COVID-19 Emergency Response Act, No. 2 (Bill C-14) which replaced the previous bill's temporary wage subsidies with the expanded Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy program and extended it to September 30.[36] Similarly, the House of Commons reconvened on April 29 and the Senate on May 1 for the Canada Emergency Student Benefit Act (Bill C-15) to create the Canada Emergency Student Benefit and the Canada Student Service Grant.[37] After a failed attempt in June,[38] Parliament met again between July 20-22 for An Act respecting further COVID-19 measures (Bill C-20) which further extended and amended the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy, provided a one-time $600 payment to persons with disabilities, and enacted the Time Limits and Other Periods Act (COVID-19).[39]

During that time, in spring and summer 2020, the Liberal Party had three Members of Parliament resign and the Conservative Party elected a new leader. Initiated after Andrew Scheer's December 2019 announcement of his impending resignation as leader, the Conservative Party leadership election resulted in Durham MP Erin O'Toole becoming the new party leader as of August 24.[40][41] Marwan Tabbara of Kitchener South-Hespeler changed his affiliation to Independent in June upon the news release that the Guelph Police Service had charged him with counts of assault, criminal harassment, breaking and entering and committing an indictable offence relating to an incident that occurred in April.[42][43] Effective September 1, York Centre MP Michael Levitt resigned to become President and CEO of the Canadian Friends of Simon Wiesenthal Centre for Holocaust Studies.[44] Effective August 17, Toronto Centre MP Bill Morneau resigned from his position as Canadian Finance Minister and his seat in Parliament reportedly due to his role in the WE Charity controversy and disagreements with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau over spending federal funds on managing COVID-19's economic impact.[45] The next day, upon naming Chrystia Freeland to replace Morneau as Finance Minister, the Prime Minister prorogued Parliament, ending the first session.[6][15]

First prorogationEdit

On 18 August 2020, Trudeau asked Governor-General Julie Payette to prorogue Parliament; she acceded to his request.[46][6][15][47]

On September 18, 2020 Minister of Health Patty Hajdu accepted the resignation of Tina Namiesniowski, who was up until then president of the PHAC. Namiesniowski resigned 17 months into her five-year tenure, which had begun on May 6, 2019. Her resignation followed the resignation of Sally Thornton, Vice-president of the Health Security Infrastructure Branch who had been in charge of the pandemic early warning system and emergency stockpile, and who had resigned earlier in the week.[48][49] Namiesniowski, who had been appointed as a "senior official" in the Privy Council Office, was replaced three days later by Iain Stewart, who was formerly at the NRC.[50]

Second sessionEdit

On September 23, 2020, Parliament resumed with a new throne speech read by Governor General Payette. During this second session, Payette would resign following a workplace review of Rideau Hall.[51] The throne speech was followed by a separate televised address (at 6:30 p.m. EDT) from Prime Minister Trudeau. At the time of the speech, both the Leader of the Opposition O'Toole and Bloc Québécois leader Yves-François Blanchet were in quarantine after being infected with COVID earlier in the month.[52] The first two bills adopted (Bills C-4 and C-9), as well as Bill C-14 and C-24, provided further federal aid related to COVID-19. With the Canada Emergency Response Benefit ending, the bills created the Canada Recovery Benefit as an income support for those not eligible for employment insurance, in addition to the Canada Recovery Caregiving Benefit, the Canada Recovery Sickness Benefit and the Canada Emergency Rent Subsidy, and the bills extended the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy to June 2021.[53][54][55] Bill C-14 directly transferred funds for Covid-related measures.[56]

Bill C-30 implemented the legislative items from the 2021 budget, including additional COVID-19 aid in the form of creating the Canada Recovery Hiring Program, extending both the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy and Canada Emergency Rent Subsidy to the end of September, extending the Canada Recovery Benefit at a reduced rate, transferring $1 billion to provinces to help implement their immunization plans, and pausing the applicability of interest on federal student and apprentice loans to March 2023; Old Age Security was increased by 10% with a one-time payment of $500; the federal minimum wage was increased to $15.00 per hour; face masks and shields were added to the list of products exempted from GST/HST; GST/HST was made applicable to payments to foreign digital products or services such as streaming subscriptions or short-term accommodations; the Canada Health Transfer was increased by $4 billion. In addition, the same bill provided $2.2 billion in additional payments for infrastructure projects funded through the Gas Tax Fund while renaming it the Canada Community-Building Fund, provided $3 billion to the Hibernia project, increased the number of judges on federal courts, and reduced the number of hours (or the amount of earnings from self-employment) required to qualify for unemployment benefits. It also enacted the new Retail Payment Activities Act to regulate payment service providers.[57]

