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The South Australia Portal

Flag of South Australia
Location within Australia

South Australia is a state of Australia in the southern central part of the country. It covers some of the most arid parts of the continent and with a total land area of 984 377 km² (380 070 sq mi), it is the fourth largest of Australia's states and territories. It is bordered to the west by Western Australia, to the north by the Northern Territory and Queensland, to the east by Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria, and along the south by the Great Australian Bight and the Southern Ocean. With 1.5 million people, the state comprises less than 10 per cent of the Australian population and ranks fifth in population among the states and territories. The majority of its people reside in the capital city Adelaide, with most of the remainder settled in fertile areas along the south-eastern coast and River Murray.

The state's origins were unique in Australia as a freely-settled, planned British province–all of Australia's other states were founded as convict colonies. Official settlement began on 28 December 1836 when the state was proclaimed at The Old Gum Tree by Governor Hindmarsh. The guiding principle behind settlement was that of systematic colonisation, a theory espoused by Edward Gibbon Wakefield that was later employed by New Zealand. The aim was to establish the province as a centre of civilisation for free immigrants, promising civil liberties and religious tolerance. Although its history is marked by economic hardship, South Australia has remained politically innovative and culturally vibrant. Today, the state is known as a state of festivals, and of fine wine.

Selected Article

Clem Hill
Clement "Clem" Hill (March 18, 1877 in Hindmarsh, Adelaide, South Australia – September 5, 1945 in Parkville, Melbourne, Victoria) was an Australian cricketer who played 49 Test matches as a specialist batsman between 1896 and 1912. He captained the Australian team in ten Tests, winning five and losing five. A prolific run scorer, Hill scored 3,412 runs in Test cricket—a world record at the time of his retirement—at an average of 39.21 per innings, including seven centuries. In 1902, Hill was the first batsman to make 1,000 runs in a calendar year, a feat that would not be repeated for 45 years. His innings of 365 scored against New South Wales for South Australia in 1900–01 was a Sheffield Shield record for 27 years. The South Australian Cricket Association named a stand at the Adelaide Oval in his honour in 2003 and he was inducted into the Australian Cricket Hall of Fame in 2005.

He played his first first-class cricket match for South Australia while still a schoolboy, aged sixteen. By the time he was nineteen, he had been included in the Australian team touring England in 1896, where he made his Test match début. At the Melbourne Cricket Ground two years later, Hill scored 188; his maiden Test century and still the highest score in Ashes Tests by a player under twenty-one. He was named one of Wisden Cricketers of the Year in 1899, despite missing half the English season due to illness. In the 1901–02 season, Hill was dismissed in consecutive innings for 99, 98 and 97. In total he was dismissed in the nineties five times. In 1903–04, Hill was at the centre of a riot at the Sydney Cricket Ground when he was given out run out in a Test match against England. With Roger Hartigan he still holds the Australian Test record partnership for the eighth wicket – 243, made against England at the Gabba in Brisbane in 1907–08.

Selected Picture

National Wine Centre of Australia, Adelaide
Credit: Elekhh

The National Wine Centre of Australia is a public exhibition building about winemaking and its industry in South Australia. It contains an interactive permanent exhibition of winemaking, introducing visitors to the technology, varieties and styles of wine. It also has a wine tasting area, giving visitors the opportunity to taste and compare wines from different areas of Australia.

WikiProjects

Major Topics

Geography: Adelaide Hills | Adelaide Plains | Barossa Valley | Clare Valley | Coonawarra | Eyre Peninsula | Fleurieu Peninsula | Flinders Ranges | Kangaroo Island | Limestone Coast | Mid North | Nullarbor Plain | Riverland | Yorke Peninsula

History: Kaurna Indigenous people | European settlement | History of Adelaide | Proclamation Day | Australian Overland Telegraph Line | Timeline of South Australian history

Towns and Cities: Adelaide | Coober Pedy | Mount Gambier | Murray Bridge| Port Augusta | Port Lincoln | Port Pirie | Victor Harbor | Whyalla

Economy and Politics: Premiers | Governors | Parliament | House of Assembly | Electoral districts | Legislative Council | State elections

Culture: Croweater | Pie floater | Wine | The Advertiser | Adelaide Festival Centre | Adelaide Entertainment Centre | WOMADelaide | Adelaide Fringe Festival | Elder Park | The Crows | The Power | The Reds | Redbacks | Hindmarsh Stadium | AAMI Stadium | Rundle Mall

People: Kaurna Indigenous people | Matthew Flinders | William Light | Charles Sturt | Edward Gibbon Wakefield | John Hindmarsh | George Gawler | Playford family | Don Dunstan

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