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The Premier of South Australia is the head of government in the state of South Australia, Australia. The Government of South Australia follows the Westminster system, with a Parliament of South Australia acting as the legislature. The Premier is appointed by the Governor of South Australia, and by modern convention holds office by virtue of his or her ability to command the support of a majority of members of the lower house of Parliament, the House of Assembly.

Premier of South Australia
Coat of arms of South Australia.svg
Flag of South Australia.svg
PremierMarshall2018.jpg
Incumbent
Steven Marshall

since 19 March 2018
StyleThe Honourable
(Formal)
Premier
(Spoken)
Member ofCabinet
Reports toParliament of South Australia Governor of South Australia
SeatAdelaide, South Australia
AppointerGovernor of South Australia
Term lengthAt the Governor's pleasure
Inaugural holderBoyle Finniss
Formation24 October 1856
Salary$374,648 (AUD)[1]
Websitehttp://premier.sa.gov.au/

Steven Marshall is the current Premier, having served since 19 March 2018.

Contents

HistoryEdit

Pre-PartyEdit

Before the 1890s when there was no formal party system in South Australia, MPs tended to have historical liberal or conservative beliefs. The liberals dominated government from the 1893 election to 1905 election with the support of the South Australian United Labor Party, with the conservatives mostly in opposition. Labor took government with the support of eight dissident liberals in 1905 when Labor won the most seats for the first time. The rise of Labor saw non-Labor politics start to merge into various party incarnations.

The two independent conservative parties, the Australasian National League (formerly National Defence League) and the Farmers and Producers Political Union merged with the Liberal and Democratic Union to become the Liberal Union in 1910. Labor formed South Australia's first majority government after winning the 1910 state election, triggering the merger. The 1910 election came two weeks after federal Labor formed Australia's first elected majority government at the 1910 federal election.

No "Country" or rural conservative parties emerged as serious long-term forces in South Australian state politics, often folding into the main non-Labor party.

List of Premiers of South AustraliaEdit

The first six Governors of South Australia oversaw governance from proclamation in 1836 until self-government and an elected Parliament of South Australia was enacted in the year prior to the inaugural 1857 election.