Addressing the federal government's relationship with Indigenous peoples, Bill C-15 adopted the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act,[58] while Bills C-5 and C-8 enacted call to actions 80 and 94 of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission making September 30 a public holiday titled National Day for Truth and Reconciliation[59] and amended the Oath of Citizenship to state "...I will faithfully observe the laws of Canada, including the Constitution, which recognizes and affirms the Aboriginal and treaty rights of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples, and fulfil my duties as a Canadian citizen."[60] Other legislation adopted during the second session included Bills C-7 and C-12, both adopted with NDP and Bloc support, to address court findings on the previous parliament's legalization of medical assistance in dying[61] and to fulfil Canada's commitment to Nationally Determined Contributions under the Paris Agreement for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Bills C-18 and C-29, both adopted with Conservative support, addressed the Brexit's impact on CETA[62] and ended the Port of Montreal strike.[63]

Six private member bills and one senate public bill received royal assent:

  • Larry Maguire's An Act to amend the Income Tax Act (transfer of small business or family farm or fishing corporation) (Bill C-208) applies the capital gains tax instead of the dividend tax to inter-generational transfers,[64]
  • Len Webber's An Act to amend the Canada Revenue Agency Act (organ and tissue donors) (Bill C-210) allows Canadians to indicate their intent to sign up as a donor through their annual income tax return,[65]
  • Kevin Waugh's An Act to amend the Criminal Code (sports betting) (Bill C-218) allows a province's lottery corporation to offer betting on single sport events, athletic contests, races and fights,[66]
  • Matt Jeneroux's An Act to amend the Canada Labour Code (bereavement leave) (Bill C-220) extends bereavement leave from 5 to 10 days and entitles employees already on compassionate care leave to also claim bereavement leave,[67]
  • Richard Bragdon's An Act to establish a framework to reduce recidivism (Bill C-228) requires the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, within one year, to develop a federal framework to reduce recidivism,[67]
  • Sonia Sidhu's An Act to establish a national framework for diabetes (Bill C-237) requires the Minister of Health, within one year, to develop a framework to improve access to information on diabetes prevention and treatment,[67]
  • Jim Munson's An Act respecting Kindness Week (Bill S-223) designates the third week of February in each and every year as "Kindness Week".[67]

Canadian MinistryEdit

The 29th Canadian Ministry had continued from the 42nd Parliament. On November 20, 2019, a month after the election, the Prime Minister re-organized his cabinet to align with government priorities and replace members who had retired or been defeated. Chrystia Freeland was named Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs. Of those continuing on in their existing roles, Bill Morneau continued as Minister of Finance, David Lametti as Minister of Justice, Harjit Sajjan as Minister of National Defence, and Navdeep Bains as Minister of Innovation, Science and Industry. In shuffling existing cabinet ministers, Patty Hajdu became the new Minister of Health, François-Philippe Champagne the new Minister of Foreign Affairs, Jonathan Wilkinson the new Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Bernadette Jordan the new Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, Seamus O'Regan the new Minister of Natural Resources, and Bill Blair the new Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness. There were seven newcomers to cabinet including Dan Vandal becoming Minister of Northern Affairs, Marc Miller the Minister of Indigenous Services, and Steven Guilbeault the Minister of Canadian Heritage.[68]

With Morneau's resignation in August 2020, Freeland was moved over to become Minister of Finance, with the Ministry of Intergovernmental Affairs being returned to Dominic LeBlanc's portfolio.[69] With Navdeep Bains' January 2021 announcement that he would not be seeking reelection, he was replaced as Innovation Minister by François-Philippe Champagne, with Marc Garneau taking over Champagne's Minister of Foreign Affairs role, Omar Alghabra being promoted to cabinet to become the new Minister of Transport, and Jim Carr returning to cabinet (as a Minister without portfolio) after a 1 year absence to receive medical treatments.[70]

SenateEdit

In the month before the 43rd Parliament convened, two new groups organized under the Rules of the Senate. The Independent Senators Group (ISG), whose members did not maintain membership with any other political party, continued from the previous parliament as the largest organized group. However, 7 of its members, along with 3 Conservative Party senators and one unaffiliated senator, had split-off to form the Canadian Senators Group which allowed its members to also be members of political parties but not be subject to a party whip.[71] Then on November 14, the Senate Liberal Caucus disbanded to form the Progressive Senate Group.[72] When 43rd Parliament convened on December 5, the senate consisted of 100 members, 51 belonging to the ISG, 24 caucusing with the Conservative Party, 13 with the Canadian Senators Group, 8 with the Progressive Senate Group, and 4 remaining non-affiliated. Senator Marc Gold left the ISG on January 24, 2020, to become the Representative of the Government in the Senate.[73] Of those who left the Senate during the 43rd Parliament, 10 had reached the mandatory retirement age, including the last remaining senator appointed by Brian Mulroney, 3 voluntarily resigned and two senators (Elaine McCoy and Judith Keating)[74][75] died while in office. The Prime-Minister appointment two new senators on January 31, 2020: Judith Keating and legal ethicist Brent Cotter.[76] The next three appointments were made on June 22, 2021: lawyer Bernadette Clement, trade unionist Hassan Yussuff and executive of the Saint John Port Authority Jim Quinn.[77] Another 5 were appointed a month later, on July 29, 2021: Clément Gignac, Amina Gerba and Michèle Audette of Quebec, Mayor of Banff Karen Sorensen, and lawyer David Arnot.[78]

Party standingsEdit

Standings in the 43rd Canadian Parliament
Affiliation House Members Senate Members
2019 Election Results At Dissolution Change On Election Day 2019 At Dissolution Change
Liberal 157 155  2  
Conservative 121 119  2 29 19   10
Bloc Québécois 32 32    
New Democratic 24 24    
Green 3 2  1  
Independent 1 5  4 7 13   6
Independent Senators Group   57 40   17
Senate Liberal Caucus   9   9
Canadian Senators Group   12   12
Progressive Senate Group   11   11
Total members 338 337   1 102 95   7
Vacant 1   1 3 10   7
Total seats 338 105


Representation by Province/TerritoryEdit

House of CommonsEdit

For background on the current representation, see:

  1. The representation acts in the List of Canadian constitutional documents
  2. Elections Canada's history on the representation formula (including the 1985 Representation Act, but any subsequent acts such as the 1999 Constitution Act or the 2011 Fair Representation Act).[79]
  3. Canadian Parliamentary Review's proposal for fairer representation for small provinces (around the time of the 2011 representation formula revision).[80]
Province / Territory Number of MPs
(ridings)[81]
Percentage
of seats
'000s persons per MP

(est. July 2019)[82]

Alberta 34 10.1% 128.6
British Columbia 42 12.4% 120.7
Manitoba 14 4.1% 97.8
New Brunswick 10 3.0% 77.7
Newfoundland and Labrador 7 2.1% 74.5
Northwest Territories 1 0.3% 44.8
Nova Scotia 11 3.3% 88.3
Nunavut 1 0.3% 38.8
Ontario 121 35.8% 120.4
Prince Edward Island 4 1.2% 39.2
Quebec 78 23.1% 108.8
Saskatchewan 14 4.1% 83.9
Yukon 1 0.3% 40.9
Canada

(total/average)

338 100% 111.2

SenateEdit

For historical and current representation in the Senate, see Senate of Canada's history and current representation.

OfficeholdersEdit

The officers of Parliament for the 43rd Parliament are set out below.

Party leadersEdit

Rump groups without official party statusEdit

  • Leader of the Green Party: Annamie Paul (from outside of the House; since October 3, 2020)
    • Parliamentary leader of the Green Party: Elizabeth May (since November 4, 2019, previously party leader)