Colour key
(for political parties)
No. Name
(Birth–Death)
Constituency
Portrait Term of Office
Start–End–Days
Elected
(Parliament)
Party Government
Colonial Government (1856–1901)
1 Boyle Finniss
(1807–1893)
MHA for Adelaide
  24 October 1856 21 August 1857 301 1857 (1st) Independent Finniss
2 John Baker
(1813–1872)
Councillor
  21 August 1857 1 September 1857 11 — (1st) Independent Baker
3 Robert Torrens
(1814–1884)
MHA for Adelaide
  1 September 1857 30 September 1857 29 — (1st) Independent Torrens
4 Richard Hanson
(1805–1876)
MHA for Adelaide
  30 September 1857 9 May 1860 952 — (1st) Independent Hanson
5 Thomas Reynolds
(1818–1875)
MHA for Adelaide
  9 May 1860 8 October 1861 517 1860 (2nd) Independent Reynolds (1st)
Reynolds (2nd)
6 George Waterhouse
(1824–1906)
Councillor
  8 October 1861 4 July 1863 634 — (2nd)
1862 (3rd)
Independent Waterhouse (1st)
Waterhouse (2nd)
7 Francis Dutton
(1818–1877)
MHA for Light
  4 July 1863 15 July 1863 11 — (3rd) Independent Dutton (1st)
8 Henry Ayers
(1821–1897)
Councillor
  15 July 1863 4 August 1864 386 — (3rd) Independent Ayers (1st)
Ayers (2nd)
9 Arthur Blyth
(1823–1890)
MHA for Gumeracha
  4 August 1864 22 March 1865 230 — (3rd) Independent Blyth (1st)
(7) Francis Dutton   22 March 1865 20 September 1865 182 1865 (4th) Independent Dutton (2nd)
(8) Henry Ayers   20 September 1865 23 October 1865 33 — (4th) Independent Ayers (3rd)
10 John Hart
(1809–1873)
MHA for Port Adelaide
  23 October 1865 28 March 1866 156 — (4th) Independent Hart (1st)
11 James Boucaut
(1831–1916)
MHA for Encounter Bay
  28 March 1866 3 May 1867 401 — (4th) Independent Boucaut (1st)
(8) Henry Ayers   3 May 1867 24 September 1868 510 — (4th)
1868 (5th)
Independent Ayers (4th)
(10) John Hart
MHA for Light
  24 September 1868 13 October 1868 19 — (5th) Independent Hart (2nd)
(8) Henry Ayers   13 October 1868 3 November 1868 21 — (5th) Independent Ayers (5th)
12 Henry Strangways
(1832–1920)
MHA for West Torrens
  3 November 1868 30 May 1870 573 — (5th)
1870 (6th)
Independent Strangways (1st)
Strangways (2nd)
(10) John Hart
MHA for The Burra
  30 May 1870 10 November 1871 529 — (6th) Independent Hart (3rd)
(9) Arthur Blyth   10 November 1871 22 January 1872 73 — (6th)
1871 (7th)
Independent Blyth (2nd)
(8) Henry Ayers   22 January 1872 22 July 1873 517 — (7th) Independent Ayers (6th)
Ayers (7th)
(9) Arthur Blyth   22 July 1873 3 June 1875 681 — (7th)
1875 (8th)
Independent Blyth (3rd)
(11) James Boucaut   3 June 1875 6 June 1876 369 — (8th) Independent Boucaut (2nd)
Boucaut (3rd)
13 John Colton
(1823–1902)
MHA for Noarlunga
  6 June 1876 26 October 1877 507 — (8th) Independent Colton (1st)
(11) James Boucaut   26 October 1877 27 September 1878 336 — (8th)
1878 (9th)
Independent Boucaut (4th)
14 William Morgan
(1828–1883)
Councillor
  27 September 1878 24 June 1881 1001 — (9th)
1881 (10th)
Independent Morgan
15 John Bray
(1842–1894)
MHA for East Adelaide
  24 June 1881 16 June 1884 1088 — (10th)
1884 (11th)
Independent Bray
(13) John Colton   16 June 1884 16 June 1885 365 — (11th) Independent Colton (2nd)
16 John Downer
(1843–1915)
MHA for Barossa
  16 June 1885 11 June 1887 725 — (11th)
1887 (12th)
Independent Downer (1st)
17 Thomas Playford (II)
(1837–1915)
MHA for Newcastle
  11 June 1887 27 June 1889 747 — (12th) Independent Playford II (1st)
18 John Cockburn
(1850–1929)
MHA for Mount Barker
  27 June 1889 19 August 1890 418 — (12th)
1890 (13th)
Liberalism Cockburn
(17) Thomas Playford (II)
MHA for East Torrens
  19 August 1890 21 June 1892 672 — (13th) Conservatism Playford II (2nd)
19 Frederick Holder
(1850–1909)
MHA for Burra
  21 June 1892 15 October 1892 116 — (13th) Liberalism Holder (1st)
(16) John Downer   15 October 1892 16 June 1893 244 — (13th) Conservatism Downer (2nd)
20 Charles Kingston
(1850–1908)
MHA for West Adelaide
  16 June 1893 1 December 1899 2359 1893 (14th)
1896 (15th)
1899 (16th)
Liberalism Kingston
21 Vaiben Solomon
(1853–1908)
MHA for Northern Territory
  1 December 1899 8 December 1899 7 — (16th) Conservatism Solomon
(19) Frederick Holder   8 December 1899 15 May 1901 523 — (16th) Liberalism Holder (2nd)
State Government (1901–present)
22 John Jenkins
(1851–1923)
MHA for Torrens
  15 May 1901 1 March 1905 1386 — (16th)
1902 (17th)
Liberalism Jenkins
23 Richard Butler
(1850–1925)
MHA for Barossa
  1 March 1905 26 July 1905 147 — (17th) Conservatism Butler I
24 Thomas Price
(1852–1909)
MHA for Torrens
  26 July 1905 5 June 1909 1410 1905 (18th)
1906 (19th)
United Labor Price
25 Archibald Peake
(1859–1920)
MHA for Victoria & Albert
  5 June 1909 3 June 1910 363 — (19th) Liberal &
Democratic Union
Peake (1st)
26 John Verran
(1856–1932)
MHA for Wallaroo
  3 June 1910 17 February 1912 624 1910 (20th) United Labor Verran
(25) Archibald Peake   17 February 1912 3 April 1915 1141 1912 (21st) Liberal Union Peake (2nd)
27 Crawford Vaughan
(1874–1947)
MHA for Sturt
  3 April 1915 14 July 1917 833 1915 (22nd) United Labor Vaughan
(25) Archibald Peake   14 July 1917 8 April 1920 999 — (22nd)
1918 (23rd)
Liberal Union Peake (3rd)
28 Henry Barwell
(1877–1959)
MHA for Stanley
  8 April 1920 16 April 1924 1469 — (23rd)
1921 (24th)
Liberal Union
(until 1923)
Liberal Federation
(from 1923)
Barwell
29 John Gunn
(1884–1959)
MHA for Adelaide
  16 April 1924 28 August 1926 864 1924 (25th) Labor Gunn
30 Lionel Hill
(1881–1963)
MHA for Port Pirie
  28 August 1926 8 April 1927 223 — (25th) Labor Hill (1st)
31 Richard L. Butler
(1885–1966)
MHA for Wooroora
  8 April 1927 17 April 1930 1105 1927 (26th) Liberal Federation Butler II (1st)
(30) Lionel Hill   17 April 1930 13 February 1933 1033 1930 (27th) Labor Hill (2nd)
32 Robert Richards
(1885–1967)
MHA for Wallaroo
  13 February 1933 18 April 1933 64 — (27th) Labor Richards
(31) Richard L. Butler   18 April 1933 5 November 1938 2027 1933 (28th)
1938 (29th)
Liberal and
Country League
Butler II (2nd)
33 Thomas Playford (IV)
(1896–1981)
MHA for Gumeracha
  5 November 1938 10 March 1965 9622 — (29th)
1941 (30th)
1944 (31st)
1947 (32nd)
1950 (33rd)
1953 (34th)
1956 (35th)
1959 (36th)
1962 (37th)
Liberal and
Country League
Playford IV (1st)
Playford IV (2nd)
34 Frank Walsh
(1897–1968)
MHA for Edwardstown
  10 March 1965 1 June 1967 813 1965 (38th) Labor Walsh
35 Don Dunstan
(1926–1999)
MHA for Norwood
  1 June 1967 17 April 1968 321 — (38th) Labor Dunstan (1st)
36 Steele Hall
(born 1928)
MHA for Gouger
  17 April 1968 2 June 1970 776 1968 (39th) Liberal and
Country League
Hall
(35) Don Dunstan   2 June 1970 15 February 1979 3180 1970 (40th)
1973 (41st)
1975 (42nd)
1977 (43rd)
Labor Dunstan (2nd)
37 Des Corcoran
(1928–2004)
MHA for Hartley
15 February 1979 18 September 1979 215 — (43rd) Labor Corcoran
38 David Tonkin
(1929–2000)
MHA for Bragg
18 September 1979 10 November 1982 1149 1979 (44th) Liberal Tonkin
39 John Bannon
(1943–2015)
MHA for Ross Smith
  10 November 1982 4 September 1992 3586 1982 (45th)
1985 (46th)
1989 (47th)
Labor Bannon
40 Lynn Arnold
(born 1949)
MHA for Ramsay
4 September 1992 14 December 1993 466 — (47th) Labor Arnold
41 Dean Brown
(born 1943)
MHA for Finniss
14 December 1993 28 November 1996 1080 1993 (48th) Liberal Brown
42 John Olsen
(born 1945)
MHA for Kavel
  28 November 1996 22 October 2001 1789 — (48th)
1997 (49th)
Liberal Olsen
43 Rob Kerin
(born 1954)
MHA for Frome
22 October 2001 5 March 2002 165 — (49th) Liberal Kerin
44 Mike Rann
(born 1953)
MHA for Ramsay
  5 March 2002 21 October 2011 3517 2002 (50th)
2006 (51st)
2010 (52nd)
Labor Rann
45 Jay Weatherill
(born 1964)
MHA for Cheltenham
  21 October 2011 19 March 2018 2341 — (52nd)
2014 (53rd)
Labor Weatherill
46 Steven Marshall
(born 1968)
MHA for Dunstan
  19 March 2018 483 2018 (54th) Liberal Marshall