Changes to party standingsEdit

House of CommonsEdit

Membership changesEdit

Date District Name Party before Party after Reason
June 6, 2020 Kitchener South—Hespeler Marwan Tabbara Liberal Independent Resigned from Liberal caucus after being charged with assault, break and enter and criminal harassment.[83][84]
August 17, 2020 Toronto Centre Bill Morneau Liberal Vacant Resigned to run for Secretary-General of the OECD.[13]
September 1, 2020 York Centre Michael Levitt Liberal Vacant Resigned to become the president of the Canadian Friends of Simon Wiesenthal Centre for Holocaust Studies.[85]
October 26, 2020 Toronto Centre Marci Ien Vacant Liberal Elected in a by-election.[86]
York Centre Ya'ara Saks Vacant Liberal
November 9, 2020 Don Valley East Yasmin Ratansi Liberal Independent Resigned from Liberal caucus after a CBC News investigation revealed she had violated parliamentary rules on Nepotism.[87]
January 20, 2021 Hastings—Lennox and Addington Derek Sloan Conservative Independent Expelled from the Conservative caucus for accepting a donation from white nationalist Paul Fromm as well as numerous other incidents.
January 25, 2021 Brampton Centre Ramesh Sangha Liberal Independent Expelled from the Liberal caucus after making controversial comments about fellow MPs.[88]
May 11, 2021 Haldimand—Norfolk Diane Finley Conservative Vacant Resigned.[89]
June 10, 2021 Fredericton Jenica Atwin Green Liberal Changed affiliation in part due to internal party infighting.[90]

The party standings in the House of Commons have changed as follows:

Number of members
per party by date
2019 2020 2021
Oct 21 Jun 6 Aug 17 Sep 1 Oct 26 Nov 10 Jan 20 Jan 25 May 11 Jun 10
Liberal 157 156 155 154 156 155 154 155
Conservative 121 120 119
Bloc Québécois 32
New Democratic 24
Green 3 2
Independent 1 2 3 4 5
  Total members 338 337 336 338 337
Government Majority -13 -14 -15 -16 -14 -15 -16 -15 -14
Vacant 0 1 2 0 1

SenateEdit

Membership changesEdit

Date Name Province Affiliation before Affiliation after Reason
October 21, 2019 André Pratte Quebec (De Salaberry) Independent Senators Group vacant Resigned
November 2, 2019 Paul McIntyre New Brunswick Conservative Mandatory retirement
November 4, 2019 Doug Black Alberta Independent Senators Group Canadian Senators Group Joined new caucus group
Robert Black Ontario (Centre Wellington)
Larry Campbell British Columbia (Vancouver)
Stephen Greene Nova Scotia (Halifax — The Citadel)
Diane Griffin Prince Edward Island
Elaine McCoy Alberta (Calgary)
Josée Verner Quebec (Montarville)
David Adams Richards New Brunswick Non-affiliated
Scott Tannas Alberta Conservative
Pamela Wallin Saskatchewan
Vernon White Ontario
November 6, 2019 Richard Neufeld British Columbia vacant Mandatory retirement
November 7, 2019 Diane Bellemare Quebec (Alma) Non-affiliated Independent Senators Group Changed affiliation
November 14, 2019 Jane Cordy Nova Scotia Senate Liberal Caucus Progressive Senate Group Joined new caucus group
Dennis Dawson Quebec (Lauzon)
Joseph A. Day New Brunswick (Saint John-Kennebecasis)
Percy Downe Prince Edward Island (Charlottetown)
Lillian Dyck Saskatchewan (North Battleford)
Serge Joyal Quebec (Kennebec)
Sandra Lovelace Nicholas New Brunswick
Terry Mercer Nova Scotia (Northend Halifax)
Jim Munson Ontario (Ottawa/Rideau Canal)
November 18, 2019 Percy Downe Prince Edward Island (Charlottetown) Progressive Senate Group Canadian Senators Group Changed affiliation
Jean-Guy Dagenais Quebec (Victoria) Conservative
January 21, 2020 Nicole Eaton Ontario vacant Mandatory retirement
January 24, 2020 Joseph A. Day New Brunswick (Saint John-Kennebecasis) Progressive Senate Group
January 24, 2020 Marc Gold Quebec (Stadacona) Independent Senators Group Non-affiliated Change in parliamentary group affiliation following appointment to Representative of the Government in the Senate
January 31, 2020 Raymonde Gagné Manitoba Change in parliamentary group affiliation following appointment as Legislative Deputy to the Government Representative
Patti LaBoucane-Benson Alberta Change in parliamentary group affiliation following appointment as Government Liaison
Brent Cotter Saskatchewan vacant Non-affiliated Appointed to Senate
Judith Keating New Brunswick
February 1, 2020 Serge Joyal Quebec (Kennebec) Progressive Senate Group vacant Mandatory retirement
February 6, 2020 Brent Cotter Saskatchewan Non-affiliated Independent Senators Group Changed affiliation
Judith Keating New Brunswick
February 18, 2020 David Tkachuk Saskatchewan Conservative vacant Mandatory retirement
April 9, 2020 Tom McInnis Nova Scotia
April 24, 2020 Grant Mitchell Alberta Non-affiliated Resigned
May 8, 2020 Patricia Bovey Manitoba Independent Senators Group Progressive Senate Group Changed affiliation
May 14, 2020 Peter Harder Ontario (Ottawa) Non-affiliated
May 21, 2020 Pierre Dalphond Quebec (De Lorimier) Independent Senators Group
July 8, 2020 Wanda Thomas Bernard Nova Scotia
August 24, 2020 Lillian Dyck Saskatchewan Progressive Senate Group vacant Mandatory retirement
September 2, 2020 Marty Klyne Saskatchewan Independent Senators Group Progressive Senate Group Changed affiliation
September 14, 2020 Brian Francis Prince Edward Island
Patrick Brazeau Quebec (Repentigny) Non-affiliated
November 11, 2020 Norman Doyle Newfoundland and Labrador Conservative vacant Mandatory retirement
December 29, 2020 Elaine McCoy Alberta Canadian Senators Group Death
January 25, 2021 Lynn Beyak Ontario (Northwestern Ontario) Non-affiliated Resigned from Senate
January 31, 2021 Murray Sinclair Manitoba Independent Senators Group
March 1, 2021 Margaret Dawn Anderson Northwest Territories Progressive Senate Group Changed affiliation
May 27, 2021 Mike Duffy Prince Edward Island (Cavendish) vacant Mandatory retirement
June 22, 2021 Bernadette Clement Ontario vacant Non-affiliated Appointed to Senate
Hassan Yussuff
Jim Quinn New Brunswick
July 14, 2021 Jim Munson Ontario Progressive Senate Group vacant Mandatory retirement
July 16, 2021 Judith Keating New Brunswick Independent Senators Group Death
July 27, 2021 Carolyn Stewart-Olsen Conservative Mandatory retirement
July 29, 2021 David Arnot Saskatchewan vacant Non-affiliated Appointed to Senate
Michèle Audette Quebec
Amina Gerba
Clément Gignac
Karen Sorensen Alberta
August 20, 2021 Clément Gignac Quebec Non-affiliated Progressive Senate Group Changed affiliation
August 27, 2021 Linda Frum Ontario Conservative vacant Resigned
September 2, 2021 Amina Gerba Quebec Non-affiliated Progressive Senate Group Changed affiliation
September 7, 2021 Jim Quinn New Brunswick Canadian Senators Group
September 17, 2021 David Arnot Saskatchewan Independent Senators Group
Diane Bellemare Quebec (Alma) Independent Senators Group Progressive Senate Group
Number of members
per group by date
2019 2020 2021
Oct 21 Nov 2 Nov 4 Nov 6 Nov 7 Nov 14 Nov 18 Jan 21 Jan 24 Jan 31 Feb 1 Feb 6 Feb 18 Apr 9 Apr 24 May 8 May 14 May 21 Jul 8 Aug 24 Sep 2 Sep 14 Nov 11 Dec 29 Jan 25 Jan 31 Mar 1 May 27 Jun 22 Jul 14 Jul 16 Jul 27 Jul 29 Aug 20 Aug 27 Sep 2 Sep 7 Sep 17
Independent Senators Group 57 49 50 51 50 48 50 49 48 47 46 44 43 42 41 40
Conservative 29 28 26 25 24 23 22 21 20 19 18
Senate Liberal Caucus 9 0
Non-affiliated 7 6 5 4 5 9 7 6 5 6 5 8 13 12 11 10 9
  Canadian Senators Group 0 11 13 12 13
Progressive Senate Group 0 9 8 7 6 7 8 9 10 9 10 11 12 11 12 13 14
  Total members 102 101 100 99 98 100 99 98 97 96 95 94 93 92 91 90 93 92 91 90 95 94
Vacant 3 4 5 6 7 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 12 13 14 15 10 11

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