Living former premiersEdit

 
Former South Australian premiers (from left) Robert Richards, Richard L. Butler, Lionel Hill and Henry Barwell meet with then Premier Tom Playford in 1940

There are seven living former premiers, the oldest being Steele Hall (1968–70, born 1928). The most recent premier to die was John Bannon (Premier 1982–1992) on 13 December 2015.

Name Term as premier Date of birth
Steele Hall 1968–1970 (1928-11-28) 28 November 1928 (age 90)
Lynn Arnold 1992–1993 (1949-01-27) 27 January 1949 (age 70)
Dean Brown 1993–1996 (1943-04-05) 5 April 1943 (age 76)
John Olsen 1996–2001 (1945-06-07) 7 June 1945 (age 74)
Rob Kerin 2001–2002 (1954-01-04) 4 January 1954 (age 65)
Mike Rann 2002–2011 (1953-01-05) 5 January 1953 (age 66)
Jay Weatherill 2011–2018 (1964-04-03) 3 April 1964 (age 55)

TimelineEdit

In the following timeline, the legend includes the Liberal and Democratic Union, the Liberal Union and the Liberal Federation represented as "Liberal (pre-1979)". The Liberal Party is represented as "Liberal (post-1979)" only. The grey area represents the duration of Playmander electoral malapportionment, beginning in 1936, in effect until the 1970 election.

Steven MarshallJay WeatherillMike RannRob KerinJohn OlsenDean BrownLynn ArnoldJohn BannonDavid TonkinDes CorcoranSteele HallDon DunstanFrank WalshThomas Playford IVRobert Richards (Australian politician)Richard Layton ButlerLionel HillJohn Gunn (Australian politician)Henry BarwellCrawford VaughanJohn VerranArchibald PeakeThomas PriceRichard Butler (Australian politician)John Jenkins (Australian politician)Vaiben SolomonCharles KingstonFrederick HolderJohn Cockburn (Australian politician)Thomas Playford IIJohn DownerJohn Cox BrayWilliam Morgan (Australian politician)John ColtonHenry StrangwaysJames BoucautJohn Hart (South Australian colonist)Arthur BlythHenry AyresFrancis DuttonGeorge Marsden WaterhouseThomas ReynoldsRichard Hanson (Australian politician)Robert TorrensJohn Baker (Australian politician)Boyle Finniss 

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "'Extraordinary' $30,000 MP pay rise under fire from South Australian welfare groups". ABC News. 18 December 2015. Retrieved 9 February 2016.

External linksEdit